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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Marcellinus, Vita Thucydidis, 3
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1. Herodotus, Histories, 5.55, 5.67, 6.126, 6.128 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.55. When he was forced to leave Sparta, Aristagoras went to Athens, which had been freed from its ruling tyrants in the manner that I will show. First Hipparchus, son of Pisistratus and brother of the tyrant Hippias, had been slain by Aristogiton and Harmodius, men of Gephyraean descent. This was in fact an evil of which he had received a premonition in a dream. After this the Athenians were subject for four years to a tyranny not less but even more absolute than before. 5.67. In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. 6.126. In the next generation Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon raised that house still higher, so that it grew much more famous in Hellas than it had formerly been. Cleisthenes son of Aristonymus son of Myron son of Andreas had one daughter, whose name was Agariste. He desired to wed her to the best man he could find in Hellas. ,It was the time of the Olympian games, and when he was victor there with a four-horse chariot, Cleisthenes made a proclamation that whichever Greek thought himself worthy to be his son-in-law should come on the sixtieth day from then or earlier to Sicyon, and Cleisthenes would make good his promise of marriage in a year from that sixtieth day. ,Then all the Greeks who were proud of themselves and their country came as suitors, and to that end Cleisthenes had them compete in running and wrestling contests. 6.128. These were the suitors. When they arrived on the appointed day, Cleisthenes first inquired the country and lineage of each; then he kept them with him for a year, testing their manliness and temper and upbringing and manner of life; this he did by consorting with them alone and in company, putting the younger of them to contests of strength, but especially watching their demeanor at the common meal; for as long as he kept them with him, he did everything for them and entertained them with magnificence. ,The suitors that most pleased him were the ones who had come from Athens, and of these Hippocleides son of Tisandrus was judged foremost, both for his manliness and because in ancestry he was related to the Cypselids of Corinth.
2. Pherecydes of Athens, Fragments, 2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.56-6.58 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 18.2-18.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.26.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.26.7.  After this incident Gelon built noteworthy temples to Demeter and Corê out of the spoils, and making a golden tripod of sixteen talents value he set it up in the sacred precinct at Delphi as a thank-offering to Apollo. At a later time he purposed to build a temple to Demeter at Aetna, since she had none in that place; but he did not complete it, his life having been cut short by fate.
6. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.9.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.9.6. After the hero-shrine of Aratus is an altar to Isthmian Poseidon, and also a Zeus Meilichius (Gracious) and an Artemis named Patroa (Paternal), both of them very inartistic works. The Meilichius is like a pyramid, the Artemis like a pillar. Here too stand their council-chamber and a portico called Cleisthenean from the name of him who built it. It was built from spoils by Cleisthenes, who helped the Amphictyons in the war at Cirrha . c. 590 B.C. In the market-place under the open sky is a bronze Zeus, a work of Lysippus, Contemporary of Alexander the Great. and by the side of it a gilded Artemis.
7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.89 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.89. 6. CLEOBULUSCleobulus, the son of Euagoras, was born at Lindus, but according to Duris he was a Carian. Some say that he traced his descent back to Heracles, that he was distinguished for strength and beauty, and was acquainted with Egyptian philosophy. He had a daughter Cleobuline, who composed riddles in hexameters; she is mentioned by Cratinus, who gives one of his plays her name, in the plural form Cleobulinae. He is also said to have rebuilt the temple of Athena which was founded by Danaus.He was the author of songs and riddles, making some 3000 lines in all.The inscription on the tomb of Midas is said by some to be his:I am a maiden of bronze and I rest upon Midas's tomb. So long as water shall flow and tall trees grow, and the sun shall rise and shine
8. Marcellinus, Vita Thucydidis, 4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

9. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 37



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
ajax, son of telamon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
altar, altars, of the god of the achelous river Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
archon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
asopis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
athens Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
cadoux, theodore j. Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
chersonese Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
choral Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
chorus, cyclic Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
cleisthenes of sicyon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
cleobulus of lindus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
community of all the athenians, membership Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
dionysia, athenian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
festival Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
festivals, promoted by tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
gelon of gela and syracuse Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
gephyraioi, genos Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
gigantomachy zeus, aition for panathenaia Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
harmodios and aristogeiton, and identities Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
hellanicus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
heraeum of argos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
hippocleides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
hippokleides, son of teisandros Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
imposed, community Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
individual Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
little panathenaia Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
lygdamis of naxos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
lysias, great panathenaia Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
marcellinus, life of thucydides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
men, athenian, genos identities Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
men, athenian, subgroup identities Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
miltiades, elder Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
panathenaea Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
panathenaia, instituted in Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
panathenaia, military theme Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
panathenaia, victory celebration Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
pheidon of argos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
pherecydes, of athens Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
philaidai, genos Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
philaus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
pisistratidae Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
ps.-aristotle, athenaion politeia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
pyrrhichistai, expenditures on Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 5
pyrrhichistai, subgroups of city Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
pythagoras of ephesus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
sacrifices' Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
salaminioi, genos, identities Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
salaminioi, genos, procession Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 239
shear, julia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679
sicyon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, at sagri on naxos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, atributed to pythagoras of ephesus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, in himera Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, in syracuse Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, next to mount etna Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, of apollo at palati Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, of athena lindia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
temple, of heros melanippus at sicyon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
theagenes of megara Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
thucydides, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 102
tisander Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 679