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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9480
Plutarch, Whether Affections Of The Soul Are Worse Than Those Of The Body, 500d


nanand the fox's tawny skin was rough and unpleasant to the eye, "But look at me within, sir judge," said she,"And you will find me fuller far than she Of fair variety," making manifest the versatility of her character which changes to many forms as necessity arises. Shall we, then, say in our own case, "Many of your diseases and affections, Oman, your body naturally produces of itself, and it receives also many that befall it from without; but if you lay yourself open on the inside, you will find a storehouse and treasury, as Democritus says, of all manner of evils and many abnormal states


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 511 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

511. Looked on the light of day. But Rhea bore
2. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 526 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

526. He was ever shifty by nature, siding with the mob. Menelau
3. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

434d. I think the case is thus and no otherwise, said he. Let us not yet affirm it quite fixedly, I said, but if this form when applied to the individual man, accepted there also as a definition of justice, we will then concede the point—for what else will there be to say? But if not, then we will look for something else. But now let us work out the inquiry in which we supposed that, if we found some larger thing that contained justice and viewed it there, we should more easily discover its nature in the individual man.
4. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Plutarch, On Tranquility of Mind, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

473b. but also the wealthy envy the learned, the famous the rich, advocates the sophists, and, by Heaven, free men and patricians regard with wondering admiration and envy successful comedians in the theatre and dancers and servants in the courts of kings; and by so doing they afford themselves no small vexation and disturbance. But that every man has within himself the store-rooms of tranquillity and discontent, and that the jars containing blessings and evils are not stored "on the threshold of Zeus," but are in the soul, is made plain by the differences in men's passions.
6. Plutarch, Marius, 46.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
chlidon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
citizen Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
debate Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
intertextual, intertextuality Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
narrator, narratorial Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
parallelism Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
plato, on complexity' Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 307
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
rome, political power Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240
structures, political Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 240