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102 results for "games"
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 9.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 182, 183, 205
9.20. "And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard.",
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 154, 453-454, 155 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 12
155. To lusty Heaven, the vilest of all these
3. Homer, Iliad, 1.400, 9.96-9.97, 22.209 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 12, 23
1.400. / But you came, goddess, and freed him from his bonds, when you had quickly called to high Olympus him of the hundred hands, whom the gods call Briareus, but all men Aegaeon; for he is mightier than his father. He sat down by the side of the son of Cronos, exulting in his glory, 9.96. / He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, with thee will I begin and with thee make an end, for that thou art king over many hosts, and to thee Zeus hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgements, that thou mayest take counsel for thy people. 9.97. / He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, with thee will I begin and with thee make an end, for that thou art king over many hosts, and to thee Zeus hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgements, that thou mayest take counsel for thy people. 22.209. / And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales,
4. Homer, Odyssey, 9.2 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 348
5. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 117, 116 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 100
116. To seek the art of fire. He took a stout
6. Solon, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 49
7. Simonides, Fragments, 109, 91-92, 83 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
8. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
9. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
10. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.3-2.4, 3.11-3.18, 5.10, 10.43-10.85 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 390; Meister (2019), Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity, 88, 92; Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 107
11. Simonides, Fragments, 109, 91-92, 83 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
12. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.37, 6.12.2, 6.16.2-6.16.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic •olympic games Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 1; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 153
6.12.2. εἴ τέ τις ἄρχειν ἄσμενος αἱρεθεὶς παραινεῖ ὑμῖν ἐκπλεῖν, τὸ ἑαυτοῦ μόνον σκοπῶν, ἄλλως τε καὶ νεώτερος ὢν ἔτι ἐς τὸ ἄρχειν, ὅπως θαυμασθῇ μὲν ἀπὸ τῆς ἱπποτροφίας, διὰ δὲ πολυτέλειαν καὶ ὠφεληθῇ τι ἐκ τῆς ἀρχῆς, μηδὲ τούτῳ ἐμπαράσχητε τῷ τῆς πόλεως κινδύνῳ ἰδίᾳ ἐλλαμπρύνεσθαι, νομίσατε δὲ τοὺς τοιούτους τὰ μὲν δημόσια ἀδικεῖν, τὰ δὲ ἴδια ἀναλοῦν, καὶ τὸ πρᾶγμα μέγα εἶναι καὶ μὴ οἷον νεωτέρῳ βουλεύσασθαί τε καὶ ὀξέως μεταχειρίσαι. 6.16.2. οἱ γὰρ Ἕλληνες καὶ ὑπὲρ δύναμιν μείζω ἡμῶν τὴν πόλιν ἐνόμισαν τῷ ἐμῷ διαπρεπεῖ τῆς Ὀλυμπίαζε θεωρίας, πρότερον ἐλπίζοντες αὐτὴν καταπεπολεμῆσθαι, διότι ἅρματα μὲν ἑπτὰ καθῆκα, ὅσα οὐδείς πω ἰδιώτης πρότερον, ἐνίκησα δὲ καὶ δεύτερος καὶ τέταρτος ἐγενόμην καὶ τἆλλα ἀξίως τῆς νίκης παρεσκευασάμην. νόμῳ μὲν γὰρ τιμὴ τὰ τοιαῦτα, ἐκ δὲ τοῦ δρωμένου καὶ δύναμις ἅμα ὑπονοεῖται. 6.16.3. καὶ ὅσα αὖ ἐν τῇ πόλει χορηγίαις ἢ ἄλλῳ τῳ λαμπρύνομαι, τοῖς μὲν ἀστοῖς φθονεῖται φύσει, πρὸς δὲ τοὺς ξένους καὶ αὕτη ἰσχὺς φαίνεται. καὶ οὐκ ἄχρηστος ἥδ’ ἡ ἄνοια, ὃς ἂν τοῖς ἰδίοις τέλεσι μὴ ἑαυτὸν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ τὴν πόλιν ὠφελῇ. 6.12.2. And if there be any man here, overjoyed at being chosen to command, who urges you to make the expedition, merely for ends of his own—especially if he be still too young to command—who seeks to be admired for his stud of horses, but on account of its heavy expenses hopes for some profit from his appointment, do not allow such an one to maintain his private splendour at his country's risk, but remember that such persons injure the public fortune while they squander their own, and that this is a matter of importance, and not for a young man to decide or hastily to take in hand. 6.16.2. The Hellenes, after expecting to see our city ruined by the war, concluded it to be even greater than it really is, by reason of the magnificence with which I represented it at the Olympic games, when I sent into the lists seven chariots, a number never before entered by any private person, and won the first prize, and was second and fourth, and took care to have everything else in a style worthy of my victory. Custom regards such displays as honourable, and they cannot be made without leaving behind them an impression of power. 6.16.3. Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city:
13. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.1.40 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 169
14. Xenophon, Constitution of The Spartans, 13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
15. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
229c. ΣΩ. οὔκ, ἀλλὰ κάτωθεν ὅσον δύʼ ἢ τρία στάδια, ᾗ πρὸς τὸ ἐν Ἄγρας διαβαίνομεν· καὶ πού τίς ἐστι βωμὸς αὐτόθι Βορέου. ΦΑΙ. οὐ πάνυ νενόηκα· ἀλλʼ εἰπὲ πρὸς Διός, ὦ Σώκρατες, σὺ τοῦτο τὸ μυθολόγημα πείθῃ ἀληθὲς εἶναι; ΣΩ. ἀλλʼ εἰ ἀπιστοίην, ὥσπερ οἱ σοφοί, οὐκ ἂν ἄτοπος εἴην, εἶτα σοφιζόμενος φαίην αὐτὴν πνεῦμα Βορέου κατὰ τῶν πλησίον πετρῶν σὺν Φαρμακείᾳ παίζουσαν ὦσαι, καὶ οὕτω δὴ τελευτήσασαν λεχθῆναι ὑπὸ τοῦ Βορέου ἀνάρπαστον 229c. Socrates. No, the place is about two or three furlongs farther down, where you cross over to the precinct of Agra ; and there is an altar of Boreas somewhere thereabouts. Phaedrus. I have never noticed it. But, for Heaven’s sake, Socrates, tell me; do you believe this tale is true? Socrates. If I disbelieved, as the wise men do, I should not be extraordinary; then I might give a rational explanation, that a blast of Boreas, the north wind, pushed her off the neighboring rocks as she was playing with Pharmacea, and
16. Herodotus, Histories, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 68
9.42. No one withstood this argument, and his opinion accordingly prevailed; for it was he and not Artabazus who was commander of the army by the king's commission. He therefore sent for the leaders of the battalions and the generals of those Greeks who were with him and asked them if they knew any oracle which prophesied that the Persians should perish in Hellas. ,Those who were summoned said nothing, some not knowing the prophecies, and some knowing them but thinking it perilous to speak, and then Mardonius himself said: “Since you either have no knowledge or are afraid to declare it, hear what I tell you based on the full knowledge that I have. ,There is an oracle that Persians are fated to come to Hellas and all perish there after they have plundered the temple at Delphi. Since we have knowledge of this same oracle, we will neither approach that temple nor attempt to plunder it; in so far as destruction hinges on that, none awaits us. ,Therefore, as many of you as wish the Persian well may rejoice in that we will overcome the Greeks.” Having spoken in this way, he gave command to have everything prepared and put in good order for the battle which would take place early the next morning.
17. Isocrates, Orations, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 153
18. Euripides, Hecuba, 518-80, 218-28 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
19. Euripides, Epigrams, 518-80, 218-28 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
20. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.192-19.193 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 161
21. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 12.1, 41.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 51
22. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 109 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
23. Callimachus, Iambi, 1-2, 4 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 183
24. Phylarchus of Athens, Fragments, None (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 111
25. Polybius, Histories, 5.9.10, 9.36.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 175
5.9.10. τοιγαροῦν οὐ μόνον ἐκρίθη παρʼ αὐτὸν τὸν καιρὸν εὐεργέτης, ἀλλὰ καὶ μεταλλάξας σωτήρ, οὐδὲ παρὰ μόνοις Λακεδαιμονίοις, ἀλλὰ παρὰ πᾶσι τοῖς Ἕλλησιν ἀθανάτου τέτευχε τιμῆς καὶ δόξης ἐπὶ 9.36.5. ἀνθʼ ὧν ὑμεῖς ἐν ταῖς κοιναῖς πανηγύρεσι μάρτυρας ποιησάμενοι τοὺς Ἕλληνας εὐεργέτην ἑαυτῶν καὶ σωτῆρα τὸν Ἀντίγονον ἀνεκηρύξατε. 5.9.10.  Not only therefore was he regarded as their benefactor at the time but after his death he was venerated as their preserver, and it was not in Sparta alone but throughout Greece that he received undying honour and glory in acknowledgement of this conduct. 9.36.5.  And in return for this you proclaimed Antigonus at public festivals in the hearing of all Greece to be your saviour and benefactor.
26. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 168, 169
27. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 276, 48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 205
48. I have now then explained the character of the first triad of those who desire virtue. There is also another more important company of which we must now proceed to speak, for the former resembles those branches of instruction which are allotted to the age of childhood, but this resembles rather the gymnastic exercises of athletic men, who are really preparing themselves for the sacred contests, who, despising all care of getting their body into proper condition, labour to bring about a healthy state of the soul, being desirous of that victory which is to be gained over the adverse passions.
28. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 182
22. It is worth while also to consider the wickedness into which a man who flies from the face of God is driven, since it is called a tempest. The law-giver showing, by this expression, that he who gives way to inconsiderate impulses without any stability or firmness exposes himself to surf and violent tossing, like those of the sea, when it is agitated in the winter season by contrary winds, and has never even a single glimpse of calm or tranquillity. But as when a ship having been tossed in the sea is agitated, it is then no longer fit to take a voyage or to anchor in harbour, but being tossed about hither and thither it leans first to one side and then to the other, and struggles in vain against the waves; so the wicked man, yielding to a perverse and insane disposition, and being unable to regulate his voyage through life without disaster, is constantly tossed about in perpetual expectation of an overturning of his life.
29. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 9.2.5, 15.49.1, 16.55.1, 16.60.2, 16.92.2, 16.92.4, 17.16.3-17.16.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 160, 161; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 274; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 89
9.2.5.  Solon believed that the boxers and short-distance runners and all other athletes contributed nothing worth mentioning to the safety of states, but that only men who excel in prudence and virtue are able to protect their native lands in times of danger. 15.49.1.  In Ionia nine cities were in the habit of holding sacrifices of great antiquity on a large scale to Poseidon in a lonely region near the place called Mycalê. Later, however, as a result of the outbreak of wars in this neighbourhood, since they were unable to hold the Panionia there, they shifted the festival gathering to a safe place near Ephesus. Having sent an embassy to Delphi, they received an oracle telling them to take copies of the ancient ancestral altars at Helicê, which was situated in what was then known as Ionia, but is now known as Achaïa. 16.55.1.  After the capture of Olynthus, he celebrated the Olympian festival to the gods in commemoration of his victory, and offered magnificent sacrifices; and he organized a great festive assembly at which he held splendid competitions and thereafter invited many of the visiting strangers to his banquets. 16.60.2.  that all the cities of the Phocians were to be razed and the men moved to villages, no one of which should have more than fifty houses, and the villages were to be not less than a stade distant from one another; that the Phocians were to possess their territory and to pay each year to the god a tribute of sixty talents until they should have paid back the sums entered in the registers at the time of the pillaging of the sanctuary. Philip, furthermore, was to hold the Pythian games together with the Boeotians and Thessalians, since the Corinthians had shared with the Phocians in the sacrilege committed against the god. 16.92.2.  As this award was being announced by the herald, he ended with the declaration that if anyone plotted against King Philip and fled to Athens for refuge, he would be delivered up. The casual phrase seemed like an omen sent by Providence to let Philip know that a plot was coming. 16.92.4.  Philip was enchanted with the message and was completely occupied with the thought of the overthrow of the Persian king, for he remembered the Pythian oracle which bore the same meaning as the words quoted by the tragic actor. 17.16.3.  He then proceeded to show them where their advantage lay and by appeals aroused their enthusiasm for the contests which lay ahead. He made lavish sacrifices to the gods at Dium in Macedonia and held the dramatic contests in honour of Zeus and the Muses which Archelaüs, one of his predecessors, had instituted. 17.16.4.  He celebrated the festival for nine days, naming each day after one of the Muses. He erected a tent to hold a hundred couches and invited his Friends and officers, as well as the ambassadors from the cities, to the banquet. Employing great magnificence, he entertained great numbers in person besides distributing to his entire force sacrificial animals and all else suitable for the festive occasion, and put his army in a fine humour.
30. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 205
1.48. But while he was preparing to display the decision which he was about to pronounce, Moses was devoting himself to all the labours of virtue, having a teacher within himself, virtuous reason, by whom he had been trained to the most virtuous pursuits of life, and had learnt to apply himself to the contemplation and practice of virtue and to the continual study of the doctrines of philosophy, which he easily and thoroughly comprehended in his soul, and committed to memory in such a manner as never to forget them; and, moreover, he made all his own actions, which were intrinsically praiseworthy, to harmonise with them, desiring not to seem wise and good, but in truth and reality to be so, because he made the right reason of nature his only aim; which is, in fact, the only first principle and fountain of all the virtues.
31. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 205
32. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.234 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 182
33. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, 109 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games, Found in books: Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 392
109. and the other said with great fortitude, "Beat Aristarchus's skin, for you cannot beat Aristarchus himself." These instances of brave fortitude, wholly full of daring, exceed in no slight degree the nobleness of those heroes, because the one class have a glory handed down to them by their ancestors without any actions of their own, while the fame of the others is founded on deeds of virtue deliberately performed, which very naturally make immortal those who practise them in a guileless spirit. XVII.
34. Strabo, Geography, 8.3.12, 9.4.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •agon, olympic games •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212; Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 107
8.3.12. After Chelonatas comes the long seashore of the Pisatans; and then Cape Pheia. And there was also a small town called Pheia: beside the walls of Pheia, about the streams of Iardanus, for there is also a small river nearby. According to some, Pheia is the beginning of Pisatis. off Pheia lie a little island and a harbor, from which the nearest distance from the sea to Olympia is one hundred and twenty stadia. Then comes another cape, Ichthys, which, like Chelonatas, projects for a considerable distance towards the west; and from it the distance to Cephallenia is again one hundred and twenty stadia. Then comes the mouth of the Alpheius, which is distant two hundred and eighty stadia from Chelonatas, and five hundred and forty five from Araxus. It flows from the same regions as the Eurotas, that is, from a place called Asea, a village in the territory of Megalopolis, where there are two springs near one another from which the rivers in question flow. They sink and flow beneath the earth for many stadia and then rise again; and then they flow down, one into Laconia and the other into Pisatis. The stream of the Eurotas reappears where the district called Bleminatis begins, and then flows past Sparta itself, traverses a long glen near Helus (a place mentioned by the poet), and empties between Gythium, the naval station of Sparta, and Acraea. But the Alpheius, after receiving the waters of the Ladon, the Erymanthus, and other rivers of less significance, flows through Phrixa, Pisatis, and Triphylia past Olympia itself to the Sicilian Sea, into which it empties between Pheia and Epitalium. Near the outlet of the river is the sacred precinct of Artemis Alpheionia or Alpheiusa (for the epithet is spelled both ways), which is about eighty stadia distant from Olympia. An annual festival is also celebrated at Olympia in honor of this goddess as well as in honor of Artemis Elaphia and Artemis Daphnia. The whole country is full of sanctuaries of Artemis, Aphrodite, and the Nymphs, being situated in sacred precincts that are generally full of flowers because of the abundance of water. And there are also numerous shrines of Hermes on the roads, and sanctuaries of Poseidon on the shores. In the sanctuary of Artemis Alpheionia are very famous paintings by two Corinthians, Cleanthes and Aregon: by Cleanthes the Capture of Troy and the Birth of Athene, and by Aregon the Artemis Borne Aloft on a Griffin. 9.4.16. It was at these Narrows that Leonidas and his men, with a few who came from the neighborhood thereof, held out against all those forces of the Persians, until the barbarians, coming around the mountains through by-paths, cut them down. And today their Polyandrium is to be seen, and pillars, and the oft-quoted inscription on the pillar of the Lacedemonians, which is as follows: Stranger, report to the Lacedemonians that we lie here in obedience to their laws.
35. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 166, 168
36. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder of olympic games Found in books: Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 96
37. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 15.264-15.271 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 17
15.264. but when the city was taken, and Herod had gotten the government into his own hands, and Costobarus was appointed to hinder men from passing out at the gates, and to guard the city, that those citizens that were guilty, and of the party opposite to the king, might not get out of it, Costobarus, being sensible that the sons of Babas were had in respect and honor by the whole multitude, and supposing that their preservation might be of great advantage to him in the changes of government afterward, he set them by themselves, and concealed them in his own farms; 15.265. and when the thing was suspected, he assured Herod upon oath that he really knew nothing of that matter, and so overcame the suspicions that lay upon him; nay, after that, when the king had publicly proposed a reward for the discovery, and had put in practice all sorts of methods for searching out this matter, he would not confess it; but being persuaded that when he had at first denied it, if the men were found, he should not escape unpunished, he was forced to keep them secret, not only out of his good-will to them, but out of a necessary regard to his own preservation also. 15.266. But when the king knew the thing, by his sister’s information, he sent men to the places where he had the intimation they were concealed, and ordered both them, and those that were accused as guilty with them, to be slain, insomuch that there were now none at all left of the kindred of Hyrcanus, and the kingdom was entirely in Herod’s own power, and there was nobody remaining of such dignity as could put a stop to what he did against the Jewish laws. 15.267. 1. On this account it was that Herod revolted from the laws of his country, and corrupted their ancient constitution, by the introduction of foreign practices, which constitution yet ought to have been preserved inviolable; by which means we became guilty of great wickedness afterward, while those religious observances which used to lead the multitude to piety were now neglected; 15.268. for, in the first place, he appointed solemn games to be celebrated every fifth year, in honor of Caesar, and built a theater at Jerusalem, as also a very great amphitheater in the plain. Both of them were indeed costly works, but opposite to the Jewish customs; for we have had no such shows delivered down to us as fit to be used or exhibited by us; 15.269. yet did he celebrate these games every five years, in the most solemn and splendid manner. He also made proclamation to the neighboring countries, and called men together out of every nation. The wrestlers also, and the rest of those that strove for the prizes in such games, were invited out of every land, both by the hopes of the rewards there to be bestowed, and by the glory of victory to be there gained. So the principal persons that were the most eminent in these sorts of exercises were gotten together, 15.270. for there were very great rewards for victory proposed, not only to those that performed their exercises naked, but to those that played the musicians also, and were called Thymelici; and he spared no pains to induce all persons, the most famous for such exercises, to come to this contest for victory. 15.271. He also proposed no small rewards to those who ran for the prizes in chariot races, when they were drawn by two, or three, or four pair of horses. He also imitated every thing, though never so costly or magnificent, in other nations, out of an ambition that he might give most public demonstration of his grandeur.
38. Xenophon of Ephesus, The Ephesian Story of Anthica And Habrocomes, 1.2, 1.6, 2.2-2.3, 2.9, 3.1, 3.8, 3.10, 4.1, 5.1.4-5.1.9, 5.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 574
39. Plutarch, Theseus, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 388
40. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 1.11.1, 3.1.4 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 161
1.11.1. ταῦτα δὲ διαπραξάμενος ἐπανῆλθεν εἰς Μακεδονίαν· καὶ τῷ τε Διὶ τῷ Ὀλυμπίῳ τὴν θυσίαν τὴν ἀπʼ Ἀρχελάου ἔτι καθεστῶσαν ἔθυσε καὶ τὸν ἀγῶνα ἐν Αἰγαῖς διέθηκε τὰ Ὀλύμπια· οἱ δὲ καὶ ταῖς Μούσαις λέγουσιν ὅτι ἀγῶνα ἐποίησε. 3.1.4. ἐκεῖθεν δὲ διαβὰς τὸν πόρον ἧκεν ἐς Μέμφιν· καὶ θύει ἐκεῖ τοῖς τε ἄλλοις θεοῖς καὶ τῷ Ἄπιδι καὶ ἀγῶνα ἐποίησε γυμνικόν τε καὶ μουσικόν· ἧκον δὲ αὐτῷ οἱ ἀμφὶ ταῦτα τεχνῖται ἐκ τῆς Ἑλλάδος οἱ δοκιμώτατοι. ἐκ δὲ Μέμφιος κατέπλει κατὰ τὸν ποταμὸν ὡς ἐπὶ θάλασσαν τούς τε ὑπασπιστὰς ἐπὶ τῶν νεῶν λαβὼν καὶ τοὺς τοξότας καὶ τοὺς Ἀγριᾶνας καὶ τῶν ἱππέων τὴν βασιλικὴν ἴλην τὴν τῶν ἑταίρων.
41. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 9.5, 14.2, 19.2-19.4, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
9.5. ἐπεὶ δὲ κελεύσαντος αὐτοῦ τοὺς αἰχμαλώτους ἀποδύοντες ἐπίπρασκον οἱ λαφυροπῶλαι, καὶ τῆς μὲν ἐσθῆτος ἦσαν ὠνηταὶ πολλοί, τῶν δὲ σωμάτων λευκῶν καὶ ἁπαλῶν παντάπασι διὰ τὰς σκιατραφίας γυμνουμένων κατεγέλων ὡς ἀχρήστων καὶ μηδενὸς ἀξίων, ἐπιστὰς ὁ Ἀγησίλαος, οὗτοι μέν, εἶπεν, οἷς μάχεσθε, ταῦτα δὲ ὑπὲρ ὧν μάχεσθε. 14.2. πρός τε θάλπος οὕτω καὶ ψῦχος εἶχεν ὥσπερ μόνος ἀεὶ χρῆσθαι ταῖς ὑπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ κεκραμέναις ὥραις πεφυκώς. ἥδιστον δὲ θέαμα τοῖς κατοικοῦσι τὴν Ἀσίαν Ἕλλησιν ἦσαν οἱ πάλαι βαρεῖς καὶ ἀφόρητοι καὶ διαρρέοντες ὑπὸ πλούτου καὶ τρυφῆς ὕπαρχοι καὶ στρατηγοὶ δεδιότες καὶ θεραπεύοντες ἄνθρωπον ἐν τρίβωνι περιϊόντα λιτῷ, καὶ πρὸς ἓν ῥῆμα βραχὺ καὶ Λακωνικὸν ἁρμόζοντες ἑαυτοὺς καὶ μετασχηματίζοντες, ὥστε πολλοῖς ἐπῄει τὰ τοῦ Τιμοθέου λέγειν, Ἄρης τύραννος· χρυσὸν δὲ Ἕλλας οὐ δέδοικε. 19.2. πλησίον γὰρ ὁ νεώς ἐστιν ὁ τῆς Ἰτωνίας Ἀθηνᾶς, καὶ πρὸ αὐτοῦ τρόπαιον ἕστηκεν, ὃ πάλαι Βοιωτοὶ Σπάρτωνος στρατηγοῦντος ἐνταῦθα νικήσαντες Ἀθηναίους καὶ Τολμίδην ἀποκτείναντες ἔστησαν, ἅμα δʼ ἡμέρᾳ βουλόμενος ἐξελέγξαι τοὺς Θηβαίους ὁ Ἀγησίλαος, εἰ διαμαχοῦνται, στεφανοῦσθαι μὲν ἐκέλευσε τοὺς στρατιώτας, αὐλεῖν δὲ τοὺς αὐλητάς, ἱστάναι δὲ καὶ κοσμεῖν τρόπαιον ὡς νενικηκότας. 19.3. ὡς δὲ ἔπεμψαν οἱ πολέμιοι νεκρῶν ἀναίρεσιν αἰτοῦντες, ἐσπείσατο, καὶ τήν νίκην οὕτως ἐκβεβαιωσάμενος εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀπεκομίσθη, Πυθίων ἀγομένων, καὶ τήν τε πομπὴν ἐπετέλει τῷ θεῷ καὶ τήν δεκάτην ἀπέθυε τῶν ἐκ τῆς Ἀσίας λαφύρων ἑκατὸν ταλάντων γενομένην. 19.4. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἀπενόστησεν οἴκαδε, προσφιλὴς μὲν ἦν εὐθὺς τοῖς πολίταις καὶ περίβλεπτος ἀπὸ τοῦ βίου καὶ τῆς διαίτης· οὐ γάρ, ὥσπερ οἱ πλεῖστοι τῶν στρατηγῶν, καινὸς ἐπανῆλθεν ἀπὸ τῆς ξένης καὶ κεκινημένος ὑπʼ ἀλλοτρίων ἐθῶν, καὶ δυσκολαίνων πρὸς τὰ οἴκοι καὶ ζυγομαχῶν, ἀλλὰ ὁμοίως τοῖς μηδεπώποτε τὸν Εὐρώταν διαβεβηκόσι τὰ παρόντα τιμῶν καὶ στέργων 30.1. οὐ μὴν ἀλλὰ τοῖς πολλοῖς, ὡς ἀφίσταντο μὲν οἱ σύμμαχοι, προσεδοκᾶτο δὲ νενικηκὼς Ἐπαμεινώνδας καὶ μεγαλοφρονῶν ἐμβαλεῖν εἰς Πελοπόννησον, ἔννοια τῶν χρησμῶν ἐνέπεσε τότε, πρὸς τὴν χωλότητα τοῦ Ἀγησιλάου, καὶ δυσθυμία πολλὴ καὶ πτοία πρὸς τὸ θεῖον, ὡς διὰ τοῦτο πραττούσης κακῶς τῆς πόλεως, ὅτι τὸν ἀρτίποδα τῆς βασιλείας ἐκβαλόντες εἵλοντο χωλὸν καὶ πεπηρωμένον· ὃ παντὸς μᾶλλον αὐτοὺς ἐδίδασκε φράζεσθαι καὶ φυλάττεσθαι τὸ δαιμόνιον. 9.5. 14.2. 19.2. 19.3. 19.4. 30.1.
42. Suetonius, Domitianus, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder of olympic games Found in books: Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 96
43. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 135
13.3. ἦν δέ τις Ὑπέρβολος Περιθοίδης, οὗ μέμνηται μὲν ὡς ἀνθρώπου πονηροῦ καὶ Θουκυδίδης, τοῖς δὲ κωμικοῖς ὁμοῦ τι πᾶσι διατριβὴν ἀεὶ σκωπτόμενος ἐν τοῖς θεάτροις παρεῖχεν. ἄτρεπτος δὲ πρὸς τὸ κακῶς ἀκούειν καὶ ἀπαθὴς ὢν ὀλιγωρίᾳ δόξης, ἣν ἀναισχυντίαν καὶ ἀπόνοιαν οὖσαν εὐτολμίαν ἔνιοι καὶ ἀνδρείαν καλοῦσιν, οὐδενὶ μὲν ἤρεσκεν, ἐχρῆτο δʼ αὐτῷ πολλάκις ὁ δῆμος ἐπιθυμῶν προπηλακίζειν τοὺς ἐν ἀξιώματι καὶ συκοφαντεῖν. 13.3. Now there was a certain Hyperbolus, of the deme Perithoedae, whom Thucydides mentions Thuc. 8.73.3 as a base fellow, and who afforded all the comic poets, without any exception, constant material for jokes in their plays. But he was unmoved by abuse, and insensible to it, owing to his contempt of public opinion. This feeling some call courage and valor, but it is really mere shamelessness and folly. No one liked him, but the people often made use of him when they were eager to besmirch and calumniate men of rank and station.
44. Plutarch, Themistocles, 5.5, 15.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 347; Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
15.2. τοὺς δὲ παῖδας εἰς Κρήτην κομιζομένους ὁ μὲν τραγικώτατος μῦθος ἀποφαίνει τὸν Μινώταυρον ἐν τῷ Λαβυρίνθῳ διαφθείρειν, ἢ πλανωμένους αὐτοὺς καὶ τυχεῖν ἐξόδου μὴ δυναμένους ἐκεῖ καταθνήσκειν, τὸν δὲ Μινώταυρον, ὥσπερ Εὐριπίδης φησί, σύμμικτον εἶδος κἀποφώλιον βρέφος γεγονέναι, καὶ ταύρου μεμῖχθαι καὶ βροτοῦ διπλῇ φύσει. Nauck, 3Trag. Graec. Frag., p. 680.
45. Plutarch, Solon, 18.5, 23.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 89, 132; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 51
18.5. ἔτι μέντοι μᾶλλον οἰόμενος δεῖν ἐπαρκεῖν τῇ τῶν πολλῶν ἀσθενείᾳ, παντὶ λαβεῖν δίκην ὑπὲρ τοῦ κακῶς πεπονθότος ἔδωκε. καὶ γὰρ πληγέντος ἑτέρου καὶ βιασθέντος ἢ βλαβέντος ἐξῆν τῷ δυναμένῳ καὶ βουλομένῳ γράφεσθαι τὸν ἀδικοῦντα καὶ διώκειν, ὀρθῶς ἐθίζοντος τοῦ νομοθέτου τοὺς πολίτας ὥσπερ ἑνὸς μέρη σώματος μέρη σώματος (or σώματος μέρη ) Coraës and Bekker, after Xylander: ἑνὸς μέρους .συναισθάνεσθαι καὶ συναλγεῖν ἀλλήλοις. τούτῳ δὲ τῷ νόμῳ συμφωνοῦντα λόγον αὐτοῦ διαμνημονεύουσιν. ἐρωτηθεὶς γάρ, ὡς ἔοικεν, ἥτις οἰκεῖται κάλλιστα τῶν πόλεων, ἐκείνη, εἶπεν, ἐν ᾗ τῶν ἀδικουμένων οὐχ ἧττον οἱ μὴ ἀδικούμενοι προβάλλονται καὶ κολάζουσι τοὺς ἀδικοῦντας. 23.3. εἰς μέν γε τὰ τιμήματα τῶν θυσιῶν λογίζεται πρόβατον καὶ δραχμὴν ἀντὶ μεδίμνου· τῷ δʼ Ἴσθμια νικήσαντι δραχμὰς ἔταξεν ἑκατὸν δίδοσθαι, τῷ δʼ Ὀλύμπια πεντακοσίας· λύκον δὲ τῷ κομίσαντι πέντε δραχμὰς ἔδωκε, λυκιδέα δὲ μίαν, ὧν φησιν ὁ Φαληρεὺς Δημήτριος τὸ μὲν βοὸς εἶναι, τὸ δὲ προβάτου τιμήν. ἃς γὰρ ἐν τῷ ἑκκαιδεκάτῳ τῶν ἀξόνων ὁρίζει τιμὰς τῶν ἐκκρίτων ἱερείων, εἰκὸς μὲν εἶναι πολλαπλασίας, ἄλλως δὲ κἀκεῖναι πρὸς τὰς νῦν εὐτελεῖς εἰσιν. 18.5. Moreover, thinking it his duty to make still further provision for the weakness of the multitude, he gave every citizen the privilege of entering suit in behalf of one who had suffered wrong. If a man was assaulted, and suffered violence or injury, it was the privilege of any one who had the ability and the inclination, to indict the wrong-doer and prosecute him. The law-giver in this way rightly accustomed the citizens, as members of one body, to feel and sympathize with one another’s wrongs. And we are told of a saying of his which is consot with this law. Being asked, namely, what city was best to live in, That city he replied, in which those who are not wronged, no less than those who are wronged, exert themselves to punish the wrongdoers. 23.3. In the valuations of sacrificial offerings, at any rate, a sheep and a bushel of grain are reckoned at a drachma; the victor in the Isthmian games was to be paid a hundred drachmas, and the Olympic victor five hundred; the man who brought in a wolf, was given five drachmas, and for a wolf’s whelp, one; the former sum, according to Demetrius the Phalerian, was the price of an ox, the latter that of a sheep. For although the prices which Solon fixes in his sixteenth table are for choice victims, and naturally many times as great as those for ordinary ones, still, even these are low in comparison with present prices.
46. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 78
47. Plutarch, Greek Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 78
48. Plutarch, Moralia, 867 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
49. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 12.4, 12.33, 53.1 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic •religious practices, olympic games Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 1; Segev (2017), Aristotle on Religion, 67
12.4.  nay, not even the swan do they greet on account of its music, not even when in the fullness of years it sings its last song, and through joy, and because it has forgotten the troubles of life, utters its triumphant notes and at the same time without sorrow conducts itself, as it seems, to a sorrowless death — even then, I say, the birds are not so charmed by its strains that they gather on some river's bank or on a broad mead or the clean strand of a mere, or on some tiny green islet in a river. 12.33.  So it is very much the same as if anyone were to place a man, a Greek or a barbarian, in some mystic shrine of extraordinary beauty and size to be initiated, where he would see many mystic sights and hear many mystic voices, where light and darkness would appear to him alternately, and a thousand other things would occur; and further, if it should be just as in the rite called enthronement, where the inducting priests are wont to seat the novices and then dance round and round them — pray, is it likely that the man in this situation would be no whit moved in his mind and would not suspect that all which was taking place was the result of a more than wise intention and preparation, even if he belonged to the most remote and nameless barbarians and had no guide and interpreter at his side — provided, of course, that he had the mind of a human being? 53.1. Democritus expresses his opinion of Homer in these words: "Homer, having been blessed with a divinely inspired genius, fashioned an 'ornament of verses' of every kind," thus indicating his belief that without a divine and superhuman nature it is impossible to produce verses of such beauty and wisdom. Many others too have written on this subject, some expressly lauding the poet and at the same time pointing out some of his wise sayings, while others have busied themselves with interpreting the thought itself, this group including not merely Aristarchus and Crates and several others of those who later were called grammarians but formerly critics. In fact Aristotle himself, with whom they say that literary interpretation and criticism began, treats of the poet in many dialogues, admiring him in general and paying him honour, as does also Heracleides of Pontus.
50. Plutarch, Agis And Cleomenes, 287.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
51. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 4.3, 5.4, 7.5, 22.5-22.6, 23.3-23.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
4.3. ἀπὸ δὲ τῆς Κρήτης ὁ Λυκοῦργος ἐπὶ Ἀσίαν ἔπλευσε, βουλόμενος, ὡς λέγεται, ταῖς Κρητικαῖς διαίταις, εὐτελέσιν οὔσαις καὶ αὐστηραῖς, τὰς Ἰωνικὰς πολυτελείας καὶ τρυφάς, ὥσπερ ἰατρὸς σώμασιν ὑγιεινοῖς ὕπουλα καὶ νοσώδη, παραβαλὼν ἀποθεωρῆσαι τὴν διαφορὰν τῶν βίων καὶ τῶν πολιτειῶν. 5.4. ἐπαρθεὶς δὲ τούτοις προσήγετο προσήγετο Cobet: προσῆγε.τοὺς ἀρίστους καὶ συνεφάπτεσθαι παρεκάλει, κρύφα διαλεγόμενος τοῖς φίλοις πρῶτον, εἶτα οὕτως κατὰ μικρὸν ἁπτόμενος πλειόνων καὶ συνιστὰς ἐπὶ τὴν πρᾶξιν. ὡς δ’ ὁ καιρὸς ἧκε, τριάκοντα τοὺς πρώτους ἐκέλευσε μετὰ τῶν ὅπλων ἕωθεν εἰς ἀγορὰν προελθεῖν ἐκπλήξεως ἕνεκα καὶ φόβου πρὸς τοὺς ἀντιπράττοντας. ὧν εἴκοσι τοὺς ἐπιφανεστάτους Ἕρμιππος ἀνέγραψε· τὸν δὲ μάλιστα τῶν Λυκούργου ἔργων κοινωνήσαντα πάντων καὶ συμπραγματευσάμενον τὰ περὶ τοὺς νόμους Ἀρθμιάδαν ὀνομάζουσιν. 22.5. τρεψάμενοι δὲ καὶ νικήσαντες ἐδίωκον ὅσον ἐκβεβαιώσασθαι τὸ νίκημα τῇ φυγῇ τῶν πολεμίων, εἶτα εὐθὺς ἀνεχώρουν, οὔτε γενναῖον οὔτε Ἑλληνικὸν ἡγούμενοι κόπτειν καὶ φονεύειν ἀπολεγομένους καὶ παρακεχωρηκότας. ἦν δὲ οὐ μόνον καλὸν τοῦτο καὶ μεγαλόψυχον, ἀλλὰ καὶ χρήσιμον. εἰδότες γὰρ οἱ μαχόμενοι πρὸς αὐτοὺς ὅτι τοὺς ὑφισταμένους ἀναιροῦσι, φείδονται δὲ τῶν ἐνδιδόντων, τοῦ μένειν τὸ φεύγειν ἡγοῦντο λυσιτελέστερον. 4.3. From Crete, Lycurgus sailed to Asia, with the desire, as we are told, of comparing with the Cretan civilization, which was simple and severe, that of the Ionians, which was extravagant and luxurious, just as a physician compares with healthy bodies those which are unsound and sickly; he could then study the difference in their modes of life and forms of government. 5.4. Thus encouraged, he tried to bring the chief men of Sparta over to his side, and exhorted them to put their hands to the work with him, explaining his designs secretly to his friends at first, then little by little engaging more and uniting them to attempt the task. And when the time for action came, he ordered thirty of the chief men to go armed into the market-place at break of day, to strike consternation and terror into those of the opposite party. The names of twenty of the most eminent among them have been recorded by Hermippus; but the man who had the largest share in all the undertakings of Lycurgus and cooperated with him in the enactment of his laws, bore the name of Arthmiadas. 22.5. When they had conquered and routed an enemy, they pursued him far enough to make their victory secure by his flight, and then at once retired, thinking it ignoble and unworthy of a Hellene to hew men to pieces who had given up the fight and abandoned the field. And this was not only a noble and magimous policy, but it was also useful. For their antagonists, knowing that they slew those who resisted them, but showed mercy to those who yielded to them, were apt to think flight more advantageous than resistance.
52. Plutarch, Lysander, 8.4-8.5, 11.13, 12.1, 19.3, 20.6-20.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
8.4. ἐκέλευε γάρ, ὥς φησι, τοὺς μὲν παῖδας ἀστραγάλοις, τοὺς δὲ ἄνδρας ὅρκοις ἐξαπατᾶν, ἀπομιμούμενος Πολυκράτη τὸν Σάμιον, οὐκ ὀρθῶς τύραννον στρατηγός, οὐδὲ Λακωνικὸν τὸ χρῆσθαι τοῖς θεοῖς ὥσπερ τοῖς πολεμίοις, μᾶλλον δὲ ὑβριστικώτερον. ὁ γὰρ ὅρκῳ παρακρουόμενος τὸν μὲν ἐχθρὸν ὁμολογεῖ δεδιέναι, τοῦ δὲ θεοῦ καταφρονεῖν. 12.1. ἦσαν δέ τινες οἱ τοὺς Διοσκούρους ἐπὶ τῆς Λυσάνδρου νεὼς ἑκατέρωθεν, ὅτε τοῦ λιμένος ἐξέπλει πρῶτον ἐπὶ τοὺς πολεμίους, ἄστρα τοῖς οἴαξιν ἐπιλάμψαι λέγοντες. οἱ δὲ καὶ τὴν τοῦ λίθου πτῶσιν ἐπὶ τῷ πάθει τούτῳ σημεῖόν φασι γενέσθαι· κατηνέχθη γάρ, ὡς ἡ δόξα τῶν πολλῶν, ἐξ οὐρανοῦ παμμεγέθης λίθος εἰς Αἰγὸς ποταμούς. καὶ δείκνυται μὲν ἔτι νῦν, 19.3. ἦν δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων ἐν ταῖς πόλεσι δημοτικῶν φόνος οὐκ ἀριθμητός, ἅτε δὴ μὴ κατʼ ἰδίας μόνον αἰτίας αὐτοῦ κτείνοντος, ἀλλὰ πολλαῖς μὲν ἔχθραις, πολλαῖς δὲ πλεονεξίαις τῶν ἑκασταχόθι φίλων χαριζομένου τὰ τοιαῦτα καὶ συνεργοῦντος. ὅθεν εὐδοκίμησεν Ἐτεοκλῆς ὁ Λακεδαιμόνιος εἰπὼν ὡς οὐκ ἂν ἡ Ἑλλὰς δύο Λυσάνδρους ἤνεγκε. τὸ δὲ αὐτὸ τοῦτο καὶ περὶ Ἀλκιβιάδου φησὶ Θεόφραστος εἰπεῖν Ἀρχέστρατον. 20.6. τοῖς δὲ πλείστοις ἐδόκει πρόσχημα ποιεῖσθαι τὸν θεόν, ἄλλως δὲ τοὺς ἐφόρους δεδοικὼς καὶ τὸν οἴκοι ζυγὸν οὐ φέρων οὐδʼ ὑπομένων ἄρχεσθαι πλάνης ὀρέγεσθαι καὶ περιφοιτήσεως τινός, ὥσπερ ἵππος ἐκ νομῆς ἀφέτου καὶ λειμῶνος αὖθις ἥκων ἐπὶ φάτνην καὶ πρὸς τὸ σύνηθες ἔργον αὖθις ἀγόμενος. ἣν μὲν γὰρ Ἔφορος τῆς ἀποδημίας ταύτης αἰτίαν ἀναγράφει, μετὰ μικρὸν ἀφηγήσομαι. 8.4. 12.1. 19.3. 20.6.
53. Plutarch, On The Proverbs of Alexander, 178 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games, truce Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 369
54. Plutarch, Comparison of Pompey With Agesilaus, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 117
1.2. Ἀγησίλαος δὲ τὴν βασιλείαν ἔδοξε λαβεῖν οὔτε τὰ πρὸς θεοὺς ἄμεμπτος οὔτε τὰ πρὸς ἀνθρώπους, κρίνας νοθείας Λεωτυχίδην, ὃν υἱὸν αὑτοῦ αὑτοῦ bracketed by Sintenis. ἀπέδειξεν ἀδελφὸς γνήσιον, τὸν δὲ χρησμὸν κατειρωνευσάμενος τὸν περὶ τῆς χωλότητος. δεύτερον, ὅτι Πομπήϊος Σύλλαν καὶ ζῶντα τιμῶν διετέλεσε καὶ τεθνηκότος ἐκήδευσε βιασάμενος Λέπιδον τὸ σῶμα, καὶ τῷ παιδὶ Φαύστῳ τὴν αὑτοῦ θυγατέρα συνῴκισεν, Ἀγησίλαος δὲ Λύσανδρον ἐκ τῆς τυχούσης προφάσεως ὑπεξέρριψε καὶ καθύβρισε. 1.2.
55. Plutarch, Aristides, 11.3-11.8, 20.4-20.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, olympic games Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 120
11.3. Ἀριστείδου δὲ πέμψαντος εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀνεῖλεν ὁ θεὸς Ἀθηναίους καθυπερτέρους ἔσεσθαι τῶν ἐναντίων εὐχομένους τῷ Διῒ καὶ τῇ Ἥρα τῇ Κιθαιρωνίᾳ καὶ Πανὶ καὶ νύμφαις Σφραγίτισι, καὶ θύοντας ἥρωσιν Ἀνδροκράτει, Λεύκωνι, Πεισάνδρῳ, Δαμοκράτει, Ὑψίωνι, Ἀκταίωνι, Πολϋΐδῳ, καὶ τὸν κίνδυνον ἐν γᾷ ἰδίᾳ ποιουμένους ἐν τῷ πεδίῳ τᾶς Δάματρος τᾶς Ἐλευσινίας καὶ τᾶς Κόρας. 11.4. οὗτος ὁ χρησμὸς ἀνενεχθεὶς ἀπορίαν τῷ Ἀριστείδῃ παρεῖχεν. οἱ μὲν γὰρ ἥρωες, οἷς ἐκέλευε θύειν, ἀρχηγέται Πλαταιέων ἦσαν, καὶ τὸ τῶν Σφραγιτίδων νυμφῶν ἄντρον ἐν μιᾷ κορυφῇ τοῦ Κιθαιρῶνός ἐστιν, εἰς δυσμὰς ἡλίου θερινὰς τετραμμένον, ἐν ᾧ καὶ μαντεῖον ἦν πρότερον, ὥς φασι, καὶ πολλοὶ κατείχοντο τῶν ἐπιχωρίων, οὓς νυμφολήπτους προσηγόρευον. 11.5. τὸ δὲ τῆς Ἐλευσινίας Δήμητρος πεδίον, καὶ τὸ τὴν μάχην ἐν ἰδίᾳ χώρᾳ ποιουμένοις τοῖς Ἀθηναίοις νίκην δίδοσθαι, πάλιν εἰς τὴν Ἀττικὴν ἀνεκαλεῖτο καὶ μεθίστη τὸν πόλεμον. ἔνθα τῶν Πλαταιέων ὁ στρατηγὸς Ἀρίμνηστος ἔδοξε κατὰ τοὺς ὕπνους ὑπὸ τοῦ Διὸς τοῦ Σωτῆρος ἐπερωτώμενον αὑτόν, ὅ τι δὴ πράττειν δέδοκται τοῖς Ἕλλησιν, εἰπεῖν, αὔριον εἰς Ἐλευσῖνα τὴν στρατιὰν ἀπάξομεν, ὦ δέσποτα, καὶ διαμαχούμεθα τοῖς βαρβάροις ἐκεῖ κατὰ τὸ πυθόχρηστον. 11.6. τὸν οὖν θεὸν φάναι διαμαρτάνειν αὐτοὺς τοῦ παντός· αὐτόθι γὰρ εἶναι περὶ τὴν Πλαταϊκὴν τὰ πυθόχρηστα καὶ ζητοῦντας ἀνευρήσειν. τούτων ἐναργῶς τῷ Ἀριμνήστῳ φανέντων ἐξεγρόμενος τάχιστα μετεπέμψατο τοὺς ἐμπειροτάτους καὶ πρεσβυτάτους τῶν πολιτῶν, μεθʼ ὧν διαλεγόμενος καὶ συνδιαπορῶν εὗρεν, ὅτι τῶν Ὑσιῶν πλησίον ὑπὸ τὸν Κιθαιρῶνα ναός ἐστιν ἀρχαῖος πάνυ πάνυ omitted by Bekker, now found in S. Δήμητρος Ἐλευσινίας καὶ Κόρης προσαγορευόμενος. 11.7. εὐθὺς οὖν παραλαβὼν τὸν Ἀριστείδην ἦγεν ἐπὶ τὸν τόπον, εὐφυέστατον ὄντα παρατάξαι φάλαγγα πεζικὴν ἱπποκρατουμένοις, διὰ τὰς ὑπωρείας τοῦ Κιθαιρῶνος ἄφιππα ποιούσας τὰ καταλήγοντα καὶ συγκυροῦντα τοῦ πεδίου πρὸς τὸ ἱερόν. αὐτοῦ δʼ ἦν καὶ τὸ τοῦ Ἀνδροκράτους ἡρῷον ἐγγύς, ἄλσει πυκνῶν καὶ συσκίων δένδρων περιεχόμενον. 11.8. ὅπως δὲ μηδὲν ἐλλιπὲς ἔχῃ πρὸς τὴν ἐλπίδα τῆς νίκης ὁ χρησμός, ἔδοξε τοῖς Πλαταιεῦσιν, Ἀριμνήστου γνώμην εἰπόντος, ἀνελεῖν τὰ πρὸς τὴν Ἀττικὴν ὅρια τῆς Πλαταιΐδος καὶ τὴν χώραν ἐπιδοῦναι τοῖς Ἀθηναίοις ὑπὲρ τῆς Ἑλλάδος ἐν οἰκείᾳ κατὰ τὸν χρησμὸν ἐναγωνίσασθαι. 20.4. περὶ δὲ θυσίας ἐρομένοις αὐτοῖς ἀνεῖλεν ὁ Πύθιος Διὸς ἐλευθερίου βωμὸν ἱδρύσασθαι, θῦσαι δὲ μὴ πρότερον ἢ τὸ κατὰ τὴν χώραν πῦρ ἀποσβέσαντας ὡς ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων μεμιασμένον ἐναύσασθαι καθαρὸν ἐκ Δελφῶν ἀπὸ τῆς κοινῆς ἑστίας. οἱ μὲν οὖν ἄρχοντες τῶν Ἑλλήνων περιιόντες εὐθὺς ἠνάγκαζον ἀποσβεννύναι τὰ πυρὰ πάντα τοὺς χρωμένους, ἐκ δὲ Πλαταιέων Εὐχίδας ὑποσχόμενος ὡς ἐνδέχεται τάχιστα κομιεῖν τὸ παρὰ τοῦ θεοῦ πῦρ ἧκεν εἰς Δελφούς. 20.5. ἁγνίσας δὲ τὸ σῶμα καὶ περιρρανάμενος ἐστεφανώσατο δάφνῃ· καὶ λαβὼν ἀπὸ τοῦ βωμοῦ τὸ πῦρ δρόμῳ πάλιν εἰς τὰς Πλαταιὰς ἐχώρει καὶ πρὸ ἡλίου δυσμῶν ἐπανῆλθε, τῆς αὐτῆς ἡμέρας χιλίους σταδίους κατανύσας. ἀσπασάμενος δὲ τοὺς πολίτας καὶ τὸ πῦρ παραδοὺς εὐθὺς ἔπεσε καὶ μετὰ μικρὸν ἐξέπνευσεν. ἀγάμενοι δʼ αὐτὸν οἱ Πλαταιεῖς ἔθαψαν ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ τῆς Εὐκλείας Ἀρτέμιδος, ἐπιγράψαντες τόδε τὸ τετράμετρον· 11.3. 11.4. 11.5. 11.6. 11.7. 11.8. 20.4. 20.5.
56. Plutarch, On Superstition, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 304
57. Philostratus The Athenian, On Athletic Training, 3, 52, 45 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 172
45. τὸ δὲ οὕτω τρυφᾷν δριμὺ μὲν καὶ ἐς ἀφροδισίων ὁρμήν, ἦρξε δὲ ἀθληταῖς καὶ τῆς ὑπὲρ χρημάτων παρανομίας καὶ τοῦ πωλεῖν τε καὶ ὠνεῖσθαι τὰς νίκας: οἱ μὲν γὰρ καὶ ἀποδίδονται τὴν ἑαυτῶν εὔκλειαν, δἰ οἶμαι, τὸ πολλῶν δεῖσθαι, οἱ δὲ ὠνοῦνται τὸ μὴ ξὺν πόνῳ νικᾷν διὰ τὸ ἁβρῶς διαιτᾶσθαι. καὶ ἀργυροῦν: μὲν ἢ χρυσοῦν περισπῶντι ἀνάθημα ἢ διαφθείροντι ὀργὴν οἱ νόμοι ὡς ἐνόχῳ ἱεροσυλίᾳ ὄντι ̔φαίνουσἰ, στέφος δὲ ̓Απόλλωνος ἢ Ποσειδῶνος, ὑπὲρ οὗ καὶ αὐτοὶ οἱ θεοὶ μέγα ἤθλησαν, ἄδεια μὲν ἀποδίδοσθαι, ἄδεια δὲ ὠνεῖσθαι, πλὴν ὅσα ̓Ηλείοις ὁ κότινος ἄσυλος μένει κατὰ τὴν ἐκ παλαιοῦ δόξαν, οἱ δὲ ἄλλοι τῶν ἀγώνων ἐπηρώθησαν: ἓν ἐκ πολλῶν εἰρήσθω μοι, ἐν ᾧ πάντα: παῖς ἐνίκα πάλην ̓́Ισθμια τρισχιλίας ἑνὶ τῶν ἀντιπάλων ὁμολογήσας ὑπὲρ τῆς νίκης. ἥκοντες οὖν τῆς ὑστεραίας ἐς τὸ γυμνάσιον ὁ μὲν ἀπῄτει τὰ χρήματα, ὁ δὲ οὐκ ὀφείλειν ἔφη, κεκρατηκέναι γὰρ δὴ ἄκοντος. ὡς δὲ οὐδὲν ἐπέραινεν, ὅρκῳ ἐπιτρέπουσι καὶ παρελθὼν ἐς τὸ τοῦ ̓Ισθμίου ἱερὸν ὤμνυε δημοσίᾳ καὶ ταῦτα κατ' ὀφθαλμοὺς τῆς ̔Ελλάδος ὁ τὴν νίκην ἀποδόμενος ἦ μὴν πεπρακέναι τοῦ θεοῦ τὸν ἀγῶνα, τρισχιλίας γὰρ ὡμολογῆσθαί οἱ, καὶ ὤμνυε ταῦτα λαμπρᾷ τῇ φωνῇ, μὴ δή τι ἀσαφὲς εἴη δείσας. τί μὲν οὐκ ἂν ἐν ̓Ιωνίᾳ, τί δὲ οὐκ ἂν ἐν ̓Ολυμπίᾳ γένοιτο ἐπ' αἰσχύνῃ ̔τοιαύτᾐ ἀγῶνος; ὅσῳ γὰρ ἀληθεστέρα, εἰ οὐδ' ἄνευ μαρτύρων, τοσῷδε ἀνιερωτέρα καὶ ἐπιρρητοτέρα. οὐκ ἀφίημι τοὺς γυμναστὰς καὶ ἀθλητὰς ἐπὶ τῇ διαφθορᾷ ταύτῃ, πάρεισι μὲν γὰρ μετὰ χρημάτων ἐπὶ τὸ γυμνάζειν, καὶ δανείζοντες τοῖς ἀθληταῖς ἐπὶ τόκοις μείζοσιν ἢ ὧν ἔμποροι θαλαττεύοντες ̔δανείζονταἰ, τῆς μὲν τῶν ἀθλητῶν δόξης ἐπιστρέφονται οὐδέν, τοῦ δὲ πωλεῖν τε καὶ ὠνεῖσθαι ξύμβουλοι γίγνονταί σφισι προνοοῦντες τοῦ ἑαυτῶν κέρδους. καὶ ταυτὶ μὲν κατὰ καπηλευόντων εἰρήσθω μοι, καπηλεύουσι γάρ που τὰς
58. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 15 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
59. Tertullian, On The Games, 11, 13, 8, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 157
10. Let us pass on now to theatrical exhibitions, which we have already shown have a common origin with the circus, and bear like idolatrous designations - even as from the first they have borne the name of Ludi, and equally minister to idols. They resemble each other also in their pomp, having the same procession to the scene of their display from temples and altars, and that mournful profusion of incense and blood, with music of pipes and trumpets, all under the direction of the soothsayer and the undertaker, those two foul masters of funeral rites and sacrifices. So as we went on from the origin of the Ludi to the circus games, we shall now direct our course thence to those of the theatre, beginning with the place of exhibition. At first the theatre was properly a temple of Venus; and, to speak briefly, it was owing to this that stage performances were allowed to escape censure, and got a footing in the world. For ofttimes the censors, in the interests of morality, put down above all the rising theatres, foreseeing, as they did, that there was great danger of their leading to a general profligacy; so that already, from this accordance of their own people with us, there is a witness to the heathen, and in the anticipatory judgment of human knowledge even a confirmation of our views. Accordingly Pompey the Great, less only than his theatre, when he had erected that citadel of all impurities, fearing some time or other censorian condemnation of his memory, superposed on it a temple of Venus; and summoning by public proclamation the people to its consecration, he called it not a theatre, but a temple, under which, said he, we have placed tiers of seats for viewing the shows. So he threw a veil over a structure on which condemnation had been often passed, and which is ever to be held in reprobation, by pretending that it was a sacred place; and by means of superstition he blinded the eyes of a virtuous discipline. But Venus and Bacchus are close allies. These two evil spirits are in sworn confederacy with each other, as the patrons of drunkenness and lust. So the theatre of Venus is as well the house of Bacchus: for they properly gave the name of Liberalia also to other theatrical amusements - which besides being consecrated to Bacchus (as were the Dionysia of the Greeks), were instituted by him; and, without doubt, the performances of the theatre have the common patronage of these two deities. That immodesty of gesture and attire which so specially and peculiarly characterizes the stage are consecrated to them - the one deity wanton by her sex, the other by his drapery; while its services of voice, and song, and lute, and pipe, belong to Apollos, and Muses, and Minervas, and Mercuries. You will hate, O Christian, the things whose authors must be the objects of your utter detestation. So we would now make a remark about the arts of the theatre, about the things also whose authors in the names we execrate. We know that the names of the dead are nothing, as are their images; but we know well enough, too, who, when images are set up, under these names carry on their wicked work, and exult in the homage rendered to them, and pretend to be divine - none other than spirits accursed, than devils. We see, therefore, that the arts also are consecrated to the service of the beings who dwell in the names of their founders; and that things cannot be held free from the taint of idolatry whose inventors have got a place among the gods for their discoveries. Nay, as regards the arts, we ought to have gone further back, and barred all further argument by the position that the demons, predetermining in their own interests from the first, among other evils of idolatry, the pollutions of the public shows, with the object of drawing man away from his Lord and binding him to their own service, carried out their purpose by bestowing on him the artistic gifts which the shows require. For none but themselves would have made provision and preparation for the objects they had in view; nor would they have given the arts to the world by any but those in whose names, and images, and histories they set up for their own ends the artifice of consecration.
60. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.23.9, 2.35.6-2.35.7, 5.10.2, 5.11, 5.13.1-5.13.7, 5.21, 5.24.9, 6.6.1, 6.11.5-6.11.9, 6.20.9, 8.27.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2003), Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars, 212
8.27.14. ἔμελλε δὲ ἄρα οὐχ Ἕλλησιν ὁ Βορέας ἔσεσθαι μόνον τοῖς πᾶσιν ὄφελος, τοῦ Μήδων ναυτικοῦ ταῖς Σηπιάσι προσράξας τὰς πολλάς, ἀλλὰ καὶ Μεγαλοπολίτας ὁ ἄνεμος οὗτος ἐρρύσατο μὴ ἁλῶναι· κατέλυσέ τε γὰρ τὸ μηχάνημα τοῦ Ἄγιδος καὶ διεφόρησεν ἐς ἀπώλειαν παντελῆ βιαίῳ τῷ πνεύματι ὁμοῦ καὶ συνεχεῖ. ὁ δὲ Ἆγις ὅτῳ τὰ ἐκ τοῦ Βορέου μὴ ἑλεῖν τὴν Μεγαλόπολιν ἐγένετο ἐμποδών, ἔστιν ὁ τὴν ἐν Ἀχαΐᾳ Πελλήνην ἀφαιρεθεὶς ὑπὸ Ἀράτου καὶ Σικυωνίων καὶ ὕστερον πρὸς Μαντινείᾳ χρησάμενος τῷ τέλει. 8.27.14. But the north wind was not only to prove a help to the whole Greek nation, when it dashed the greater part of the Persian fleet on the Sepiad rocks, but it also saved Megalopolis from being captured. For it blew violently and continuously, and broke up the engine of Agis, scattering it to utter destruction. The Agis whom the north wind prevented from taking Megalopolis is the man from whom was taken Pellene in Achaia by the Sicyonians under Aratus, and later he met his end at Mantineia .
61. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 18, 20, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 186
62. Lucian, The Carousal, Or The Lapiths, 13.8, 14.12, 16.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 182
63. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 161
64. Lucian, The Dream, Or The Cock, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 126
65. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 4.3, 4.10, 5.4, 21.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 184
66. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 79.10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
67. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 1.1.1, 1.1.5, 1.1.13-1.1.16, 1.6.3-1.6.5, 2.1.2, 3.2.14-3.2.15, 3.3.1, 3.7, 4.1.6-4.1.12, 4.3.7, 4.5.1-4.5.3, 4.7.1, 5.1.3, 5.1.7, 5.4.4, 5.5.5, 6.2.1, 6.4.2, 8.2.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 570, 712
68. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.3.6, 1.18.2, 2.24.2-2.24.3, 3.7.5, 3.20, 4.11.1, 4.18.1, 7.13.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 574; Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 160
69. Lucian, Dialogues of The Dead, 13.2-13.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 186
70. Galen, On Semen, 8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 173, 174
71. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.2.4, 4.1.2, 4.4.2, 5.4.3, 5.5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
72. Lucian, The Ignorant Book-Collector, 14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympia, olympic games Found in books: Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 186
73. Philostratus, Heroicus, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
74. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.55-1.56 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 89
1.55. So far Pisistratus. To return to Solon: one of his sayings is that 70 years are the term of man's life.He seems to have enacted some admirable laws; for instance, if any man neglects to provide for his parents, he shall be disfranchised; moreover there is a similar penalty for the spendthrift who runs through his patrimony. Again, not to have a settled occupation is made a crime for which any one may, if he pleases, impeach the offender. Lysias, however, in his speech against Nicias ascribes this law to Draco, and to Solon another depriving open profligates of the right to speak in the Assembly. He curtailed the honours of athletes who took part in the games, fixing the allowance for an Olympic victor at 500 drachmae, for an Isthmian victor at 100 drachmae, and proportionately in all other cases. It was in bad taste, he urged, to increase the rewards of these victors, and to ignore the exclusive claims of those who had fallen in battle, whose sons ought, moreover, to be maintained and educated by the State. 1.56. The effect of this was that many strove to acquit themselves as gallant soldiers in battle, like Polyzelus, Cynegirus, Callimachus and all who fought at Marathon; or again like Harmodius and Aristogiton, and Miltiades and thousands more. Athletes, on the other hand, incur heavy costs while in training, do harm when successful, and are crowned for a victory over their country rather than over their rivals, and when they grow old they, in the words of Euripides,Are worn threadbare, cloaks that have lost the nap;and Solon, perceiving this, treated them with scant respect. Excellent, too, is his provision that the guardian of an orphan should not marry the mother of his ward, and that the next heir who would succeed on the death of the orphans should be disqualified from acting as their guardian.
75. Chares Mytilenensis, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 161
76. Epigraphy, Ig V, 1.364  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 172
77. Epigraphy, Nomima, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 63
78. Epigraphy, Dubois 2002, 5  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 132
79. Epigraphy, Lscg, 33, 44, 5, 78, 8, 4  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 104
80. Epigraphy, Lss, 1, 14, 3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 104
81. Epigraphy, I.Cret., 4.64  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 63
82. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131, 826, 847, 893, 880  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127
83. Epigraphy, Ig Ii, 7.2712  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 160, 161
84. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,7, 515.6  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 391
85. Epigraphy, Igr Iv, 1164, 1163  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 574
86. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Timaeus, 6.54.5  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 160
87. Pindar, L., a b c d\n0 3/4.70 3/4.70 3/4 70\n1 3/4.71 3/4.71 3/4 71\n2 6.54 6.54 6 54\n3 6.53 6.53 6 53\n4 3/4.72 3/4.72 3/4 72\n5 3/4.73 3/4.73 3/4 73\n6 6.51 6.51 6 51\n7 6.52 6.52 6 52  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Meister (2019), Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity, 92
88. Anon., Tanḥuma Shoftim, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan
89. Epigraphy, Seg, 23.212, 29.806, 46.409, 54.464, 56.478, 59.416, 63.305  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games •olympic games, torch race (modern) Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 265; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 176, 198
90. Nicobule, Fgrh 127, None  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 161
91. Acetas, Fgrh 405, None  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 160
92. Andocides, Orations, 4.29  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 135
94. Andocides, Orations, 4.29  Tagged with subjects: •games, olympic Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 135
95. Bacchylides, Odes, 1.158-1.161  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 348
97. Epigraphy, Ngsl, 66-68, 65  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 538
98. Lamprias, Catalogue, 204, 227  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 78
99. Epigraphy, Iaph 2007, 12.410  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 570
100. Philostratus, Gymnasticus, None  Tagged with subjects: •games, isthmian, olympic Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 500
101. Epigraphy, Raubitschek, Daa, 174, 21, 120  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127
102. Epigraphy, Ivo, 146  Tagged with subjects: •olympic games Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 127