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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4601
Donatus, Vergillia Vita, 22
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Cicero, De Oratore, 2.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.25. Nam, quod addidisti tertium, vos esse eos, qui vitam insuavem sine his studiis putaretis, id me non modo non hortatur ad disputandum, sed etiam deterret. Nam ut C. Lucilius, homo doctus et perurbanus, dicere solebat ea, quae scriberet neque se ab indoctissimis neque a doctissimis legi velle, quod alteri nihil intellegerent, alteri plus fortasse quam ipse; de quo etiam scripsit "Persium non curo legere,"—hic fuit enim, ut noramus, omnium fere nostrorum hominum doctissimus—"Laelium Decumum volo," quem cognovimus virum bonum et non inlitteratum, sed nihil ad Persium; sic ego, si iam mihi disputandum sit de his nostris studiis, nolim equidem apud rusticos, sed multo minus apud vos; malo enim non intellegi orationem meam quam reprehendi.'
2. Horace, Sermones, 2.1, 2.1.32-2.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. In the former book, most honored Epaphroditus, I have demonstrated our antiquity, and confirmed the truth of what I have said, from the writings of the Phoenicians, and Chaldeans, and Egyptians. I have, moreover, produced many of the Grecian writers, as witnesses thereto. I have also made a refutation of Manetho and Cheremon, and of certain others of our enemies. 2.1. for in his third book, which relates to the affairs of Egypt, he speaks thus:—“I have heard of the ancient men of Egypt, that Moses was of Heliopolis, and that he thought himself obliged to follow the customs of his forefathers, and offered his prayers in the open air, towards the city walls; but that he reduced them all to be directed towards the sun-rising, which was agreeable to the situation of Heliopolis; 2.1. Or how is it possible that all the Jews should get together to these sacrifices, and the entrails of one man should be sufficient for so many thousands to taste of them, as Apion pretends? Or why did not the king carry this man, whosoever he was, and whatsoever was his name (which is not set down in Apion’s book)
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.748-6.751, 6.851-6.853 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.748. Th' Olympian heaven above our earth aspires. — 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 6.750. Roll lightning-blasted in the gulf profound; 6.751. The twin Aloidae Aloïdae , colossal shades 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
augustus, as character in jonsons poetaster Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
horace, and reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
horace, as character in jonsons poetaster Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
horace, satirae Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
horace, satires Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
jonson, ben, horace in Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
jonson, ben, poetaster Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
jonson, ben, virgil in Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
lucilius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
quotation, alone Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
quotation, public and private' Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
satirae (horace) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 194
suetonius Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
virgil, aelius donatus (vsd) Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
virgil, donatus auctus Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67
virgil, in ben jonsons poetaster Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 67