Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7482
Lucian, The Double Indictment, 29


nanoverweening pride. Does not such ingratitude as this render him liable to the penalties imposed by the marriage-laws? He leaves me, his lawful wife, to whom he is indebted alike for wealth and reputation, leaves me to neglect, and goes off in pursuit of novelty; and that, at a time when all eyes are turned upon me, when all men write me their protectress. I hold out against the entreaties of countless suitors: they knock, and my doors remain closed to them; they call loudly upon my name, but I scorn their empty clamours, and answer them not. All is in vain: he will not return to me, nor withdraw his eyes from this new love. In Heaven's name, what does he expect to get from him? what has Dialogue but his cloak? In conclusion, gentlemen: should he attempt to employ my art in his defence, suffer him not thus unscrupulously to sharpen my own sword against me; bid him defend himself, if he can, with the weapons of his adored Dialogue. HERM: Now there, madam, you are unreasonable: how can he possibly make a dialogue of it all by himself? No, no; let him deliver a regular speech, just the same as other people.


nanThey say, indeed, that he is not on the best of terms even with his beloved Dialogue; apparently I am not the only victim of his overweening pride. Does not such ingratitude as this render him liable to the penalties imposed by the marriage laws? He leaves me, his lawful wife, to whom he is indebted alike for wealth and reputation, leaves me to neglect, and goes off in pursuit of novelty; and that, at a time when all eyes are turned upon me, when all men write me their protectress. I hold out against the entreaties of countless suitors: they knock, and my doors remain closed to them; they call loudly upon my name, but I scorn their empty clamours, and answer them not. All is in vain: he will not return to me, nor withdraw his eyes from this new love. In Heaven’s name, what does he expect to get from him? what has Dialogue but his cloak?In conclusion, gentlemen: should he attempt to employ my art in his defence, suffer him not thus unscrupulously to sharpen my own sword against me; bid him defend himself, if he can, with the weapons of his adored Dialogue.Her. Now there, madam, you are unreasonable: how can he possibly make a dialogue of it all by himself? No, no; let him deliver a regular speech, just the same as other people.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

None available

Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiochos iv of commagene Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
commagene, culture, history Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
elite, commagenian Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
identity, ethnic Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
lucian of samosata Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
provincialisation Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
rome (city) Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
soldiers' Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28