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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10526
Suetonius, Vitellius, 14.4
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1. Suetonius, Domitianus, 15.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Suetonius, Tiberius, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Tacitus, Annals, 2.32, 12.52, 16.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.32.  His estate was parcelled out among the accusers, and extraordinary praetorships were conferred on those of senatorial status. Cotta Messalinus then moved that the effigy of Libo should not accompany the funeral processions of his descendants; Gnaeus Lentulus, that no member of the Scribonian house should adopt the surname of Drusus. Days of public thanksgiving were fixed at the instance of Pomponius Flaccus. Lucius Piso, Asinius Gallus, Papius Mutilus, and Lucius Apronius procured a decree that votive offerings should be made to Jupiter, Mars, and Concord; and that the thirteenth of September, the anniversary of Libo's suicide, should rank as a festival. This union of sounding names and sycophancy I have recorded as showing how long that evil has been rooted in the State. â€” Other resolutions of the senate ordered the expulsion of the astrologers and magic-mongers from Italy. One of their number, Lucius Pituanius, was flung from the Rock; another — Publius Marcius — was executed by the consuls outside the Esquiline Gate according to ancient usage and at sound of trumpet. 12.52.  In the consulate of Faustus Sulla and Salvius Otho, Furius Scribonianus was driven into exile, on a charge of inquiring into the end of the sovereign by the agency of astrologers: his mother Vibidia was included in the arraignment, on the ground that she had not acquiesced in her former misadventure — she had been sentenced to relegation. Camillus, the father of Scribonianus, had taken arms in Dalmatia: a point placed by the emperor to the credit of his clemency, since he was sparing this hostile stock for a second time. The exile, however, did not long survive: the question whether he died by a natural death or from poison was answered by the gossips according to their various beliefs. The expulsion of the astrologers from Italy was ordered by a drastic and impotent decree of the senate. Then followed a speech by the emperor, commending all who voluntarily renounced senatorial rank owing to straitened circumstances: those who, by remaining, added impudence to poverty were removed. 16.14.  In the consulate of Gaius Suetonius and Luccius Telesinus, Antistius Sosianus, who had, as I have said, been sentenced to exile for composing scurrilous verses upon Nero, heard of the honour paid to informers and of the emperor's alacrity for bloodshed. Reckless by temperament, with a quick eye for opportunities, he used the similarity of their fortunes in order to ingratiate himself with Pammenes, who was an exile in the same place and, as a noted astrologer, had wide connections of friendship. He believed it was not for nothing that messengers were for ever coming to consult Pammenes, to whom, as he discovered at the same time, a yearly pension was allowed by Publius Anteius. He was further aware that Pammenes' affection for Agrippina had earned him the hatred of Nero; that his riches were admirably calculated to excite cupidity; and that this was a circumstance which proved fatal to many. He therefore intercepted a letter from Anteius, stole in addition the papers, concealed in Pammenes' archives, which contained his horoscope and career, and, lighting at the same time on the astrologer's calculations with regard to the birth and life of Ostorius Scapula, wrote to the emperor that, could he be granted a short respite from his banishment, he would bring him grave news conducive to his safety; for Anteius and Ostorius had designs upon the empire, and were peering into their destinies and that of the prince. Fast galleys were at once sent out, and Sosianus arrived in haste. The moment his information was divulged, Anteius and Ostorius were regarded, not as incriminated, but as condemned: so much so, that not a man would become signatory to the will of Anteius until Tigellinus came forward with his sanction, first warning the testator not to defer his final dispositions. Anteius swallowed poison; but, disgusted by its slowness, found a speedier death by cutting his arteries.
4. Tacitus, Histories, 2.62 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.62.  No other severe measures were taken against the rebels; there were no further confiscations. The wills of those who fell in Otho's ranks were allowed to stand, and if the soldiers died intestate, the law took its regular course. In fact, if Vitellius had only moderated his luxurious mode of life, there would have been no occasion to fear his avarice. But his passion for elaborate banquets was shameful and insatiate. Dainties to tempt his palate were constantly brought from Rome and all Italy, while the roads from both the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian seas hummed with hurrying vehicles. The preparation of banquets for him ruined the leading citizens of the communities through which he passed; the communities themselves were devastated; and his soldiers lost their energy and their valour as they became accustomed to pleasure and learned to despise their leader. Vitellius sent a proclamation to Rome in advance of his arrival, deferring the title Augustus and declining the name Caesar, although he rejected none of an emperor's powers. The astrologers were banished from Italy; strict measures were taken to prevent Roman knights from degrading themselves in gladiatorial schools and the arena. Former emperors had driven knights to such actions by money or more often by force; and most municipal towns and colonies were in the habit of rivalling the emperors in bribing the worst of their young men to take up these disgraceful pursuits.
5. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 16.3, 49.43.5, 57.15.8-57.15.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

49.43.5.  Besides doing this Agrippa drove the astrologers and charlatans from the city. During these same days a decree was passed that no one belonging to the senatorial class should be tried for piracy, and so those who were under any charge at the time were set free, and some were given a free hand to practice their villainy in the future. 57.15.8.  But as for all the other astrologers and magicians and such as practised divination in any other way whatsoever, he put to death those who were foreigners and banished all the citizens that were accused of still employing the art at this time after the previous decree by which it had been forbidden to engage in any such business in the city; but to those that obeyed immunity was granted. 57.15.9.  In fact, all the citizens would have been acquitted even contrary to his wish, had not a certain tribune prevented it. Here was a particularly good illustration of the democratic form of government, inasmuch as the senate, agreeing with the motion of Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, overruled Drusus and Tiberius, only to be thwarted in its turn by the tribune.
6. Theodosius Ii Emperor of Rome, Theodosian Code, 3.1 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7. Paulus Julius, Digesta, 5.21.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander severus Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
apollonius of myndos Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
ascletarius Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
astrologers,astrologers,clients of Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
astrologers,expulsion of Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
astrologers Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
astrology,astrologers Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
caligula Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
clergy,clerics Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
crimen laesae maiestatis Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
divination Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
domitian Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
execution,capital punishment,death penalty Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
false teachers Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
horoscopes Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
jews Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
julius paulus Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
law,roman' Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
mathematici Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
pammenes Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
samaritans Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 77
tiberius Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307
vitellius Bowen and Rochberg (2020), Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts, 307