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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7520
Lucian, The Sky-Man, 26


nanThe prayers disposed of, he went on to the next chair and opening, and attended to oaths and their takers. These done with, and Hermodorus the Epicurean annihilated, he proceeded to the next chair to deal with omens, prophetic voices, and auguries. Then came the turn of the sacrifice aperture, through which the smoke came up and communicated to Zeus the name of the devotee it represented. After that, he was free to give his wind and weather orders:— Rain for Scythia today, a thunderstorm for Libya, snow for Greece. The north wind he instructed to blow in Lydia, the west to raise a storm in the Adriatic, the south to take a rest; a thousand bushels of hail to be distributed over Cappadocia.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 14.422, 14.427-14.428, 14.434-14.437, 14.446-14.447 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 463, 429 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

429. ἀπὸ βρετέων βίᾳ
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.164 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.164. Nor is the care and providence of the immortal gods bestowed only upon the human race in its entirety, but it is also wont to be extended to individuals. We may narrow down the entirety of the human race and bring it gradually down to smaller and smaller groups, and finally to single individuals. For if we believe, for the reasons that we have spoken of before, that the gods care for all human beings everywhere in every coast and region of the lands remote from this continent in which we dwell, then they care also for the men who inhabit with us these lands between the sunrise and the sunset.
4. Lucian, The Double Indictment, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. Zeus. A curse on all those philosophers who will have it that none but the Gods are happy! If they could but know what we have to put up with on men’s account, they would not envy us our nectar and our ambrosia. They take Homer’s word for it all,— the word of a blind quack; ’tis he who pronounces us blessed, and expatiates on heavenly glories, he who could not see in front of his own nose. Look at the Sun, now. He yokes that chariot, and is riding through the heavens from morn till night, clothed in his garment of fire, and dispensing his rays abroad; not so much breathing space as goes to the scratching of an ear; once let his horses catch him napping, and they have the bit between their teeth and are off ‘cross country, with the result that the Earth is scorched to a cinder. The Moon is no better off: she is kept up into the small hours to light the reveller and the diner out upon their homeward path. And then Apollo,— he has his work cut out for him: with such a press of oracular business, it is much if he has any ears left to hear with: he is wanted at Delphi; the next minute, he must be off to Colophon; then away to Xanthus; then back at a trot to Clarus; then it is Delos, then Branchidae;— in short, he is at the beck of every priestess who has taken her draught of holy water, munched her laurel leaf, and made the tripod rock; it is now or never; if he is not there that minute to reel off the required oracle, his credit is gone. The traps they set for him too! He must have a dog’s nose for lamb and tortoise in the pot, or his Lydian customer departs, laughing him to scorn. As for Asclepius, he has no peace for his patients: his eyes are acquainted with horror, and his hands with loathsomeness; another’s sickness is his pain. To say nothing of the work that the Winds have to get through, what with sowing and winnowing and getting the ships along; or of Sleep, always on the wing, with Dream at his side all night giving a helping hand.
5. Lucian, Sacrifices, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. So talking, we reached the spot where he was to sit and listen to the prayers. There was a row of openings with lids like well covers, and a chair of gold by each. Zeus took his seat at the first, lifted off the lid and inclined his ear. From every quarter of Earth were coming the most various and contradictory petitions; for I too bent down my head and listened. Here are specimens. ‘O Zeus, that I might be king!’ ‘O Zeus, that my onions and garlic might thrive!’ ‘Ye Gods, a speedy death for my father!’ Or again, ‘Would that I might succeed to my wife’s property!’ ‘Grant that my plot against my brother be not detected.’ ‘Let me win my suit.’ ‘Give me an Olympic garland.’ of those at sea, one prayed for a north, another for a south wind; the farmer asked for rain, the fuller for sun. Zeus listened, and gave each prayer careful consideration, but without promising to grant them all;Our Father this bestowed, and that withheld.Righteous prayers he allowed to come up through the hole, received and laid them down at his right, while he sent the unholy ones packing with a downward puff of breath, that Heaven might not be defiled by their entrance. In one case I saw him puzzled; two men praying for opposite things and promising the same sacrifices, he could not tell which of them to favour, and experienced a truly Academic suspense of judgement, showing a reserve and equilibrium worthy of Pyrrho himself.
7. Maximus of Tyre, Dialexeis, 5.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristophanes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 40
burns, d.m. Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
cicero Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
elis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
ethiopia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
eumaeus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
graf, f. Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
hermes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
jason of pherae Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
lucian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 40
lucian of samosata Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
maximus of tyre Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
odysseus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
olympus, mount Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 40, 56
prayer, criticism of Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
prayer, petitionary Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
providence Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
rite, ritual Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
sophocles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56
stoa, stoic(ism) Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
tartarus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 40
theology Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70
zeus' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 40
zeus Dillon and Timotin, Platonic Theories of Prayer (2015) 70; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 56