Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4540
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 5
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.22.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22.4. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time.
2. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 5.12, 5.12.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Polybius, Histories, 2.61, 12.15.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.61. 1.  To take another instance, Phylarchus, while narrating with exaggeration and elaboration the calamities of the Mantineans, evidently deeming it a historian's duty to lay stress on criminal acts,,2.  does not even make mention of the noble conduct of the Megalopolitans at nearly the same date, as if it were rather the proper function of history to chronicle the commission of sins than to call attention to right and honourable actions,,3.  or as if readers of his memoirs would be improved less by account of good conduct which we should emulate than by criminal conduct which we should shun.,4.  He tells us how Cleomenes took the city, and before doing any damage to it, sent at once a post to the Megalopolitans at Messene offering to hand back their own native country to them uninjured on condition of their throwing in their lot with him. So much he lets us know, wishing to show the magimity of Cleomenes and his moderation to his enemies,,5.  and he goes on to tell how when the letter was being read out they would not allow the reader to continue until the end, and how they came very near stoning the letter-bearers.,6.  So far he makes everything quite clear to us, but he deprives us of what should follow and what is the special virtue of history, I mean praise and honourable mention of conduct noteworthy for its excellence.,7.  And yet he had an opportunity ready to his hand here. For if we consider those men to be good who by speeches and resolutions only expose themselves to war for the sake of their friends and allies, and if we bestow not only praise but lavish thanks and gifts on those who have suffered their country to be laid waste and their city besieged,,8.  what should we feel for the Megalopolitans? Surely the deepest reverence and the highest regard.,9.  In the first place they left their lands at the mercy of Cleomenes, next they utterly lost their city owing to their support of the Achaeans,,10.  and finally, when quite unexpectedly it was put in their power to get it back undamaged, they preferred to lose their land, their tombs, their temples, their homes, and their possessions, all in fact that is dearest to men, rather than break faith with their allies.,11.  What more noble conduct has there ever been or could there be? To what could an author with more advantage call the attention of his readers, and how could he better stimulate them to loyalty to their engagements and to true and faithful comradeship?,12.  But Phylarchus, blind, as it seems to me, to the most noble actions and those most worthy of an author's attention, has not said a single word on the subject. 12.15.9.  But Timaeus, blinded by his own malice, has chronicled with hostility and exaggeration the defects of Agathocles and has entirely omitted to mention his shining qualities, being unaware that it is just as mendacious for a writer to conceal what did occur as to report what did not occur. I myself, while refraining in order to spare him from giving full expression to my hostility to Timaeus, have omitted nothing less to the object I had in view. . . . .
4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.7.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.7.2.  I arrived in Italy at the very time that Augustus Caesar put an end to the civil war, in the middle of the one hundred and eighty-seventh Olympiad, and having from that time to this present day, a period of twenty-two years, lived at Rome, learned the language of the Romans and acquainted myself with their writings, I have devoted myself during all that time to matters bearing upon my subject.
5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, De Veterum Censura, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.1-3.7, 3.9, 4.1-4.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Sallust, Catiline, 3.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 3.1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 18.10 (1st cent. CE

18.10.  As for Herodotus, if you ever want real enjoyment, you will read him when quite at your ease, for the easy-going manner and charm of his narrative will give the impression that his work deals with stories rather than with actual history. But among the foremost historians I place Thucydides, and among those of second rank Theopompus; for not only is there a rhetorical quality in the narrative portion of his speeches, but he is not without eloquence nor negligent in expression, and the slovenliness of his diction is not so bad as to offend you. As for Ephorus, while he hands down to us a great deal of information about events, yet the tediousness and carelessness of his narrative style would not suit your purpose.
10. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Dion, 36.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Pericles, 13.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Lucian, How To Write History, 12-13, 39-41, 61, 63, 7, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Papyri, P.Oxy., 71.4808



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alternatives Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
ancestors Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
arrangement Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
atticus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
beauty, of language Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
body, and the natural Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
body, metaphor for speech and text, latin Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
body, synoptic Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
brevitasbrevity Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116, 117
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
cicero Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
ciceromarcus tullius cicero, and historiography Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
ciceromarcus tullius cicero, modicum corpus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
classicality and classicizing Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 43
commentarii, disordered or incomplete Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116, 117
commentarii Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
corpus hominis bene figurati, and natura Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
de architectura, literariness and textuality Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
dio chrysostom, on training for public speaking Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116
dionysius of halicarnassus, ethos (character) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43
dionysius of halicarnassus, explicit assessment of historiographers by Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43
dionysius of halicarnassus, on imitation Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
dionysius of halicarnassus, prohairesis (deliberate choice) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
dionysius of halicarnassus, rhetorical works Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43
dionysius of halicarnassus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43; Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
flattery, flatterers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, contrasted with virtue Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, mis- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, success/failure as result of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
grandeur (of language) Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
herodotus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116, 117
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
history and historiography, perpetua historia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116
intellectual culture, rome Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
lucceius Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116
moderation Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
moles, john Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
omissions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
philistus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
philistus of syracuse, author of sicelica Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116
praeceptaprecepts Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116, 117
prose style Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
protagoras Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
quintus tullius cicero Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116
reading lists Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
rhetoric Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
style/stylistic (interest in)' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
sublimity Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
synopsis Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 117
syntaxis, associated with bodies Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116
theopompus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340
thucydides, assessment by dionysius of halicarnassus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43
thucydides Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 116, 117
varietas variety or vicissitude Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
vitruvius, and cicero Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115, 116, 117
woodman, a. j. Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 115
xenophon Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 43; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 340