Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7482
Lucian, The Double Indictment, 27


nanGentlemen, the defendant was no more than a boy — he still spoke with his native accent, and might at any moment have exhibited himself in the garb of an Assyrian — when I found him wandering up and down Ionia, at a loss for employment. I took him in hand; I gave him an education; and, convinced of his capabilities and of his devotion to me (for he was my very humble servant in those days, and had no admiration to spare for any one else), I turned my back upon the many suitors who sought my hand, upon the wealthy, the brilliant and the high-born, and betrothed myself to this monster of ingratitude; upon this obscure pauper boy I bestowed the rich dowry of my surpassing eloquence, brought him to be enrolled among my own people, and made him my fellow citizen, to the bitter mortification of his unsuccessful rivals. When he formed the resolution of travelling, in order to make his good fortune known to the world, I did not remain behind: I accompanied him everywhere, from city to city, shedding my lustre upon him, and clothing him in honour and renown. Of our travels in Greece and Ionia, I say nothing: he expressed a wish to visit Italy: I sailed the Ionian Sea with him, and attended him even as far as Gaul, scattering plenty in his path. For a long time he consulted my wishes in everything, was unfailing in his attendance upon me, and never passed a night away from my side. But no sooner had he secured an adequate


nanGentlemen, the defendant was no more than a boy — he still spoke with his native accent, and might at any moment have exhibited himself in the garb of an Assyrian — when I found him wandering up and down Ionia, at a loss for employment. I took him in hand; I gave him an education; and, convinced of his capabilities and of his devotion to me (for he was my very humble servant in those days, and had no admiration to spare for anyone else), I turned my back upon the many suitors who sought my hand, upon the wealthy, the brilliant and the high born, and betrothed myself to this monster of ingratitude; upon this obscure pauper boy I bestowed the rich dowry of my surpassing eloquence, brought him to be enrolled among my own people, and made him my fellow citizen, to the bitter mortification of his unsuccessful rivals. When he formed the resolution of travelling, in order to make his good fortune known to the world, I did not remain behind: I accompanied him everywhere, from city to city, shedding my lustre upon him, and clothing him in honour and renown. Of our travels in Greece and Ionia, I say nothing: he expressed a wish to visit Italy: I sailed the Ionian Sea with him, and attended him even as far as Gaul, scattering plenty in his path.For a long time he consulted my wishes in everything, was unfailing in his attendance upon me, and never passed a night away from my side.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Cicero, De Oratore, 1.17, 3.127 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.17. Est enim et scientia comprehendenda rerum plurimarum, sine qua verborum volubilitas iis atque inridenda est, et ipsa oratio conformanda non solum electione, sed etiam constructione verborum, et omnes animorum motus, quos hominum generi rerum natura tribuit, penitus pernoscendi, quod omnis vis ratioque dicendi in eorum, qui audiunt, mentibus aut sedandis aut excitandis expromenda est; accedat eodem oportet lepos quidam facetiaeque et eruditio libero digna celeritasque et brevitas et respondendi et lacessendi subtili venustate atque urbanitate coniuncta; tenenda praeterea est omnis antiquitas exemplorumque vis, neque legum ac iuris civilis scientia neglegenda est. 3.127. ex quibus Elius Hippias, cum Olympiam venisset maxima illa quinquennali celebritate ludorum, gloriatus est cuncta paene audiente Graecia nihil esse ulla in arte rerum omnium quod ipse nesciret; nec solum has artis, quibus liberales doctrinae atque ingenuae continerentur, geometriam, musicam, litterarum cognitionem et poetarum atque illa, quae de naturis rerum, quae de hominum moribus, quae de rebus publicis dicerentur, se tenere sed anulum, quem haberet, pallium, quo amictus, soccos, quibus indutus esset, se sua manu confecisse.
2. Strabo, Geography, 16.2.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16.2.10. In the district of Apameia is a city well fortified in almost every part. For it consists of a well-fortified hill, situated in a hollow plain, and almost surrounded by the Orontes, which, passing by a large lake in the neighbourhood, flows through wide-spread marshes and meadows of vast extent, affording pasture for cattle and horses. The city is thus securely situated, and received the name Cherrhonesus (or the peninsula) from the nature of its position. It is well supplied from a very large fertile tract of country, through which the Orontes flows with numerous windings. Seleucus Nicator, and succeeding kings, kept there five hundred elephants, and the greater part of their army.It was formerly called Pella by the first Macedonians, because most of the soldiers of the Macedonian army had settled there; for Pella, the native place of Philip and Alexander, was held to be the metropolis of the Macedonians. Here also the soldiers were mustered, and the breed of horses kept up. There were in the royal stud more than thirty thousand brood mares and three hundred stallions. Here were employed colt-breakers, instructors in the method of fighting in heavy armour, and all who were paid to teach the arts of war.The power Trypho, surnamed Diodotus, acquired is a proof of the influence of this place; for when he aimed at the empire of Syria, he made Apameia the centre of his operations. He was born at Casiana, a strong fortress in the Apameian district, and educated in Apameia; he was a favourite of the king and the persons about the court. When he attempted to effect a revolution in the state, he obtained his supplies from Apameia and from the neighbouring cities, Larisa, Casiana, Megara, Apollonia, and others like them, all of which were reckoned to belong to the district of Apameia. He was proclaimed king of this country, and maintained his sovereignty for a long time. Caecilius Bassus, at the head of two legions, caused Apameia to revolt, and was besieged by two large Roman armies, but his resistance was so vigorous and long that he only surrendered voluntarily and on his own conditions. For the country supplied his army with provisions, and a great many of the chiefs of the neighbouring tribes were his allies, who possessed strongholds, among which was Lysias, situated above the lake, near Apameia, Arethusa, belonging to Sampsiceramus and Iamblichus his son, chiefs of the tribe of the Emeseni. At no great distance were Heliopolis and Chalcis, which were subject to Ptolemy, son of Mennaeus, who possessed the Massyas and the mountainous country of the Ituraeans. Among the auxiliaries of Bassus was Alchaedamnus, king of the Rhambaei, a tribe of the Nomads on this side of the Euphrates. He was a friend of the Romans, but, considering himself as having been unjustly treated by their governors, he retired to Mesopotamia, and then became a tributary of Bassus. Poseidonius the Stoic was a native of this place, a man of the most extensive learning among the philosophers of our times.
3. Lucian, The Ignorant Book-Collector, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Lucian, Apology, 15, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Lucian, The Double Indictment, 33-34, 28 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. But no sooner had he secured an adequate provision, no sooner did he consider his reputation established, than his countece changed towards me: he assumed a haughty air, and neglected, nay, utterly abandoned me; having conceived a violent affection for the bearded old person yonder, whom you may know from his dress to be Dialogue, and who passes for a son of Philosophy. With this Dialogue, in spite of the disparity of age, he is now living; and is not ashamed to clip the wings of free, high soaring eloquence, and submit himself to the comedian’s fetters of bald question and answer. He, whose thoughts should have found utterance in thundering oratory, is content to weave a puny network of conversation. Such things may draw a smile from his audience, a nod, an unimpassioned wave of the hand, a murmur of approbation: they can never hope to evoke the deafening uproar of universal applause. And this, gentlemen, is the fascination under which he looks coldly upon me; I commend his taste!
6. Lucian, Salaried Posts In Great Houses, 27, 30, 24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 12-16, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Lucian, The Syrian Goddess, 1.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. There is in Syria a city not far from the river Euphrates: it is called “the Sacred City,” and is sacred to the Assyrian Hera. As far as I can judge this name was not conferred upon the city when it was first settled, but originally it bore another name. In course of time the great sacrifices were held therein, and then this title was bestowed upon it. I will speak of this city, and of what it contains. I will speak also of the laws which govern its holy rites, of its popular assemblies and of the sacrifices offered by its citizens. I will speak also of all the traditions attaching to the founders of this holy place: and of the manner of the founding of its temple. I write as an Assyrian born who have witnessed with mine own eyes some of the facts which I am about to narrate: some, again, I learnt from the priests: they occurred before my time, but I narrate them as they were told to me.
9. Lucian, Parliament of The Gods, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Lucian, Hercules, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. For a long time I stood staring at this in amazement: I knew not what to make of it, and was beginning to feel somewhat nettled, when I was addressed in admirable Greek by a Gaul who stood at my side, and who besides possessing a scholarly acquaintance with the Gallic mythology, proved to be not unfamiliar with our own. ‘Sir,’ he said, ‘I see this picture puzzles you: let me solve the riddle. We Gauls connect eloquence not with Hermes, as you do, but with the mightier Heracles. Nor need it surprise you to see him represented as an old man. It is the prerogative of eloquence, that it reaches perfection in old age; at least if we may believe your poets, who tell us thatYouth is the sport of every random gust,whereas old ageHath that to say that passes youthful wit.Thus we find that from Nestor’s lips honey is distilled; and that the words of the Trojan counsellors are compared to the lily, which, if I have not forgotten my Greek, is the name of a flower.
11. Lucian, How To Write History, 24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Lucian, The Dead Come To Life Or The Fisherman, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Lucian, The Scythian, Or The Consul, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 626 (2nd cent. CE

15. Photius, Bibliotheca (Library, Bibl.), 94



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age, old Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
alexander of abonouteichos Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
antioch Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
antiochos iv of commagene Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
apameia Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
apologists Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
apology (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
aramaic Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 87
arethousa Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
arsakid Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
athens Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
authorial mask Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
biography Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
celts Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
chariton Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
christian discourse and practices Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
christians, christianity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
commagene, culture, history Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
constantine Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
cult, mysteries, rituals, foundation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
cult of the dead Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
cynics, cynic views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
daphne, syrian Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
dea syria Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
death Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
deification Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
dialogues (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
diocletian Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
education Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
egypt Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
elite, commagenian Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
eloquence, art of Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
emisenoi Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
ethnicity, lucian and Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
euphrates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
family, household Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
gaul Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
goetes, religious charlatans/fraud Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
grammarian Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
greece, greek philosophers Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
greek language Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 87
hellenism Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
heracles, celtic Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
heracles Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
herodotus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
hierapolis Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
iamblichos babyloniaka, ix Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
iconography, and ethnicity Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
identity, ethnic Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
immolation, self-immolation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
individual Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
italy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
lucian, de dea syria Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
lucian, heracles Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
lucian Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60; Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
lucian of samosata Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28, 86, 87; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
lucius verus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
magic Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
marcus aurelius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
menippos of gadara Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
mourning Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
ogmios (celtic heracles) Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 60
olympia Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
orators Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
paideia Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 86
palmyra Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
parthians Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
photios Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
provincialisation Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rhetoric Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rhetorics Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
rhētōr Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
rome, cultural tradition Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rome, provinces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rome (city) Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
satire (literary genre)' Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
senate at rome Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
slaves Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
sohaimos the achaimemd Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
soldiers Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 28
sophists Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 469
souda Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
syria Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
syrians Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
tatian Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
trajan Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181
venus see aphrodite, lucius verus, emperor Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 67
xenophon of ephesos Stephens and Winkler, Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary (1995) 181