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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10249
Seneca The Younger, Quaestiones Naturales, 3.18.3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, De Finibus, 3.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.7.  I was down at my place at Tusculum, and wanted to consult some books from the library of the young Lucullus; so I went to his country-house, as I was in the habit of doing, to help myself to the volumes I needed. On my arrival, seated in the library I found Marcus Cato; I had not known he was there. He was surrounded by piles of books on Stoicism; for he possessed, as you are aware, a voracious appetite for reading, and could never have enough of it; indeed it was often his practice actually to brave the idle censure of the mob by reading in the senate-house itself, while waiting for the senate to assemble, — he did not steal any attention from public business. So it may well be believed that when I found him taking a complete holiday, with a vast supply of books at his command, he had the air of indulging in a literary debauch, if the term may be applied to so honourable an occupation.
2. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 3.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.7. nam in Tusculano cum essem vellemque e bibliotheca pueri Luculli quibusdam libris uti, veni in eius villam, ut eos ipse, ut solebam, depromerem. quo cum venissem, M. Catonem, quem ibi esse nescieram, vidi in bibliotheca sedentem multis circumfusum Stoicorum libris. erat enim, ut scis, in eo aviditas legendi, nec satiari poterat, quippe qui ne reprehensionem ne re pn sionē R ne pren- sionem ABE rep hensionem N nec reprensionem V quidem vulgi iem reformidans iem non ut credo reformidans (punct. ab alt. m. pos.) N in ipsa curia soleret legere saepe, dum senatus cogeretur, nihil operae rei publicae detrahens. quo magis tum in summo otio maximaque copia quasi helluari libris, si hoc verbo in tam clara re utendum est, videbatur. 3.7.  I was down at my place at Tusculum, and wanted to consult some books from the library of the young Lucullus; so I went to his country-house, as I was in the habit of doing, to help myself to the volumes I needed. On my arrival, seated in the library I found Marcus Cato; I had not known he was there. He was surrounded by piles of books on Stoicism; for he possessed, as you are aware, a voracious appetite for reading, and could never have enough of it; indeed it was often his practice actually to brave the idle censure of the mob by reading in the senate-house itself, while waiting for the senate to assemble, — he did not steal any attention from public business. So it may well be believed that when I found him taking a complete holiday, with a vast supply of books at his command, he had the air of indulging in a literary debauch, if the term may be applied to so honourable an occupation.
3. Varro, On Agriculture, 3.3.9-3.3.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 2.1.13 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 11.26, 11.36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.26.  By now the ease of adultery had cloyed on Messalina and she was drifting towards untried debaucheries, when Silius himself, blinded by his fate, or convinced perhaps that the antidote to impending danger was actual danger, began to press for the mask to be dropped:— "They were not reduced to waiting upon the emperor's old age: deliberation was innocuous only to the innocent; detected guilt must borrow help from hardihood. They had associates with the same motives for fear. He himself was celibate, childless, prepared for wedlock and to adopt Britannicus. Messalina would retain her power unaltered, with the addition of a mind at ease, could they but forestall Claudius, who, if slow to guard against treachery, was prompt to anger." She took his phrases with a coolness due, not to any tenderness for her husband, but to a misgiving that Silius, with no heights left to scale, might spurn his paramour and come to appreciate at its just value a crime sanctioned in the hour of danger. Yet, for the sake of that transcendent infamy which constitutes the last delight of the profligate, she coveted the name of wife; and, waiting only till Claudius left for Ostia to hold a sacrifice, she celebrated the full solemnities of marriage. 11.36.  Only Mnester caused some hesitation, as, tearing his garments, he called to Claudius to look at the imprints of the lash and remember the phrase by which he had placed him at the disposal of Messalina. "Others had sinned through a bounty of high hope; he, from need; and no man would have had to perish sooner, if Silius gained the empire." The Caesar was affected, and leaned to mercy; but the freedmen decided him, after so many executions of the great, not to spare an actor: when the transgression was so heinous, it mattered nothing whether it was voluntary or enforced. Even the defence of the Roman knight Traulus Montanus was not admitted. A modest but remarkably handsome youth, he had within a single night received his unsought invitation and his dismissal from Messalina, who was equally capricious in her desires and her disdains. In the cases of Suillius Caesoninus and Plautius Lateranus, the death penalty was remitted. The latter was indebted to the distinguished service of his uncle: Suillius was protected by his vices, since in the proceedings of that shameful rout his part had been the reverse of masculine.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
adynaton Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
aversion,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
banquets Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197
cato,m. porcius (of utica,the younger) Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197
cold Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
connoisseurship,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127
decline Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
fastidium,and aversion Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,and connoisseurship Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127
fastidium,and luxury Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,and monotony Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,and moralizing Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,and natural appetite Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,and satiety Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,as ethical reflex Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
fastidium,as index of abnormality Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,caused by pathology Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
fastidium,scripts of,and ambiguity Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fastidium,scripts of,and perversity Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
fighting (of vices and virtue) Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
fish Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197
iced drinks Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
innovation Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
luxury,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
marcius philippus,(lucius) Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127
messalina Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
mirror Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
monotony,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
mullets Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197
natural appetite,deviation from Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
nature Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
nausea Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
nero claudius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
papirius fabianus Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
perversion Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
pleasure Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
poverty Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
rich,regarded as perverse Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 128
satiety,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
scorn,as lexical item,and fastidium,of fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127, 128
self-consciousness' Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 127
stomach Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197, 198
warm Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
weakening Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 198
wise man Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 197