Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.





145 results for "games"
1. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 540-541, 543-544, 542 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196
542. Forever and ‘offering a splendid view’.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 5.102, 6.162-6.163, 11.495-11.496, 14.434-14.437, 14.446, 15.420 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497, 499; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64, 100
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.52, 2.683-2.684, 9.363, 9.447, 9.478, 10.460-10.464, 16.233-16.235, 16.595 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196, 198; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60
2.52. / but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. 2.683. / And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.684. / And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 9.363. / my ships at early dawn sailing over the teeming Hellespont, and on board men right eager to ply the oar; and if so be the great Shaker of the Earth grants me fair voyaging, on the third day shall I reach deep-soiled Phthia. Possessions full many have I that I left on my ill-starred way hither, 9.447. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.478. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 10.460. / and these things did goodly Odysseus hold aloft in his hand to Athene, the driver of the spoil, and he made prayer, and spake, saying:Rejoice, goddess, in these, for on thee, first of all the immortals in Olympus, will we call; but send thou us on against the horses and the sleeping-places of the Thracian warriors. 10.461. / and these things did goodly Odysseus hold aloft in his hand to Athene, the driver of the spoil, and he made prayer, and spake, saying:Rejoice, goddess, in these, for on thee, first of all the immortals in Olympus, will we call; but send thou us on against the horses and the sleeping-places of the Thracian warriors. 10.462. / and these things did goodly Odysseus hold aloft in his hand to Athene, the driver of the spoil, and he made prayer, and spake, saying:Rejoice, goddess, in these, for on thee, first of all the immortals in Olympus, will we call; but send thou us on against the horses and the sleeping-places of the Thracian warriors. 10.463. / and these things did goodly Odysseus hold aloft in his hand to Athene, the driver of the spoil, and he made prayer, and spake, saying:Rejoice, goddess, in these, for on thee, first of all the immortals in Olympus, will we call; but send thou us on against the horses and the sleeping-places of the Thracian warriors. 10.464. / and these things did goodly Odysseus hold aloft in his hand to Athene, the driver of the spoil, and he made prayer, and spake, saying:Rejoice, goddess, in these, for on thee, first of all the immortals in Olympus, will we call; but send thou us on against the horses and the sleeping-places of the Thracian warriors. 16.233. / and himself he washed his hands, and drew flaming wine. Then he made prayer, standing in the midst of the court, and poured forth the wine, looking up to heaven; and not unmarked was he of Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt:Zeus, thou king, Dodonaean, Pelasgian, thou that dwellest afar, ruling over wintry Dodona,—and about thee dwell the Selli, 16.234. / and himself he washed his hands, and drew flaming wine. Then he made prayer, standing in the midst of the court, and poured forth the wine, looking up to heaven; and not unmarked was he of Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt:Zeus, thou king, Dodonaean, Pelasgian, thou that dwellest afar, ruling over wintry Dodona,—and about thee dwell the Selli, 16.235. / thine interpreters, men with unwashen feet that couch on the ground. Aforetime verily thou didst hear my word, when I prayed: me thou didst honour, and didst mightily smite the host of the Achaeans; even so now also fulfill thou for me this my desire. Myself verily will I abide in the gathering of the ships, 16.595. / the dear son of Chalcon, him that had his abode in Hellas, and for wealth and substance was pre-eminent among the Myrmidons. Him did Glaucus smite full upon the breast with a thrust of his spear, turning suddenly upon rum, when the other was about to overtake him in pursuit. And he fell with a thud, and sore grief gat hold of the Achaeans,
4. Pindar, Fragments, 70, 191 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
5. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 594-595 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
595. ὀλολυγμὸν ἄλλος ἄλλοθεν κατὰ πτόλιν 595. A shout one man and other, through the city,
6. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 5 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 268
7. Pindar, Parthenia, 14 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
8. Pindar, Paeanes, 7.1, 7.11, 9.36, 9.93-9.96 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 65; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196, 198, 380
9. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 9.8-9.27 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •foundation, pythian games at sikyon Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 158, 161
10. Pindar, Dithyrambi (Poxy. 1604.), None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129
11. Bacchylides, Fragmenta Ex Operibus Incertis, 11.37-11.42 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 268
12. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
13. Theognis, Elegies, 6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497
14. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
15. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.20, 6.4.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games •pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60, 227; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64
16. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
17. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.112.5, 2.8.2, 3.36.3, 3.36.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 276; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 227, 293
1.112.5. Λακεδαιμόνιοι δὲ μετὰ ταῦτα τὸν ἱερὸν καλούμενον πόλεμον ἐστράτευσαν, καὶ κρατήσαντες τοῦ ἐν Δελφοῖς ἱεροῦ παρέδοσαν Δελφοῖς: καὶ αὖθις ὕστερον Ἀθηναῖοι ἀποχωρησάντων αὐτῶν στρατεύσαντες καὶ κρατήσαντες παρέδοσαν Φωκεῦσιν. 2.8.2. καὶ πολλὰ μὲν λόγια ἐλέγετο, πολλὰ δὲ χρησμολόγοι ᾖδον ἔν τε τοῖς μέλλουσι πολεμήσειν καὶ ἐν ταῖς ἄλλαις πόλεσιν. 3.36.3. πέμπουσιν οὖν τριήρη ὡς Πάχητα ἄγγελον τῶν δεδογμένων, κατὰ τάχος κελεύοντες διαχρήσασθαι Μυτιληναίους. 3.36.6. καταστάσης δ’ εὐθὺς ἐκκλησίας ἄλλαι τε γνῶμαι ἀφ’ ἑκάστων ἐλέγοντο καὶ Κλέων ὁ Κλεαινέτου, ὅσπερ καὶ τὴν προτέραν ἐνενικήκει ὥστε ἀποκτεῖναι, ὢν καὶ ἐς τὰ ἄλλα βιαιότατος τῶν πολιτῶν τῷ τε δήμῳ παρὰ πολὺ ἐν τῷ τότε πιθανώτατος, παρελθὼν αὖθις ἔλεγε τοιάδε. 1.112.5. After this the Lacedaemonians marched out on a sacred war, and becoming masters of the temple at Delphi , placed it in the hands of the Delphians. Immediately after their retreat, the Athenians marched out, became masters of the temple, and placed it in the hands of the Phocians. 2.8.2. Everywhere predictions were being recited and oracles being chanted by such persons as collect them, and this not only in the contending cities. 3.36.3. They accordingly sent a trireme to communicate the decree to Paches, commanding him to lose no time in despatching the Mitylenians. 3.36.6. An assembly was therefore at once called, and after much expression of opinion upon both sides, Cleon, son of Cleaenetus, the same who had carried the former motion of putting the Mitylenians to death, the most violent man at Athens , and at that time by far the most powerful with the commons, came forward again and spoke as follows:—
18. Theopompus of Chios, Fragments, 12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
19. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136
20. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 784 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64
784. ἀλλ' οὐδὲ θύσιμός ἐστιν αὑτηγί. σά μάν;
21. Euripides, Hecuba, 459-461, 458 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497
458. ἔνθα πρωτόγονός τε φοῖ-
22. Herodotus, Histories, 1.90, 3.131, 5.67, 7.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games •foundation, pythian games at sikyon Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 161; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129, 196; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 335
1.90. When Cyrus heard this, he was exceedingly pleased, for he believed the advice good; and praising him greatly, and telling his guard to act as Croesus had advised, he said: “Croesus, now that you, a king, are determined to act and to speak with integrity, ask me directly for whatever favor you like.” ,“Master,” said Croesus, “you will most gratify me if you will let me send these chains of mine to that god of the Greeks whom I especially honored and to ask him if it is his way to deceive those who serve him well.” When Cyrus asked him what grudge against the god led him to make this request, ,Croesus repeated to him the story of all his own aspirations, and the answers of the oracles, and more particularly his offerings, and how the oracle had encouraged him to attack the Persians; and so saying he once more insistently pled that he be allowed to reproach the god for this. At this Cyrus smiled, and replied, “This I will grant you, Croesus, and whatever other favor you may ever ask me.” ,When Croesus heard this, he sent Lydians to Delphi , telling them to lay his chains on the doorstep of the temple, and to ask the god if he were not ashamed to have persuaded Croesus to attack the Persians, telling him that he would destroy Cyrus' power; of which power (they were to say, showing the chains) these were the first-fruits. They should ask this; and further, if it were the way of the Greek gods to be ungrateful. 3.131. Now this is how Democedes had come from Croton to live with Polycrates: he was oppressed by a harsh-tempered father at Croton ; since he could not stand him, he left him and went to Aegina . Within the first year after settling there, he excelled the rest of the physicians, although he had no equipment nor any medical implements. ,In his second year the Aeginetans paid him a talent to be their public physician; in the third year the Athenians hired him for a hundred minae, and Polycrates in the fourth year for two talents. Thus he came to Samos , and not least because of this man the physicians of Croton were well-respected [ ,for at this time the best physicians in Greek countries were those of Croton , and next to them those of Cyrene . About the same time the Argives had the name of being the best musicians]. 5.67. In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. 7.2. But while Darius was making preparations against Egypt and Athens, a great quarrel arose among his sons concerning the chief power in the land. They held that before his army marched he must declare an heir to the kingship according to Persian law. ,Three sons had been born to Darius before he became king by his first wife, the daughter of Gobryas, and four more after he became king by Atossa daughter of Cyrus. Artobazanes was the oldest of the earlier sons, Xerxes of the later; ,and as sons of different mothers they were rivals. Artobazanes pleaded that he was the oldest of all Darius' offspring and that it was everywhere customary that the eldest should rule; Xerxes argued that he was the son of Cyrus' daughter Atossa and that it was Cyrus who had won the Persians their freedom.
23. Isocrates, Orations, 4.1-4.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 293
24. Aeschines, Letters, 3.107-3.112 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196
25. Callimachus, Aetia, 86, 88-89, 87 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 335
26. Callimachus, Hymn To Apollo, 1-4, 117 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497
27. Callimachus, Hymn To Delos, 210 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497
28. Aristotle, Meteorology, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
29. Dinarchus, Or., 1.78, 1.98 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 78
30. Philochorus, Fragments, 23 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129
31. Demosthenes, Orations, 2.5, 2.10, 4.44, 9.31-9.34, 10.11, 10.18, 10.70-10.74, 14.39, 15.26, 18.285, 19.128, 19.132-19.133, 19.284, 19.296-19.298, 19.311, 21.148, 21.153, 22.61, 51.9, 59.73 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60, 78, 226, 227
32. Anon., 1 Enoch, 142 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 227
33. Plautus, Poenulus, 5.13.8 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
34. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 4.25.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
4.25.3.  When he had arranged affairs in the city in the best manner, he conceived a desire to perpetuate his memory with posterity by some illustrious enterprise. And upon turning his attention to the monuments both of ancient kings and statesmen by which they had gained reputation and glory, he did not envy either that Assyrian woman for having built the walls of Babylon, or the kings of Egypt for having raised the pyramids at Memphis, or any other prince for whatever monument he might have erected as a display of his riches and of the multitude of workmen at his command. On the contrary, he regarded all these things as trivial and ephemeral and unworthy of serious attention, mere beguilements for the eyes, but no real aids to the conduct of life or to the administration of public affairs, since they led to nothing more than a reputation for great felicity on the part of those who built them. But the things that he regarded as worthy of praise and emulation were the works of the mind, the advantages from which are enjoyed by the greatest number of people and for the greatest length of time. And of all the achievements of this nature he admired most the plan of Amphictyon, the son of Hellen, who, seeing the Greek nation weak and easy to be destroyed by the barbarians who surrounded them, brought them together in a general council and assemblage of the whole nation, named after him the Amphictyonic council; and then, apart from the particular laws by which each city was governed, established others common to all, which they call the Amphictyonic laws, in consequence of which they lived in mutual friendship, and fulfilling the obligations of kinship by their actions rather than by their professions, continued troublesome and formidable neighbours to the barbarians.
35. Strabo, Geography, 10.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
10.5.1. Islands The islands near Crete are Thera, the metropolis of the Cyrenaeans, a colony of the Lacedemonians, and, near Thera, Anaphe, where is the sanctuary of the Aegletan Apollo. Callimachus speaks in one place as follows,Aegletan Anaphe, neighbor to Laconian Thera, and in another, mentioning only Thera,mother of my fatherland, famed for its horses. Thera is a long island, being two hundred stadia in perimeter; it lies opposite Dia, an island near the Cnossian Heracleium, but it is seven hundred stadia distant from Crete. Near it are both Anaphe and Therasia. One hundred stadia distant from the latter is the little island Ios, where, according to some writers, the poet Homer was buried. From Ios towards the west one comes to Sicinos and Lagusa and Pholegandros, which last Aratus calls Iron Island, because of its ruggedness. Near these is Cimolos, whence comes the Cimolian earth. From Cimolos Siphnos is visible, in reference to which island, because of its worthlessness, people say Siphnian knuckle-bone. And still nearer both to Cimolos and to Crete is Melos, which is more notable than these and is seven hundred stadia from the Hermionic promontory, the Scyllaion, and almost the same distance from the Dictynnaion. The Athenians once sent an expedition to Melos and slaughtered most of the inhabitants from youth upwards. Now these islands are indeed in the Cretan Sea, but Delos itself and the Cyclades in its neighborhood and the Sporades which lie close to these, to which belong the aforesaid islands in the neighborhood of Crete, are rather in the Aegean Sea.
36. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.437, 1.448, 1.449, 1.450, 1.451, 12.39, 12.40, 12.41, 12.42, 12.43, 12.44, 12.45, 12.46, 12.47, 12.48, 12.49, 12.50, 12.51, 12.52, 12.53, 12.54, 12.55, 12.56, 12.57, 12.58, 12.59, 12.60, 12.61, 12.62, 12.63, 13.623-14.608, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 14.4, 14.5, 14.6, 14.7, 14.8, 14.9, 14.10, 15.12, 15.13, 15.14, 15.15, 15.16, 15.17, 15.18, 15.19, 15.20, 15.21, 15.22, 15.23, 15.24, 15.25, 15.26, 15.27, 15.28, 15.29, 15.30, 15.31, 15.32, 15.33, 15.34, 15.35, 15.36, 15.37, 15.38, 15.39, 15.40, 15.41, 15.42, 15.43, 15.44, 15.45, 15.46, 15.47, 15.48, 15.49, 15.50, 15.51, 15.52, 15.53, 15.54, 15.55, 15.56, 15.57, 15.622, 15.623, 15.624, 15.625, 15.626, 15.627, 15.628, 15.629, 15.630, 15.631, 15.632, 15.633, 15.634, 15.635, 15.636, 15.637, 15.638, 15.639, 15.640, 15.641, 15.642, 15.643, 15.644, 15.645, 15.646, 15.647, 15.648, 15.649, 15.650, 15.651, 15.652, 15.653, 15.654, 15.655, 15.656, 15.657, 15.658, 15.659, 15.660, 15.661, 15.662, 15.663, 15.664, 15.665, 15.666, 15.667, 15.668, 15.669, 15.670, 15.671, 15.672, 15.673, 15.674, 15.675, 15.676, 15.677, 15.678, 15.679, 15.680, 15.681, 15.682, 15.683, 15.684, 15.685, 15.686, 15.687, 15.688, 15.689, 15.690, 15.691, 15.692, 15.693, 15.694, 15.695, 15.696, 15.697, 15.698, 15.699, 15.700, 15.701, 15.702, 15.703, 15.704, 15.705, 15.706, 15.707, 15.708, 15.709, 15.710, 15.711, 15.712, 15.713, 15.714, 15.715, 15.716, 15.717, 15.718, 15.719, 15.720, 15.721, 15.722, 15.723, 15.724, 15.725, 15.726, 15.727, 15.728, 15.729, 15.730, 15.731, 15.732, 15.733, 15.734, 15.735, 15.736, 15.737, 15.738, 15.739, 15.740, 15.741, 15.742, 15.743, 15.744, 15.745 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 334
15.727. puppe caput posuit, donec Castrumque sacrasque
37. Livy, History, 81, 83, 82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 30
38. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.1.10-6.1.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 338
39. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 20.76.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
20.76.6.  When all inclined toward the quickest possible withdrawal, he commanded the soldiers to break camp and speedily returned to Syria, the whole fleet coasting along beside him. After the departure of the enemy Ptolemy rejoiced greatly; and, when he had made a thank-offering to the gods, he entertained his friends lavishly.
40. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64
3.1.4. ὀργισθεὶς δὲ αὐτῷ Ποσειδῶν ὅτι μὴ κατέθυσε τὸν ταῦρον, τοῦτον μὲν ἐξηγρίωσε, Πασιφάην δὲ ἐλθεῖν εἰς ἐπιθυμίαν αὐτοῦ παρεσκεύασεν. ἡ δὲ ἐρασθεῖσα τοῦ ταύρου συνεργὸν λαμβάνει Δαίδαλον, ὃς ἦν ἀρχιτέκτων, πεφευγὼς ἐξ Ἀθηνῶν ἐπὶ φόνῳ. οὗτος ξυλίνην βοῦν ἐπὶ τροχῶν κατασκευάσας, καὶ ταύτην λαβὼν καὶ 2 -- κοιλάνας ἔνδοθεν, 3 -- ἐκδείρας τε βοῦν τὴν δορὰν περιέρραψε, καὶ θεὶς ἐν ᾧπερ εἴθιστο ὁ ταῦρος λειμῶνι βόσκεσθαι, τὴν Πασιφάην ἐνεβίβασεν. ἐλθὼν δὲ ὁ ταῦρος ὡς ἀληθινῇ βοῒ συνῆλθεν. ἡ δὲ Ἀστέριον ἐγέννησε τὸν κληθέντα Μινώταυρον. οὗτος εἶχε ταύρου πρόσωπον, τὰ δὲ λοιπὰ ἀνδρός· Μίνως δὲ ἐν τῷ λαβυρίνθῳ κατά τινας χρησμοὺς κατακλείσας αὐτὸν ἐφύλαττεν. ἦν δὲ ὁ λαβύρινθος, ὃν Δαίδαλος κατεσκεύασεν, οἴκημα καμπαῖς πολυπλόκοις πλανῶν τὴν ἔξοδον. τὰ μὲν οὖν περὶ Μινωταύρου καὶ Ἀνδρόγεω καὶ Φαίδρας καὶ Ἀριάδνης ἐν τοῖς περὶ Θησέως ὕστερον ἐροῦμεν.
41. Plutarch, Flaminius, 12.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 53
42. Plutarch, Solon, 23, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196
43. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 49
44. Plutarch, Greek Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
45. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 49
814c. it is even now possible to resemble our ancestors, but Marathon, the Eurymedon, Plataea, and all the other examples which make the common folk vainly to swell with pride and kick up their heels, should be left to the schools of the sophists. And not only should the statesman show himself and his native State blameless towards our rulers, but he should also have always a friend among the men of high station who have the greatest power as a firm bulwark, so to speak, of his administration; for the Romans themselves are most eager to promote the political interests of their friends; and it is a fine thing also, when we gain advantage from the friendship of great men, to turn it to the welfare of our community, as Polybius and Panaetius, through Scipio's goodwill towards them,
46. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196
47. Plutarch, Whether Land Or Sea Animals Are More Clever, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
48. Plutarch, Pericles, 1.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
1.5. διὸ καλῶς μὲν Ἀντισθένης ἀκούσας ὅτι σπουδαῖός ἐστιν αὐλητὴς Ἰσμηνίας, ἀλλʼ ἄνθρωπος, ἔφη, μοχθηρός· οὐ γὰρ ἂν οὕτω σπουδαῖος ἦν αὐλητής· ὁ δὲ Φίλιππος πρὸς τὸν υἱὸν ἐπιτερπῶς ἔν τινι πότῳ ψήλαντα καὶ τεχνικῶς εἶπεν· οὐκ αἰσχύνῃ καλῶς οὕτω ψάλλων; ἀρκεῖ γάρ, ἂν βασιλεὺς ἀκροᾶσθαι ψαλλόντων σχολάζῃ, καὶ πολὺ νέμει ταῖς Μούσαις ἑτέρων ἀγωνιζομένων τὰ τοιαῦτα θεατὴς γιγνόμενος. 1.5. Therefore it was a fine saying of Antisthenes, when he heard that Ismenias was an excellent piper: But he’s a worthless man, said he, otherwise he wouldn’t be so good a piper. And so Philip Philip of Macedon, to Alexander. once said to his son, who, as the wine went round, plucked the strings charmingly and skilfully, Art not ashamed to pluck the strings so well? It is enough, surely, if a king have leisure to hear others pluck the strings, and he pays great deference to the Muses if he be but a spectator of such contests.
49. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 5.20.1, 5.29.1, 6.19.5, 6.28.3, 7.14.1, 7.24.4 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games •pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
5.20.1. Ἀλεξάνδρῳ δὲ ἐπειδὴ οἱ ἀποθανόντες ἐν τῇ μάχῃ κεκόσμηντο τῷ πρέποντι κόσμῳ, ὁ δὲ τοῖς θεοῖς τὰ νομιζόμενα ἐπινίκια ἔθυε, καὶ ἀγὼν ἐποιεῖτο αὐτῷ γυμνικὸς καὶ ἱππικὸς αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τῇ ὄχθῃ τοῦ Ὑδάσπου, ἵναπερ τὸ πρῶτον διέβη ἅμα τῷ στρατῷ. 5.29.1. οἱ δὲ ἐβόων τε οἷα ἂν ὄχλος ξυμμιγὴς χαίρων βοήσειε καὶ ἐδάκρυον οἱ πολλοὶ αὐτῶν· οἱ δὲ καὶ τῇ σκηνῇ τῇ βασιλικῇ πελάζοντες ηὔχοντο Ἀλεξάνδρῳ πολλὰ καὶ ἀγαθά, ὅτι πρὸς σφῶν μόνων νικηθῆναι ἠνέσχετο. ἔνθα δὴ διελὼν κατὰ τάξεις τὴν στρατιὰν δώδεκα βωμοὺς κατασκευάζειν προστάττει, ὕψος μὲν κατὰ τοὺς μεγίστους πύργους, εὖρος δὲ μείζονας ἔτι ἢ κατὰ πύργους, χαριστήρια τοῖς θεοῖς τοῖς ἐς τοσόνδε ἀγαγοῦσιν αὐτὸν νικῶντα καὶ μνημεῖα τῶν αὑτοῦ πόνων. 6.19.5. αὐτὸς δὲ ὑπερβαλὼν τοῦ Ἰνδοῦ ποταμοῦ τὰς ἐκβολὰς ἐς τὸ πέλαγος ἀνέπλει, ὡς μὲν ἔλεγεν, ἀπιδεῖν εἴ πού τις χώρα πλησίον ἀνίσχει ἐν τῷ πόντῳ, ἐμοὶ δὲ δοκεῖ, οὐχ ἥκιστα ὡς πεπλευκέναι τὴν μεγάλην τὴν ἔξω Ἰνδῶν θάλασσαν. ἐνταῦθα ταύρους τε σφάξας τῷ Ποσειδῶνι ἀφῆκεν ἐς τὴν θάλασσαν καὶ σπείσας ἐπὶ τῇ θυσίᾳ τήν τε φιάλην χρυσῆν οὖσαν καὶ κρατῆρας χρυσοῦς ἐνέβαλεν ἐς τὸν πόντον χαριστήρια, εὐχόμενος σῶόν οἱ παραπέμψαι τὸν στρατὸν τὸν ναυτικόν, ὅντινα ξὺν Νεάρχῳ ἐπενόει στέλλειν ὡς ἐπὶ τὸν κόλπον τὸν Περσικὸν καὶ τὰς ἐκβολὰς τοῦ τε Εὐφράτου καὶ τοῦ Τίγρητος. 6.28.3. ἀλλὰ ἐκεῖνα ἤδη Ἀριστοβούλῳ ἑπόμενος ξυγγράφω, θῦσαι ἐν Καρμανίᾳ Ἀλέξανδρον χαριστήρια τῆς κατʼ Ἰνδῶν νίκης καὶ ὑπὲρ τῆς στρατιᾶς, ὅτι ἀπεσώθη ἐκ Γαδρωσίων, καὶ ἀγῶνα διαθεῖναι μουσικόν τε καὶ γυμνικόν· καταλέξαι δὲ καὶ Πευκέσταν ἐς τοὺς σωματοφύλακας, ἤδη μὲν ἐγνωκότα σατράπην καταστῆσαι τῆς Περσίδος, ἐθέλοντα δὲ πρὸ τῆς σατραπείας μηδὲ ταύτης τῆς τιμῆς καὶ πίστεως ἀπείρατον εἶναι ἐπὶ τῷ ἐν Μαλλοῖς ἔργῳ· 7.14.1. ἐν Ἐκβατάνοις δὲ θυσίαν τε ἔθυσεν Ἀλέξανδρος, ὥσπερ αὐτῷ ἐπὶ ξυμφοραῖς ἀγαθαῖς νόμος, καὶ ἀγῶνα ἐπετέλει γυμνικόν τε καὶ μουσικόν, καὶ πότοι αὐτῷ ἐγίνοντο παρὰ τοῖς ἑταίροις. καὶ ἐν τούτῳ Ἡφαιστίων ἔκαμε τὸ σῶμα· ἑβδόμη τε ἡμέρα ἤδη ἦν αὐτῷ τῆς νόσου καὶ λέγουσι τὸ μὲν στάδιον πλῆρες εἶναι· παίδων γὰρ ἀγὼν ἦν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ἡμέρᾳ γυμνικός· ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐξηγγέλλετο Ἀλεξάνδρῳ ὅτι κακῶς ἔχοι Ἡφαιστίων, ὁ δὲ παρʼ αὐτὸν ἐλθὼν σπουδῇ οὐκέτι ζῶντα κατέλαβεν. 7.24.4. ἡμέραι τε οὐ πολλαὶ ἐπὶ τούτῳ ἐγένοντο καὶ τεθυκὼς τοῖς θεοῖς τάς τε νομιζομένας θυσίας ἐπὶ ξυμφοραῖς ἀγαθαῖς καί τινας καὶ ἐκ μαντείας εὐωχεῖτο ἅμα τοῖς φίλοις καὶ ἔπινε πόρρω τῶν νυκτῶν. δοῦναι δὲ λέγεται καὶ τῇ στρατιᾷ ἱερεῖα καὶ οἶνον κατὰ λόχους καὶ ἑκατοστύας. ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ πότου αὐτὸν μὲν ἀπαλλάττεσθαι ἐθέλειν ἐπὶ κοιτῶνα εἰσὶν οἳ ἀνέγραψαν· Μήδιον δὲ αὐτῷ ἐντυχόντα, τῶν ἑταίρων ἐν τῷ τότε τὸν πιθανώτατον, δεηθῆναι κωμάσαι παρὰ οἷ· γενέσθαι γὰρ ἂν ἡδὺν τὸν κῶμον. Eumen. fr. 2
50. Plutarch, Virtues of Women, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
51. Plutarch, Moralia, 792 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 96
52. Plutarch, Demetrius, 40.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agon, transfer of pythian games Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 270, 271
40.4. ταῖς μὲν οὖν Θήβαις οὔπω δέκατον οἰκουμέναις ἔτος ἁλῶναι δὶς ἐν τῷ χρόνῳ τούτῳ συνέπεσε. τῶν δὲ Πυθίων καθηκόντων πρᾶγμα καινότατον ἐπέτρεψεν αὑτῷ ποιεῖν ὁ Δημήτριος. ἐπεὶ γὰρ Αἰτωλοὶ τὰ περὶ Δελφοὺς στενὰ κατεῖχον, ἐν Ἀθήναις αὐτὸς ἦγε τὸν ἀγῶνα καὶ τὴν πανήγυριν, ὡς δὴ προσῆκον αὐτόθι μάλιστα τιμᾶσθαι τὸν θεόν, ὃς καὶ πατρῷός ἐστι καὶ λέγεται τοῦ γένους ἀρχηγός. 40.4.
53. Plutarch, On Hearing, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 96
54. Plutarch, Oracles At Delphi No Longer Given In Verse, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 96
55. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
56. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
57. Plutarch, Consolation To His Wife, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 96
611d. when they reach the point where the want is no longer felt; and your Timoxena has been deprived of little, for what she knew was little, and her pleasure was in little things; and as for those things of which she had acquired no perception, which she had never conceived, and to which she had never given thought, how could she be said to be deprived of them? Furthermore, Iknow that you are kept from believing the statements of that other set, who win many to their way of thinking when they say that nothing is in any way evil or painful to "what has undergone dissolution," by the teaching of our fathers and by the mystic formulas of Dionysiac rites, the knowledge of which we who are participants share with each other. Consider then that the soul, which is imperishable,
58. Plutarch, Advice To Bride And Groom, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
59. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 13.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agon, transfer of pythian games Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 270
13.1. Ἀθηναίοις δὲ διηλλάγη, καίπερ οὐ μετρίως ἐνεγκοῦσι τὸ περὶ Θήβας δυστύχημα· καὶ γὰρ τὴν τῶν μυστηρίων ἑορτὴν ἐν χερσὶν ἔχοντες ὑπὸ πένθους ἀφῆκαν, καὶ τοῖς καταφυγοῦσιν ἐπὶ καταφυγοῦσιν ἐπὶ Bekker corrects to φυγοῦσιν εἰς. τὴν πόλιν ἁπάντων μετεδίδοσαν τῶν φιλανθρώπων. 13.1. Furthermore, he was reconciled with the Athenians, although they showed exceeding sorrow at the misfortunes of Thebes; for although they had begun the festival of the mysteries, they gave it up in consequence of their grief; According to Arrian (i. 10, 2) , it was from panic fright. and upon the Thebans who sought refuge in their city they bestowed every kindness.
60. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 4.12.65 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
61. Appian, The Mithridatic Wars, 11-13, 15, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 30
62. Plutarch, Sulla, 15, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 30
63. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 15 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
64. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.23.9, 2.22.8-2.22.9, 6.6.1, 6.14.10, 10.7.1-10.7.6, 10.19.1, 10.37.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games •games, pythian •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 53; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 276; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129, 196, 198
1.23.9. ἀνδριάντων δὲ ὅσοι μετὰ τὸν ἵππον ἑστήκασιν Ἐπιχαρίνου μὲν ὁπλιτοδρομεῖν ἀσκήσαντος τὴν εἰκόνα ἐποίησε Κριτίας , Οἰνοβίῳ δὲ ἔργον ἐστὶν ἐς Θουκυδίδην τὸν Ὀλόρου χρηστόν· ψήφισμα γὰρ ἐνίκησεν Οἰνόβιος κατελθεῖν ἐς Ἀθήνας Θουκυδίδην, καί οἱ δολοφονηθέντι ὡς κατῄει μνῆμά ἐστιν οὐ πόρρω πυλῶν Μελιτίδων. 2.22.8. ἐρχομένῳ δὲ ὁδὸν εὐθεῖαν ἐς γυμνάσιον Κυλάραβιν, ἀπὸ τοῦ παιδὸς ὀνομαζόμενον τοῦ Σθενέλου, τέθαπται δὴ Λικύμνιος ὁ Ἠλεκτρύωνος· ἀποθανεῖν δʼ αὐτὸν Ὅμηρος ὑπὸ Τληπτολέμου φησὶ τοῦ Ἡρακλέους, καὶ διὰ τὸν φόνον τοῦτον ἔφυγεν ἐξ Ἄργους Τληπτόλεμος. ὀλίγον δὲ τῆς ἐπὶ Κυλάραβιν καὶ τὴν ταύτῃ πύλην ἀποτραπεῖσι Σακάδα μνῆμά ἐστιν, ὃς τὸ αὔλημα τὸ Πυθικὸν πρῶτος ηὔλησεν ἐν Δελφοῖς· 2.22.9. καὶ τὸ ἔχθος τὸ Ἀπόλλωνι διαμένον ἐς τοὺς αὐλητὰς ἔτι ἀπὸ Μαρσύου καὶ τῆς ἁμίλλης τοῦ Σιληνοῦ παυθῆναι διὰ τοῦτον δοκεῖ τὸν Σακάδαν. ἐν δὲ τῷ γυμνασίῳ τῷ Κυλαράβου καὶ Πανία ἐστὶν Ἀθηνᾶ καλουμένη καὶ τάφον Σθενέλου δεικνύουσι, τὸν δὲ αὐτοῦ Κυλαράβου. πεποίηται δὲ οὐ πόρρω τοῦ γυμνασίου πολυάνδριον τοῖς μετὰ Ἀθηναίων πλεύσασιν Ἀργείοις ἐπὶ καταδουλώσει Συρακουσῶν τε καὶ Σικελίας. 6.6.1. τούτῳ μὲν ἐνταῦθα ἐγένετο ἡ τελευτή· ἐν δὲ Ὀλυμπίᾳ παρὰ τοῦ Πουλυδάμαντος τὸν ἀνδριάντα δύο τε ἐκ τῆς Ἀρκάδων καὶ Ἀττικὸς ὁ τρίτος ἕστηκεν ἀθλητής. τὸν μὲν δὴ Μαντινέα Πρωτόλαον Διαλκοῦς πυγμῇ παῖδας κρατήσαντα ὁ Ῥηγῖνος Πυθαγόρας , Ναρυκίδαν δὲ τὸν Δαμαρέτου παλαιστὴν ἄνδρα ἐκ Φιγαλίας Σικυώνιος Δαίδαλος , Καλλίᾳ δὲ Ἀθηναίῳ παγκρατιαστῇ τὸν ἀνδριάντα ἀνὴρ Ἀθηναῖος Μίκων ἐποίησεν ὁ ζωγράφος. Νικοδάμου δὲ ἔργον τοῦ Μαιναλίου παγκρατιαστής ἐστιν ἐκ Μαινάλου, δύο νίκας ἐν ἀνδράσιν ἀνελόμενος, Ἀνδροσθένης Λοχαίου. 6.14.10. Σακάδας μὲν γὰρ τὸν ἀγῶνα τὸν τεθέντα ὑπὸ Ἀμφικτυόνων οὐκ ὄντα πω στεφανίτην καὶ ἐπʼ ἐκείνῳ στεφανίτας δύο ἐνίκησε, Πυθόκριτος δὲ ὁ Σικυώνιος τὰς ἐφεξῆς τούτων πυθιάδας ἕξ, μόνος δὴ οὗτος αὐλητής· δῆλα δὲ ὅτι καὶ ἐν τῷ ἀγῶνι τῷ Ὀλυμπίασιν ἐπηύλησεν ἑξάκις τῷ πεντάθλῳ. Πυθοκρίτῳ μὲν γέγονεν ἀντὶ τούτων ἡ ἐν Ὀλυμπίᾳ στήλη καὶ ἐπίγραμμα ἐπʼ αὐτῇ, Πυθοκρίτου τοῦ Καλλινίκου μνᾶμα ταὐλητᾶ τά δε· ἀνέθεσαν δὲ καὶ τὸ κοινὸν τὸ Αἰτωλῶν Κύλωνα, ὃς 10.7.1. ἔοικε δὲ ἐξ ἀρχῆς τὸ ἱερὸν τὸ ἐν Δελφοῖς ὑπὸ ἀνθρώπων ἐπιβεβουλεῦσθαι πλείστων ἤδη. οὗτός τε ὁ Εὐβοεὺς λῃστὴς καὶ ἔτεσιν ὕστερον τὸ ἔθνος τὸ Φλεγυῶν, ἔτι δὲ Πύρρος ὁ Ἀχιλλέως ἐπεχείρησεν αὐτῷ, καὶ δυνάμεως μοῖρα τῆς Ξέρξου, καὶ οἱ χρόνον τε ἐπὶ πλεῖστον καὶ μάλιστα τοῦ θεοῦ τοῖς χρήμασιν ἐπελθόντες οἱ ἐν Φωκεῦσι δυνάσται, καὶ ἡ Γαλατῶν στρατιά. ἔμελλε δὲ ἄρα οὐδὲ τῆς Νέρωνος ἐς πάντα ὀλιγωρίας ἀπειράτως ἕξειν, ὃς τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα πεντακοσίας θεῶν τε ἀναμὶξ ἀφείλετο καὶ ἀνθρώπων εἰκόνας χαλκᾶς. 10.7.2. ἀρχαιότατον δὲ ἀγώνισμα γενέσθαι μνημονεύουσι καὶ ἐφʼ ᾧ πρῶτον ἆθλα ἔθεσαν, ᾆσαι ὕμνον ἐς τὸν θεόν· καὶ ᾖσε καὶ ἐνίκησεν ᾄδων Χρυσόθεμις ἐκ Κρήτης, οὗ δὴ ὁ πατὴρ λέγεται Καρμάνωρ καθῆραι Ἀπόλλωνα. Χρυσοθέμιδος δὲ ὕστερον Φιλάμμωνά τε ᾠδῇ μνημονεύουσι νικῆσαι καὶ ἐπʼ ἐκείνῳ Θάμυριν τὸν Φιλάμμωνος. Ὀρφέα δὲ σεμνολογίᾳ τῇ ἐπὶ τελεταῖς καὶ ὑπὸ φρονήματος τοῦ ἄλλου καὶ Μουσαῖον τῇ ἐς πάντα μιμήσει τοῦ Ὀρφέως οὐκ ἐθελῆσαί φασιν αὐτοὺς ἐπὶ ἀγῶνι μουσικῆς ἐξετάζεσθαι. 10.7.3. φασὶ δὲ καὶ Ἐλευθῆρα ἀνελέσθαι Πυθικὴν νίκην μέγα καὶ ἡδὺ φωνοῦντα, ἐπεὶ ᾄδειν γε αὐτὸν οὐχ αὑτοῦ τὴν ᾠδήν. λέγεται δὲ καὶ Ἡσίοδον ἀπελαθῆναι τοῦ ἀγωνίσματος ἅτε οὐ κιθαρίζειν ὁμοῦ τῇ ᾠδῇ δεδιδαγμένον. Ὅμηρος δὲ ἀφίκετο μὲν ἐς Δελφοὺς ἐρησόμενος ὁπόσα καὶ ἐδεῖτο, ἔμελλε δὲ αὐτῷ καὶ κιθαρίζειν διδαχθέντι ἀχρεῖον τὸ μάθημα ὑπὸ τῶν ὀφθαλμῶν τῆς συμφορᾶς γενήσεσθαι. 10.7.4. τῆς δὲ τεσσαρακοστῆς Ὀλυμπιάδος καὶ ὀγδόης, ἣν Γλαυκίας ὁ Κροτωνιάτης ἐνίκησε, ταύτης ἔτει τρίτῳ ἆθλα ἔθεσαν οἱ Ἀμφικτύονες κιθαρῳδίας μὲν καθὰ καὶ ἐξ ἀρχῆς, προσέθεσαν δὲ καὶ αὐλῳδίας ἀγώνισμα καὶ αὐλῶν· ἀνηγορεύθησαν δὲ νικῶντες Κεφαλήν τε Μελάμπους κιθαρῳδίᾳ καὶ αὐλῳδὸς Ἀρκὰς Ἐχέμβροτος, Σακάδας δὲ Ἀργεῖος ἐπὶ τοῖς αὐλοῖς· ἀνείλετο δὲ ὁ Σακάδας οὗτος καὶ ἄλλας δύο τὰς ἐφεξῆς ταύτης πυθιάδας. 10.7.5. ἔθεσαν δὲ καὶ ἆθλα τότε ἀθληταῖς πρῶτον, τά τε ἐν Ὀλυμπίᾳ πλὴν τεθρίππου καὶ αὐτοὶ νομοθετήσαντες δολίχου καὶ διαύλου παισὶν εἶναι δρόμον. δευτέρᾳ δὲ πυθιάδι οὐκ ἐπὶ ἄθλοις ἐκάλεσαν ἔτι ἀγωνίζεσθαι, στεφανίτην δὲ τὸν ἀγῶνα ἀπὸ τούτου κατεστήσαντο· καὶ αὐλῳδίαν τό τε κατέλυσαν, καταγνόντες οὐκ εἶναι τὸ ἄκουσμα εὔφημον· ἡ γὰρ αὐλῳδία μέλη τε ἦν αὐλῶν τὰ σκυθρωπότατα καὶ ἐλεγεῖα θρῆνοι προσᾳδόμενα τοῖς αὐλοῖς. 10.7.6. μαρτυρεῖ δέ μοι καὶ τοῦ Ἐχεμβρότου τὸ ἀνάθημα, τρίπους χαλκοῦς ἀνατεθεὶς τῷ Ἡρακλεῖ τῷ ἐν Θήβαις· ἐπίγραμμα δὲ ὁ τρίπους εἶχεν· Ἐχέμβροτος Ἀρκὰς θῆκε τῷ Ἡρακλεῖ νικήσας τόδʼ ἄγαλμʼ Ἀμφικτυόνων ἐν ἀέθλοις, Ἕλλησι δʼ ἀείδων μέλεα καὶ ἐλέγους. κατὰ τοῦτο μὲν τῆς αὐλῳδίας ἐπαύσθη τὸ ἀγώνισμα· προσέθεσαν δὲ καὶ ἵππων δρόμον, ἀνηγορεύθη δὲ ἐπὶ τῷ ἅρματι Κλεισθένης ὁ Σικυῶνος τυραννήσας. 10.19.1. παρὰ δὲ τὸν Γοργίαν ἀνάθημά ἐστιν Ἀμφικτυόνων Σκιωναῖος Σκύλλις, ὃς καταδῦναι καὶ ἐς τὰ βαθύτατα θαλάσσης πάσης ἔχει φήμην· ἐδιδάξατο δὲ καὶ Ὕδναν τὴν θυγατέρα δύεσθαι. 10.37.5. τὸ δὲ πεδίον τὸ ἀπὸ τῆς Κίρρας ψιλόν ἐστιν ἅπαν, καὶ φυτεύειν δένδρα οὐκ ἐθέλουσιν ἢ ἔκ τινος ἀρᾶς ἢ ἀχρεῖον τὴν γῆν ἐς δένδρων τροφὴν εἰδότες. λέγεται δὲ ἐς τὴν Κίρραν καὶ ἀπὸ τῆς Κίρρας τὸ ὄνομα τὸ ἐφʼ ἡμῶν τεθῆναι τῷ χωρίῳ φασίν. Ὅμηρος μέντοι Κρῖσαν ἔν τε Ἰλιάδι ὁμοίως καὶ ὕμνῳ τῷ ἐς Ἀπόλλωνα ὀνόματι τῷ ἐξ ἀρχῆς καλεῖ τὴν πόλιν. χρόνῳ δὲ ὕστερον οἱ ἐν τῇ Κίρρᾳ ἄλλα τε ἠσέβησαν ἐς τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ ἀπέτεμνον τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς χώρας. 1.23.9. of the statues that stand after the horse, the likeness of Epicharinus who practised the race in armour was made by Critius, while Oenobius performed a kind service for Thucydides the son of Olorus. The great historian of the Peloponnesian war. He succeeded in getting a decree passed for the return of Thucydides to Athens , who was treacherously murdered as he was returning, and there is a monument to him not far from the Melitid gate. 2.22.8. As you go along a straight road to a gymnasium, called Cylarabis after the son of Sthenelus, you come to the grave of Licymnius, the son of Electryon, who, Homer says, was killed by Tleptolemus, the son of Heracles for which homicide Tleptolemus was banished from Argos . On turning a little aside from the road to Cylarabis and to the gate there, you come to the tomb of Sacadas, who was the first to play at Delphi the Pythian flute-tune; 2.22.9. the hostility of Apollo to flute-players, which had lasted ever since the rivalry of Marsyas the Silenus, is supposed to have stayed because of this Sacadas. In the gymnasium of Cylarabes is an Athena called Pania; they show also the graves of Sthenelus and of Cylarabes himself. Not far from the gymnasium has been built a common grave of those Argives who sailed with the Athenians to enslave Syracuse and Sicily . 6.6.1. Beside the statue of Pulydamas at Olympia stand two Arcadians and one Attic athlete. The statue of the Mantinean, Protolaus the son of Dialces, who won the boxing-match for boys, was made by Pythagoras of Rhegium ; that of Narycidas, son of Damaretus, a wrestler from Phigalia , was made by Daedalus of Sicyon ; that of the Athenian Callias, a pancratiast, is by the Athenian painter Micon. Nicodamus the Maenalian made the statue of the Maenalian pancratiast Androsthenes, the son of Lochaeus, who won two victories among the men. 6.14.10. For Sacadas won in the games introduced by the Amphictyons before a crown was awarded for success, and after this victory two others for which crowns were given; but at the next six Pythian Festivals Pythocritus of Sicyon was victor, being the only flute-player so to distinguish himself. It is also clear that at the Olympic Festival he fluted six times for the pentathlum. For these reasons the slab at Olympia was erected in honor of Pythocritus, with the inscription on it :— This is the monument of the flute-player Pythocritus, the son of Callinicus . 10.7.1. It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men. 10.7.2. The oldest contest and the one for which they first offered prizes was, according to tradition, the singing of a hymn to the god. The man who sang and won the prize was Chrysothemis of Crete , whose father Carmanor is said to have cleansed Apollo. After Chrysothemis, says tradition, Philammon won with a song, and after him his son Thamyris. But they say that Orpheus, a proud man and conceited about his mysteries, and Musaeus, who copied Orpheus in everything, refused to submit to the competition in musical skill. 10.7.3. They say too that Eleuther won a Pythian victory for his loud and sweet voice, for the song that he sang was not of his own composition. The story is that Hesiod too was debarred from competing because he had not learned to accompany his own singing on the harp. Homer too came to Delphi to inquire about his needs, but even though he had learned to play the harp, he would have found the skill useless owing to the loss of his eye-sight. 10.7.4. In the third year of the forty-eighth Olympiad, 586 B.C at which Glaucias of Crotona was victorious, the Amphictyons held contests for harping as from the beginning, but added competitions for flute-playing and for singing to the flute. The conquerors proclaimed were Melampus, a Cephallenian, for harping, and Echembrotus, an Arcadian, for singing to the flute, with Sacadas of Argos for flute-playing. This same Sacadas won victories at the next two Pythian festivals. 10.7.5. On that occasion they also offered for the first time prizes for athletes, the competitions being the same as those at Olympia , except the four-horse chariot, and the Delphians themselves added to the contests running-races for boys, the long course and the double course. At the second Pythian Festival they no longer offered prizes for events, and hereafter gave a crown for victory. On this occasion they no longer included singing to the flute, thinking that the music was ill-omened to listen to. For the tunes of the flute were most dismal, and the words sung to the tunes were lamentations. 10.7.6. What I say is confirmed by the votive offering of Echembrotus, a bronze tripod dedicated to the Heracles at Thebes . The tripod has as its inscription:— Echembrotus of Arcadia dedicated this pleasant gift to Heracles When he won a victory at the games of the Amphictyons, Singing for the Greeks tunes and lamentations. In this way the competition in singing to the flute was dropped. But they added a chariot-race, and Cleisthenes, the tyrant of Sicyon , was proclaimed victor in the chariot-race. 10.19.1. Beside the Gorgias is a votive offering of the Amphictyons, representing Scyllis of Scione, who, tradition says, dived into the very deepest parts of every sea. He also taught his daughter Hydna to dive. 10.37.5. The plain from Cirrha is altogether bare, and the inhabitants will not plant trees, either because the land is under a curse, or because they know that the ground is useless for growing trees. It is said that to Cirrha ...and they say that from Cirrha the place received its modern name. Homer, however, in the Iliad , Hom. Il. 2.520 and similarly in the hymn to Apollo, See HH Apoll. 269 , 282, 438. calls the city by its ancient name of Crisa . Afterwards the people of Cirrha behaved wickedly towards Apollo; especially in appropriating some of the god's land.
65. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 2.23.5, 2.34, 3.2.4, 4.1.2, 4.4.2, 4.16.5-4.16.6, 4.16.8, 4.20, 5.4.3, 5.5.2, 5.15.3, 5.19.1, 5.20.1, 5.22.6, 5.25.3, 5.27.3, 6.3.1-6.3.3 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian •pythian games Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 497, 499, 500, 726; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
66. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
67. Polyaenus, Stratagems, 1.44, 2.13, 6.1.3, 7.43 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
68. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
69. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 63.14.2, 79.10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 53; Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
70. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 4.19 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
71. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 8.4.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 726
72. Philostratus, Heroicus, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
73. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.86, 3.46, 6.96-6.98 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
2.86. The case stands thus. The disciples of Aristippus were his daughter Arete, Aethiops of Ptolemais, and Antipater of Cyrene. The pupil of Arete was Aristippus, who went by the name of mother-taught, and his pupil was Theodorus, known as the atheist, subsequently as god. Antipater's pupil was Epitimides of Cyrene, his was Paraebates, and he had as pupils Hegesias, the advocate of suicide, and Anniceris, who ransomed Plato.Those then who adhered to the teaching of Aristippus and were known as Cyrenaics held the following opinions. They laid down that there are two states, pleasure and pain, the former a smooth, the latter a rough motion, and that pleasure does not differ from pleasure nor is one pleasure more pleasant than another. 3.46. His disciples were Speusippus of Athens, Xenocrates of Chalcedon, Aristotle of Stagira, Philippus of Opus, Hestiaeus of Perinthus, Dion of Syracuse, Amyclus of Heraclea, Erastus and Coriscus of Scepsus, Timolaus of Cyzicus, Euaeon of Lampsacus, Python and Heraclides of Aenus, Hippothales and Callippus of Athens, Demetrius of Amphipolis, Heraclides of Pontus, and many others, among them two women, Lastheneia of Mantinea and Axiothea of Phlius, who is reported by Dicaearchus to have worn men's clothes. Some say that Theophrastus too attended his lectures. Chamaeleon adds Hyperides the orator and Lycurgus, 6.96. 7. HIPPARCHIAHipparchia too, sister of Metrocles, was captured by their doctrines. Both of them were born at Maroneia.She fell in love with the discourses and the life of Crates, and would not pay attention to any of her suitors, their wealth, their high birth or their beauty. But to her Crates was everything. She used even to threaten her parents she would make away with herself, unless she were given in marriage to him. Crates therefore was implored by her parents to dissuade the girl, and did all he could, and at last, failing to persuade her, got up, took off his clothes before her face and said, This is the bridegroom, here are his possessions; make your choice accordingly; for you will be no helpmeet of mine, unless you share my pursuits. 6.97. The girl chose and, adopting the same dress, went about with her husband and lived with him in public and went out to dinners with him. Accordingly she appeared at the banquet given by Lysimachus, and there put down Theodorus, known as the atheist, by means of the following sophism. Any action which would not be called wrong if done by Theodorus, would not be called wrong if done by Hipparchia. Now Theodorus does no wrong when he strikes himself: therefore neither does Hipparchia do wrong when she strikes Theodorus. He had no reply wherewith to meet the argument, but tried to strip her of her cloak. But Hipparchia showed no sign of alarm or of the perturbation natural in a woman. 6.98. And when he said to her:Is this sheWho quitting woof and warp and comb and loom?she replied, It is I, Theodorus, – but do you suppose that I have been ill advised about myself, if instead of wasting further time upon the loom I spent it in education? These tales and countless others are told of the female philosopher.There is current a work of Crates entitled Epistles, containing excellent philosophy in a style which sometimes resembles that of Plato. He has also written tragedies, stamped with a very lofty kind of philosophy; as, for example, the following passage:Not one tower hath my country nor one roof,But wide as the whole earth its citadelAnd home prepared for us to dwell therein.He died in old age, and was buried in Boeotia.
74. Gregory of Nazianzus, In Theophania (Orat. 38), 240 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
75. Eunapius, Lives of The Philosophers, 466 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
76. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 4.2, 7.1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 50
77. John Malalas, History, 21 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
78. Epigraphy, Lsam, 39.10-39.14  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64
79. Epigraphy, Miletos, 369  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games, at delphi Found in books: Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 53
80. Epigraphy, Dubois 2002, 5  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
81. Epigraphy, Bch, a b c d\n0 109.1985.102 109.1985.102 109 1985 \n1 109.1985.101 109.1985.101 109 1985 \n2 109.1985.100 109.1985.100 109 1985 \n3 109.1985.99 109.1985.99 109 1985 \n4 109.1985.98 109.1985.98 109 1985 \n5 109.1985.97 109.1985.97 109 1985 \n6 109.1985.96 109.1985.96 109 1985 \n7 109.1985.95 109.1985.95 109 1985 \n8 109.1985.94 109.1985.94 109 1985 \n9 64/65.1940/1.100 64/65.1940/1.100 64/65 1940/1\n10 109.1985.86 109.1985.86 109 1985 \n11 23.1899.526 23.1899.526 23 1899 \n12 109.1985.103 109.1985.103 109 1985 \n13 109.1985.93 109.1985.93 109 1985 \n14 109.1985.92 109.1985.92 109 1985 \n15 14 14 14 None \n16 63.1939.168 63.1939.168 63 1939 \n17 696 696 696 None \n18 73.1949.276.27 73.1949.276.27 73 1949 \n19 109.1985.81 109.1985.81 109 1985 \n20 109.1985.82 109.1985.82 109 1985 \n21 109.1985.83 109.1985.83 109 1985 \n22 109.1985.84 109.1985.84 109 1985 \n23 109.1985.87 109.1985.87 109 1985 \n24 109.1985.88 109.1985.88 109 1985 \n25 109.1985.89 109.1985.89 109 1985 \n26 109.1985.91 109.1985.91 109 1985 \n27 109.1985.79 109.1985.79 109 1985 \n28 109.1985.80 109.1985.80 109 1985 \n29 109.1985.90 109.1985.90 109 1985 \n30 109.1985.85 109.1985.85 109 1985 \n31 83.1959.484 83.1959.484 83 1959 \n32 63.1939.161 63.1939.161 63 1939 \n33 3711 3711 3711 None \n34 5.1881.404 5.1881.404 5 1881 \n35 16 16 16 None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 21
82. Epigraphy, Bch Suppl., 4.136  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, pythian games Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 94
83. Papyri, P.Oxy., 3656  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
84. Agathemerus, Trgf Fr., 1.1.2  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 335
85. Ostraca, Crum 1902, 525  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
86. Themistius, Oration, None  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
87. Epigraphy, Lscg, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 270, 271
88. Epigraphy, Lss, 1, 14, 5, 3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 104
89. Papyri, Sp, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
90. Lamprias Catalogue, No., 113, 87  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424
91. Stephanos Ho Byzantios, Ethnica, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
92. Suidas Thessalius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 50
93. Anon., Scholia On Homer'S Iliad, 21.194  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198
94. Anon., Scholia To Pindar, Nemean Odes, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 161
95. Epigraphy, Ig, 4.853, 7.2713, 15.1599  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 53
96. Epigraphy, Ngsl, 66-68, 65  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 538
97. Epigraphy, Fouilles De Delphes, 1.14, 1.48, 1.151-1.152, 1.154, 1.220, 1.260, 1.308, 1.318, 1.353-1.354, 1.365, 1.458, 1.481-1.485, 1.488, 1.490-1.495, 1.2232, 1.4662, 2.55, 2.78, 2.88-2.89, 2.140, 2.160, 3.4.79, 3.119-3.120, 3.124-3.126, 3.145-3.146, 3.153, 3.214-3.215, 3.230-3.237, 3.239-3.243, 3.249, 3.298, 3.378, 3.383, 3.385-3.396, 4.21-4.24, 4.36, 4.44-4.46, 4.69, 4.77, 4.118, 4.132-4.135, 4.169, 4.173, 4.406, 4.438  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, pythian games •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 424; Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 4, 21, 30, 42, 53, 80, 94, 124, 125, 143
98. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 10.9, 10.16.11-10.16.14  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
99. Anon., Suda, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 72
100. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 62.17-62.28  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 64
101. Andocides, Orations, 4.32  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136
102. Callimachus, Hymns, 4.16-4.22  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
103. Andocides, Orations, 4.32  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136
104. Aeschines, Or., 1.35, 2.163  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60, 227
105. Bacchylides, Odes, 10  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136
106. Philostratus, Gymnasticus, None  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
107. Epigraphy, Samama 2003, 65  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, pythian games Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 94
108. Epigraphy, Klio, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 124
110. Various, Fgrh, None  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 276
112. Pl., Schol. Dem. (Dilts), 19.277  Tagged with subjects: •delphi, pythian games Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 60
113. Ep., Pr., 20.1, 53.1-53.2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 227
114. Rh., Pol., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 227
116. Lycurg., Tox., 6.2, 7.1  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
117. Epigraphy, Ig Xii Suppl., 168.5  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
118. Demetrius Phalereus Rhetor, Eloc. 76 451 N. 121, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
119. Epigraphy, Ils, 8905, 308  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 50
120. Epigraphy, Seg, 2.330, 42.785, 48.999, 63.1333, 63.1337  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, pythian •agon, transfer of pythian games •festivals, pythian games •pythian games, at delphi Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 499; Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 80; Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 53; Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 270, 271
121. Epigraphy, Raubitschek, Daa, 120, 174, 21  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127
122. Epigraphy, Ivo, 146  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127
123. Targum, Targum Ps.-Jn. Deut., 80  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 380
124. Polybios, Timoleon, 18.46  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
125. Epigraphy, Ig Iii, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 100
126. Etymologicum Magnum, Catasterismi, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 72
127. Harpocration, Commentarii In Dionysium Periegetam, None  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 72
128. Epigraphy, Choix, 165-166, 168, 185, 193, 208-209, 227, 167  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 125
129. Epigraphy, Sgdi, 2642, 2662, 2727, 2688  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 80
130. Epigraphy, Inscriptiones Latinae Selectae, 8905  Tagged with subjects: •domitian, patronage of pythian games Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 1; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 1
131. Menaechmus, Fragments, 5  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129
132. Euripides, Pmg, None  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 136
133. Epigraphy, Nomima, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 63
134. Pindar, N., 2  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 65, 136
135. Epigraphy, Cid, 1.12, 4.103  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, pythian games Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 30, 42
136. Pindar, I., 1.41-1.45  Tagged with subjects: •megacles, alcmaeonid winner in the pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 65
137. Lamprias, Catalogue, 204, 227  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 78
138. Epigraphy, Fdd Iii, 4.34-4.35, 4.120, 4.287  Tagged with subjects: •games, pythian Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 53
139. Epigraphy, I.Cret., 4.64  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 63
140. Epigraphy, I.Kaunos, 28, 79  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 80
141. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131, 847, 880, 893, 826  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127
143. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1126  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
144. Epigraphy, Didyma, 201  Tagged with subjects: •pythian games, at delphi Found in books: Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 53
145. Epigraphy, Syll. , None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 270