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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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66 results for "founder"
1. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 14.29 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 780
14.29. "בַּמִּדְבָּר הַזֶּה יִפְּלוּ פִגְרֵיכֶם וְכָל־פְּקֻדֵיכֶם לְכָל־מִסְפַּרְכֶם מִבֶּן עֶשְׂרִים שָׁנָה וָמָעְלָה אֲשֶׁר הֲלִינֹתֶם עָלָי׃", 14.29. "your carcasses shall fall in this wilderness, and all that were numbered of you, according to your whole number, from twenty years old and upward, ye that have murmured against Me;",
2. Homer, Odyssey, 11.24-11.43 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 149
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.485-2.486 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 271
2.485. / for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. / for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths
4. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 66.24 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 780
66.24. "וְיָצְאוּ וְרָאוּ בְּפִגְרֵי הָאֲנָשִׁים הַפֹּשְׁעִים בִּי כִּי תוֹלַעְתָּם לֹא תָמוּת וְאִשָּׁם לֹא תִכְבֶּה וְהָיוּ דֵרָאוֹן לְכָל־בָּשָׂר׃", 66.24. "And they shall go forth, and look Upon the carcasses of the men that have rebelled against Me; For their worm shall not die, Neither shall their fire be quenched; And they shall be an abhorring unto all flesh. ",
5. Herodotus, Histories, 1.5.3, 7.152.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 136
1.5.3. These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike. 7.152.3. The conduct of the Argives was accordingly not utterly shameful. As for myself, although it is my business to set down that which is told me, to believe it is none at all of my business. This I ask the reader to hold true for the whole of my history, for there is another tale current, according to which it would seem that it was the Argives who invited the Persian into Hellas, because the war with the Lacedaemonians was going badly, and they would prefer anything to their present distresses.
6. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.21.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 136
1.21.2. καὶ ὁ πόλεμος οὗτος, καίπερ τῶν ἀνθρώπων ἐν ᾧ μὲν ἂν πολεμῶσι τὸν παρόντα αἰεὶ μέγιστον κρινόντων, παυσαμένων δὲ τὰ ἀρχαῖα μᾶλλον θαυμαζόντων, ἀπ’ αὐτῶν τῶν ἔργων σκοποῦσι δηλώσει ὅμως μείζων γεγενημένος αὐτῶν. 1.21.2. To come to this war; despite the known disposition of the actors in a struggle to overrate its importance, and when it is over to return to their admiration of earlier events, yet an examination of the facts will show that it was much greater than the wars which preceded it.
7. Callimachus, Epigrams, 51 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 90
8. Callimachus, Epigrams, 51 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 90
9. Callimachus, Aetia, 110.64 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 130
10. Ennius, Annales, 1.54-1.55, 1.110, 2.106-2.108 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 90, 128
11. Cicero, Philippicae, 5.46 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 183
12. Cicero, De Oratore, 2.348 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 193
2.348. Est etiam cum ceteris praestantibus viris comparatio in laudatione praeclara. De quo genere libitum mihi est paulo plura quam ostenderam dicere, non tam propter usum forensem, qui est a me omni hoc sermone tractatus, quam ut hoc videretis, si laudationes essent in oratoris officio, quod nemo negat, oratori virtutum omnium cognitionem, sine qua laudatio effici non possit, esse necessariam.
13. Cicero, Republic, 6.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 149
6.13. Sed quo sis, Africane, alacrior ad tutandam rem publicam, sic habeto: omnibus, qui patriam conservaverint, adiuverint, auxerint, certum esse in caelo definitum locum, ubi beati aevo sempiterno fruantur; nihil est enim illi principi deo, qui omnem mundum regit, quod quidem in terris fiat, acceptius quam concilia coetusque hominum iure sociati, quae civitates appellantur; harum rectores et conservatores hinc profecti huc revertuntur.
14. Cicero, Letters, 1.16.6, 1.16.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 269
15. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.16.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244
16. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.85 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 183
17. Cicero, On Fate, 4.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 149
18. Cicero, On Divination, 1.3.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 185
19. Horace, Odes, 3.29.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 316
20. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.79.11 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 116
1.79.11.  But their life was that of herdsmen, and they lived by their own labour, generally upon the mountains in huts which they built, roofs and all, out of sticks and reeds. One of these, called the hut of Romulus, remained even to my day on the flank of the Palatine hill which faces towards the Circus, and it is preserved holy by those who have charge of these matters; they add nothing to it to render it more stately, but if any part of it is injured, either by storms or by the lapse of time, they repair the damage and restore the hut as nearly as possible to its former condition.
21. Horace, Letters, 1.8.12, 1.10.1-1.10.2, 1.14.10-1.14.12, 1.14.16-1.14.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 58
22. Horace, Epodes, 9.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 316
23. Livy, History, None (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244
24. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 3.113-3.128 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 106
3.113. Simplicitas rudis ante fuit: nunc aurea Roma est, 3.114. rend= 3.115. Aspice quae nunc sunt Capitolia, quaeque fuerunt: 3.116. rend= 3.117. Curia, concilio quae nunc dignissima tanto, 3.118. rend= 3.119. Quae nunc sub Phoebo ducibusque Palatia fulgent, 3.120. rend= 3.121. Prisca iuvent alios: ego me nunc denique natum 3.122. rend= 3.123. Non quia nunc terrae lentum subducitur aurum, 3.124. rend= 3.125. Nec quia decrescunt effosso marmore montes, 3.126. rend= 3.127. Sed quia cultus adest, nec nostros mansit in annos 3.128. rend=
25. Ovid, Fasti, 1.15-1.16, 1.27-1.38, 1.199, 1.593-1.619, 1.709-1.712, 2.15-2.16, 2.127-2.128, 2.487, 2.492, 2.496, 2.499-2.512, 2.533-2.571, 3.21-3.24, 3.31-3.34, 3.156, 3.159-3.160, 3.183-3.186, 3.881-3.882, 4.37-4.38, 4.55-4.60, 4.383-4.384, 4.673-4.676 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 51, 90, 93, 116, 117, 118, 122, 128, 130, 136, 141, 193
1.15. adnue coti per laudes ire tuorum, 1.16. deque meo pavidos excute corde metus, 1.27. tempora digereret cum conditor urbis, in anno 1.28. constituit menses quinque bis esse suo. 1.29. scilicet arma magis quam sidera, Romule, noras, 1.30. curaque finitimos vincere maior erat. 1.31. est tamen et ratio, Caesar, quae movent illum, 1.32. erroremque suum quo tueatur, habet, 1.33. quod satis est, utero matris dum prodeat infans, 1.34. hoc anno statuit temporis esse satis, 1.35. per totidem menses a funere coniugis uxor 1.36. sustinet in vidua tristia signa domo, 1.37. haec igitur vidit trabeati cura Quirini, 1.38. cum rudibus populis annua iura daret. 1.199. dum casa Martigenam capiebat parva Quirinum, 1.593. Africa victorem de se vocat, alter Isauras 1.594. aut Cretum domitas testificatur opes; 1.595. hunc Numidae faciunt, illum Messana superbum, 1.596. ille Numantina traxit ab urbe notam, 1.597. et mortem et nomen Druso Germania fecit— 1.598. me miserum, virtus quam brevis illa fuit! 1.599. si petat a victis, tot sumat nomina Caesar, 1.600. quot numero gentes maximus orbis habet, 1.601. ex uno quidam celebres aut torquis adempti 1.602. aut corvi titulos auxiliaris habent. 1.603. Magne, tuum nomen rerum est mensura tuarum: 1.604. sed qui te vicit, nomine maior erat. 1.605. nec gradus est supra Fabios cognominis ullus: 1.606. illa domus meritis Maxima dicta suis. 1.607. sed tamen humanis celebrantur honoribus omnes: 1.608. hic socium summo cum Iove nomen habet, 1.609. sancta vocant augusta patres, augusta vocantur 1.610. templa sacerdotum rite dicata manu; 1.611. huius et augurium dependet origine verbi, 1.612. et quodcumque sua Iuppiter auget ope. 1.613. augeat imperium nostri ducis, augeat annos, 1.614. protegat et vestras querna corona fores, 1.615. auspicibusque deis tanti cognominis heres 1.616. omine suscipiat, quo pater, orbis onus I 15. G CAR 1.617. Respiciet Titan actas ubi tertius Idus, 1.618. fient Parrhasiae sacra relata deae. 1.619. Nam prius Ausonias matres carpenta vehebant 1.709. Ipsum nos carmen deduxit Pacis ad aram. 1.710. haec erit a mensis fine secunda dies. 1.711. frondibus Actiacis comptos redimita capillos, 1.712. Pax, ades et toto mitis in orbe mane. 2.15. at tua prosequimur studioso pectore, Caesar, 2.16. nomina, per titulos ingredimurque tuos. 2.127. sancte pater patriae, tibi plebs, tibi curia nomen 2.128. hoc dedit, hoc dedimus nos tibi nomen, eques, 2.487. unus erit, quem tu tolles in caerula caeli 2.492. forte tuis illic, Romule, iura dabas, 2.496. fit fuga, rex patriis astra petebat equis, 2.499. sed Proculus Longa veniebat Iulius Alba, 2.500. lunaque fulgebat, nec facis usus erat, 2.501. cum subito motu saepes tremuere sinistrae: 2.502. rettulit ille gradus, horrueruntque comae, 2.503. pulcher et humano maior trabeaque decorus 2.504. Romulus in media visus adesse via 2.505. et dixisse simul ‘prohibe lugere Quirites, 2.506. nec violent lacrimis numina nostra suis; 2.507. tura ferant placentque novum pia turba Quirinum 2.508. et patrias artes militiamque colant.’ iussit 2.509. et in tenues oculis evanuit auras; 2.510. convocat hic populos iussaque verba refert. 2.511. templa deo fiunt, collis quoque dictus ab illo est, 2.512. et referunt certi sacra paterna dies. 2.533. Est honor et tumulis. Animas placate paternas 2.534. parvaque in extinctas munera ferte pyras. 2.535. parva petunt manes, pietas pro divite grata est 2.536. munere: non avidos Styx habet ima deos, 2.537. tegula porrectis satis est velata coronis 2.538. et sparsae fruges parcaque mica salis 2.539. inque mero mollita Ceres violaeque solutae: 2.540. haec habeat media testa relicta via. 2.541. nec maiora veto, sed et his placabilis umbra est 2.542. adde preces positis et sua verba focis, 2.543. hunc morem Aeneas, pietatis idoneus auctor, 2.544. attulit in terras, iuste Latine, tuas; 2.545. ille patris Genio sollemnia dona ferebat: 2.546. hinc populi ritus edidicere pios. 2.547. at quondam, dum longa gerunt pugnacibus armis 2.548. bella, Parentales deseruere dies. 2.549. non impune fuit; nam dicitur omine ab isto 2.550. Roma suburbanis incaluisse rogis. 2.551. vix equidem credo: bustis exisse feruntur 2.552. et tacitae questi tempore noctis avi, 2.553. perque vias urbis latosque ululasse per agros 2.554. deformes animas, volgus ie, ferunt. 2.555. post ea praeteriti tumulis redduntur honores, 2.556. prodigiisque venit funeribusque modus, 2.557. dum tamen haec fiunt, viduae cessate puellae: 2.558. expectet puros pinea taeda dies, 2.559. nec tibi, quae cupidae matura videbere matri, 2.560. comat virgineas hasta recurva comas. 2.561. conde tuas, Hymenaee, faces et ab ignibus atris 2.562. aufer! habent alias maesta sepulchra faces. 2.563. di quoque templorum foribus celentur opertis, 2.564. ture vacent arae stentque sine igne foci. 2.565. nunc animae tenues et corpora functa sepulcris 2.566. errant, nunc posito pascitur umbra cibo. 2.567. nec tamen haec ultra, quam tot de mense supersint 2.568. Luciferi, quot habent carmina nostra pedes, 2.569. hanc, quia iusta ferunt, dixere Feralia lucem; 2.570. ultima placandis manibus illa dies. 2.571. ecce anus in mediis residens annosa puellis 3.21. Mars videt hanc visamque cupit potiturque cupita 3.22. et sua divina furta fefellit ope. 3.23. somnus abit, iacet ipsa gravis: iam scilicet intra 3.24. viscera Romanae conditor urbis erat. 3.31. inde duae pariter, visu mirabile, palmae 3.32. surgunt: ex illis altera maior erat, 3.33. et gravibus ramis totum protexerat orbem 3.34. contigeratque sua sidera summa coma. 3.156. Caesaris in multis haec quoque cura fuit. 3.159. promissumque sibi voluit praenoscere caelum 3.160. nec deus ignotas hospes inire domos, 3.183. quae fuerit nostri, si quaeris, regia nati, 3.184. aspice de canna straminibusque domum. 3.185. in stipula placidi capiebat munera somni, 3.186. et tamen ex illo venit in astra toro. 3.881. Ianus adorandus cumque hoc Concordia mitis 3.882. et Romana Salus araque Pacis erit. 33 CC 4.37. hinc satus Aeneas, pietas spectata, per ignes 4.38. sacra patremque humeris, altera sacra, tulit, 4.55. ense cadit patruo Lausus: placet Ilia Marti 4.56. teque parit, gemino iuncte Quirine Remo. 4.57. ille suos semper Venerem Martemque parentes 4.58. dixit et emeruit vocis habere fidem; 4.59. neve secuturi possent nescire nepotes, 4.60. tempora dis generis continuata dedit, 4.383. hanc ego militia sedem, tu pace parasti, 4.384. inter bis quinos usus honore viros.’ 4.673. hanc quondam Cytherea diem properantius ire 4.674. iussit et admissos praecipitavit equos, 4.675. ut titulum imperii quam primum luce sequenti 4.676. Augusto iuveni prospera bella darent. 1.15. Approve my attempt to tell of your family honours, 1.16. And banish the apprehension from my heart. 1.27. When Rome’s founder established the calendar 1.28. He determined there’d be ten months in every year. 1.29. You knew more about swords than stars, Romulus, surely, 1.30. Since conquering neighbours was your chief concern. 1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him, 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral, 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view, 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.199. When a small hut held Romulus, son of Mars, 1.593. Another witnesses to Isaurian or Cretan power tamed: 1.594. This makes glory from Numidians, that Messana, 1.595. While the next drew his fame from Numantia. 1.596. Drusus owed his death and glory to Germany – 1.597. Alas, how brief that great virtue was! 1.598. If Caesar was to take his titles from the defeated 1.599. He would need as many names as tribes on earth. 1.600. Some have earned fame from lone enemies, 1.601. Named from a torque won or a raven-companion. 1.602. Pompey the Great, your name reflects your deeds, 1.603. But he who defeated you was greater still. 1.604. No surname ranks higher than that of the Fabii, 1.605. Their family was called Greatest for their services. 1.606. Yet these are human honours bestowed on all. 1.607. Augustus alone has a name that ranks with great Jove. 1.608. Sacred things are called august by the senators, 1.609. And so are temples duly dedicated by priestly hands. 1.610. From the same root comes the word augury, 1.611. And Jupiter augments things by his power. 1.612. May he augment our leader’s empire and his years, 1.613. And may the oak-leaf crown protect his doors. 1.614. By the god’s auspices, may the father’s omen 1.615. Attend the heir of so great a name, when he rules the world. 1.616. When the third sun looks back on the past Ides, 1.617. The rites of Carmenta, the Parrhasian goddess, are repeated. 1.618. Formerly the Ausonian mothers drove in carriages (carpenta) 1.619. (These I think were named after Evander’s mother). 1.709. This day is the second from the month’s end. 1.710. Come, Peace, your graceful tresses wreathed 1.711. With laurel of Actium: stay gently in this world. 1.712. While we lack enemies, or cause for triumphs: 2.15. Still I promote your titles with a dutiful heart, 2.16. Caesar, and your progress towards glory. 2.127. Sacred Father of the Country, this title has been conferred 2.128. On you, by the senate, the people, and by us, the knights. 2.487. You said to me: “There’ll be one you’ll raise 2.492. You chanced to be judging the people there, Romulus. 2.496. All fled, and the king rose to the stars behind his father’s horses. 2.499. But Julius Proculus was travelling from Alba Longa, 2.500. With the moon shining, and having no need of a torch, 2.501. When suddenly the hedge to his left moved and shook: 2.502. So that he drew back a step, his hair bristling. 2.503. It seemed to him that Romulus, handsome, more than human, 2.504. And finely dressed, stood there, in the centre of the road, 2.505. Saying: ‘Prevent the Quirites from mourning me, 2.506. And profaning my divinity by their tears: 2.507. Let the pious crowds bring incense and propitiate 2.508. The new god Quirinus, and cultivate their father’s art of war.’ 2.509. So he commanded and vanished into thin air: 2.510. Proculus gathered the people and reported the command. 2.511. Temples were built for the god, the hill named for him, 2.512. And on certain days the ancestral rites are re-enacted. 2.533. And the grave must be honoured. Appease your fathers’ 2.534. Spirits, and bring little gifts to the tombs you built. 2.535. Their shades ask little, piety they prefer to costly 2.536. offerings: no greedy deities haunt the Stygian depths. 2.537. A tile wreathed round with garlands offered is enough, 2.538. A scattering of meal, and a few grains of salt, 2.539. And bread soaked in wine, and loose violets: 2.540. Set them on a brick left in the middle of the path. 2.541. Not that I veto larger gifts, but these please the shades: 2.542. Add prayers and proper words to the fixed fires. 2.543. This custom was brought to your lands, just Latinus, 2.544. By Aeneas, a fitting promoter of piety. 2.545. He brought solemn gifts to his father’s spirit: 2.546. From him the people learned the pious rites. 2.547. But once, waging a long war with fierce weapons, 2.548. They neglected the Parentalia, Festival of the Dead. 2.549. It did not go unpunished: they say from that ominous day 2.550. Rome grew hot from funeral fires near the City. 2.551. I scarcely believe it, but they say that ancestral spirit 2.552. Came moaning from their tombs in the still of night, 2.553. And misshapen spirits, a bodiless throng, howled 2.554. Through the City streets, and through the broad fields. 2.555. Afterwards neglected honour was paid to the tombs, 2.556. And there was an end to the portents, and the funerals. 2.557. But while these rites are enacted, girls, don’t marry: 2.558. Let the marriage torches wait for purer days. 2.559. And virgin, who to your mother seem ripe for love, 2.560. Don’t let the curved spear comb your tresses. 2.561. Hymen, hide your torches, and carry them far 2.562. From these dark fires! The gloomy tomb owns other torches. 2.563. And hide the gods, closing those revealing temple doors, 2.564. Let the altars be free of incense, the hearths without fire. 2.565. Now ghostly spirits and the entombed dead wander, 2.566. Now the shadow feeds on the nourishment that’s offered. 2.567. But it only lasts till there are no more days in the month 2.568. Than the feet (eleven) that my metres possess. 2.569. This day they call the Feralia because they bear (ferunt) 2.570. offerings to the dead: the last day to propitiate the shades. 2.571. See, an old woman sitting amongst the girls performs the rite 3.21. Mars saw her, seeing her desired her, desiring her 3.22. Possessed her, by divine power hiding his theft. 3.23. She lost sleep, lay there heavily: and already, 3.24. Rome’s founder had his being in her womb,. 3.31. From it, strange sight, at once, two palm trees sprang: 3.32. One of the trees was taller than the other, 3.33. And covered all the world with its heavy branches, 3.34. Touching the topmost stars with its crown. 3.156. When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand. 3.159. And wished to have prescience of those heaven 3.160. Promised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house. 3.183. If you ask where my son’s palace was, 3.184. See there, that house made of straw and reeds. 3.185. He snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw, 3.186. Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars. 3.881. And the Safety of Rome, and the altar of Peace. 3.882. The Moon rules the months: this month’s span end 4.37. From them came Aeneas, whose piety was seen, carrying 4.38. Holy things, and a father as holy, on his shoulders, through the fire. 4.55. Lausus fell to his uncle’s sword: Ilia pleased Mars, 4.56. And bore you Quirinus, and your brother Remus. 4.57. You always claimed your parents were Mars and Venus, 4.58. And deserved to be believed when you said so: 4.59. And you granted successive months to your race’s gods, 4.60. So your descendants might not be in ignorance of the truth. 4.383. I won this seat in war, and you in peace 4.384. Because of your role among the Decemvirs.’ 4.673. Cytherea once commanded the day to pass more quickly, 4.674. And hurried on the Sun’s galloping horses, 4.675. So this next day young Augustus might receive 4.676. The title of Emperor sooner for his victory in war.
26. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.4, 14.814 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 90, 141
1.4. ad mea perpetuum deducite tempora carmen. 14.814. “unus erit, quem tu tolles in caerula caeli”
27. Ovid, Tristia, 1.1.1, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 116
3.1. ‘Missus in hanc venio timide liber exulis urbem: 3.1. Ergo erat in fatis Scythiam quoque visere nostris, 3.1. Haec mea si casu miraris epistula quare 3.1. O mihi care quidem semper, sed tempore duro 3.1. Usus amicitiae tecum mihi parvus, ut illam 3.1. Foedus amicitiae nec vis, carissime, nostrae, 3.1. VADE salutatum, subito perarata, Perillam, 3.1. Nunc ego Triptolemi cuperem consistere curru, 3.1. Hic quoque sunt igitur Graiae—quis crederet?—urbes 3.1. Siquis adhuc istic meminit Nasonis adempti, 3.1. Si quis es, insultes qui casibus, improbe, nostris, 3.1. Frigora iam Zephyri minuunt, annoque peracto 3.1. Ecce supervacuus—quid enim fuit utile gigni?— 3.1. Cultor et antistes doctorum sancte virorum,
28. Sallust, Catiline, 10.4-10.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 116
29. Propertius, Elegies, None (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 316
30. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 7.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 51, 183
31. Catullus, Poems, 58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 106
32. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 1.6.4 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 331
1.6.4. Quis fuit Marius, si illum suis inspexerimus maioribus? in septem consulatibus nihil habet clarius quam se auctorem. Pompeium si hereditariae extulissent imagines nemo Magnum dixisset. Seruium regem tulit Roma, in cuius uirtutibus humilitate nominis nihil est clarius. quid tibi uidentur illi ab aratro, qui paupertate sua beatam fecere rem publicam ? quemcumque uoluerimus reuolue nobilem: ad humilitatem peruenies. Quid recenseo singulos, cum hanc urbem possim tibi ostendere? nudi stetere colles, interque tam effusa moenia nihil est humili casa nobilius: fastigatis supra tectis auro puro fulgens praelucet Capitolium. potes obiurgare Romanos, quod humilitatem suam cum obscurare possint ostendunt et haec non putant magna, nisi apparuerit ex paruis surrexisse ?
33. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.442 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 778
2.442. Now the overthrow of the places of strength, and the death of the high priest Aias, so puffed up Manahem, that he became barbarously cruel; and as he thought he had no antagonist to dispute the management of affairs with him, he was no better than an insupportable tyrant;
34. Suetonius, Augustus, 7.2, 92.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 116, 185, 193
35. Suetonius, Iulius, 40.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 122
36. Tacitus, Annals, 2.61, 14.53 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 152, 244
2.61. Ceterum Germanicus aliis quoque miraculis intendit animum, quorum praecipua fuere Memnonis saxea effigies, ubi radiis solis icta est, vocalem sonum reddens, disiectasque inter et vix pervias arenas instar montium eductae pyramides certamine et opibus regum, lacusque effossa humo, superfluentis Nili receptacula; atque alibi angustiae et profunda altitudo, nullis inquirentium spatiis penetrabilis. exim ventum Elephantinen ac Syenen, claustra olim Romani imperii, quod nunc rubrum ad mare patescit. 14.53. At Seneca crimitium non ignarus, prodentibus iis quibus aliqua honesti cura et familiaritatem eius magis asperte Caesare, tempus sermoni orat et accepto ita incipit: 'quartus decimus annus est, Caesar, ex quo spei tuae admotus sum, octavus ut imperium obtines: medio temporis tantum honorum atque opum in me cumulasti ut nihil felicitati meae desit nisi moderatio eius. utar magnis exemplis nec meae fortunae sed tuae. abavus tuus Augustus Marco Agrippae Mytilenense secretum, C. Maecenati urbe in ipsa velut peregrinum otium permisit; quorum alter bellorum socius, alter Romae pluribus laboribus iactatus ampla quidem sed pro ingentibus meritis praemia acceperant. ego quid aliud munificentiae tuae adhibere potui quam studia, ut sic dixerim, in umbra educata, et quibus claritudo venit, quod iuventae tuae rudimentis adfuisse videor, grande huius rei pretium. at tu gratiam immensam, innumeram pecuniam circumdedisti adeo ut plerumque intra me ipse volvam: egone equestri et provinciali loco ortus proceribus civitatis adnumeror? inter nobilis et longa decora praeferentis novitas mea enituit? ubi est animus ille modicis contentus? talis hortos extruit et per haec suburbana incedit et tantis agrorum spatiis, tam lato faenore exuberat? una defensio occurrit quod muneribus tuis obniti non debui. 2.61.  But other marvels, too, arrested the attention of Germanicus: in especial, the stone colossus of Memnon, which emits a vocal sound when touched by the rays of the sun; the pyramids reared mountain high by the wealth of emulous kings among wind-swept and all but impassable sands; the excavated lake which receives the overflow of Nile; and, elsewhere, narrow gorges and deeps impervious to the plummet of the explorer. Then he proceeded to Elephantine and Syene, once the limits of the Roman Empire, which now stretches to the Persian Gulf. 14.53.  Seneca was aware of his maligners: they were revealed from the quarters where there was some little regard for honour, and the Caesar's avoidance of his intimacy was becoming marked. He therefore asked to have a time fixed for an interview; it was granted, and he began as follows:— "It is the fourteenth year, Caesar, since I was associated with your hopeful youth, the eighth that you have held the empire: in the time between, you have heaped upon me so much of honour and of wealth that all that is lacking to complete my happiness is discretion in its use. I shall appeal to great precedents, and I shall draw them not from my rank but from yours. Augustus, the grandfather of your grandfather, conceded to Marcus Agrippa the privacy of Mytilene, and to Gaius Maecenas, within the capital itself, something tantamount to retirement abroad. One had been the partner of his wars, the other had been harassed by more numerous labours at Rome, and each had received his reward — a magnificent reward, it is true, but proportioned to immense deserts. For myself, what incentive to your generosity have I been able to apply except some bookish acquirements, cultivated, I might say, in the shadows of the cloister? Acquirements to which fame has come because I am thought to have lent a helping hand in your own first youthful efforts — a wage that overpays the service! But you have invested me with measureless influence, with countless riches; so that often I put the question to myself:— 'Is it I, born in the station of a simple knight and a provincial, who am numbered with the magnates of the realm? Among these nobles, wearing their long-descended glories, has my novel name swum into ken? Where is that spirit which found contentment in mediocrity? Building these terraced gardens? — Pacing these suburban mansions? — Luxuriating in these broad acres, these world-wide investments?' — A single defence suggests itself — that I had not the right to obstruct your bounty.
37. Tacitus, Histories, 5.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244
5.9.  The first Roman to subdue the Jews and set foot in their temple by right of conquest was Gnaeus Pompey; thereafter it was a matter of common knowledge that there were no representations of the gods within, but that the place was empty and the secret shrine contained nothing. The walls of Jerusalem were razed, but the temple remained standing. Later, in the time of our civil wars, when these eastern provinces had fallen into the hands of Mark Antony, the Parthian prince, Pacorus, seized Judea, but he was slain by Publius Ventidius, and the Parthians were thrown back across the Euphrates: the Jews were subdued by Gaius Sosius. Antony gave the throne to Herod, and Augustus, after his victory, increased his power. After Herod's death, a certain Simon assumed the name of king without waiting for Caesar's decision. He, however, was put to death by Quintilius Varus, governor of Syria; the Jews were repressed; and the kingdom was divided into three parts and given to Herod's sons. Under Tiberius all was quiet. Then, when Caligula ordered the Jews to set up his statue in their temple, they chose rather to resort to arms, but the emperor's death put an end to their uprising. The princes now being dead or reduced to insignificance, Claudius made Judea a province and entrusted it to Roman knights or to freedmen; one of the latter, Antonius Felix, practised every kind of cruelty and lust, wielding the power of king with all the instincts of a slave; he had married Drusilla, the grand-daughter of Cleopatra and Antony, and so was Antony's grandson-in‑law, while Claudius was Antony's grandson.
38. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.106.144 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 51
39. Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.28-5.29, 8.132-8.133, 10.15-10.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244, 269
40. Mishnah, Pesahim, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 780
3.1. "אֵלּוּ עוֹבְרִין בְּפֶסַח, כֻּתָּח הַבַּבְלִי, וְשֵׁכָר הַמָּדִי, וְחֹמֶץ הָאֲדוֹמִי, וְזֵתוֹם הַמִּצְרִי, וְזוֹמָן שֶׁל צַבָּעִים, וַעֲמִילָן שֶׁל טַבָּחִים, וְקוֹלָן שֶׁל סוֹפְרִים. רַבִּי אֱלִיעֶזֶר אוֹמֵר, אַף תַּכְשִׁיטֵי נָשִׁים. זֶה הַכְּלָל, כָּל שֶׁהוּא מִמִּין דָּגָן, הֲרֵי זֶה עוֹבֵר בְּפֶסַח. הֲרֵי אֵלּוּ בְאַזְהָרָה, וְאֵין בָּהֶן מִשּׁוּם כָּרֵת: \n", 3.1. "These must be removed on Pesah:Babylonian kutah, Medean beer, Idumean vinegar, Egyptian zitom, The dyer’s pulp, cook’s dough, and the scribes’ paste. Rabbi Eliezer says: women’s ornaments too. This is the general rule: whatever is of a species of grain must be removed on Pesah. These are subject to a warning but they do not involve karet.",
41. Statius, Siluae, 1.1.32-1.1.35, 3.4.47-3.4.49, 4.1.5-4.1.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 316
42. Silius Italicus, Punica, 3.622-3.624, 11.259-11.261, 12.111-12.112 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244, 316
43. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 17.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 152
44. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 2.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 118
45. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 4-6, 3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 185
46. Plutarch, Romulus, 20.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 116
20.4. ἐβουλεύοντο δʼ οἱ βασιλεῖς οὐκ εὐθὺς ἐν κοινῷ μετʼ ἀλλήλων, ἀλλʼ ἑκάτερος πρότερον ἰδίᾳ μετὰ τῶν ἑκατόν, εἶθʼ οὕτως εἰς ταὐτὸν ἅπαντας συνῆγον. ᾤκει δὲ Τάτιος μὲν ὅπου νῦν ὁ τῆς Μονήτης ναός ἐστι, Ῥωμύλος δὲ παρὰ τοὺς λεγομένους βαθμοὺς καλῆς ἀκτῆς. καλῆς ἀκτῆς a corruption of Κάκου ? Cf. Diodorus, iv. 21, 2. οὗτοι δʼ εἰσὶ περὶ τὴν εἰς τὸν ἱππόδρομον τὸν μέγαν ἐκ Παλατίου κατάβασιν. 20.4. The two kings did not at once hold council in common with one another, but each at first sat with his own hundred councillors apart, then afterwards they united them all into one body, as at the present time. Tatius dwelt where now is the temple of Moneta, and Romulus beside the so-called Steps of Fair Shore; The Greek text is probably corrupt. The scalae Caci or Steps of Cacus must be meant. these are near the descent into the Circus Maximus from the Palatine.
47. Plutarch, Camillus, 36.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 331
36.5. εἰσαγομένων δὲ τῶν κατὰ τοῦ Μαλλίου δικῶν μεγάλα τοὺς κατηγόρους ἔβλαπτεν ἡ ὄψις. ὁ γὰρ τόπος, ἐφʼ οὗ βεβηκὼς ὁ Μάλλιοςἐνυκτομάχησε πρὸς τοὺς Κελτούς, ὑπερεφαίνετο τῆς ἀγορᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ Καπιτωλίου καὶ παρεῖχεν οἶκτον τοῖς ὁρῶσιν· αὐτός τε τὰς χεῖρας ὀρέγων ἐκεῖσε καὶ δακρύων ὑπεμίμνῃσκε τῶν ἀγώνων, ὥστε τοὺς κρίνοντας ἀπορεῖν καὶ πολλάκις ἀναβάλλεσθαι τὴν δίκην, μήτʼ ἀφεῖναι βουλομένους ἐπὶ τεκμηρίοις φανεροῖς τὸ ἀδίκημα μήτε χρήσασθαι τῷ νόμῳ δυναμένους ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖς τῆς πράξεως οὔσης διὰ τὸν τόπον. 36.5. When Manlius was brought to trial, the view from the place was a great obstacle in the way of his accusers. For the spot where Manlius had stood when he fought his night battle with the Gauls, overlooked the forum from the Capitol, and moved the hearts of the spectators to pity. Manlius himself, too, stretched out his hands toward the spot, and wept as he called to men’s remembrance his famous struggle there, so that the judges knew not what to do, and once and again postponed the case. They were unwilling to acquit the prisoner of his crime when the proofs of it were so plain; and they were unable to execute the law upon him when, owing to the place of trial, his saving exploit was, so to speak, in every eye.
48. Plutarch, Roman Questions, 27.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 136
49. Mishnah, Moed Qatan, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 780
1.1. "מַשְׁקִין בֵּית הַשְּׁלָחִין בַּמּוֹעֵד וּבַשְּׁבִיעִית, בֵּין מִמַּעְיָן שֶׁיָּצָא בַתְּחִלָּה, בֵּין מִמַּעְיָן שֶׁלֹּא יָצָא בַתְּחִלָּה. אֲבָל אֵין מַשְׁקִין לֹא מִמֵּי הַגְּשָׁמִים וְלֹא מִמֵּי הַקִּילוֹן. וְאֵין עוֹשִׂין עוּגִיּוֹת לַגְּפָנִים: \n", 1.1. "They may water an irrigated field during the festival [week] or in the sabbatical year, both from a newly-emerging spring and from a spring that is not just emerged. But they may not water the field with water from stored rain, and not with a swipe and bucket. And they may not make small ditches around the vines.",
50. Juvenal, Satires, 6.60-6.62 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 106
51. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.4.4, 53.16.7-53.16.8, 56.34.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 51, 116, 185, 193
44.4.4.  In addition to these remarkable privileges they named him father of his country, stamped this title on the coinage, voted to celebrate his birthday by public sacrifice, ordered that he should have a statue in the cities and in all the temples of Rome, 53.16.7.  For when they wished to call him by some distinctive title, and men were proposing one title and another and urging its selection, Caesar was exceedingly desirous of being called Romulus, but when he perceived that this caused him to be suspected of desiring the kingship, 53.16.8.  he desisted from his efforts to obtain it, and took the title of "Augustus," signifying that he was more than human; for all the most precious and sacred objects are termed augusta. Therefore they addressed him also in Greek as Sebastos, meaning an august personage, from the passive of the verb sebazo, "to revere." 56.34.2.  This image was borne from the palace by the officials elected for the following year, and another of gold from the senate-house, and still another upon a triumphal chariot. Behind these came the images of his ancestors and of his deceased relatives (except that of Caesar, because he had been numbered among the demigods) and those of other Romans who had been prominent in any way, beginning with Romulus himself.
52. Anon., Genesis Rabba, 76.6 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 779
76.6. הַצִּילֵנִי נָא מִיַּד אָחִי מִיַּד עֵשָׂו (בראשית לב, יב), הַצֵּל אֶת בָּנַי לֶעָתִיד לָבוֹא מִיַּד בְּנֵי בָנָיו שֶׁבָּאוּ עֲלֵיהֶן מִכֹּחוֹ שֶׁל עֵשָׂו, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (דניאל ז, ח): מִסְתַּכַּל הֲוֵית בְּקַרְנַיָּא וַאֲלוּ קֶרֶן אָחֳרִי זְעֵירָה סִלְקָת בֵּינֵיהֵן, זֶה בֶּן נֵצֶר. (דניאל ז, ח): וּתְלָת מִן קַרְנַיָּא קַדְמָיָתָא אֶתְעֲקַרָה מִן קָדָמַהּ, זוֹ שֶׁנָּתְנוּ לָהֶם מַלְכוּתָם, מַקְדִּין וּקְרוֹס וְקַרְדִידוֹסִי. (דניאל ז, ח): וַאֲלוּ עַיְנִין כְּעַיְנֵי אֲנָשָׁא בְּקַרְנָא דָא וּפֻם מְמַלִּל רַבְרְבָן, זוֹ מַלְכוּת הָרְשָׁעָה שֶׁהִיא מַכְתֶּבֶת טִירוֹנְיָא מִכָּל אֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם. אָמַר רַבִּי יוֹחָנָן כְּתִיב עַל קַרְנַיָא עֲשַׂר מִנַּהּ מַלְכוּתָא עַשְׂרָא מַלְכִין יְקֻמוּן מִן אַרְעָא, כּוּלְּהוֹן בְּיוֹצְאֵי יְרֵכוֹ שֶׁל עֵשָׂו הַכָּתוּב מְדַבֵּר, אֶלָּא: מְִתַּכַּל הֲוֵית בְּקַרְנַיָּא וַאֲלוּ קֶרֶן אָחֳרִי זְעֵירָה סִלְקָת בֵּינֵיהֵן, זוֹ מַלְכוּת הָרְשָׁעָה. וּתְלָת מִן קַרְנַיָּא קַדְמָיָתָא אֶתְעֲקַרָה מִן קָדָמַהּ, אֵלּוּ שְׁלשָׁה מַלְכֻיּוֹת הָרִאשׁוֹנוֹת. וַאֲלוּ עַיְנִין כְּעַיְנֵי אֲנָשָׁא בְּקַרְנָא דָא, זוֹ מַלְכוּת הָרְשָׁעָה שֶׁהִיא מַכְנֶסֶת עַיִן רָעָה בְּמָמוֹנוֹ שֶׁל אָדָם, פְּלַן עַתִּיר נַעַבְדִּינֵיהּ אַרְכוֹנוֹנוּס, פְּלַן עַתִּיר נַעַבְדֵיהּ בַּלְיוֹטוֹס. (בראשית לב, יב): פֶּן יָבוֹא וְהִכַּנִי אֵם עַל בָּנִים, וְאַתָּה אָמַרְתָּ (דברים כב, ו): לֹא תִקַּח הָאֵם עַל הַבָּנִים. דָּבָר אַחֵר, פֶּן יָבוֹא וְהִכַּנִּי אֵם עַל בָּנִים, וְאַתָּה אָמַרְתָּ (ויקרא כב, כח): וְשׁוֹר וָשֶׂה אֹתוֹ וְאֶת בְּנוֹ לֹא תִשְׁחֲטוּ בְּיוֹם אֶחָד.
53. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 271
54. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.1.9-1.1.12, 1.1.15-1.1.19, 2.7.22-2.7.24, 2.7.28-2.7.29 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 58
55. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Tyranni Triginta, 2.1.2, 15.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 779
56. Justinian, Digest, 50.15.1.5 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 779
57. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3-1.11.5, 2.59.3  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome •founder(s), of rome Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 183; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 331
58. Anon., Midrash On Song of Songs, 1.6.4  Tagged with subjects: •abba kolon, alleged founder of rome Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 778
1.6.4. בְּנֵי אִמִּי נִחֲרוּ בִי, רַבִּי מֵאִיר וְרַבִּי יוֹסֵי. רַבִּי מֵאִיר אוֹמֵר בְּנֵי אִמִּי, בְּנֵי אֻמָּתִי, אֵלּוּ הֵן דָּתָן וַאֲבִירָם, נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִּי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי. שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, עַל שֶׁהָיָה עוֹשֶׂה דִין בֵּין בְּנוֹתָיו שֶׁל יִתְרוֹ לֹא הָיָה לוֹ לַעֲשׂוֹת דִּין בֵּינִי וּבֵין אַחַי אֲשֶׁר בְּמִצְרַיִם, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי. רַבִּי יוֹסֵי אוֹמֵר, בְּנֵי אִמִּי נִחֲרוּ בִי, בְּנֵי אֻמָּתִי, אֵלּוּ הַמְרַגְּלִים. נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִּי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי. שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, עַל שֶׁנִּתְעַכַּבְתִּי בַּמִּדְבָּר אַרְבָּעִים וּשְׁתַּיִם מַסָּעוֹת לֹא הָיָה לִי לִכָּנֵס לְאֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי. דָּבָר אַחֵר, בְּנֵי אִמִּי נִחֲרוּ בִי, בְּנֵי אֻמָּתִי, זֶה יָרָבְעָם בֶּן נְבָט. נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי. שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, מִשְּׁמִירַת שְׁנֵי עֲגָלָיו שֶׁל יָרָבְעָם. כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי, לֹא הָיִיתִי מְשַׁמֵּר מִשְׁמֶרֶת כְּהֻנָּה וּלְוִיָה, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי. אָמַר רַבִּי לֵוִי יוֹם שֶׁנִּתְחַתֵּן שְׁלֹמֹה לְבַת פַּרְעֹה נְכֹה, יָרַד מִיכָאֵל הַשַֹּׂר הַגָּדוֹל מִן הַשָּׁמַיִם וְנָעַץ קָנֶה גָּדוֹל בַּיָּם וְעָלָה לַחְלוּחִית מִכָּן וּמִכָּן וְעָשׂוּ אוֹתוֹ מָקוֹם כְּחֹרֶשׁ, וְהוּא הָיָה מְקוֹמָהּ שֶׁל רוֹמִי. יוֹם שֶׁהֶעֱמִיד יָרָבְעָם בֶּן נְבָט שְׁנֵי עֶגְלֵי זָהָב, נִבְנוּ שְׁנֵי צְרִיפִין בְּרוֹמִי, וַהֲווֹ בָּנַיִן לְהוֹן וְאִינוּן נָפְלִין בָּנַיִן לְהוֹן וְנָפְלִין, הֲוָה תַּמָּן גַּבְרָא סַב וּשְׁמֵיהּ אַבָּא קוֹלוֹן אֲמַר לוֹן אִי לֵית אַתּוּן מָטַיִן מַיָּא מִנְּהַר פְּרָת וְגָבְלִין בַּהֲדָא טִינָא וּבָנַיִן לְהוֹן לֵית אִינוּן קָיְמִין, אֲמַרוּ לֵיהּ מָאן עָבִיד כֵּן, אֲמַר לוֹן אֲנָא, עֲבַד גַּרְמֵיהּ שַׁפַּיי דַּחֲמַר, הֲוָה עָלֵיל לְקִרְיָא וְנָפֵיק לְקִרְיָא, עָלֵל לִמְדִינָה וְנָפֵיק לִמְדִינָה, עַד זְמַן דַּאֲתָא לְתַמָּן, כֵּיוָן דִּמְטָא לְתַמָּן אֲזַל וְאַמְטֵי מַיָא מִן פְּרָת וְגַבְלוֹן בְּטִינָא וּבְנוֹן יָתְהוֹן וְקָמוֹן, מִן הַהִיא עָנָתָה הֲווֹן אָמְרִין כָּל מְדִינָה וּמְדִינָה דְּלֵית אַבָּא קוֹלוֹן לָא תִיתְקְרֵי מְדִינָה, וַהֲווֹ קָרְיָין לֵיהּ רוֹמִי בַּבְלוּן. יוֹם שֶׁנִּסְתַּלֵּק אֵלִיָּהוּ זָכוּר לַטּוֹב, נִצָּב בֶּאֱדוֹם מֶלֶךְ, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (מלכים א כב, מח): וּמֶלֶךְ אֵין בֶּאֱדוֹם נִצָּב מֶלֶךְ. דָּבָר אַחֵר, בְּנֵי אִמִּי נִחֲרוּ בִי, בְּנֵי אֻמָּתִי, זֶה אַחְאָב. נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי. שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, מְפַטֵּם וּמַאֲכִיל לְצִדְקִיָּהוּ בֶּן כְּנַעֲנָה וַחֲבֵרָיו, וְנָבִיא אֶחָד שֶׁל אֱמֶת הָיָה לִי, זֶה מִכָיְהוּ, וּפַקֵיד הָכֵי וַאֲמַר (מלכים א כב, כז): וְהַאֲכִלֻהוּ לֶחֶם לַחַץ וּמַיִם לַחַץ עַד בֹּאִי בְשָׁלוֹם, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי. דָּבָר אַחֵר, בְּנֵי אִמִּי, אֻמָּתִי, זוֹ אִיזֶבֶל. נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי, שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, מַאֲכֶלֶת וּמְפַטֶּמֶת לִנְבִיאֵי הַבַּעַל וְהָאַשֵּׁרָה, וְאֵלִיָּהוּ הַנָּבִיא זָכוּר לַטּוֹב שֶׁהָיָה נְבִיא הָאֱמֶת, שָׁלְחָה וְאָמְרָה לוֹ (מלכים א יט, ב): כָעֵת מָחָר אָשִׂים אֶת נַפְשְׁךָ כְּנֶפֶשׁ אַחַד מֵהֶם, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי. דָּבָר אַחֵר, בְּנֵי אִמִּי, זֶה צִדְקִיָּהוּ הַמֶּלֶךְ. נִחֲרוּ בִי, נִתְגָּרוּ בִי, מִלְאוּ הַדַּיָּן חֲרוֹן אַף עָלַי. שָׂמֻנִי נֹטֵרָה אֶת הַכְּרָמִים, שֶׁהָיָה מְפַטֵּם לְפַשְׁחוּר בֶּן מַלְכִּיָּה וַחֲבֵרָיו. וְנָבִיא אֶחָד שֶׁל אֱמֶת הָיָה לִי, זֶה יִרְמְיָהוּ, וְכָתַב בּוֹ (ירמיה לז, כא): וְנָתֹן לוֹ כִכַּר לֶחֶם לַיּוֹם מִחוּץ הָאֹפִים, מַהוּ מִחוּץ הָאֹפִים, אָמַר רַבִּי יִצְחָק זוֹ פַּת קִיבָּר, שֶׁנִּמְכֶּרֶת חוּץ לַפְּלַטְיָא שֶׁהִיא שְׁחוֹרָה מִסֻּבִּים שֶׁל שְׂעוֹרִים, הֱוֵי: כַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי, עַל שֶׁכַּרְמִי שֶׁלִּי לֹא נָטָרְתִּי.
59. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.5, 1.8, 1.421-1.438, 2.725, 2.730-2.731, 2.736-2.740, 2.752-2.757, 2.760, 2.766, 2.768-2.771, 3.302-3.305, 3.349-3.351, 4.86-4.89, 4.165-4.168, 4.655, 6.126, 6.128-6.129, 6.179, 6.268, 6.384, 6.477, 6.539, 6.642-6.644, 6.673, 6.676, 6.688, 6.703, 6.783-6.787, 7.29-7.36, 7.47-7.49, 7.170-7.191, 7.646, 8.86-8.96, 8.105, 8.107, 8.115, 8.306-8.400, 8.554, 8.714-8.728  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 57, 58, 115, 116, 149, 152, 244, 269, 271, 272, 316, 331
1.5. by violence of Heaven, to satisfy 1.8. the city, and bring o'er his fathers' gods 1.421. had driven him,—for desert land it seemed,— 1.422. to learn what tribes of man or beast possess 1.423. a place so wild, and careful tidings bring 1.424. back to his friends. His fleet of ships the while, 1.425. where dense, dark groves o'er-arch a hollowed crag, 1.426. he left encircled in far-branching shade. 1.427. Then with no followers save his trusty friend 1.428. Achates, he went forth upon his way, 1.429. two broad-tipped javelins poising in his hand. 1.430. Deep to the midmost wood he went, and there 1.431. his Mother in his path uprose; she seemed 1.432. in garb and countece a maid, and bore, 1.433. like Spartan maids, a weapon; in such guise 1.434. Harpalyce the Thracian urges on 1.435. her panting coursers and in wild career 1.436. outstrips impetuous Hebrus as it flows. 1.437. Over her lovely shoulders was a bow, 1.438. lender and light, as fits a huntress fair; 2.725. when Priam was his foe. With flush of shame 2.730. the aged warrior hurled with nerveless arm 2.731. his ineffectual spear, which hoarsely rang 2.736. tell him my naughty deeds! Be sure and say 2.737. how Neoptolemus hath shamed his sires. 2.738. Now die!” With this, he trailed before the shrines 2.739. the trembling King, whose feet slipped in the stream 2.740. of his son's blood. Then Pyrrhus' left hand clutched 2.752. and dazed me utterly. A vision rose 2.753. of my own cherished father, as I saw 2.754. the King, his aged peer, sore wounded Iying 2.755. in mortal agony; a vision too 2.756. of lost Creusa at my ravaged hearth, 2.757. and young Iulus' peril. Then my eyes 2.760. from battlement or tower; some in despair 2.766. lighted full well my roving steps and eyes. 2.768. for Troy o'erthrown, and of some Greek revenge, 2.769. or her wronged husband's Iong indigt ire. 2.770. So hid she at that shrine her hateful brow, 2.771. being of Greece and Troy , full well she knew, 3.302. to islands in the broad Ionic main, — 3.303. the Strophades, where dread Celaeno bides, 3.304. with other Harpies, who had quit the halls 3.305. of stricken Phineus, and for very fear 3.349. ons of Laomedon, have ye made war? 3.350. And will ye from their rightful kingdom drive 3.351. the guiltless Harpies? Hear, O, hear my word 4.86. and poured it full between the lifted horns 4.87. of the white heifer; or on temple floors 4.88. he strode among the richly laden shrines, 4.89. the eyes of gods upon her, worshipping 4.165. Juno the Queen replied: “Leave that to me! 4.166. But in what wise our urgent task and grave 4.167. may soon be sped, I will in brief unfold 4.168. to thine attending ear. A royal hunt 4.655. Thus frantic Pentheus flees the stern array 6.126. Through Italy ; the cause of so much ill 6.128. A marriage-chamber for an alien bride. 6.129. Oh! yield not to thy woe, but front it ever, 6.179. Cocytus circles through the sightless gloom. 6.268. In silent flight, and find a wished-for rest 6.384. These were but shapes and shadows sweeping by, 6.477. For thou hast power! Or if some path there be, 6.539. Came safe across the river, and were moored 6.642. of ears and nostrils infamously shorn. 6.643. Scarce could Aeneas know the shuddering shade 6.644. That strove to hide its face and shameful scar; 6.673. In that same hour on my sad couch I lay, 6.676. But my illustrious bride from all the house 6.688. But, friend, what fortunes have thy life befallen? 6.703. To Tartarus th' accurst.” Deiphobus Deïphobus 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured, 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires, 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 7.29. on that destroying shore, kind Neptune filled 7.30. their sails with winds of power, and sped them on 7.32. Now morning flushed the wave, and saffron-garbed 7.33. Aurora from her rose-red chariot beamed 7.34. in highest heaven; the sea-winds ceased to stir; 7.35. a sudden calm possessed the air, and tides 7.36. of marble smoothness met the laboring oar. 7.47. and all their sequent story I unfold! 7.48. How Latium 's honor stood, when alien ships 7.49. brought war to Italy , and from what cause 7.170. eldest of names divine; the Nymphs he called, 7.171. and river-gods unknown; his voice invoked 7.172. the night, the omen-stars through night that roll. 7.173. Jove, Ida's child, and Phrygia 's fertile Queen: 7.174. he called his mother from Olympian skies, 7.175. and sire from Erebus. Lo, o'er his head 7.176. three times unclouded Jove omnipotent 7.177. in thunder spoke, and, with effulgent ray 7.178. from his ethereal tract outreaching far, 7.179. hook visibly the golden-gleaming air. 7.180. Swift, through the concourse of the Trojans, spread 7.181. news of the day at hand when they should build 7.182. their destined walls. So, with rejoicing heart 7.183. at such vast omen, they set forth a feast 7.184. with zealous emulation, ranging well 7.186. Soon as the morrow with the lamp of dawn 7.187. looked o'er the world, they took their separate ways, 7.188. exploring shore and towns; here spread the pools 7.189. and fountain of Numicius; here they see 7.190. the river Tiber , where bold Latins dwell. 7.191. Anchises' son chose out from his brave band 7.646. come back unguided to their friendly door, 8.86. in time to come. I am the copious flood 8.87. which thou beholdest chafing at yon shores 8.88. and parting fruitful fields: cerulean stream 8.89. of Tiber , favored greatly of high Heaven. 8.90. here shall arise my house magnificent, 8.92. So spake the river-god, and sank from view 8.93. down to his deepest cave; then night and sleep 8.94. together from Aeneas fled away. 8.95. He rose, and to the orient beams of morn 8.96. his forehead gave; in both his hollowed palms 8.105. whence first thy beauty flows, there evermore 8.107. O chief and sovereign of Hesperian streams, 8.115. tretched prone. The good Aeneas slew her there, 8.306. rolling this way and that his wrathful eyes, 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed 8.308. the slope of Aventine ; three times he stormed 8.309. the rock-built gate in vain; and thrice withdrew 8.310. to rest him in the vale. But high above 8.311. a pointed peak arose, sheer face of rock 8.312. on every side, which towered into view 8.313. from the long ridge above the vaulted cave, 8.314. fit haunt for birds of evil-boding wing. 8.315. This peak, which leftward toward the river leaned, 8.316. he smote upon its right—his utmost blow — 8.317. breaking its bases Ioose; then suddenly 8.318. thrust at it: as he thrust, the thunder-sound 8.319. filled all the arching sky, the river's banks 8.320. asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm 8.321. reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair 8.322. lay shelterless, and naked to the day 8.323. the gloomy caverns of his vast abode 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.326. th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale, 8.327. which gods abhor; and to the realms on high 8.328. the measureless abyss should be laid bare, 8.329. and pale ghosts shrink before the entering sun. 8.330. Now upon Cacus, startled by the glare, 8.331. caged in the rocks and howling horribly, 8.332. Alcides hurled his weapons, raining down 8.333. all sorts of deadly missiles—trunks of trees, 8.334. and monstrous boulders from the mountain torn. 8.335. But when the giant from his mortal strait 8.336. no refuge knew, he blew from his foul jaws 8.337. a storm of smoke—incredible to tell — 8.338. and with thick darkness blinding every eye, 8.339. concealed his cave, uprolling from below 8.340. one pitch-black night of mingled gloom and fire. 8.341. This would Alcides not endure, but leaped 8.342. headlong across the flames, where densest hung 8.343. the rolling smoke, and through the cavern surged 8.344. a drifting and impenetrable cloud. 8.345. With Cacus, who breathed unavailing flame, 8.346. he grappled in the dark, locked limb with limb, 8.347. and strangled him, till o'er the bloodless throat 8.348. the starting eyeballs stared. Then Hercules 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den, 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes, 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 8.355. of bristling shag, the face both beast and man, 8.356. and that fire-blasted throat whence breathed no more 8.357. the extinguished flame. 'T is since that famous day 8.358. we celebrate this feast, and glad of heart 8.359. each generation keeps the holy time. 8.360. Potitius began the worship due, 8.361. and our Pinarian house is vowed to guard 8.362. the rites of Hercules. An altar fair 8.363. within this wood they raised; 't is called ‘the Great,’ 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows 8.366. with garlands worthy of the gift of Heaven. 8.367. Lift high the cup in every thankful hand, 8.368. and praise our people's god with plenteous wine.” 8.369. He spoke; and of the poplar's changeful sheen, 8.370. acred to Hercules, wove him a wreath 8.371. to shade his silvered brow. The sacred cup 8.372. he raised in his right hand, while all the rest 8.374. Soon from the travelling heavens the western star 8.375. glowed nearer, and Potitius led forth 8.376. the priest-procession, girt in ancient guise 8.377. with skins of beasts and carrying burning brands. 8.378. new feasts are spread, and altars heaped anew 8.379. with gifts and laden chargers. Then with song 8.380. the Salian choir surrounds the blazing shrine, 8.381. their foreheads wreathed with poplar. Here the youth, 8.382. the elders yonder, in proud anthem sing 8.383. the glory and the deeds of Hercules: 8.384. how first he strangled with strong infant hand 8.385. two serpents, Juno's plague; what cities proud, 8.386. Troy and Oechalia, his famous war 8.387. in pieces broke; what labors numberless 8.388. as King Eurystheus' bondman he endured, 8.389. by cruel Juno's will. “Thou, unsubdued, 8.390. didst strike the twy-formed, cloud-bred centaurs down, 8.391. Pholus and tall Hylaeus. Thou hast slain 8.392. the Cretan horror, and the lion huge 8.393. beneath the Nemean crag. At sight of thee 8.394. the Stygian region quailed, and Cerberus, 8.395. crouching o'er half-picked bones in gory cave. 8.396. Nothing could bid thee fear. Typhoeus towered 8.397. in his colossal Titan-panoply 8.398. o'er thee in vain; nor did thy cunning fail 8.399. when Lema's wonder-serpent round thee drew 8.400. its multudinous head. Hail, Jove's true son! 8.554. where smoking rocks precipitously tower 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air, 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber , in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods
63. Arch., Att., 2.5.1, 7.11.3, 7.21.2, 8.2.2, 8.3.3, 9.6.2  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 244, 269
64. Vergil, Eclogues, 2.73  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 269
65. Vergil, Georgics, 2.156-2.157, 2.458-2.467, 2.533-2.535, 4.208-4.209  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 57, 271
2.156. tot congesta manu praeruptis oppida saxis 2.157. fluminaque antiquos subter labentia muros. 2.458. O fortunatos nimium, sua si bona norint, 2.459. agricolas! quibus ipsa procul discordibus armis 2.460. fundit humo facilem victum iustissima tellus. 2.461. Si non ingentem foribus domus alta superbis 2.462. mane salutantum totis vomit aedibus undam, 2.463. nec varios inhiant pulchra testudine postis 2.464. inlusasque auro vestes Ephyreiaque aera, 2.465. alba neque Assyrio fucatur lana veneno 2.466. nec casia liquidi corrumpitur usus olivi: 2.467. at secura quies et nescia fallere vita, 2.533. hanc Remus et frater, sic fortis Etruria crevit 2.534. scilicet et rerum facta est pulcherrima Roma, 2.535. septemque una sibi muro circumdedit arces. 4.208. at genus immortale manet multosque per annos 4.209. stat fortuna domus et avi numerantur avorum.
66. Strabo, Geography, 3.4.16  Tagged with subjects: •aeneas, founder of rome Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 149
3.4.16. Iberia produces a large quantity of roots used in dyeing. In olives, vines, figs, and every kind of similar fruit trees, the Iberian coast next the Mediterranean abounds, they are likewise plentiful beyond. of the coasts next the ocean, that towards the north is destitute of them, on account of the cold, and the remaining portion generally on account of the apathy of the men, and because they do not lead a civilized life, but pass their days in poverty, only acting on the animal impulse, and living most corruptly. They do not attend to ease or luxury, unless any one considers it can add to the happiness of their lives to wash themselves and their wives in stale urine kept in tanks, and to rinse their teeth with it, which they say is the custom both with the Cantabrians and their neighbours. This practice, as well as that of sleeping on the ground, is common both among the Iberians and Kelts. Some say that the Gallicians are atheists, but that the Keltiberians, and their neighbours to the north, [sacrifice] to a nameless god, every full moon, at night, before their doors, the whole family passing the night in dancing and festival. The Vettones, the first time they came to a Roman camp, and saw certain of the officers walking up and down the roads for the mere pleasure of walking, supposed that they were mad, and offered to show them the way to their tents. For they thought, when not fighting, one should remain quietly seated at ease.