Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.





32 results for "games"
1. Homer, Odyssey, a b c d\n0 10.523 10.523 10 523\n1 10.521 10.521 10 521\n2 10.522 10.522 10 522\n3 10.524 10.524 10 524\n4 10.525 10.525 10 525\n5 10.526 10.526 10 526\n6 23.325 23.325 23 325\n7 23.326 23.326 23 326\n8 23.327 23.327 23 327\n9 23.328 23.328 23 328\n10 23.329 23.329 23 329\n11 23.330 23.330 23 330\n12 23.335 23.335 23 335\n13 23.332 23.332 23 332\n14 23.333 23.333 23 333\n15 23.334 23.334 23 334\n16 23.336 23.336 23 336\n17 23.338 23.338 23 338\n18 23.324 23.324 23 324\n19 23.331 23.331 23 331\n20 23.323 23.323 23 323\n21 23.315 23.315 23 315\n22 23.321 23.321 23 321\n23 "8.73" "8.73" "8 73"\n24 23.310 23.310 23 310\n25 23.311 23.311 23 311\n26 23.312 23.312 23 312\n27 23.313 23.313 23 313\n28 23.314 23.314 23 314\n29 23.339 23.339 23 339\n30 23.316 23.316 23 316\n31 23.317 23.317 23 317\n32 23.318 23.318 23 318\n33 23.319 23.319 23 319\n34 23.320 23.320 23 320\n35 23.322 23.322 23 322\n36 23.340 23.340 23 340\n37 23.342 23.342 23 342\n38 23.343 23.343 23 343\n39 23.341 23.341 23 341\n40 23.337 23.337 23 337 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 553
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 654-655, 657-659, 656 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42
656. of Arcturus and across the sky halfway
3. Homer, Iliad, a b c d\n0 "9.186" "9.186" "9 186" (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 43
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 126
5. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 5.93-5.95 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 553; Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 167
6. Sophocles, Antigone, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic contests/games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 527
7. Isaeus, Orations, 2.10, 6.65, 8.38-8.39 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic contests/games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 553
8. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.1.40 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 169
9. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic contests/games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 553
2.2.13. ἔγωγε, ἔφη. εἶτα τούτων μὲν ἐπιμελεῖσθαι παρεσκεύασαι, τὴν δὲ μητέρα τὴν πάντων μάλιστά σε φιλοῦσαν οὐκ οἴει δεῖν θεραπεύειν; οὐκ οἶσθʼ ὅτι καὶ ἡ πόλις ἄλλης μὲν ἀχαριστίας οὐδεμιᾶς ἐπιμελεῖται οὐδὲ δικάζει, ἀλλὰ περιορᾷ τοὺς εὖ πεπονθότας χάριν οὐκ ἀποδόντας, ἐὰν δέ τις γονέας μὴ θεραπεύῃ, τούτῳ δίκην τε ἐπιτίθησι καὶ ἀποδοκιμάζουσα οὐκ ἐᾷ ἄρχειν τοῦτον, ὡς οὔτε ἂν τὰ ἱερὰ εὐσεβῶς θυόμενα ὑπὲρ τῆς πόλεως τούτου θύοντος οὔτε ἄλλο καλῶς καὶ δικαίως οὐδὲν ἂν τούτου πράξαντος; καὶ νὴ Δία ἐάν τις τῶν γονέων τελευτησάντων τοὺς τάφους μὴ κοσμῇ, καὶ τοῦτο ἐξετάζει ἡ πόλις ἐν ταῖς τῶν ἀρχόντων δοκιμασίαις. 2.2.13. And yet, when you are resolved to cultivate these, you don’t think courtesy is due to your mother, who loves you more than all? Don’t you know that even the state ignores all other forms of ingratitude and pronounces no judgment on them, Cyropaedia I. ii. 7. caring nothing if the recipient of a favour neglects to thank his benefactor, but inflicts penalties on the man who is discourteous to his parents and rejects him as unworthy of office, holding that it would be a sin for him to offer sacrifices on behalf of the state and that he is unlikely to do anything else honourably and rightly? Aye, and if one fail to honour his parents’ graves, the state inquires into that too, when it examines the candidates for office.
10. Isocrates, Evagoras, a b c d\n0 "9.1" "9.1" "9 1" \n1 "9.8" "9.8" "9 8" \n2 "9.11" "9.11" "9 11" (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42
11. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 182
12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 55 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic contests/games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 553
13. Polybius, Histories, 5.9.10, 6.53-6.54, 9.36.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 175
5.9.10. τοιγαροῦν οὐ μόνον ἐκρίθη παρʼ αὐτὸν τὸν καιρὸν εὐεργέτης, ἀλλὰ καὶ μεταλλάξας σωτήρ, οὐδὲ παρὰ μόνοις Λακεδαιμονίοις, ἀλλὰ παρὰ πᾶσι τοῖς Ἕλλησιν ἀθανάτου τέτευχε τιμῆς καὶ δόξης ἐπὶ 9.36.5. ἀνθʼ ὧν ὑμεῖς ἐν ταῖς κοιναῖς πανηγύρεσι μάρτυρας ποιησάμενοι τοὺς Ἕλληνας εὐεργέτην ἑαυτῶν καὶ σωτῆρα τὸν Ἀντίγονον ἀνεκηρύξατε. 5.9.10.  Not only therefore was he regarded as their benefactor at the time but after his death he was venerated as their preserver, and it was not in Sparta alone but throughout Greece that he received undying honour and glory in acknowledgement of this conduct. 6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this? 6.54. 1.  Besides, he who makes the oration over the man about to be buried, when he has finished speaking of him recounts the successes and exploits of the rest whose images are present, beginning with the most ancient.,2.  By this means, by this constant renewal of the good report of brave men, the celebrity of those who performed noble deeds is rendered immortal, while at the same time the fame of those who did good service to their country becomes known to the people and a heritage for future generations.,3.  But the most important result is that young men are thus inspired to endure every suffering for public welfare in the hope of winning the glory that attends on brave men.,4.  What I say is confirmed by the facts. For many Romans have voluntarily engaged in single combat in order to decide a battle, not a few have faced certain death, some in war to save the lives of the rest, and others in peace to save the republic.,5.  Some even when in office have put their own sons to death contrary to every law or custom, setting a higher value on the interest of their country than on the ties of nature that bound them to their nearest and dearest.,6.  Many such stories about many men are related in Roman history, but one told of a certain person will suffice for the present as an example and as a confirmation of what I say. 9.36.5.  And in return for this you proclaimed Antigonus at public festivals in the hearing of all Greece to be your saviour and benefactor.
14. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 168, 169
15. Suetonius, Vespasianus, "19" (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42
16. Suetonius, Iulius, "84" (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42
17. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 98, 163
18. Philostratus The Athenian, On Athletic Training, 52, 45 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 171, 172
45. τὸ δὲ οὕτω τρυφᾷν δριμὺ μὲν καὶ ἐς ἀφροδισίων ὁρμήν, ἦρξε δὲ ἀθληταῖς καὶ τῆς ὑπὲρ χρημάτων παρανομίας καὶ τοῦ πωλεῖν τε καὶ ὠνεῖσθαι τὰς νίκας: οἱ μὲν γὰρ καὶ ἀποδίδονται τὴν ἑαυτῶν εὔκλειαν, δἰ οἶμαι, τὸ πολλῶν δεῖσθαι, οἱ δὲ ὠνοῦνται τὸ μὴ ξὺν πόνῳ νικᾷν διὰ τὸ ἁβρῶς διαιτᾶσθαι. καὶ ἀργυροῦν: μὲν ἢ χρυσοῦν περισπῶντι ἀνάθημα ἢ διαφθείροντι ὀργὴν οἱ νόμοι ὡς ἐνόχῳ ἱεροσυλίᾳ ὄντι ̔φαίνουσἰ, στέφος δὲ ̓Απόλλωνος ἢ Ποσειδῶνος, ὑπὲρ οὗ καὶ αὐτοὶ οἱ θεοὶ μέγα ἤθλησαν, ἄδεια μὲν ἀποδίδοσθαι, ἄδεια δὲ ὠνεῖσθαι, πλὴν ὅσα ̓Ηλείοις ὁ κότινος ἄσυλος μένει κατὰ τὴν ἐκ παλαιοῦ δόξαν, οἱ δὲ ἄλλοι τῶν ἀγώνων ἐπηρώθησαν: ἓν ἐκ πολλῶν εἰρήσθω μοι, ἐν ᾧ πάντα: παῖς ἐνίκα πάλην ̓́Ισθμια τρισχιλίας ἑνὶ τῶν ἀντιπάλων ὁμολογήσας ὑπὲρ τῆς νίκης. ἥκοντες οὖν τῆς ὑστεραίας ἐς τὸ γυμνάσιον ὁ μὲν ἀπῄτει τὰ χρήματα, ὁ δὲ οὐκ ὀφείλειν ἔφη, κεκρατηκέναι γὰρ δὴ ἄκοντος. ὡς δὲ οὐδὲν ἐπέραινεν, ὅρκῳ ἐπιτρέπουσι καὶ παρελθὼν ἐς τὸ τοῦ ̓Ισθμίου ἱερὸν ὤμνυε δημοσίᾳ καὶ ταῦτα κατ' ὀφθαλμοὺς τῆς ̔Ελλάδος ὁ τὴν νίκην ἀποδόμενος ἦ μὴν πεπρακέναι τοῦ θεοῦ τὸν ἀγῶνα, τρισχιλίας γὰρ ὡμολογῆσθαί οἱ, καὶ ὤμνυε ταῦτα λαμπρᾷ τῇ φωνῇ, μὴ δή τι ἀσαφὲς εἴη δείσας. τί μὲν οὐκ ἂν ἐν ̓Ιωνίᾳ, τί δὲ οὐκ ἂν ἐν ̓Ολυμπίᾳ γένοιτο ἐπ' αἰσχύνῃ ̔τοιαύτᾐ ἀγῶνος; ὅσῳ γὰρ ἀληθεστέρα, εἰ οὐδ' ἄνευ μαρτύρων, τοσῷδε ἀνιερωτέρα καὶ ἐπιρρητοτέρα. οὐκ ἀφίημι τοὺς γυμναστὰς καὶ ἀθλητὰς ἐπὶ τῇ διαφθορᾷ ταύτῃ, πάρεισι μὲν γὰρ μετὰ χρημάτων ἐπὶ τὸ γυμνάζειν, καὶ δανείζοντες τοῖς ἀθληταῖς ἐπὶ τόκοις μείζοσιν ἢ ὧν ἔμποροι θαλαττεύοντες ̔δανείζονταἰ, τῆς μὲν τῶν ἀθλητῶν δόξης ἐπιστρέφονται οὐδέν, τοῦ δὲ πωλεῖν τε καὶ ὠνεῖσθαι ξύμβουλοι γίγνονταί σφισι προνοοῦντες τοῦ ἑαυτῶν κέρδους. καὶ ταυτὶ μὲν κατὰ καπηλευόντων εἰρήσθω μοι, καπηλεύουσι γάρ που τὰς
19. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.21 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 171, 172
20. Lucian, The Dream, Or The Cock, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 126
21. Galen, On Semen, 8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 173, 174
22. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 3.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 160
23. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 9.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 209
24. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, a b c d\n0 "37" "37" "37" None\n1 19.105 19.105 19 105 \n2 19.106 19.106 19 106 \n3 19.107 19.107 19 107 \n4 19.108 19.108 19 108 \n5 19.109 19.109 19 109 \n6 19.110 19.110 19 110 \n7 19.111 19.111 19 111 \n8 19.112 19.112 19 112 \n9 19.113 19.113 19 113 \n10 19.114 19.114 19 114 \n11 19.115 19.115 19 115 \n12 19.104 19.104 19 104 \n13 "19.81" "19.81" "19 81" \n14 19.99 19.99 19 99 \n15 19.98 19.98 19 98 \n16 "19.74" "19.74" "19 74" \n17 19.80 19.80 19 80 \n18 19.81 19.81 19 81 \n19 19.82 19.82 19 82 \n20 19.83 19.83 19 83 \n21 19.84 19.84 19 84 \n22 19.85 19.85 19 85 \n23 19.86 19.86 19 86 \n24 19.87 19.87 19 87 \n25 19.89 19.89 19 89 \n26 19.90 19.90 19 90 \n27 19.91 19.91 19 91 \n28 19.92 19.92 19 92 \n29 19.93 19.93 19 93 \n30 19.94 19.94 19 94 \n31 19.95 19.95 19 95 \n32 19.96 19.96 19 96 \n33 19.97 19.97 19 97 \n34 19.88 19.88 19 88 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 43
25. Suda, S.V. Artemidorus;, None  Tagged with subjects: •games, athletic Found in books: Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 9
26. Epigraphy, Ig V, 1.364  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 172
27. Epigraphy, Seg, 23.212, 46.409, 54.464, 56.478, 59.416, 63.305  Tagged with subjects: •athletics, olympic games Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 176, 198
28. Epigraphy, Roueche, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 55
29. Papyri, P.Oxy., None  Tagged with subjects: •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 55
30. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,7, 515.6  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 391
32. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 4.129-4.130, 4.171-4.172  Tagged with subjects: •athletic games Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 43