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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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5 results for "germans"
1. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 2.15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •germans, untrustworthy Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430
2. Tacitus, Germania (De Origine Et Situ Germanorum), 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •germans, untrustworthy Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430
3. Strabo, Geography, 7.2.4  Tagged with subjects: •germans, untrustworthy Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430
7.2.4. of the Germans, as I have said, those towards the north extend along the ocean; and beginning at the outlets of the Rhenus, they are known as far as the Albis; and of these the best known are the Sugambri and the Cimbri; but those parts of the country beyond the Albis that are near the ocean are wholly unknown to us. For of the men of earlier times I know of no one who has made this voyage along the coast to the eastern parts that extend as far as the mouth of the Caspian Sea; and the Romans have not yet advanced into the parts that are beyond the Albis; and likewise no one has made the journey by land either. However, it is clear from the climata and the parallel distances that if one travels longitudinally towards the east, one encounters the regions that are about the Borysthenes and that are to the north of the Pontus; but what is beyond Germany and what beyond the countries which are next after Germany — whether one should say the Bastarnae, as most writers suspect, or say that others lie in between, either the Iazyges, or the Roxolani, or certain other of the wagon-dwellers — it is not easy to say; nor yet whether they extend as far as the ocean along its entire length, or whether any part is uninhabitable by reason of the cold or other cause, or whether even a different race of people, succeeding the Germans, is situated between the sea and the eastern Germans. And this same ignorance prevails also in regard to the rest of the peoples that come next in order on the north; for I know neither the Bastarnae, nor the Sauromatae, nor, in a word, any of the peoples who dwell above the Pontus, nor how far distant they are from the Atlantic Sea, nor whether their countries border upon it.
4. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.106, 2.117.3, 2.118  Tagged with subjects: •germans, untrustworthy Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430
5. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.794  Tagged with subjects: •germans, untrustworthy Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430