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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9534
Plutarch, On The Eating Of Flesh I, 996b


nanis no worse than he who slaughters it outright. But it seems that we are more observant of acts contrary to convention than of those that are contrary to nature. In that place, then, Imade my remarks in a popular vein. Istill hesitate, however, to attempt a discussion of the principle underlying my opinion, great as it is, and mysterious and incredible, as Plato says, with merely clever men of mortal opinions, just as a steersman hesitates to shift his course in the midst of a storm, or a playwright to raise his god from the machine in the midst of a play. Yet perhaps it is not unsuitable to set the pitch and announce the theme by quoting some verses of Empedocles. ... By these lines he means, though he does not say so directly, that human souls are imprisoned in mortal bodies as a punishment for murder, the eating of animal flesh, and cannibalism.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.50 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Bacchae, 742-745, 920, 1185 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1185. νέος ὁ μόσχος ἄρτι word split in text foreign xml:lang= 1185. The bull is young; his cheek is just growing downy under his soft-haired crest. Choru
4. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

400c. ign ( σῆμα ). But I think it most likely that the Orphic poets gave this name, with the idea that the soul is undergoing punishment for something; they think it has the body as an enclosure to keep it safe, like a prison, and this is, as the name itself denotes, the safe ( σῶμα ) for the soul, until the penalty is paid, and not even a letter needs to be changed.
5. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

854b. My good man, the evil force that now moves you and prompts you to go temple-robbing is neither of human origin nor of divine, but it is some impulse bred of old in men from ancient wrongs unexpiated, which courses round wreaking ruin; and it you must guard against with all your strength. How you must thus guard, now learn. When there comes upon you any such intention, betake yourself to the rites of guilt-averting, betake yourself as suppliant to the shrines of the curse-lifting deities, betake yourself to the company of the men who are reputed virtuous; and thus learn, partly from others
6. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 2.8-2.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Sayings of The Spartans, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Beasts Are Rational, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Cato The Elder, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, On The Eating of Flesh I, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, On Exilio, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

607c. but by coming to Thebes expatriated his 'descendant,' Euhius Dionysus, Rouser of women, Him that is adored in frenzy"? Now as to the matters at which Aeschylus hinted darkly when he said And pure Apollo, god exiled from heaven "let my lips" in the words of Herodotus "be sealed"; Empedocles, however, when beginning the presentation of his philosophy, says by way of prelude: Alaw there is, an oracle of Doom, of old enacted by the assembled gods, That if a Daemon — such as live for ages— Defile himself with foul and sinful murder, He must for seasons thrice ten thousand roam Far from the Blest: such is the path Itread
12. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, 75, 364 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Whether Land Or Sea Animals Are More Clever, 959 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.36 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.36. 36.The Pythagoreans, therefore, diligently applying themselves to the study of numbers and lines, sacrificed for the most part from these to the Gods, denominating, indeed, a certain number Minerva, but another Diana, and another Apollo: and again, they called one number justice, but another temperance 15. In diagrams also they adopted a similar mode. And thus, by offerings of this kind, they rendered the Gods propitious to them, so as to obtain of them the object of their wishes, by the things which they dedicated to, and the names by which they invoked them. They likewise frequently employed their aid in divination, and if they were in want of a certain thing for the purpose of some investigation. In order, therefore to affect this, they made use of the Gods within the heavens, both the erratic and non-erratic, of all of whom it is requisite to consider the sun as the leader; but to rank the moon in the second place; and we should conjoin with these fire, in the third place, from its |66 alliance to them, as the theologist 16 says. He also says that no animal is to be sacrificed; but that first-fruits are to be offered from meal and honey, and the vegetable productions of the earth. He adds, that fire is not to be enkindled on a hearth defiled with gore; and asserts other things of the like kind. For what occasion is there to transcribe all he says? For he who is studious of piety knows, indeed, that to the Gods no animal is to be sacrificed, but that a sacrifice of this kind pertains to daemons, and other powers, whether they are beneficent, or depraved1. He likewise knows who those are that ought to sacrifice to these, and to what extent they ought to proceed in the sacrifices which they make. Other things, however, will be passed over by me in silence. But what some Platonists have divulged, I shall lay before the reader, in order that the things proposed to be discussed, may become manifest to the intelligent. What they have unfolded, therefore, is as follows: SPAN
15. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Phaedonem Commentaria, 1.3 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

16. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 654-655, 653



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ancestors,wicked (incl. titans) Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 195
bacchoi deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
blood,shedding of Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
daimon,empedoclean Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
demeter deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
derveni papyrus deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
dionysus deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76, 356
eleusis deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
empedocles Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122; deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76, 356
eschatology deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
etymologies deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
eucharist deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
ferocity Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
haussleiter,j. Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
hera Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 195
iconography deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
insensitivity Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
intellect,intelligence of beasts Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
intemperance Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140, 158
lawlessness Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
maenadism deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
man,rational being Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
mankind Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140
necessity,in empedocles Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
oath-breaking,in empedocles Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
oracle,in empedocles Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
orpheus Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
passion Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140
plutarch Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
porphyry Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
profligacy Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
pythagoras Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
rational,soul Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
rites deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76, 356
rome deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
sacramentalism deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 356
sacrifice,animal,rejection of,empedocles Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
sextus empiricus Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
soul,rational Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 158
spitting,sea spits out the daimon Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
stoics Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140, 158
symbola / synthemata deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76
titans deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76, 356
transmigration,in empedocles Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 84
virtue,animal Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140, 158
virtue,human Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 140
wright,m.r.' Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 122
zeus deJauregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 76, 356