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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7511
Lucian, The Runaways, 5


nanZeus. Poor child! it is too bad of them. And what have they been doing to you exactly?Phi. Judge for yourself whether the provocation was a slight one. When formerly you looked down upon the world, and saw that it was filled with iniquity and transgression, and was become the troubled abode of sin and folly, you had compassion on the frailty of ignorant mankind, and sent me down to them: you bade me see to it, that wickedness and violence and brutality should cease from among them; I was to lift their eyes upwards to the truth, and cause them to live together in unity. Remember your words on that occasion: 'Behold, my daughter, the misdeeds of mankind; behold how ignorance has wrought upon them. I feel compassion for them, and have chosen you from among all the Gods to heal their ills; for who else should heal them? '


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 4.95 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.95. I understand from the Greeks who live beside the Hellespont and Pontus, that this Salmoxis was a man who was once a slave in Samos, his master being Pythagoras son of Mnesarchus; ,then, after being freed and gaining great wealth, he returned to his own country. Now the Thracians were a poor and backward people, but this Salmoxis knew Ionian ways and a more advanced way of life than the Thracian; for he had consorted with Greeks, and moreover with one of the greatest Greek teachers, Pythagoras; ,therefore he made a hall, where he entertained and fed the leaders among his countrymen, and taught them that neither he nor his guests nor any of their descendants would ever die, but that they would go to a place where they would live forever and have all good things. ,While he was doing as I have said and teaching this doctrine, he was meanwhile making an underground chamber. When this was finished, he vanished from the sight of the Thracians, and went down into the underground chamber, where he lived for three years, ,while the Thracians wished him back and mourned him for dead; then in the fourth year he appeared to the Thracians, and thus they came to believe what Salmoxis had told them. Such is the Greek story about him.
2. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Timaeus, 48, 47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Justin, First Apology, 56, 5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Why, then, should this be? In our case, who pledge ourselves to do no wickedness, nor to hold these atheistic opinions, you do not examine the charges made against us; but, yielding to unreasoning passion, and to the instigation of evil demons, you punish us without consideration or judgment. For the truth shall be spoken; since of old these evil demons, effecting apparitions of themselves, both defiled women and corrupted boys, and showed such fearful sights to men, that those who did not use their reason in judging of the actions that were done, were struck with terror; and being carried away by fear, and not knowing that these were demons, they called them gods, and gave to each the name which each of the demons chose for himself. And when Socrates endeavoured, by true reason and examination, to bring these things to light, and deliver men from the demons, then the demons themselves, by means of men who rejoiced in iniquity, compassed his death, as an atheist and a profane person, on the charge that he was introducing new divinities; and in our case they display a similar activity. For not only among the Greeks did reason (Logos) prevail to condemn these things through Socrates, but also among the Barbarians were they condemned by Reason (or the Word, the Logos) Himself, who took shape, and became man, and was called Jesus Christ; and in obedience to Him, we not only deny that they who did such things as these are gods, but assert that they are wicked and impious demons, whose actions will not bear comparison with those even of men desirous of virtue.
6. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 2.2, 7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 39-40, 38 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

38. It was with his eye on this Italian propaganda, too, that he took a further step. This was the institution of mysteries, with hierophants and torch bearers complete. The ceremonies occupied three successive days. On the first, proclamation was made on the Athenian model to this effect: ‘If there be any atheist or Christian or Epicurean here spying upon our rites, let him depart in haste; and let all such as have faith in the God be initiated and all blessing attend them.’ He led the litany with, ‘Christians, avaunt!’ and the crowd responded, ‘Epicureans, avaunt!’ Then was presented the child bed of Leto and birth of Apollo, the bridal of Coronis, Asclepius born. The second day, the epiphany and nativity of the God Glycon.
8. Lucian, Parliament of The Gods, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Lucian, The Runaways, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Zeus. Ah, to be sure: the Gymnosophists. I have heard a great deal of them. Among other things, they ascend gigantic pyres, and sit quietly burning to death without moving a muscle. However, that is no such great matter: I saw it done at Olympia only the other day. You would be there, no doubt,–when that old man burnt himself?Phi. No, father: I was afraid to go near Olympia, on account of those hateful men I was telling you of; I saw that numbers of them were going there, to make their barking clamour heard in the temple, and to abuse all comers.
10. Lucian, Nigrinus, 35 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. This he said, and much more to the same effect. At length he was silent. All the time I had listened in awestruck attention, dreading the moment when he should cease. And when it was all over, my condition was like that of the Phaeacians. For a long time I gazed upon him, spellbound; then I was seized with a violent attack of giddiness; I was bathed in perspiration, and when I attempted to speak, I broke down; my voice failed, my tongue stammered, and at last I was reduced to tears. Mine was no surface wound from a random shaft. The words had sunk deep into a vital part; had come with true aim, and cleft my soul asunder. For (if I may venture to philosophize on my own account) I conceive the case thus:— A well conditioned human soul is like a target of some soft material.
11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.129 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.129. Neither do they think that the divergence of opinion between philosophers is any reason for abandoning the study of philosophy, since at that rate we should have to give up life altogether: so Posidonius in his Exhortations. Chrysippus allows that the ordinary Greek education is serviceable.It is their doctrine that there can be no question of right as between man and the lower animals, because of their unlikeness. Thus Chrysippus in the first book of his treatise On Justice, and Posidonius in the first book of his De officio. Further, they say that the wise man will feel affection for the youths who by their countece show a natural endowment for virtue. So Zeno in his Republic, Chrysippus in book i. of his work On Modes of Life, and Apollodorus in his Ethics.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander the false prophet (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
antipater Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 400
charon (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
dialogues of the dead (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
downward journey (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
funerals (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
icaromenippus (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
kunst,karl v Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 400
lucian Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
martyr,justin,on philosophy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
menippus,or descent into hades (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
munychia Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 400
nigrinus (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
parliament of the gods (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
passing of peregrinus (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
perdiccas Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 400
perigrinus (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
philosophers for sale (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
philosophy,history of Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
sacrifices (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
stoicism,philosophical background for justin Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
the runaways (lucian) Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
zeus rants (lucian)' Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 164
διαδοχή Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47
διαφωνία Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
διάδοχος Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
δόξα Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47, 48
καταπέμπειν Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 47