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116 results for "gallus"
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 25-30, 24 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 46
24. By them to sing adeptly as he brought
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.348, 1.349, 1.350, 1.351, 1.352, 1.353, 1.354, 1.355, 1.356, 9.529, 9.530, 9.531, 9.532, 9.533, 9.534, 9.535, 9.536, 9.537, 9.538, 9.539, 9.540, 9.541, 9.542, 9.543, 9.544, 9.545, 9.546, 9.547, 9.548, 9.549, 9.550, 9.551, 9.552, 9.553, 9.554, 9.555, 9.556, 9.557, 9.558, 9.559, 9.560, 9.561, 9.562, 9.563, 9.564, 9.565, 9.566, 9.567, 9.568, 9.569, 9.570, 9.571, 9.572, 9.573, 9.574, 9.575, 9.576, 9.577, 9.578, 9.579, 9.580, 9.581, 9.582, 9.583, 9.584, 9.585, 9.586, 9.587, 9.588, 9.589, 9.590, 9.591, 9.592, 9.593, 9.594, 9.595, 9.596, 9.597, 9.598, 9.599, 11.550, 18.79, 18.80, 18.81, 18.82, 18.83, 18.84, 18.85, 18.86, 18.87, 18.88, 18.89, 18.90, 18.91, 18.92, 18.93, 45612.41, 45612.42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 12
1.348. / and led forth from the hut the fair-cheeked Briseis, and gave her to them to lead away. So the two went back beside the ships of the Achaeans, and with them, all unwilling, went the woman. But Achilles burst into tears, and withdrew apart from his comrades, and sat down on the shore of the grey sea, looking forth over the wine-dark deep.
3. Alcaeus, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
4. Alcaeus, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
5. Solon, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 107
6. Theognis, Elegies, 1181 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
7. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.81-2.88 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 107
8. Herodotus, Histories, 5.93 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 107
5.93. These were the words of Socles, the envoy from Corinth, and Hippias answered, calling the same gods as Socles had invoked to witness, that the Corinthians would be the first to wish the Pisistratidae back, when the time appointed should come for them to be vexed by the Athenians. ,Hippias made this answer, inasmuch as he had more exact knowledge of the oracles than any man, but the rest of the allies, who had till now kept silence, spoke out when they heard the free speech of Socles and sided with the opinion of the Corinthians, entreating the Lacedaemonians not to harm a Greek city.
9. Euripides, Fragments, 5.9 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 162
10. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
823b. ὃ βουλόμεθα μᾶλλον. θήρα γὰρ πάμπολύ τι πρᾶγμά ἐστι, περιειλημμένον ὀνόματι νῦν σχεδὸν ἑνί. πολλὴ μὲν γὰρ ἡ τῶν ἐνύδρων, πολλὴ δὲ ἡ τῶν πτηνῶν, πάμπολυ δὲ καὶ τὸ περὶ τὰ πεζὰ θηρεύματα, οὐ μόνον θηρίων, ἀλλὰ καὶ τὴν τῶν ἀνθρώπων ἀξίαν ἐννοεῖν θήραν, τήν τε κατὰ πόλεμον, πολλὴ δὲ καὶ ἡ κατὰ φιλίαν θηρεύουσα, ἡ μὲν ἔπαινον, ἡ δὲ ψόγον ἔχει· καὶ κλωπεῖαι καὶ λῃστῶν καὶ στρατοπέδων στρατοπέδοις 823b. to show more clearly what we mean. Hunting is a large and complex matter, all of which is now generally embraced under this single name. of the hunting of water-animals there are many varieties, and many of the hunting of fowls; and very many varieties also of hunts of land-animals—not of beasts only, but also, mark you, of men, both in war and often, too, in friendship, a kind of hunt that is partly approved and partly disapproved; and then there are robberies and hunts carried on by pirates and by bands.
11. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
12. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
13. Callimachus, Aetia, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 46
14. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
15. Theocritus, Epigrams, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 33
16. Theocritus, Idylls, 1.11, 1.19, 1.65-1.143, 3.1-3.6, 4.1-4.3, 4.13, 7.66, 7.73, 7.78-7.89, 7.122, 7.133-7.157, 11.1, 11.3, 11.34, 11.44-11.49, 11.72, 17.124-17.130, 24.103-24.106 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 148, 151, 153; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 6, 7, 8, 29, 30, 32, 42, 45, 47, 50, 51, 172, 173; Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 46
17. Callimachus, Epigrams, 28, 35 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 304
18. Callimachus, Hymn To Apollo, 2.108-2.112 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 37, 312
19. Callimachus, Epigrams, 28, 35 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 304
20. Antigonus, Fragments, None (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 21
21. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.451-1.452, 1.547-1.558, 1.1112-1.1116, 2.500-2.527, 3.1-3.5, 4.355-4.390 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) •gallus (cornelius) Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 146; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 21, 43, 136; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349
1.451. αἱ δὲ νέον σκοπέλοισιν ὑποσκιόωνται ἄρουραι, 1.452. δειελινὸν κλίνοντος ὑπὸ ζόφον ἠελίοιο, 1.547. πάντες δʼ οὐρανόθεν λεῦσσον θεοὶ ἤματι κείνῳ 1.548. νῆα καὶ ἡμιθέων ἀνδρῶν μένος, οἳ τότʼ ἄριστοι 1.549. πόντον ἐπιπλώεσκον· ἐπʼ ἀκροτάτῃσι δὲ νύμφαι 1.550. Πηλιάδες κορυφῇσιν ἐθάμβεον εἰσορόωσαι 1.551. ἔργον Ἀθηναίης Ἰτωνίδος, ἠδὲ καὶ αὐτοὺς 1.552. ἥρωας χείρεσσιν ἐπικραδάοντας ἐρετμά. 1.553. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ἐξ ὑπάτου ὄρεος κίεν ἄγχι θαλάσσης 1.554. χείρων Φιλλυρίδης, πολιῇ δʼ ἐπὶ κύματος ἀγῇ 1.555. τέγγε πόδας, καὶ πολλὰ βαρείῃ χειρὶ κελεύων, 1.556. νόστον ἐπευφήμησεν ἀκηδέα νισσομένοισιν. 1.557. σὺν καί οἱ παράκοιτις ἐπωλένιον φορέουσα 1.558. Πηλεΐδην Ἀχιλῆα, φίλῳ δειδίσκετο πατρί. 1.1112. τοῖσι δὲ Μακριάδες σκοπιαὶ καὶ πᾶσα περαίη 1.1113. Θρηικίης ἐνὶ χερσὶν ἑαῖς προυφαίνετʼ ἰδέσθαι· 1.1114. φαίνετο δʼ ἠερόεν στόμα Βοσπόρου ἠδὲ κολῶναι 1.1115. Μυσίαι· ἐκ δʼ ἑτέρης ποταμοῦ ῥόος Αἰσήποιο 1.1116. ἄστυ τε καὶ πεδίον Νηπήιον Ἀδρηστείης. 2.500. Κυρήνη πέφαταί τις ἕλος πάρα Πηνειοῖο 2.501. μῆλα νέμειν προτέροισι παρʼ ἀνδράσιν· εὔαδε γάρ οἱ 2.502. παρθενίη καὶ λέκτρον ἀκήρατον. αὐτὰρ Ἀπόλλων 2.503. τήνγʼ ἀνερεψάμενος ποταμῷ ἔπι ποιμαίνουσαν 2.504. τηλόθεν Αἱμονίης, χθονίῃς παρακάτθετο νύμφαις, 2.505. αἳ Λιβύην ἐνέμοντο παραὶ Μυρτώσιον αἶπος. 2.506. ἔνθα δʼ Ἀρισταῖον Φοίβῳ τέκεν, ὃν καλέουσιν 2.507. Ἀγρέα καὶ Νόμιον πολυλήιοι Αἱμονιῆες. 2.508. τὴν μὲν γὰρ φιλότητι θεὸς ποιήσατο νύμφην 2.509. αὐτοῦ μακραίωνα καὶ ἀγρότιν· υἷα δʼ ἔνεικεν 2.510. νηπίαχον Χείρωνος ὑπʼ ἄντροισιν κομέεσθαι. 2.511. τῷ καὶ ἀεξηθέντι θεαὶ γάμον ἐμνήστευσαν 2.512. Μοῦσαι, ἀκεστορίην τε θεοπροπίας τʼ ἐδίδαξαν· 2.513. καί μιν ἑῶν μήλων θέσαν ἤρανον, ὅσσʼ ἐνέμοντο 2.514. ἂμ πεδίον Φθίης Ἀθαμάντιον ἀμφί τʼ ἐρυμνὴν 2.515. Ὄθρυν καὶ ποταμοῦ ἱερὸν ῥόον Ἀπιδανοῖο. 2.516. ἦμος δʼ οὐρανόθεν Μινωίδας ἔφλεγε νήσους 2.517. Σείριος, οὐδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἔην ἄκος ἐνναέτῃσιν, 2.518. τῆμος τόνγʼ ἐκάλεσσαν ἐφημοσύναις Ἑκάτοιο 2.519. λοιμοῦ ἀλεξητῆρα. λίπεν δʼ ὅγε πατρὸς ἐφετμῇ 2.520. Φθίην, ἐν δὲ Κέῳ κατενάσσατο, λαὸν ἀγείρας 2.521. Παρράσιον, τοίπερ τε Λυκάονός εἰσι γενέθλης, 2.522. καὶ βωμὸν ποίησε μέγαν Διὸς Ἰκμαίοιο, 2.523. ἱερά τʼ εὖ ἔρρεξεν ἐν οὔρεσιν ἀστέρι κείνῳ 2.524. Σειρίῳ αὐτῷ τε Κρονίδῃ Διί. τοῖο δʼ ἕκητι 2.525. γαῖαν ἐπιψύχουσιν ἐτήσιαι ἐκ Διὸς αὖραι 2.526. ἤματα τεσσαράκοντα· Κέῳ δʼ ἔτι νῦν ἱερῆες 2.527. ἀντολέων προπάροιθε Κυνὸς ῥέζουσι θυηλάς. 3.1. 3.1. εἰ δʼ ἄγε νῦν, Ἐρατώ, παρά θʼ ἵστασο, καί μοι ἔνισπε, 3.2. ἔνθεν ὅπως ἐς Ἰωλκὸν ἀνήγαγε κῶας Ἰήσων 3.3. Μηδείης ὑπʼ ἔρωτι. σὺ γὰρ καὶ Κύπριδος αἶσαν 3.4. ἔμμορες, ἀδμῆτας δὲ τεοῖς μελεδήμασι θέλγεις 3.5. παρθενικάς· τῶ καί τοι ἐπήρατον οὔνομʼ ἀνῆπται. 4.355. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε συναρτύνασθε μενοινὴν 4.356. ἀμφʼ ἐμοί; ἦέ σε πάγχυ λαθιφροσύναις ἐνέηκαν 4.357. ἀγλαΐαι, τῶν δʼ οὔτι μετατρέπῃ, ὅσσʼ ἀγόρευες 4.358. χρειοῖ ἐνισχόμενος; ποῦ τοι Διὸς Ἱκεσίοιο 4.359. ὅρκια, ποῦ δὲ μελιχραὶ ὑποσχεσίαι βεβάασιν; 4.360. ᾗς ἐγὼ οὐ κατὰ κόσμον ἀναιδήτῳ ἰότητι 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.364. σῶν ἕνεκεν καμάτων, ἵνα μοι σόος ἀμφί τε βουσὶν 4.365. ἀμφί τε γηγενέεσσιν ἀναπλήσειας ἀέθλους. 4.366. ὕστατον αὖ καὶ κῶας, ἐπεί τʼ ἐπαϊστὸν ἐτύχθη, 4.367. εἷλες ἐμῇ ματίῃ· κατὰ δʼ οὐλοὸν αἶσχος ἔχευα 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι. 4.370. πάντῃ νυν πρόφρων ὑπερίστασο, μηδέ με μούνην 4.371. σεῖο λίπῃς ἀπάνευθεν, ἐποιχόμενος βασιλῆας. 4.372. ἀλλʼ αὔτως εἴρυσο· δίκη δέ τοι ἔμπεδος ἔστω 4.373. καὶ θέμις, ἣν ἄμφω συναρέσσαμεν· ἢ σύγʼ ἔπειτα 4.374. φασγάνῳ αὐτίκα τόνδε μέσον διὰ λαιμὸν ἀμῆσαι, 4.375. ὄφρʼ ἐπίηρα φέρωμαι ἐοικότα μαργοσύνῃσιν. 4.376. σχετλίη, εἴ κεν δή με κασιγνήτοιο δικάσσῃ 4.377. ἔμμεναι οὗτος ἄναξ, τῷ ἐπίσχετε τάσδʼ ἀλεγεινὰς 4.378. ἄμφω συνθεσίας. πῶς ἵξομαι ὄμματα πατρός; 4.379. ἦ μάλʼ ἐυκλειής; τίνα δʼ οὐ τίσιν, ἠὲ βαρεῖαν 4.380. ἄτην οὐ σμυγερῶς δεινῶν ὕπερ, οἷα ἔοργα, 4.381. ὀτλήσω; σὺ δέ κεν θυμηδέα νόστον ἕλοιο; 4.382. μὴ τόγε παμβασίλεια Διὸς τελέσειεν ἄκοιτις, 4.383. ᾗ ἐπικυδιάεις. μνήσαιο δέ καί ποτʼ ἐμεῖο, 4.384. στρευγόμενος καμάτοισι· δέρος δέ τοι ἶσον ὀνείροις 4.385. οἴχοιτʼ εἰς ἔρεβος μεταμώνιον. ἐκ δέ σε πάτρης 4.386. αὐτίκʼ ἐμαί σʼ ἐλάσειαν Ἐρινύες· οἷα καὶ αὐτὴ 4.387. σῇ πάθον ἀτροπίῃ. τὰ μὲν οὐ θέμις ἀκράαντα 4.388. ἐν γαίῃ πεσέειν. μάλα γὰρ μέγαν ἤλιτες ὅρκον, 4.389. νηλεές· ἀλλʼ οὔ θήν μοι ἐπιλλίζοντες ὀπίσσω 4.390. δὴν ἔσσεσθʼ εὔκηλοι ἕκητί γε συνθεσιάων.’
22. Nicander, Alexipharmaca, 516 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 16
23. Nicander, Theriaca, 516 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 16
24. Polybius, Histories, 6.7.5-6.7.8, 11.1.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 515; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
6.7.5. ἅμα δὲ περὶ ταῦτα σπουδάζοντες ἐκτὸς ἦσαν πάσης διαβολῆς καὶ φθόνου διὰ τὸ μήτε περὶ τὴν ἐσθῆτα μεγάλας ποιεῖσθαι τὰς παραλλαγὰς μήτε περὶ τὴν βρῶσιν καὶ πόσιν, ἀλλὰ παραπλήσιον ἔχειν τὴν βιοτείαν τοῖς ἄλλοις, ὁμόσε ποιούμενοι τοῖς πολλοῖς ἀεὶ τὴν δίαιταν. 6.7.6. ἐπεὶ δʼ ἐκ διαδοχῆς καὶ κατὰ γένος τὰς ἀρχὰς παραλαμβάνοντες ἕτοιμα μὲν εἶχον ἤδη τὰ πρὸς τὴν ἀσφάλειαν, ἕτοιμα δὲ καὶ πλείω τῶν ἱκανῶν τὰ πρὸς τὴν τροφήν, 6.7.7. τότε δὴ ταῖς ἐπιθυμίαις ἑπόμενοι διὰ τὴν περιουσίαν ἐξάλλους μὲν ἐσθῆτας ὑπέλαβον δεῖν ἔχειν τοὺς ἡγουμένους τῶν ὑποταττομένων, ἐξάλλους δὲ καὶ ποικίλας τὰς περὶ τὴν τροφὴν ἀπολαύσεις καὶ παρασκευάς, ἀναντιρρήτους δὲ καὶ παρὰ τῶν μὴ προσηκόντων τὰς τῶν ἀφροδισίων χρείας καὶ συνουσίας. 6.7.8. ἐφʼ οἷς μὲν φθόνου γενομένου καὶ προσκοπῆς, ἐφʼ οἷς δὲ μίσους ἐκκαιομένου καὶ δυσμενικῆς ὀργῆς, ἐγένετο μὲν ἐκ τῆς βασιλείας τυραννίς, ἀρχὴ δὲ καταλύσεως ἐγεννᾶτο καὶ σύστασις ἐπιβουλῆς τοῖς ἡγουμένοις· 11.1.2. ἐγὼ δὲ κρίνω χρήσιμον μὲν εἶναι καὶ τὸ τῶν προγραφῶν γένος· καὶ γὰρ εἰς ἐπίστασιν ἄγει τοὺς ἀναγινώσκειν θέλοντας καὶ συνεκκαλεῖται καὶ παρορμᾷ πρὸς τὴν ἀνάγνωσιν τοὺς ἐντυγχάνοντας, πρὸς δὲ τούτοις πᾶν τὸ ζητούμενον ἑτοίμως ἔνεστιν εὑρεῖν διὰ τούτου· 11.1.2. τῶν δὲ πραγμάτων οὐκέτι διδόντων ἀναστροφὴν διὰ τὸ θεωρεῖν τοὺς πολεμίους ἐκτεταγμένους καὶ προσάγοντας, ἠναγκάζετο παρατάττειν τοὺς Ἴβηρας καὶ τοὺς μετʼ αὐτοῦ γεγονότας Γαλάτας. 6.7.5.  And while pursuing these aims, they were exempt from all vituperation or jealousy, as neither in their dress nor in their food did they make any great distinction, they lived very much like everyone else, not keeping apart from the people. 6.7.6.  But when they received the office by hereditary succession and found their safety now provided for, and more than sufficient provision of food, 6.7.7.  they gave way to their appetites owing to this superabundance, and came to think that the rulers must be distinguished from their subjects by a peculiar dress, that there should be a peculiar luxury and variety in the dressing and serving of their viands, and that they should meet with no denial in the pursuit of their amours, however lawless. 6.7.8.  These habits having given rise in the one case to envy and offence and in the other to an outburst of hatred and passionate resentment, the kingship changed into a tyranny; the first steps towards its overthrow were taken by the subjects, and conspiracies began to be formed. 11.1.2.  None of these things were agreeable to Hasdrubal, but as circumstances did not admit of delay, for he saw the Romans already in battle order and advantage, he was obliged to draw up his Iberians and the Gauls who were with him.
25. Cicero, Brutus, 27, 39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
39. videsne igitur vel vel Heusinger : ut L : Brute Martha in ea ipsa urbe, in qua et nata et alta sit eloquentia, quam ea sero prodierit in lucem ? Si quidem ante Solonis aetatem et Pisistrati de nullo ut diserto memoriae proditum est. At hi quidem, ut populi Romani aetas est, senes, ut Atheniensium saecula numerantur, adulescentes debent videri. Nam etsi Servio Tullio regte viguerunt, tamen multo diutius Athenae iam erant quam est Roma ad hodiernum diem. Nec tamen dubito quin habuerit vim magnam semper oratio.
26. Cicero, Philippicae, 5.42-5.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 46
27. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 2.9.2, 8.2.2, 8.4.5, 8.6.5, 8.9.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
28. Philodemus of Gadara, De Musica \ , 4.6.13-4.6.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 49
29. Cicero, Brutus, 27, 39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
39. videsne igitur vel vel Heusinger : ut L : Brute Martha in ea ipsa urbe, in qua et nata et alta sit eloquentia, quam ea sero prodierit in lucem ? Si quidem ante Solonis aetatem et Pisistrati de nullo ut diserto memoriae proditum est. At hi quidem, ut populi Romani aetas est, senes, ut Atheniensium saecula numerantur, adulescentes debent videri. Nam etsi Servio Tullio regte viguerunt, tamen multo diutius Athenae iam erant quam est Roma ad hodiernum diem. Nec tamen dubito quin habuerit vim magnam semper oratio.
30. Cicero, Diuinatio In Q. Caecilium, 35-37, 44, 46, 45 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 75
31. Horace, Odes, 1.10.1-1.10.6, 1.12.45-1.12.48, 1.33.2-1.33.3, 2.9, 3.1-3.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 23, 311, 321; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 159; Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 62
32. Horace, Letters, 2.1.233-2.1.234, 2.1.247, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 20, 46, 47
33. Horace, Epodes, 11.19-11.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 57
34. Horace, Sermones, 1.4.5, 1.5.40, 1.6.55, 1.9.22-1.9.23, 1.10, 1.10.43-1.10.44, 1.10.67, 1.10.81-1.10.84, 1.20.81, 2.8.20-2.8.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 20, 27, 46, 47, 61
35. Ovid, Amores, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 152
1.9.4. Turpe senex miles, turpe senilis amor.
36. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.17, 1.21-1.22, 1.29, 1.89, 1.206, 1.219-1.228, 3.334, 3.537 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 21, 59, 117, 173, 312
1.17. Aeacidae Chiron, ego sum praeceptor Amoris: 1.21. Et mihi cedet Amor, quamvis mea vulneret arcu 1.22. rend= 1.29. Usus opus movet hoc: vati parete perito; 1.89. Sed tu praecipue curvis venare theatris: 1.206. rend= 1.219. Atque aliqua ex illis cum regum nomina quaeret, 1.220. rend= 1.221. Omnia responde, nec tantum siqua rogabit; 1.222. rend= 1.223. Hic est Euphrates, praecinctus harundine frontem: 1.224. rend= 1.225. Hos facito Armenios; haec est Danaëia Persis: 1.226. rend= 1.227. Ille vel ille, duces; et erunt quae nomina dicas, 1.228. rend= 3.334. rend= 3.537. Vesper et Eoae novere Lycorida terrae:
37. Ovid, Epistulae (Heroides), 19.172 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 59
38. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 1.8.53-1.8.54, 2.5.25-2.5.26, 3.4.45-3.4.50, 4.16.11-4.16.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 192, 229; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 246
39. Ovid, Fasti, 1.336-1.456, 3.603, 3.628-3.632, 3.643-3.644, 4.45, 4.195-4.196 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 136, 187, 220, 330
1.336. hostibus a domitis hostia nomen habet, 1.337. ante, deos homini quod conciliare valeret, 1.338. far erat et puri lucida mica salis, 1.339. nondum pertulerat lacrimatas cortice murras 1.340. acta per aequoreas hospita navis aquas, 1.341. tura nec Euphrates nec miserat India costum, 1.342. nec fuerant rubri cognita fila croci. 1.343. ara dabat fumos herbis contenta Sabinis 1.344. et non exiguo laurus adusta sono. 1.345. si quis erat, factis prati de flore coronis 1.346. qui posset violas addere, dives erat. 1.347. hic, qui nunc aperit percussi viscera tauri, 1.348. in sacris nullum culter habebat opus. 1.349. prima Ceres avidae gavisa est sanguine porcae 1.350. ulta suas merita caede nocentis opes; 1.351. nam sata vere novo teneris lactentia sulcis 1.352. eruta saetigerae comperit ore suis. 1.353. sus dederat poenas: exemplo territus huius 1.354. palmite debueras abstinuisse, caper. 1.355. quem spectans aliquis dentes in vite prementem 1.356. talia non tacito dicta dolore dedit: 1.357. ‘rode, caper, vitem! tamen hinc, cum stabis ad aram, 1.358. in tua quod spargi cornua possit, erit.’ 1.359. verba fides sequitur: noxae tibi deditus hostis 1.360. spargitur adfuso cornua, Bacche, mero. 1.361. culpa sui nocuit, nocuit quoque culpa capellae: 1.362. quid bos, quid placidae commeruistis oves? 1.363. flebat Aristaeus, quod apes cum stirpe necatas 1.364. viderat inceptos destituisse favos. 1.365. caerula quem genetrix aegre solata dolentem 1.366. addidit haec dictis ultima verba suis: 1.367. ‘siste, puer, lacrimas! Proteus tua damna levabit, 1.368. quoque modo repares quae periere, dabit, 1.369. decipiat ne te versis tamen ille figuris, 1.370. impediant geminas vincula firma manus.’ 1.371. pervenit ad vatem iuvenis resolutaque somno 1.372. alligat aequorei brachia capta senis, 1.373. ille sua faciem transformis adulterat arte: 1.374. mox domitus vinclis in sua membra redit, 1.375. oraque caerulea tollens rorantia barba, 1.376. qua dixit ‘repares arte, requiris, apes? 1.377. obrue mactati corpus tellure iuvenci: 1.378. quod petis a nobis, obrutus ille dabit.’ 1.379. iussa facit pastor: fervent examina putri 1.380. de bove: mille animas una necata dedit, 1.381. poscit ovem fatum: verbenas improba carpsit, 1.382. quas pia dis ruris ferre solebat anus. 1.383. quid tuti superest, animam cum ponat in aris 1.384. lanigerumque pecus ruricolaeque boves? 1.385. placat equo Persis radiis Hyperiona cinctum, 1.386. ne detur celeri victima tarda deo. 1.387. quod semel est triplici pro virgine caesa Dianae, 1.388. nunc quoque pro nulla virgine cerva cadit, 1.389. exta canum vidi Triviae libare Sapaeos, 1.390. et quicumque tuas accolit, Haeme, nives, 1.391. caeditur et rigido custodi ruris asellus; 1.392. causa pudenda quidem, sed tamen apta deo. 1.393. festa corymbiferi celebrabas, Graecia, Bacchi, 1.394. tertia quae solito tempore bruma refert. 1.395. di quoque cultores in idem venere Lyaei, 1.396. et quicumque iocis non alienus erat, 1.397. Panes et in Venerem Satyrorum prona iuventus, 1.398. quaeque colunt amnes solaque rura deae. 1.399. venerat et senior pando Silenus asello, 1.400. quique ruber pavidas inguine terret aves, 1.401. dulcia qui dignum nemus in convivia nacti 1.402. gramine vestitis accubuere toris, vina 1.403. vina dabat Liber, tulerat sibi quisque coronam, 1.404. miscendas parce rivus agebat aquas. 1.405. Naides effusis aliae sine pectinis usu, 1.406. pars aderant positis arte manuque comis: 1.407. illa super suras tunicam collecta ministrat, 1.408. altera dissuto pectus aperta sinu: 1.409. exserit haec humerum, vestem trahit illa per herbas, 1.410. impediunt teneros vincula nulla pedes, 1.411. hinc aliae Satyris incendia mitia praebent, 1.412. pars tibi, qui pinu tempora nexa geris, 1.413. te quoque, inextinctae Silene libidinis, urunt: 1.414. nequitia est, quae te non sinit esse senem. 1.415. at ruber, hortorum decus et tutela, Priapus 1.416. omnibus ex illis Lotide captus erat: 1.417. hanc cupit, hanc optat, sola suspirat in illa, 1.418. signaque dat nutu, sollicitatque notis, 1.419. fastus inest pulchris, sequiturque superbia formam: 1.420. irrisum voltu despicit illa suo. 1.421. nox erat, et vino somnum faciente iacebant 1.422. corpora diversis victa sopore locis. 1.423. Lotis in herbosa sub acernis ultima ramis, 1.424. sicut erat lusu fessa, quievit humo. 1.425. surgit amans animamque tenens vestigia furtim 1.426. suspenso digitis fert taciturna gradu, 1.427. ut tetigit niveae secreta cubilia nymphae, 1.428. ipsa sui flatus ne sonet aura, cavet, 1.429. et iam finitima corpus librabat in herba: 1.430. illa tamen multi plena soporis erat. 1.431. gaudet et, a pedibus tracto velamine, vota 1.432. ad sua felici coeperat ire via. 1.433. ecce rudens rauco Sileni vector asellus 1.434. intempestivos edidit ore sonos. 1.435. territa consurgit nymphe manibusque Priapum 1.436. reicit et fugiens concitat omne nemus; 1.437. at deus obscena nimium quoque parte paratus 1.438. omnibus ad lunae lumina risus erat. 1.439. morte dedit poenas auctor clamoris, et haec est 1.440. Hellespontiaco victima grata deo. 1.441. intactae fueratis aves, solacia ruris, 1.442. adsuetum silvis innocuumque genus, 1.443. quae facitis nidos et plumis ova fovetis 1.444. et facili dulces editis ore modos; 1.445. sed nil ista iuvant, quia linguae crimen habetis, 1.446. dique putant mentes vos aperire suas. 1.447. nec tamen hoc falsum: nam, dis ut proxima quaeque, 1.448. nunc penna veras, nunc datis ore notas, 1.449. tuta diu volucrum proles tum denique caesa est, 1.450. iuveruntque deos indicis exta sui. 1.451. ergo saepe suo coniunx abducta marito 1.452. uritur Idaliis alba columba focis; 1.453. nec defensa iuvant Capitolia, quo minus anser 1.454. det iecur in lances, Inachi lauta, tuas; 1.455. nocte deae Nocti cristatus caeditur ales, 1.456. quod tepidum vigili provocet ore diem. 3.603. litore dotali solo comitatus Achate 3.628. incipit Aeneas (cetera turba silet): 3.629. ‘hanc tibi cur tradam, pia causa, Lavinia coniunx, 3.630. est mihi: consumpsi naufragus huius opes. 3.631. orta Tyro est, regnum Libyca possedit in ora; 3.632. quam precor ut carae more sororis ames.’ 3.643. exilit et velox humili super arva fenestra 3.644. se iacit: audacem fecerat ipse timor. 4.45. ille dedit Capyi recidiva vocabula Troiae 4.195. sic ego, sic Erato (mensis Cythereius illi 4.196. cessit, quod teneri nomen amoris habet): 1.336. And hostia, sacrifice, from hostile conquered foes. 1.337. Cornmeal, and glittering grains of pure salt, 1.338. Were once the means for men to placate the gods. 1.339. No foreign ship had yet brought liquid myrrh 1.340. Extracted from tree’s bark, over the ocean waves: 1.341. Euphrates had not sent incense, nor India balm, 1.342. And the threads of yellow saffron were unknown. 1.343. The altar was happy to fume with Sabine juniper, 1.344. And the laurel burned with a loud crackling. 1.345. He was rich, whoever could add violet 1.346. To garlands woven from meadow flowers. 1.347. The knife that bares the entrails of the stricken bull, 1.348. Had no role to perform in the sacred rites. 1.349. Ceres was first to delight in the blood of the greedy sow, 1.350. Her crops avenged by the rightful death of the guilty creature, 1.351. She learned that in spring the grain, milky with sweet juice, 1.352. Had been uprooted by the snouts of bristling pigs. 1.353. The swine were punished: terrified by that example, 1.354. You should have spared the vine-shoots, he-goat. 1.355. Watching a goat nibbling a vine someone once 1.356. Vented their indignation in these words: 1.357. ‘Gnaw the vine, goat! But when you stand at the altar 1.358. There’ll be something from it to sprinkle on your horns.’ 1.359. Truth followed: Bacchus, your enemy is given you 1.360. To punish, and sprinkled wine flows over its horns. 1.361. The sow suffered for her crime, and the goat for hers: 1.362. But what were you guilty of you sheep and oxen? 1.363. Aristaeus wept because he saw his bees destroyed, 1.364. And the hives they had begun left abandoned. 1.365. His azure mother, Cyrene, could barely calm his grief, 1.366. But added these final words to what she said: 1.367. ‘Son, cease your tears! Proteus will allay your loss, 1.368. And show you how to recover what has perished. 1.369. But lest he still deceives you by changing shape, 1.370. Entangle both his hands with strong fastenings.’ 1.371. The youth approached the seer, who was fast asleep, 1.372. And bound the arms of that Old Man of the Sea. 1.373. He by his art altered his shape and transformed his face, 1.374. But soon reverted to his true form, tamed by the ropes. 1.375. Then raising his dripping head, and sea-green beard, 1.376. He said: ‘Do you ask how to recover your bees? 1.377. Kill a heifer and bury its carcase in the earth, 1.378. Buried it will produce what you ask of me.’ 1.379. The shepherd obeyed: the beast’s putrid corpse 1.380. Swarmed: one life destroyed created thousands. 1.381. Death claims the sheep: wickedly, it grazed the vervain 1.382. That a pious old woman offered to the rural gods. 1.383. What creature’s safe if woolly sheep, and oxen 1.384. Broken to the plough, lay their lives on the altar? 1.385. Persia propitiates Hyperion, crowned with rays, 1.386. With horses, no sluggish victims for the swift god. 1.387. Because a hind was once sacrificed to Diana the twin, 1.388. Instead of Iphigeneia, a hind dies, though not for a virgin now. 1.389. I have seen a dog’s entrails offered to Trivia by Sapaeans, 1.390. Whose homes border on your snows, Mount Haemus. 1.391. A young ass too is sacrificed to the erect rural guardian, 1.392. Priapus, the reason’s shameful, but appropriate to the god. 1.393. Greece, you held a festival of ivy-berried Bacchus, 1.394. That used to recur at the appointed time, every third winter. 1.395. There too came the divinities who worshipped him as Lyaeus, 1.396. And whoever else was not averse to jesting, 1.397. The Pans and the young Satyrs prone to lust, 1.398. And the goddesses of rivers and lonely haunts. 1.399. And old Silenus came on a hollow-backed ass, 1.400. And crimson Priapus scaring the timid birds with his rod. 1.401. Finding a grove suited to sweet entertainment, 1.402. They lay down on beds of grass covered with cloths. 1.403. Liber offered wine, each had brought a garland, 1.404. A stream supplied ample water for the mixing. 1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair, 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee, 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass, 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 1.411. So some create amorous passion in the Satyrs, 1.412. Some in you, Pan, brows wreathed in pine. 1.413. You too Silenus, are on fire, insatiable lecher: 1.414. Wickedness alone prevents you growing old. 1.415. But crimson Priapus, guardian and glory of gardens, 1.416. of them all, was captivated by Lotis: 1.417. He desires, and prays, and sighs for her alone, 1.418. He signals to her, by nodding, woos her with signs. 1.419. But the lovely are disdainful, pride waits on beauty: 1.420. She laughed at him, and scorned him with a look. 1.421. It was night, and drowsy from the wine, 1.422. They lay here and there, overcome by sleep. 1.423. Tired from play, Lotis rested on the grassy earth, 1.424. Furthest away, under the maple branches. 1.425. Her lover stood, and holding his breath, stole 1.426. Furtively and silently towards her on tiptoe. 1.427. Reaching the snow-white nymph’s secluded bed, 1.428. He took care lest the sound of his breath escaped. 1.429. Now he balanced on his toes on the grass nearby: 1.430. But she was still completely full of sleep. 1.431. He rejoiced, and drawing the cover from her feet, 1.432. He happily began to have his way with her. 1.433. Suddenly Silenus’ ass braying raucously, 1.434. Gave an untimely bellow from its jaws. 1.435. Terrified the nymph rose, pushed Priapus away, 1.436. And, fleeing, gave the alarm to the whole grove. 1.437. But the over-expectant god with his rigid member, 1.438. Was laughed at by them all, in the moonlight. 1.439. The creator of that ruckus paid with his life, 1.440. And he’s the sacrifice dear to the Hellespontine god. 1.441. You were chaste once, you birds, a rural solace, 1.442. You harmless race that haunt the woodlands, 1.443. Who build your nests, warm your eggs with your wings, 1.444. And utter sweet measures from your ready beaks, 1.445. But that is no help to you, because of your guilty tongues, 1.446. And the gods’ belief that you reveal their thoughts. 1.447. Nor is that false: since the closer you are to the gods, 1.448. The truer the omens you give by voice and flight. 1.449. Though long untouched, birds were killed at last, 1.450. And the gods delighted in the informers’ entrails. 1.451. So the white dove, torn from her mate, 1.452. Is often burned in the Idalian flames: 1.453. Nor did saving the Capitol benefit the goose, 1.454. Who yielded his liver on a dish to you, Inachus’ daughter: 1.455. The cock is sacrificed at night to the Goddess, Night, 1.456. Because he summons the day with his waking cries, 3.603. That had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates, 3.628. ‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting 3.629. This lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense. 3.630. She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore: 3.631. I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’ 3.632. Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong 3.643. To the ground: fear itself had made her daring. 3.644. With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest, 4.45. Epytus gave his son Capys a Trojan name, 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love):
40. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.5-1.437, 2.217-2.226, 4.347-4.349, 5.308-5.309, 5.319-5.331, 5.341-5.355, 9.346-9.348, 10.8-10.10, 15.96-15.142, 15.364-15.366 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) •cornelius gallus Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 5, 187, 192, 277; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349; Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 167, 168
1.5. Ante mare et terras et quod tegit omnia caelum 1.6. unus erat toto naturae vultus in orbe, 1.7. quem dixere chaos: rudis indigestaque moles 1.8. nec quicquam nisi pondus iners congestaque eodem 1.9. non bene iunctarum discordia semina rerum. 1.10. nullus adhuc mundo praebebat lumina Titan, 1.11. nec nova crescendo reparabat cornua Phoebe, 1.12. nec circumfuso pendebat in aere tellus 1.13. ponderibus librata suis, nec bracchia longo 1.14. margine terrarum porrexerat Amphitrite; 1.15. utque aer, tellus illic et pontus et aether. 1.16. Sic erat instabilis tellus, innabilis unda, 1.17. lucis egens aer: nulli sua forma manebat, 1.18. obstabatque aliis aliud, quia corpore in uno 1.19. frigida pugnabant calidis, umentia siccis, 1.20. mollia cum duris, sine pondere habentia pondus. 1.21. Hanc deus et melior litem natura diremit. 1.22. Nam caelo terras et terris abscidit undas, 1.23. et liquidum spisso secrevit ab aere caelum. 1.24. Quae postquam evolvit caecoque exemit acervo, 1.25. dissociata locis concordi pace ligavit. 1.26. Ignea convexi vis et sine pondere caeli 1.27. emicuit summaque locum sibi fecit in arce: 1.28. proximus est aer illi levitate locoque: 1.29. densior his tellus, elementaque grandia traxit 1.30. et pressa est gravitate sua: circumfluus umor 1.31. ultima possedit solidumque coercuit orbem. 1.32. Sic ubi dispositam quisquis fuit ille deorum 1.33. congeriem secuit sectamque in membra redegit, 1.34. principio terram, ne non aequalis ab omni 1.35. parte foret, magni speciem glomeravit in orbis. 1.36. Tum freta diffudit rapidisque tumescere ventis 1.37. iussit et ambitae circumdare litora terrae. 1.38. Addidit et fontes et stagna inmensa lacusque 1.39. fluminaque obliquis cinxit declivia ripis, 1.40. quae, diversa locis, partim sorbentur ab ipsa, 1.41. in mare perveniunt partim campoque recepta 1.42. liberioris aquae pro ripis litora pulsant. 1.43. Iussit et extendi campos, subsidere valles, 1.44. fronde tegi silvas, lapidosos surgere montes. 1.45. Utque duae dextra caelum totidemque sinistra 1.46. parte secant zonae, quinta est ardentior illis, 1.47. sic onus inclusum numero distinxit eodem 1.48. cura dei, totidemque plagae tellure premuntur. 1.49. Quarum quae media est, non est habitabilis aestu: 1.50. nix tegit alta duas: totidem inter utrumque locavit 1.51. temperiemque dedit mixta cum frigore flamma. 1.52. Inminet his aer. Qui quanto est pondere terrae, 1.53. pondere aquae levior tanto est onerosior igni. 1.54. Illic et nebulas, illic consistere nubes 1.55. iussit et humanas motura tonitrua mentes 1.56. et cum fulminibus facientes fulgura ventos. 1.57. His quoque non passim mundi fabricator habendum 1.58. aera permisit: vix nunc obsistitur illis, 1.59. cum sua quisque regant diverso flamina tractu, 1.60. quin lanient mundum: tanta est discordia fratrum. 1.61. Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit 1.62. Persidaque et radiis iuga subdita matutinis; 1.63. vesper et occiduo quae litora sole tepescunt, 1.64. proxima sunt Zephyro: Scythiam septemque triones 1.65. horrifer invasit Boreas: contraria tellus 1.66. nubibus adsiduis pluviaque madescit ab Austro. 1.67. Haec super inposuit liquidum et gravitate carentem 1.68. aethera nec quicquam terrenae faecis habentem. 1.69. Vix ita limitibus dissaepserat omnia certis, 1.70. cum, quae pressa diu massa latuere sub illa, 1.71. sidera coeperunt toto effervescere caelo. 1.72. Neu regio foret ulla suis animalibus orba, 1.73. astra tenent caeleste solum formaeque deorum, 1.74. cesserunt nitidis habitandae piscibus undae, 1.75. terra feras cepit, volucres agitabilis aer. 1.76. Sanctius his animal mentisque capacius altae 1.77. deerat adhuc et quod dominari in cetera posset. 1.78. Natus homo est, sive hunc divino semine fecit 1.79. ille opifex rerum, mundi melioris origo, 1.80. sive recens tellus seductaque nuper ab alto 1.81. aethere cognati retinebat semina caeli; 1.82. quam satus Iapeto mixtam pluvialibus undis 1.83. finxit in effigiem moderantum cuncta deorum. 1.84. Pronaque cum spectent animalia cetera terram, 1.85. os homini sublime dedit, caelumque videre 1.86. iussit et erectos ad sidera tollere vultus. 1.87. Sic, modo quae fuerat rudis et sine imagine, tellus 1.88. induit ignotas hominum conversa figuras. 1.89. Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, 1.90. sponte sua, sine lege fidem rectumque colebat. 1.91. Poena metusque aberant, nec verba mitia fixo 1.92. aere legebantur, nec supplex turba timebat 1.93. iudicis ora sui, sed erant sine vindice tuti. 1.94. Nondum caesa suis, peregrinum ut viseret orbem, 1.95. montibus in liquidas pinus descenderat undas, 1.96. nullaque mortales praeter sua litora norant. 1.97. Nondum praecipites cingebant oppida fossae; 1.98. non tuba directi, non aeris cornua flexi, 1.99. non galeae, non ensis erat: sine militis usu 1.100. mollia securae peragebant otia gentes. 1.101. ipsa quoque inmunis rastroque intacta nec ullis 1.102. saucia vomeribus per se dabat omnia tellus; 1.103. contentique cibis nullo cogente creatis 1.104. arbuteos fetus montanaque fraga legebant 1.105. cornaque et in duris haerentia mora rubetis 1.106. et quae deciderant patula Iovis arbore glandes. 1.107. Ver erat aeternum, placidique tepentibus auris 1.108. mulcebant zephyri natos sine semine flores. 1.109. Mox etiam fruges tellus inarata ferebat, 1.110. nec renovatus ager gravidis canebat aristis; 1.111. flumina iam lactis, iam flumina nectaris ibant, 1.112. flavaque de viridi stillabant ilice mella. 1.113. Postquam, Saturno tenebrosa in Tartara misso, 1.114. sub Iove mundus erat, subiit argentea proles, 1.115. auro deterior, fulvo pretiosior aere. 1.116. Iuppiter antiqui contraxit tempora veris 1.117. perque hiemes aestusque et inaequalis autumnos 1.118. et breve ver spatiis exegit quattuor annum. 1.119. Tum primum siccis aer fervoribus ustus 1.120. canduit, et ventis glacies adstricta pependit. 1.121. Tum primum subiere domus (domus antra fuerunt 1.122. et densi frutices et vinctae cortice virgae). 1.123. Semina tum primum longis Cerealia sulcis 1.124. obruta sunt, pressique iugo gemuere iuvenci. 1.125. Tertia post illam successit aenea proles, 1.126. saevior ingeniis et ad horrida promptior arma, 1.127. non scelerata tamen. De duro est ultima ferro. 1.128. Protinus inrupit venae peioris in aevum 1.129. omne nefas: fugere pudor verumque fidesque; 1.130. In quorum subiere locum fraudesque dolique 1.131. insidiaeque et vis et amor sceleratus habendi. 1.132. Vela dabat ventis (nec adhuc bene noverat illos) 1.133. navita; quaeque diu steterant in montibus altis, 1.134. fluctibus ignotis insultavere carinae, 1.135. communemque prius ceu lumina solis et auras 1.136. cautus humum longo signavit limite mensor. 1.137. Nec tantum segetes alimentaque debita dives 1.138. poscebatur humus, sed itum est in viscera terrae: 1.139. quasque recondiderat Stygiisque admoverat umbris, 1.140. effodiuntur opes, inritamenta malorum. 1.141. Iamque nocens ferrum ferroque nocentius aurum 1.142. prodierat: prodit bellum, quod pugnat utroque, 1.143. sanguineaque manu crepitantia concutit arma. 1.144. Vivitur ex rapto: non hospes ab hospite tutus, 1.145. non socer a genero; fratrum quoque gratia rara est. 1.146. Inminet exitio vir coniugis, illa mariti; 1.147. lurida terribiles miscent aconita novercae; 1.148. filius ante diem patrios inquirit in annos. 1.149. Victa iacet pietas, et virgo caede madentis, 1.150. ultima caelestum terras Astraea reliquit. 1.151. Neve foret terris securior arduus aether, 1.152. adfectasse ferunt regnum caeleste Gigantas 1.153. altaque congestos struxisse ad sidera montes. 1.154. Tum pater omnipotens misso perfregit Olympum 1.155. fulmine et excussit subiectae Pelion Ossae. 1.156. Obruta mole sua cum corpora dira iacerent, 1.157. perfusam multo natorum sanguine Terram 1.158. inmaduisse ferunt calidumque animasse cruorem, 1.159. et, ne nulla suae stirpis monimenta manerent, 1.160. in faciem vertisse hominum. Sed et illa propago 1.161. contemptrix superum saevaeque avidissima caedis 1.162. et violenta fuit: scires e sanguine natos. 1.163. Quae pater ut summa vidit Saturnius arce, 1.164. ingemit et, facto nondum vulgata recenti, 1.165. foeda Lycaoniae referens convivia mensae, 1.166. ingentes animo et dignas Iove concipit iras, 1.167. conciliumque vocat: tenuit mora nulla vocatos. 1.168. Est via sublimis, caelo manifesta sereno: 1.169. lactea nomen habet, candore notabilis ipso. 1.170. Hac iter est superis ad magni tecta Totis 1.171. regalemque domum. Dextra laevaque deorum 1.172. atria nobilium valvis celebrantur apertis 1.173. (plebs habitat diversa locis): hac parte potentes 1.174. caelicolae clarique suos posuere penates. 1.175. Hic locus est, quem, si verbis audacia detur, 1.176. haud timeam magni dixisse Palatia caeli. 1.177. Ergo ubi marmoreo superi sedere recessu, 1.178. celsior ipse loco sceptroque innixus eburno 1.179. terrificam capitis concussit terque quaterque 1.180. caesariem, cum qua terram, mare, sidera movit. 1.181. Talibus inde modis ora indigtia solvit: 1.182. “Non ego pro mundi regno magis anxius illa 1.183. tempestate fui, qua centum quisque parabat 1.184. inicere anguipedum captivo bracchia caelo. 1.185. Nam quamquam ferus hostis erat, tamen illud ab uno 1.186. corpore et ex una pendebat origine bellum. 1.187. Nunc mihi, qua totum Nereus circumsonat orbem, 1.188. perdendum est mortale genus: per flumina iuro 1.189. infera, sub terras Stygio labentia luco! 1.190. cuncta prius temptata: sed inmedicabile corpus 1.191. ense recidendum est, ne pars sincera trahatur. 1.192. Sunt mihi semidei, sunt rustica numina, nymphae 1.193. faunique satyrique et monticolae silvani: 1.194. quos quoniam caeli nondum dignamur honore, 1.195. quas dedimus certe terras habitare sinamus. 1.196. An satis, o superi, tutos fore creditis illos, 1.197. cum mihi, qui fulmen, qui vos habeoque regoque, 1.198. struxerit insidias notus feritate Lycaon?” 1.199. Confremuere omnes studiisque ardentibus ausum 1.200. talia deposcunt. Sic, cum manus inpia saevit 1.201. sanguine Caesareo Romanum exstinguere nomen, 1.202. attonitum tanto subitae terrore ruinae 1.203. humanum genus est totusque perhorruit orbis: 1.204. nec tibi grata minus pietas, Auguste, tuorum est, 1.205. quam fuit illa Iovi. Qui postquam voce manuque 1.206. murmura conpressit, tenuere silentia cuncti. 1.207. Substitit ut clamor pressus gravitate regentis, 1.208. Iuppiter hoc iterum sermone silentia rupit: 1.209. “Ille quidem poenas, curam hanc dimittite, solvit. 1.210. Quod tamen admissum, quae sit vindicta, docebo. 1.211. Contigerat nostras infamia temporis aures; 1.212. quam cupiens falsam summo delabor Olympo 1.213. et deus humana lustro sub imagine terras. 1.214. Longa mora est, quantum noxae sit ubique repertum, 1.215. enumerare: minor fuit ipsa infamia vero. 1.216. Maenala transieram latebris horrenda ferarum 1.217. et cum Cyllene gelidi pineta Lycaei: 1.218. Arcadis hinc sedes et inhospita tecta tyranni 1.219. ingredior, traherent cum sera crepuscula noctem. 1.220. Signa dedi venisse deum, vulgusque precari 1.221. coeperat: inridet primo pia vota Lycaon, 1.222. mox ait ”experiar deus hic, discrimine aperto, 1.223. an sit mortalis. Nec erit dubitabile verum.” 1.224. Nocte gravem somno necopina perdere morte 1.225. me parat: haec illi placet experientia veri. 1.226. Nec contentus eo est: missi de gente Molossa 1.227. obsidis unius iugulum mucrone resolvit, 1.228. atque ita semineces partim ferventibus artus 1.229. mollit aquis, partim subiecto torruit igni. 1.230. Quod simul inposuit mensis, ego vindice flamma 1.231. in domino dignos everti tecta penates. 1.232. Territus ipse fugit, nactusque silentia ruris 1.233. exululat frustraque loqui conatur: ab ipso 1.234. conligit os rabiem, solitaeque cupidine caedis 1.235. vertitur in pecudes et nunc quoque sanguine gaudet. 1.236. In villos abeunt vestes, in crura lacerti: 1.237. fit lupus et veteris servat vestigia formae. 1.238. Canities eadem est, eadem violentia vultus, 1.239. idem oculi lucent, eadem feritatis imago est. 1.240. Occidit una domus. Sed non domus una perire 1.241. digna fuit: qua terra patet, fera regnat Erinys. 1.242. In facinus iurasse putes. Dent ocius omnes 1.243. quas meruere pati (sic stat sententia) poenas.” 1.244. Dicta Iovis pars voce probant stimulosque frementi 1.245. adiciunt, alii partes adsensibus inplent. 1.246. Est tamen humani generis iactura dolori 1.247. omnibus, et, quae sit terrae mortalibus orbae 1.248. forma futura, rogant, quis sit laturus in aras 1.249. tura, ferisne paret populandas tradere terras. 1.250. Talia quaerentes (sibi enim fore cetera curae) 1.251. rex superum trepidare vetat subolemque priori 1.252. dissimilem populo promittit origine mira. 1.253. Iamque erat in totas sparsurus fulmina terras: 1.254. sed timuit, ne forte sacer tot ab ignibus aether 1.255. conciperet flammas longusque ardesceret axis: 1.256. esse quoque in fatis reminiscitur, adfore tempus, 1.257. quo mare, quo tellus correptaque regia caeli 1.258. ardeat et mundi moles obsessa laboret. 1.259. Tela reponuntur manibus fabricata Cyclopum: 1.260. poena placet diversa, genus mortale sub undis 1.261. perdere et ex omni nimbos demittere caelo. 1.262. Protinus Aeoliis Aquilonem claudit in antris 1.263. et quaecumque fugant inductas flamina nubes 1.264. emittitque Notum. Madidis Notus evolat alis, 1.265. terribilem picea tectus caligine vultum: 1.266. barba gravis nimbis, canis fluit unda capillis; 1.267. fronte sedent nebulae, rorant pennaeque sinusque. 1.268. Utque manu late pendentia nubila pressit, 1.269. fit fragor: hinc densi funduntur ab aethere nimbi. 1.270. Nuntia Iunonis varios induta colores 1.271. concipit Iris aquas alimentaque nubibus adfert. 1.272. Sternuntur segetes et deplorata coloni 1.273. vota iacent, longique perit labor inritus anni. 1.274. Nec caelo contenta suo est Iovis ira, sed illum 1.275. caeruleus frater iuvat auxiliaribus undis. 1.276. Convocat hic amnes. Qui postquam tecta tyranni 1.277. intravere sui, “non est hortamine longo 1.278. nunc” ait “utendum. Vires effundite vestras: 1.279. sic opus est! aperite domos ac mole remota 1.280. fluminibus vestris totas inmittite habenas!” 1.281. Iusserat; hi redeunt ac fontibus ora relaxant 1.282. et defrenato volvuntur in aequora cursu. 1.283. Ipse tridente suo terram percussit: at illa 1.284. intremuit motuque vias patefecit aquarum. 1.285. Exspatiata ruunt per apertos flumina campos 1.286. cumque satis arbusta simul pecudesque virosque 1.287. tectaque cumque suis rapiunt penetralia sacris. 1.288. Siqua domus mansit potuitque resistere tanto 1.289. indeiecta malo, culmen tamen altior huius 1.290. unda tegit, pressaeque latent sub gurgite turres. 1.291. Iamque mare et tellus nullum discrimen habebant: 1.292. omnia pontus erant; deerant quoque litora ponto. 1.293. Occupat hic collem, cumba sedet alter adunca 1.294. et ducit remos illic, ubi nuper ararat, 1.295. ille supra segetes aut mersae culmina villae 1.296. navigat, hic summa piscem deprendit in ulmo. 1.297. Figitur in viridi, si fors tulit, ancora prato, 1.298. aut subiecta terunt curvae vineta carinae; 1.299. et, modo qua graciles gramen carpsere capellae, 1.300. nunc ibi deformes ponunt sua corpora phocae. 1.301. Mirantur sub aqua lucos urbesque domosque 1.302. Nereides, silvasque tenent delphines et altis 1.303. incursant ramis agitataque robora pulsant. 1.304. Nat lupus inter oves, fulvos vehit unda leones, 1.305. unda vehit tigres, nec vires fulminis apro, 1.306. crura nec ablato prosunt velocia cervo. 1.307. Quaesitisque diu terris, ubi sistere possit, 1.308. in mare lassatis volucris vaga decidit alis. 1.309. Obruerat tumulos inmensa licentia ponti, 1.310. pulsabantque novi montana cacumina fluctus. 1.311. Maxima pars unda rapitur; quibus unda pepercit, 1.312. illos longa domant inopi ieiunia victu. 1.313. Separat Aonios Oetaeis Phocis ab arvis, 1.314. terra ferax, dum terra fuit, sed tempore in illo 1.315. pars maris et latus subitarum campus aquarum. 1.316. Mons ibi verticibus petit arduus astra duobus, 1.317. nomine Parnasus, superantque cacumina nubes. 1.318. Hic ubi Deucalion (nam cetera texerat aequor) 1.319. cum consorte tori parva rate vectus adhaesit, 1.320. Corycidas nymphas et numina montis adorant 1.321. fatidicamque Themin, quae tunc oracla tenebat. 1.322. Non illo melior quisquam nec amantior aequi 1.323. vir fuit aut illa metuentior ulla deorum. 1.324. Iuppiter ut liquidis stagnare paludibus orbem 1.325. et superesse virum de tot modo milibus unum, 1.326. et superesse videt de tot modo milibus unam, 1.327. innocuos ambo, cultores numinis ambo, 1.328. nubila disiecit nimbisque aquilone remotis 1.329. et caelo terras ostendit et aethera terris. 1.330. Nec maris ira manet, positoque tricuspide telo 1.331. mulcet aquas rector pelagi supraque profundum 1.332. exstantem atque umeros innato murice tectum 1.333. caeruleum Tritona vocat conchaeque soti 1.334. inspirare iubet fluctusque et flumina signo 1.335. iam revocare dato. Cava bucina sumitur illi, 1.336. tortilis, in latum quae turbine crescit ab imo, 1.337. bucina, quae medio concepit ubi aera ponto, 1.338. litora voce replet sub utroque iacentia Phoebo. 1.339. Tunc quoque, ut ora dei madida rorantia barba 1.340. contigit et cecinit iussos inflata receptus, 1.341. omnibus audita est telluris et aequoris undis, 1.342. et quibus est undis audita, coercuit omnes. 1.343. Iam mare litus habet, plenos capit alveus amnes, 1.344. flumina subsidunt collesque exire videntur, 1.345. surgit humus, crescunt loca decrescentibus undis, 1.346. postque diem longam nudata cacumina silvae 1.347. ostendunt limumque tenent in fronde relictum. 1.348. Redditus orbis erat. Quem postquam vidit iem 1.349. et desolatas agere alta silentia terras, 1.350. Deucalion lacrimis ita Pyrrham adfatur obortis: 1.351. “O soror, o coniunx, o femina sola superstes, 1.352. quam commune mihi genus et patruelis origo, 1.353. deinde torus iunxit, nunc ipsa pericula iungunt, 1.354. terrarum, quascumque vident occasus et ortus, 1.355. nos duo turba sumus; possedit cetera pontus. 1.356. Haec quoque adhuc vitae non est fiducia nostrae 1.357. certa satis; terrent etiam nunc nubila mentem. 1.358. Quis tibi, si sine me fatis erepta fuisses, 1.359. nunc animus, miseranda, foret? quo sola timorem 1.360. ferre modo posses? quo consolante doleres? 1.361. Namque ego (crede mihi) si te quoque pontus haberet, 1.362. te sequerer, coniunx, et me quoque pontus haberet. 1.363. O utinam possim populos reparare paternis 1.364. artibus atque animas formatae infundere terrae! 1.365. Nunc genus in nobis restat mortale duobus 1.366. (sic visum superis) hominumque exempla manemus.” 1.367. Dixerat, et flebant. Placuit caeleste precari 1.368. numen et auxilium per sacras quaerere sortes. 1.369. Nulla mora est: adeunt pariter Cephisidas undas, 1.370. ut nondum liquidas, sic iam vada nota secantes. 1.371. Inde ubi libatos inroravere liquores 1.372. vestibus et capiti, flectunt vestigia sanctae 1.373. ad delubra deae, quorum fastigia turpi 1.374. pallebant musco stabantque sine ignibus arae. 1.375. Ut templi tetigere gradus, procumbit uterque 1.376. pronus humi gelidoque pavens dedit oscula saxo 1.377. atque ita “si precibus” dixerunt “numina iustis 1.378. victa remollescunt, si flectitur ira deorum, 1.379. dic, Themi, qua generis damnum reparabile nostri 1.380. arte sit, et mersis fer opem, mitissima, rebus.” 1.381. Mota dea est sortemque dedit: “Discedite templo 1.382. et velate caput cinctasque resolvite vestes 1.383. ossaque post tergum magnae iactate parentis.” 1.384. Obstipuere diu, rumpitque silentia voce 1.385. Pyrrha prior iussisque deae parere recusat, 1.386. detque sibi veniam pavido rogat ore, pavetque 1.387. laedere iactatis maternas ossibus umbras. 1.388. Interea repetunt caecis obscura latebris 1.389. verba datae sortis secum inter seque volutant. 1.390. Inde Promethides placidis Epimethida dictis 1.391. mulcet et “aut fallax” ait “est sollertia nobis, 1.392. aut pia sunt nullumque nefas oracula suadent. 1.393. Magna parens terra est, lapides in corpore terrae 1.394. ossa reor dici; iacere hos post terga iubemur.” 1.395. Coniugis augurio quamquam Titania mota est, 1.396. spes tamen in dubio est: adeo caelestibus ambo 1.397. diffidunt monitis. Sed quid temptare nocebit? 1.398. Discedunt velantque caput tunicasque recingunt 1.399. et iussos lapides sua post vestigia mittunt. 1.400. Saxa (quis hoc credat, nisi sit pro teste vetustas?) 1.401. ponere duritiem coepere suumque rigorem 1.402. mollirique mora mollitaque ducere formam. 1.403. Mox ubi creverunt naturaque mitior illis 1.404. contigit, ut quaedam, sic non manifesta, videri 1.405. forma potest hominis, sed, uti de marmore coepta, 1.406. non exacta satis rudibusque simillima signis. 1.407. Quae tamen ex illis aliquo pars umida suco 1.408. et terrena fuit, versa est in corporis usum; 1.409. quod solidum est flectique nequit, mutatur in ossa; 1.410. quae modo vena fuit, sub eodem nomine mansit; 1.411. inque brevi spatio superorum numine saxa 1.412. missa viri manibus faciem traxere virorum, 1.413. et de femineo reparata est femina iactu. 1.414. Inde genus durum sumus experiensque laborum 1.415. et documenta damus qua simus origine nati. 1.416. Cetera diversis tellus animalia formis 1.417. sponte sua peperit, postquam vetus umor ab igne 1.418. percaluit solis, caenumque udaeque paludes 1.419. intumuere aestu, fecundaque semina rerum 1.420. vivaci nutrita solo ceu matris in alvo 1.421. creverunt faciemque aliquam cepere morando. 1.422. Sic ubi deseruit madidos septemfluus agros 1.423. Nilus et antiquo sua flumina reddidit alveo 1.424. aetherioque recens exarsit sidere limus, 1.425. plurima cultores versis animalia glaebis 1.426. inveniunt, et in his quaedam modo coepta per ipsum 1.427. nascendi spatium, quaedam inperfecta suisque 1.428. trunca vident numeris; et eodem in corpore saepe 1.429. altera pars vivit, rudis est pars altera tellus. 1.430. Quippe ubi temperiem sumpsere umorque calorque, 1.431. concipiunt, et ab his oriuntur cuncta duobus; 1.432. cumque sit ignis aquae pugnax, vapor umidus omnes 1.433. res creat, et discors concordia fetibus apta est. 1.434. Ergo ubi diluvio tellus lutulenta recenti 1.435. solibus aetheriis altoque recanduit aestu, 1.436. edidit innumeras species, partimque figuras 1.437. rettulit antiquas, partim nova monstra creavit. 2.217. ardet Athos Taurusque Cilix et Tmolus et Oete 2.218. et tum sicca, prius creberrima fontibus, Ide, 2.219. virgineusque Helicon et nondum Oeagrius Haemus; 2.220. ardet in inmensum geminatis ignibus Aetna 2.221. Parnasusque biceps et Eryx et Cynthus et Othrys, 2.222. et tandem nivibus Rhodope caritura, Mimasque 2.223. Dindymaque et Mycale natusque ad sacra Cithaeron. 2.224. Nec prosunt Scythiae sua frigora: Caucasus ardet 2.225. Ossaque cum Pindo maiorque ambobus Olympus 2.226. aeriaeque Alpes et nubifer Appenninus. 4.347. Salmacis exarsit: flagrant quoque lumina nymphae, 4.348. non aliter quam cum puro nitidissimus orbe 4.349. opposita speculi referitur imagine Phoebus. 5.308. “Desinite indoctum vana dulcedine vulgus 5.309. fallere: nobiscum, siqua est fiducia vobis, 5.319. bella canit superum, falsoque in honore Gigantas 5.320. ponit et extenuat magnorum facta deorum; 5.321. emissumque ima de sede Typhoea terrae 5.322. caelitibus fecisse metum cunctosque dedisse 5.323. terga fugae, donec fessos Aegyptia tellus 5.324. ceperit et septem discretus in ostia Nilus. 5.325. Huc quoque terrigenam venisse Typhoea narrat 5.326. et se mentitis superos celasse figuris; 5.327. “duxque gregis” dixit “fit Iuppiter; unde recurvis 5.328. nunc quoque formatus Libys est cum cornibus Ammon. 5.329. Delius in corvo, proles Semeleia capro, 5.330. fele soror Phoebi, nivea Saturnia vacca, 5.331. pisce Venus latuit, Cyllenius ibidis alis.” 5.341. “Prima Ceres unco glaebam dimovit aratro, 5.342. prima dedit fruges alimentaque mitia terris, 5.343. prima dedit leges: Cereris sunt omnia munus. 5.344. Illa canenda mihi est. Utinam modo dicere possem 5.345. carmina digna dea: certe dea carmine digna est. 5.346. Vasta giganteis ingesta est insula membris 5.347. Trinacris et magnis subiectum molibus urget 5.348. aetherias ausum sperare Typhoea sedes. 5.349. Nititur ille quidem pugnatque resurgere saepe, 5.350. dextra sed Ausonio manus est subiecta Peloro, 5.351. laeva, Pachyne, tibi, Lilybaeo crura premuntur, 5.352. degravat Aetna caput: sub qua resupinus harenas 5.353. eiectat flammamque ferox vomit ore Typhoeus. 5.354. Saepe remoliri luctatur pondera terrae 5.355. oppidaque et magnos devolvere corpore montes. 9.346. Scilicet, ut referunt tardi nunc denique agrestes, 9.347. Lotis in hanc nymphe, fugiens obscena Priapi, 9.348. contulerat versos servato nomine, vultus. 10.8. Exitus auspicio gravior: nam nupta per herbas 10.9. dum nova naiadum turba comitata vagatur, 10.10. occidit in talum serpentis dente recepto. 15.96. At vetus illa aetas, cui fecimus aurea nomen, 15.97. fetibus arboreis et, quas humus educat, herbis 15.98. fortunata fuit nec polluit ora cruore. 15.99. Tunc et aves tutae movere per aera pennas, 15.100. et lepus impavidus mediis erravit in arvis, 15.101. nec sua credulitas piscem suspenderat hamo: 15.102. cuncta sine insidiis nullamque timentia fraudem 15.103. plenaque pacis erant. Postquam non utilis auctor 15.104. victibus invidit, quisquis fuit ille, deorum 15.105. corporeasque dapes avidam demersit in alvum, 15.106. fecit iter sceleri, primoque e caede ferarum 15.107. incaluisse potest maculatum sanguine ferrum 15.108. (idque satis fuerat), nostrumque petentia letum 15.109. corpora missa neci salva pietate fatemur: 15.110. sed quam danda neci, tam non epulanda fuerunt. 15.111. Longius inde nefas abiit, et prima putatur 15.112. hostia sus meruisse mori, quia semina pando 15.113. eruerit rostro spemque interceperit anni. 15.114. Vite caper morsa Bacchi mactatus ad aras 15.115. dicitur ultoris; nocuit sua culpa duobus! 15.116. Quid meruistis oves, placidum pecus, inque tuendos 15.117. natum homines, pleno quae fertis in ubere nectar, 15.118. mollia quae nobis vestras velamina lanas 15.119. praebetis vitaque magis quam morte iuvatis? 15.120. Quid meruere boves, animal sine fraude dolisque, 15.121. innocuum, simplex, natum tolerare labores? 15.122. Inmemor est demum nec frugum munere dignus, 15.123. qui potuit curvi dempto modo pondere aratri 15.124. ruricolam mactare suum, qui trita labore 15.125. illa, quibus totiens durum renovaverat arvum, 15.126. tot dederat messes, percussit colla securi. 15.127. Nec satis est, quod tale nefas committitur: ipsos 15.128. inscripsere deos sceleri, numenque supernum 15.129. caede laboriferi credunt gaudere iuvenci. 15.130. Victima labe carens et praestantissima forma 15.131. (nam placuisse nocet) vittis insignis et auro 15.132. sistitur ante aras auditque ignara precantem 15.133. imponique suae videt inter cornua fronti, 15.134. quas coluit, fruges percussaque sanguine cultros 15.135. inficit in liquida praevisos forsitan unda. 15.136. Protinus ereptas viventi pectore fibras 15.137. inspiciunt mentesque deum scrutantur in illis: 15.138. unde (fames homini vetitorum tanta ciborum!) 15.139. audetis vesci, genus o mortale? Quod, oro, 15.140. ne facite, et monitis animos advertite nostris! 15.141. Cumque boum dabitis caesorum membra palato, 15.142. mandere vos vestros scite et sentite colonos. 15.364. I quoque, delectos mactatos obrue tauros 15.365. (cognita res usu) de putri viscere passim 15.366. florilegae nascuntur apes, quae more parentum
41. Ovid, Remedia Amoris, 1, 144, 199, 2, 200-204, 21-22, 24, 752, 765, 12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 155
42. Ovid, Tristia, 1.7.13-1.7.16, 2.445-2.466, 4.10.51-4.10.54, 5.1.17, 5.1.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 21, 192, 316
2.445. non fuit opprobrio celebrasse Lycorida Gallo, 2.446. sed linguam nimio non tenuisse mero. 2.447. credere iuranti durum putat esse Tibullus, 2.448. sic etiam de se quod neget illa viro. 2.449. fallere custodes idem note xml:id= 2.450. seque sua miserum nunc ait arte premi. 2.451. saepe, velut gemmam dominae signumve probaret, 2.452. per causam meminit se tetigisse manum; 2.453. utque refert, digitis saepe est nutuque locutus, 2.454. et tacitam mensae duxit in orbe notam 2.455. et quibus e sucis abeat de corpore livor, 2.456. impresso fieri qui solet ore, docet: 2.457. denique ab incauto nimium petit ille marito, 2.458. se quoque uti servet, peccet ut illa minus, 2.459. scit, cui latretur, cum solus obambulet, ipsas 2.460. cur totiens clausas exercet ante fores, 2.461. multaque dat furti talis praecepta docetque 2.462. qua nuptae possint fallere ab arte viros, 2.463. non fuit hoc illi fraudi, legiturque Tibullus 2.464. et placet, et iam te principe notus erat. 2.465. invenies eadem blandi praecepta Properti: 2.466. destrictus minima nec tamen ille nota est.
43. Horace, Ars Poetica, 55 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 20
44. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.79, 1.102-1.135, 1.321, 1.975, 2.7-2.10, 3.420, 3.524, 4.1020, 4.1061-4.1072, 5.1-5.2, 5.13-5.21, 5.373, 6.4-6.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 43, 48, 49, 59; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 160; Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 167, 168
1.62. Humana ante oculos foede cum vita iaceret 1.63. in terris oppressa gravi sub religione, 1.64. quae caput a caeli regionibus ostendebat 1.65. horribili super aspectu mortalibus instans, 1.66. primum Graius homo mortalis tollere contra 1.67. est oculos ausus primusque obsistere contra; 1.68. quem neque fama deum nec fulmina nec minitanti 1.69. murmure compressit caelum, sed eo magis acrem 1.70. inritat animi virtutem, effringere ut arta 1.71. naturae primus portarum claustra cupiret. 1.72. ergo vivida vis animi pervicit et extra 1.73. processit longe flammantia moenia mundi 1.74. atque omne immensum peragravit mente animoque, 1.75. unde refert nobis victor quid possit oriri, 1.76. quid nequeat, finita potestas denique cuique 1.77. qua nam sit ratione atque alte terminus haerens. 1.78. quare religio pedibus subiecta vicissim 1.79. opteritur, nos exaequat victoria caelo. 1.102. Tutemet a nobis iam quovis tempore vatum 1.103. terriloquis victus dictis desciscere quaeres. 1.104. quippe etenim quam multa tibi iam fingere possunt 1.105. somnia, quae vitae rationes vertere possint 1.106. fortunasque tuas omnis turbare timore! 1.107. et merito; nam si certam finem esse viderent 1.108. aerumnarum homines, aliqua ratione valerent 1.109. religionibus atque minis obsistere vatum. 1.110. nunc ratio nulla est restandi, nulla facultas, 1.111. aeternas quoniam poenas in morte timendum. 1.112. ignoratur enim quae sit natura animai, 1.113. nata sit an contra nascentibus insinuetur 1.114. et simul intereat nobiscum morte dirempta 1.115. an tenebras Orci visat vastasque lacunas 1.116. an pecudes alias divinitus insinuet se, 1.117. Ennius ut noster cecinit, qui primus amoeno 1.118. detulit ex Helicone perenni fronde coronam, 1.119. per gentis Italas hominum quae clara clueret; 1.120. etsi praeterea tamen esse Acherusia templa 1.121. Ennius aeternis exponit versibus edens, 1.122. quo neque permaneant animae neque corpora nostra, 1.123. sed quaedam simulacra modis pallentia miris; 1.124. unde sibi exortam semper florentis Homeri 1.125. commemorat speciem lacrimas effundere salsas 1.126. coepisse et rerum naturam expandere dictis. 1.127. qua propter bene cum superis de rebus habenda 1.128. nobis est ratio, solis lunaeque meatus 1.129. qua fiant ratione, et qua vi quaeque gerantur 1.130. in terris, tunc cum primis ratione sagaci 1.131. unde anima atque animi constet natura videndum, 1.132. et quae res nobis vigilantibus obvia mentes 1.133. terrificet morbo adfectis somnoque sepultis, 1.134. cernere uti videamur eos audireque coram, 1.135. morte obita quorum tellus amplectitur ossa. 1.321. invida praeclusit speciem natura videndi. 1.975. quorum utrumque tibi effugium praecludit et omne 2.7. sed nihil dulcius est, bene quam munita tenere 2.8. edita doctrina sapientum templa serena, 2.9. despicere unde queas alios passimque videre 2.10. errare atque viam palantis quaerere vitae, 3.420. digna tua pergam disponere carmina vita. 3.524. res occurrere et effugium praecludere eunti 4.1020. multi mortem obeunt. multi, de montibus altis 4.1061. nam si abest quod ames, praesto simulacra tamen sunt 4.1062. illius et nomen dulce obversatur ad auris. 4.1063. sed fugitare decet simulacra et pabula amoris 4.1064. absterrere sibi atque alio convertere mentem 4.1065. et iacere umorem coniectum in corpora quaeque 4.1066. nec retinere semel conversum unius amore 4.1067. et servare sibi curam certumque dolorem; 4.1068. ulcus enim vivescit et inveterascit alendo 4.1069. inque dies gliscit furor atque aerumna gravescit, 4.1070. si non prima novis conturbes volnera plagis 4.1071. volgivagaque vagus Venere ante recentia cures 4.1072. aut alio possis animi traducere motus. 5.1. Quis potis est dignum pollenti pectore carmen 5.2. condere pro rerum maiestate hisque repertis? 5.13. confer enim divina aliorum antiqua reperta. 5.14. namque Ceres fertur fruges Liberque liquoris 5.15. vitigeni laticem mortalibus instituisse; 5.16. cum tamen his posset sine rebus vita manere, 5.17. ut fama est aliquas etiam nunc vivere gentis. 5.18. at bene non poterat sine puro pectore vivi; 5.19. quo magis hic merito nobis deus esse videtur, 5.20. ex quo nunc etiam per magnas didita gentis 5.21. dulcia permulcent animos solacia vitae. 5.373. haut igitur leti praeclusa est ianua caelo 6.4. et primae dederunt solacia dulcia vitae, 6.5. cum genuere virum tali cum corde repertum, 6.6. omnia veridico qui quondam ex ore profudit;
45. Propertius, Elegies, None (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 62
46. Catullus, Poems, 64.132 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 146
47. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1, 1.1.1-1.1.2, 1.1.5, 1.1.53-1.1.58, 1.1.69-1.1.72, 1.2.91-1.2.92, 1.3, 1.3.35-1.3.50, 1.4.40, 1.5.3, 1.7.29, 1.10, 1.10.11, 1.10.13, 2.1, 2.3, 2.3.11, 2.3.14-2.3.16, 2.3.31-2.3.32, 2.5-2.6, 2.6.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 152; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 31, 32, 46, 47, 57, 58, 59, 62, 117, 229, 231, 304, 321, 329, 330
48. Sallust, Catiline, 11-13, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 48
49. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1, 1.678, 3.112, 4.305-4.330, 4.347, 4.365-4.387, 4.420, 4.489, 4.529-4.532, 4.591, 4.672-4.692, 5.334, 7.37-7.45, 8.726, 9.465-9.467, 10.132-10.138, 12.4-12.9, 12.702-12.703 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 146; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 14, 15, 16, 136, 162, 277, 311, 312, 316; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 246; Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 62
1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way, 1.678. Aeneas groaned aloud, with bursting heart, 3.112. and Myconos uptower, and bade it rest 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew, 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes, 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring, 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung, 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call, 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy , a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire, 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish, 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire, 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel, 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred, 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus , I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.420. his stratagem, and all the coming change 4.489. of Carthage and thy Libyan colony 4.529. His Lycian oracles! and sent by Jove 4.530. the messenger of Heaven on fleeting air 4.531. the ruthless bidding brings! Proud business 4.532. for gods, I trow, that such a task disturbs 4.591. thee only, did that traitor make a friend, 4.672. a witch, a priestess, a Numidian crone, 4.673. who guards the shrine of the Hesperides 4.674. and feeds the dragon; she protects the fruit 4.675. of that enchanting tree, and scatters there 4.676. her slumb'rous poppies mixed with honey-dew. 4.677. Her spells and magic promise to set free 4.678. what hearts she will, or visit cruel woes 4.679. on men afar. She stops the downward flow 4.680. of rivers, and turns back the rolling stars; 4.681. on midnight ghosts she calls: her vot'ries hear 4.682. earth bellowing loud below, while from the hills 4.683. the ash-trees travel down. But, sister mine, 4.684. thou knowest, and the gods their witness give, 4.685. how little mind have I to don the garb 4.686. of sorcery. Depart in secret, thou, 4.687. and bid them build a lofty funeral pyre 4.688. inside our palalce-wall, and heap thereon 4.689. the hero's arms, which that blasphemer hung 4.690. within my chamber; every relic bring, 4.691. and chiefly that ill-omened nuptial bed, 4.692. my death and ruin! For I must blot out 5.334. with the green laurel-garland; to the crews 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream, 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands, 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered, 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 9.465. had gamed the midnight through and sleeping lay, 9.466. his fair young body to the wine-god given; 9.467. but happier now had that long-revelling night 10.132. his armament, or instigate a war 10.133. for Cupid's sake? Then was thy decent hour 10.134. to tremble for thy children; now too late 10.135. the folly of thy long lament to Heaven, 10.136. and objurgation vain.” Such Juno's plea; 10.137. the throng of gods with voices loud or low 10.138. gave various reply: as gathering winds 12.4. gaze all his way, fierce rage implacable 12.5. wells his high heart. As when on Libyan plain 12.6. a lion, gashed along his tawny breast 12.7. by the huntsman's grievous thrust, awakens him 12.8. unto his last grim fight, and gloriously 12.9. haking the great thews of his maned neck, 12.702. who hated war (though vainly) when he plied 12.703. his native fisher-craft in Lerna 's streams,
50. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.1-1.5, 1.11-1.12, 1.23, 1.40-1.45, 3.105, 4.12, 6.7-6.12, 6.64-6.73, 9.2-9.5, 9.26-9.27, 9.47, 10.9-10.12, 10.70-10.74 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 148, 153; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348, 349; Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 60; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 246; Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 46
51. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 1, 22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
52. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.18, 1.147-1.148, 1.509, 2.9-2.82, 2.490, 2.493, 3.4, 3.13, 3.16, 4.1, 4.281-4.310, 4.315-4.316, 4.319-4.325, 4.351-4.356, 4.448, 4.452-4.527, 4.532, 4.559-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 21, 39, 41, 46, 47, 58, 172, 173, 187, 192, 311, 312, 316; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349; Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 64
1.14. Neptune; et cultor nemorum, cui pinguia Ceae 1.15. ter centum nivei tondent dumeta iuvenci; 1.16. ipse nemus linquens patrium saltusque Lycaei, 1.17. Pan, ovium custos, tua si tibi Maenala curae, 1.18. adsis, o Tegeaee, favens, oleaeque Minerva 1.147. Prima Ceres ferro mortalis vertere terram 1.148. instituit, cum iam glandes atque arbuta sacrae 1.509. Hinc movet Euphrates, illinc Germania bellum; 2.9. Principio arboribus varia est natura creandis. 2.10. namque aliae nullis hominum cogentibus ipsae 2.11. sponte sua veniunt camposque et flumina late 2.12. curva tenent, ut molle siler lentaeque genestae, 2.13. populus et glauca canentia fronde salicta; 2.14. pars autem posito surgunt de semine, ut altae 2.15. castaneae nemorumque Iovi quae maxima frondet 2.16. aesculus atque habitae Grais oracula quercus. 2.17. Pullulat ab radice aliis densissima silva, 2.18. ut cerasis ulmisque; etiam Parnasia laurus 2.19. parva sub ingenti matris se subicit umbra. 2.20. Hos natura modos primum dedit, his genus omne 2.21. silvarum fruticumque viret nemorumque sacrorum. 2.22. Sunt aliae, quas ipse via sibi repperit usus. 2.23. Hic plantas tenero abscindens de corpore matrum 2.24. deposuit sulcis, hic stirpes obruit arvo 2.25. quadrifidasque sudes et acuto robore vallos; 2.26. silvarumque aliae pressos propaginis arcus 2.27. exspectant et viva sua plantaria terra; 2.28. nil radicis egent aliae summumque putator 2.29. haud dubitat terrae referens mandare cacumen. 2.30. Quin et caudicibus sectis—mirabile dictu— 2.31. truditur e sicco radix oleagina ligno. 2.32. Et saepe alterius ramos inpune videmus 2.33. vertere in alterius mutatamque insita mala 2.34. ferre pirum et prunis lapidosa rubescere corna. 2.35. Quare agite o proprios generatim discite cultus, 2.36. agricolae, fructusque feros mollite colendo, 2.37. neu segnes iaceant terrae. Iuvat Ismara Baccho 2.38. conserere atque olea magnum vestire Taburnum. 2.39. Tuque ades inceptumque una decurre laborem, 2.40. O decus, o famae merito pars maxima nostrae, 2.41. Maecenas, pelagoque volans da vela patenti; 2.42. non ego cuncta meis amplecti versibus opto, 2.43. non, mihi si linguae centum sint oraque centum, 2.44. ferrea vox; ades et primi lege litoris oram. 2.45. In manibus terrae; non hic te carmine ficto 2.46. atque per ambages et longa exorsa tenebo. 2.47. Sponte sua quae se tollunt in luminis oras, 2.48. infecunda quidem, sed laeta et fortia surgunt; 2.49. quippe solo natura subest. Tamen haec quoque, si quis 2.50. inserat aut scrobibus mandet mutata subactis, 2.51. exuerint silvestrem animum cultuque frequenti 2.52. in quascumque voles artis haud tarda sequentur. 2.53. Nec non et sterilis, quae stirpibus exit ab imis, 2.54. hoc faciat, vacuos si sit digesta per agros; 2.55. nunc altae frondes et rami matris opacant 2.56. crescentique adimunt fetus uruntque ferentem. 2.57. Iam quae seminibus iactis se sustulit arbos 2.58. tarda venit seris factura nepotibus umbram, 2.59. pomaque degenerant sucos oblita priores 2.60. et turpis avibus praedam fert uva racemos. 2.61. Scilicet omnibus est labor inpendendus et omnes 2.62. cogendae in sulcum ac multa mercede domandae. 2.63. Sed truncis oleae melius, propagine vites 2.64. respondent, solido Paphiae de robore myrtus; 2.65. plantis et durae coryli nascuntur et ingens 2.66. fraxinus Herculeaeque arbos umbrosa coronae 2.67. Chaoniique patris glandes, etiam ardua palma 2.68. nascitur et casus abies visura marinos. 2.69. Inseritur vero et fetu nucis arbutus horrida, 2.70. et steriles platani malos gessere valentis; 2.71. castaneae fagus, ornusque incanuit albo 2.72. flore piri glandemque sues fregere sub ulmis. 2.73. Nec modus inserere atque oculos inponere simplex. 2.74. Nam qua se medio trudunt de cortice gemmae 2.75. et tenuis rumpunt tunicas, angustus in ipso 2.76. fit nodo sinus: huc aliena ex arbore germen 2.77. includunt udoque docent inolescere libro. 2.78. Aut rursum enodes trunci resecantur et alte 2.79. finditur in solidum cuneis via, deinde feraces 2.80. plantae inmittuntur: nec longum tempus, et ingens 2.81. exsilit ad caelum ramis felicibus arbos 2.82. miraturque novas frondes et non sua poma. 2.490. Felix, qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas, 2.493. Fortunatus et ille, deos qui novit agrestis, 3.4. omnia iam volgata: quis aut Eurysthea durum 3.13. et viridi in campo templum de marmore ponam 3.16. In medio mihi Caesar erit templumque tenebit: 4.1. Protinus aerii mellis caelestia dona 4.281. Sed siquem proles subito defecerit omnis, 4.282. nec genus unde novae stirpis revocetur habebit, 4.283. tempus et Arcadii memoranda inventa magistri 4.284. pandere, quoque modo caesis iam saepe iuvencis 4.285. insincerus apes tulerit cruor. Altius omnem 4.286. expediam prima repetens ab origine famam. 4.287. Nam qua Pellaei gens fortunata Canopi 4.288. accolit effuso stagtem flumine Nilum 4.289. et circum pictis vehitur sua rura phaselis, 4.290. quaque pharetratae vicinia Persidis urget, 4.291. et viridem Aegyptum nigra fecundat harena, 4.292. et diversa ruens septem discurrit in ora 4.293. usque coloratis amnis devexus ab Indis 4.294. omnis in hac certam regio iacit arte salutem. 4.295. Exiguus primum atque ipsos contractus in usus 4.296. eligitur locus; hunc angustique imbrice tecti 4.297. parietibusque premunt artis et quattuor addunt, 4.298. quattuor a ventis obliqua luce fenestras. 4.299. Tum vitulus bima curvans iam cornua fronte 4.300. quaeritur; huic geminae nares et spiritus oris 4.301. multa reluctanti obstruitur, plagisque perempto 4.302. tunsa per integram solvuntur viscera pellem. 4.303. Sic positum in clauso linquunt et ramea costis 4.304. subiciunt fragmenta, thymum casiasque recentes. 4.305. Hoc geritur Zephyris primum impellentibus undas, 4.306. ante novis rubeant quam prata coloribus, ante 4.307. garrula quam tignis nidum suspendat hirundo. 4.308. Interea teneris tepefactus in ossibus umor 4.309. aestuat et visenda modis animalia miris, 4.310. trunca pedum primo, mox et stridentia pennis, 4.315. Quis deus hanc, Musae, quis nobis extudit artem? 4.316. Unde nova ingressus hominum experientia cepit? 4.319. tristis ad extremi sacrum caput adstitit amnis 4.320. multa querens atque hac adfatus voce parentem: 4.321. “Mater, Cyrene mater, quae gurgitis huius 4.322. ima tenes, quid me praeclara stirpe deorum, 4.323. si modo, quem perhibes, pater est Thymbraeus Apollo, 4.324. invisum fatis genuisti? aut quo tibi nostri 4.325. pulsus amor? quid me caelum sperare iubebas? 4.351. obstipuere; sed ante alias Arethusa sorores 4.352. prospiciens summa flavum caput extulit unda 4.353. et procul: “O gemitu non frustra exterrita tanto, 4.354. Cyrene soror, ipse tibi, tua maxima cura, 4.355. tristis Aristaeus Penei genitoris ad undam 4.356. stat lacrimans et te crudelem nomine dicit.” 4.448. sed tu desine velle. Deum praecepta secuti 4.452. et graviter frendens sic fatis ora resolvit. 4.453. “Non te nullius exercent numinis irae; 4.454. magna luis commissa: tibi has miserabilis Orpheus 4.455. haudquaquam ob meritum poenas, ni fata resistant, 4.456. suscitat et rapta graviter pro coniuge saevit. 4.457. Illa quidem, dum te fugeret per flumina praeceps, 4.458. immanem ante pedes hydrum moritura puella 4.459. servantem ripas alta non vidit in herba. 4.460. At chorus aequalis Dryadum clamore supremos 4.461. implerunt montes; flerunt Rhodopeiae arces 4.462. altaque Pangaea et Rhesi mavortia tellus 4.463. atque Getae atque Hebrus et Actias Orithyia. 4.464. Ipse cava solans aegrum testudine amorem 4.465. te, dulcis coniunx, te solo in litore secum, 4.466. te veniente die, te decedente canebat. 4.467. Taenarias etiam fauces, alta ostia Ditis, 4.468. et caligantem nigra formidine lucum 4.469. ingressus manesque adiit regemque tremendum 4.470. nesciaque humanis precibus mansuescere corda. 4.471. At cantu commotae Erebi de sedibus imis 4.472. umbrae ibant tenues simulacraque luce carentum, 4.473. quam multa in foliis avium se milia condunt 4.474. vesper ubi aut hibernus agit de montibus imber, 4.475. matres atque viri defunctaque corpora vita 4.476. magimum heroum, pueri innuptaeque puellae, 4.477. impositique rogis iuvenes ante ora parentum, 4.478. quos circum limus niger et deformis harundo 4.479. Cocyti tardaque palus inamabilis unda 4.480. alligat et noviens Styx interfusa coercet. 4.481. Quin ipsae stupuere domus atque intima Leti 4.482. tartara caeruleosque implexae crinibus angues 4.483. Eumenides, tenuitque inhians tria Cerberus ora 4.484. atque Ixionii vento rota constitit orbis. 4.485. Iamque pedem referens casus evaserat omnes; 4.486. redditaque Eurydice superas veniebat ad auras, 4.487. pone sequens, namque hanc dederat Proserpina legem, 4.488. cum subita incautum dementia cepit amantem, 4.489. ignoscenda quidem, scirent si ignoscere manes. 4.490. Restitit Eurydicenque suam iam luce sub ipsa 4.491. immemor heu! victusque animi respexit. Ibi omnis 4.492. effusus labor atque immitis rupta tyranni 4.493. foedera, terque fragor stagnis auditus Avernis. 4.494. Illa, “Quis et me,” inquit, “miseram et te perdidit, Orpheu, 4.495. quis tantus furor? En iterum crudelia retro 4.496. Fata vocant, conditque natantia lumina somnus. 4.497. Iamque vale: feror ingenti circumdata nocte 4.498. invalidasque tibi tendens, heu non tua, palmas!” 4.499. dixit et ex oculis subito, ceu fumus in auras 4.500. commixtus tenues, fugit diversa, neque illum, 4.501. prensantem nequiquam umbras et multa volentem 4.502. dicere, praeterea vidit, nec portitor Orci 4.503. amplius obiectam passus transire paludem. 4.504. Quid faceret? Quo se rapta bis coniuge ferret? 4.505. Quo fletu Manis, quae numina voce moveret? 4.506. Illa quidem Stygia nabat iam frigida cumba. 4.507. Septem illum totos perhibent ex ordine menses 4.508. rupe sub aeria deserti ad Strymonis undam 4.509. flesse sibi et gelidis haec evolvisse sub antris 4.510. mulcentem tigres et agentem carmine quercus; 4.511. qualis populea maerens philomela sub umbra 4.512. amissos queritur fetus, quos durus arator 4.513. observans nido implumes detraxit; at illa 4.514. flet noctem ramoque sedens miserabile carmen 4.515. integrat et maestis late loca questibus implet. 4.516. Nulla Venus, non ulli animum flexere hymenaei. 4.517. Solus Hyperboreas glacies Tanaimque nivalem 4.518. arvaque Rhipaeis numquam viduata pruinis 4.519. lustrabat raptam Eurydicen atque inrita Ditis 4.520. dona querens; spretae Ciconum quo munere matres 4.521. inter sacra deum nocturnique orgia Bacchi 4.522. discerptum latos iuvenem sparsere per agros. 4.523. Tum quoque marmorea caput a cervice revulsum 4.524. gurgite cum medio portans Oeagrius Hebrus 4.525. volveret, Eurydicen vox ipsa et frigida lingua 4.526. “ah miseram Eurydicen!” anima fugiente vocabat: 4.527. “Eurydicen” toto referebant flumine ripae.” 4.532. Haec omnis morbi causa; hinc miserabile Nymphae, 4.559. Haec super arvorum cultu pecorumque canebam 4.560. et super arboribus, Caesar dum magnus ad altum 4.561. fulminat Euphraten bello victorque volentes 4.562. per populos dat iura viamque adfectat Olympo. 4.563. Illo Vergilium me tempore dulcis alebat 4.564. Parthenope studiis florentem ignobilis oti, 4.565. carmina qui lusi pastorum audaxque iuventa, 4.566. Tityre, te patulae cecini sub tegmine fagi.
53. Martial, Epigrams, 4.6.4, 14.186 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 313
54. Tacitus, Annals, 3.12.2, 6.29.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •senate of rome, punishes cornelius gallus Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 139
55. Suetonius, Tiberius, 70 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 324
56. Suetonius, Nero, 28.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
57. Suetonius, Iulius, 20.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, c. cornelius Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 60
58. Suetonius, Augustus, 66.1-66.2, 85.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 139
59. Statius, Thebais, 9.678-9.725 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349
60. Statius, Siluae, 1.2.253-1.2.255, 1.3.1, 2.4.1-2.4.3, 3.2.78-3.2.83, 4.7.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 136; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 159, 160, 246
61. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 111 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus, poet and prefect of egypt Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 482
62. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 111 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus, poet and prefect of egypt Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 482
63. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 79.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348
64. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 5.1432-5.1433, 8.17, 8.20, 8.64, 40.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 62, 118
65. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
66. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 1.8.16, 10.1.93, 10.11.88 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 320, 330, 331
1.8.16.  while still greater care is required in teaching all the tropes which are employed for the adornment more especially of poetry, but of oratory as well, and in making his class acquainted with the two sorts of schemata or figures known as figures of speech and figures of thought. I shall however postpone discussion of tropes and figures till I come to deal with the various ornaments of style.
67. Martial, Epigrams, 4.6.4, 14.186 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 313
68. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.574-1.586 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349
69. Suetonius, De Grammaticis, 16.1-16.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 139; Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 141
70. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.8.16, 6.2.30, 10.1.93, 10.11.88 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 12, 155; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 320, 330, 331
1.8.16.  while still greater care is required in teaching all the tropes which are employed for the adornment more especially of poetry, but of oratory as well, and in making his class acquainted with the two sorts of schemata or figures known as figures of speech and figures of thought. I shall however postpone discussion of tropes and figures till I come to deal with the various ornaments of style.
71. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 2.18 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
2.18.  With these words he tried to make it clear that while he considered Homer to be a marvellous and truly divine herald of valour, yet he regarded himself and the Homeric heroes as the athletes who strove in the contest of noble achievement."Still, it would not be at all strange, father," he continued, "if I were to be a good poet as well, did nature but favour me; for you know that a king might find that even rhetoric was valuable to him. You, for example, are often compelled to write and speak in opposition to Demosthenes, a very clever orator who can sway his audience — to say nothing of the other political leaders of Athens."
72. Calpurnius Siculus, Eclogae, 2.1-2.4, 2.51-2.59, 2.68, 2.91, 2.99-2.100, 3.33, 3.43-3.44, 3.88-3.91 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 237, 238, 242, 246
73. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 4.63 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 324
74. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.23.4-53.23.7, 54.1.3-54.1.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •senate of rome, punishes cornelius gallus •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 139; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 105, 118
53.23.4.  The reason was that he consulted and coöperated with Augustus in the most humane, the most celebrated, and the most beneficial projects, and yet did not claim in the slightest degree a share in the glory of them, but used the honours which the emperor bestowed, not for personal gain or enjoyment, but for the benefit of the donor himself and of the public. 53.23.5.  On the other hand, Cornelius Gallus was encouraged to insolence by the honour shown him. Thus, he indulged in a great deal of disrespectful gossip about Augustus and was guilty of many reprehensible actions besides; for he not only set up images of himself practically everywhere in Egypt, but also inscribed upon the pyramids a list of his achievements. 53.23.6.  For this act he was accused by Valerius Largus, his comrade and intimate, and was disfranchised by Augustus, so that he was prevented from living in the emperor's provinces. After this had happened, many others attacked him and brought numerous indictments against him. 53.23.7.  The senate uimously voted that he should be convicted in the courts, exiled, and deprived of his estate, that his estate should be given to Augustus, and that the senate itself should offer sacrifices. Overwhelmed by grief at this, Gallus committed suicide before the decrees took effect; 54.1.3.  They accordingly wished to elect him dictator, and shutting the senators up in their meeting-place, they forced them to vote this measure by threatening to burn down the building over their heads. Next they took the twenty-four rods and approached Augustus, begging him to consent both to being named dictator and to becoming commissioner of the grain supply, as Pompey had once done. 54.1.4.  He accepted the latter duty under compulsion, and ordered that two men should be chosen annually, from among those who had served as praetors not less than five years previously in every case, to attend to the distribution of the grain. As for the dictatorship, however, he did not accept the office, but went so far as to rend his garments when he found himself unable to restrain the people in any other way, either by argument or by entreaty;
75. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.2.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349
8.2.3. ὁ μὲν γὰρ Δία τε ὠνόμασεν Ὕπατον πρῶτος, καὶ ὁπόσα ἔχει ψυχήν, τούτων μὲν ἠξίωσεν οὐδὲν θῦσαι, πέμματα δὲ ἐπιχώρια ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ καθήγισεν, ἃ πελάνους καλοῦσιν ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἡμᾶς Ἀθηναῖοι· Λυκάων δὲ ἐπὶ τὸν βωμὸν τοῦ Λυκαίου Διὸς βρέφος ἤνεγκεν ἀνθρώπου καὶ ἔθυσε τὸ βρέφος καὶ ἔσπεισεν ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ τὸ αἷμα, καὶ αὐτὸν αὐτίκα ἐπὶ τῇ θυσίᾳ γενέσθαι λύκον φασὶν ἀντὶ ἀνθρώπου. 8.2.3. For Cecrops was the first to name Zeus the Supreme god, and refused to sacrifice anything that had life in it, but burnt instead on the altar the national cakes which the Athenians still call pelanoi. But Lycaon brought a human baby to the altar of Lycaean Zeus, and sacrificed it, pouring out its blood upon the altar, and according to the legend immediately after the sacrifice he was changed from a man to a wolf (Lycos).
76. Lucian, A Professor of Public Speaking, 6-9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348
77. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 153
78. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 1.4.12 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
79. Lucian, How To Write History, 56 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 324
80. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 153
2.33.2.
81. Cyprian, Letters, 1.6 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348
82. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 4.1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus (cornelius) Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 136
83. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 17.14.5 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 105
84. Servius, In Vergilii Bucolicon Librum, 4.11, 10.71 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, c. cornelius •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 60; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 246
85. Diomedes Grammarian, Ars Grammatica, 1.484.17-485.10 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 321
86. Maximianus, Elegiae, 1.61-1.62, 1.101, 2.1, 2.33-2.36 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 152, 155
87. Servius Danielis, Ad G., 1.19  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 330
88. Anon., Lament For Bion, 77  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 51
89. B., P.Berol., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 515
90. Papyri, P.Ryl., 3.477  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, c. cornelius Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 75
91. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 6.336, 7.196, 7.352, 7.674, 9.205, 11.130  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 324; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 33, 44
92. Anon., Appendix Vergiliana. Culex, 1  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 246
93. Anon., Scholia Veronensis, None  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 44
94. Anon., Appendix Vergiliana. Catalepton., 7  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 20
95. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 5.49-5.56  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 349
96. Meleager, Epigrams, None  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 33
97. Plutarch, Vita Caesaris, 58  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 31
98. Servius, Ad G., 2.7  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 330
99. Ariosto, Orlando Furioso, 23.108  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 396
100. Parthenius, Test. Lightfoot, 4  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
101. Asconius Pedianus, Works, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 60
103. Gallus, Fr., 2.4  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Xinyue (2022), Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry, 63
104. Ovid, Metamorphoses 1. If., a b c d\n0 1. 1. 1  Tagged with subjects: •gallus (cornelius) Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 136
105. Vergil, Bucolics, 1.1-1.18, 1.21, 1.26-1.35, 1.40-1.43, 1.45-1.52, 1.62, 1.64-1.66, 1.74-1.81, 1.83, 2.21, 2.36-2.39, 2.68-2.69, 2.73, 3.1, 3.3, 3.20, 3.96, 5.12-5.15, 6.2-6.10, 6.13-6.19, 6.21, 6.31-6.84, 7.9, 9.21-9.25, 9.35-9.36, 10.2, 10.6-10.7, 10.9-10.15, 10.18, 10.20-10.77  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 57, 59, 61, 107, 162, 172, 173, 231, 235, 237, 238, 242, 304, 311, 312, 393, 396
106. Servius, Ad A., 1.183, 1.251, 2.32, 2.79, 2.201, 3.16, 6.618, 7.378  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 329, 330, 331
107. Cicero, Tusculanae Disputiones, 46.3-46.4  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 118
108. Servius, Ad B., 1.1, 3.20, 3.70-3.71, 5.21, 6.72, 10.1, 10.46, 10.71  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 6, 8, 12, 21, 23, 29, 44, 105, 117, 329, 330
109. Anon., Vsd, 17, 19, 27, 37-42, 66  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 29
110. Euphorius, Fr., None  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 61, 62
111. Galen, On The Diagnosis And Cure of The Errors of The Soul, None  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Found in books: Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 348
112. Gallus, Cornelius, Fr., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 100
113. Servius Danielis, Ad A., 1.251, 4.462, 10.145, 11.457  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 330
114. Servius Danielis, Ad B., 6.54, 7.22, 8.22  Tagged with subjects: •gallus, cornelius Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 44, 47, 330
115. Suetonius, Ann., 14.2  Tagged with subjects: •cornelius gallus Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2018), Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel, 86
116. Ulpian, Digest, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 220