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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4540
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.20
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On Thucydides, 23.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.2-3.19, 3.21, 4.1-4.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 18.13-18.17 (1st cent. CE

18.13.  when we are convinced that in the comparison we should be found to be not inferior to them, with the chance, occasionally, of being even superior. I shall now turn to the Socratics, writers who, I affirm, are quite indispensable to every man who aspires to become an orator. For just as no meat without salt will be gratifying to the taste, so no branch of literature, as it seems to me, could possibly be pleasing to the ear if it lacked the Socratic grace. It would be a long task to eulogize the others; even to read them is no light thing. 18.14.  But it is my own opinion that Xenophon, and he alone of the ancients, can satisfy all the requirements of a man in public life. Whether one is commanding an army in time of war, or is guiding the affairs of a state, or is addressing a popular assembly or a senate, or even if he were addressing a court of law and desired, not as a professional master of eloquence merely, but as a statesman or a royal prince, to utter sentiments appropriate to such a character at the bar of justice, the best exemplar of all, it seems to me, and the most profitable for all these purposes is Xenophon. For not only are his ideas clear and simple and easy for everyone to grasp, but the character of his narrative style is attractive, pleasing, and convincing, being in a high degree true to life in the representation of character, with much charm also and effectiveness, so that his power suggests not cleverness but actual wizardry. 18.15.  If, for instance, you should be willing to read his work on the March Inland very carefully, you will find no speech, such as you will one day possess the ability to make, whose subject matter he has not dealt with and can offer as a kind of norm to any man who wishes to steer his course by him or imitate him. If it is needful for the statesman to encourage those who are in the depths of despondency, time and again our writer shows how to do this; or if the need is to incite and exhort, no one who understands the Greek language could fail to be aroused by Xenophon's hortatory speeches. 18.16.  My own heart, at any rate, is deeply moved and at times I weep even as I read his account of all those deeds of valour. Or, if it is necessary to deal prudently with those who are proud and conceited and to avoid, on the one hand, being affected in any way by their displeasure, or, on the other, enslaving one's own spirit to them in unseemly fashion and doing their will in everything, guidance in this also is to be found in him. And also how to hold secret conferences both with generals apart from the common soldiers and with the soldiers in the same way; the proper manner of conversing with kings and princes; how to deceive enemies to their hurt and friends for their own benefit; how to tell the plain truth to those who are needlessly disturbed without giving offence, and to make them believe it; how not to trust too readily those in authority over you, and the means by which such persons deceive their inferiors, and the way in which men outwit and are outwitted — 18.17.  on all these points Xenophon's treatise gives adequate information. For I imagine that it is because he combines deeds with words, because he did not learn by hearsay nor by copying, but by doing deeds himself as well as telling of them, that he made his speeches most convincingly true to life in all his works and especially in this one which I chanced to mention. And be well assured that you will have no occasion to repent, but that both in the senate and before the people you will find this great man reaching out a hand to you if you earnestly and diligently read him.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
dio chrysostom, on training for public speaking Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
dionysius of halicarnassus, on imitation Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
dionysius of halicarnassus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92, 98, 99
emotion Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
grandeur (of language) Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
hellanicus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92
herodotus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92, 98, 99; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
historiography Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
homer Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 98
philistus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
prose style Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
quintilian Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
reading lists Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
rhetoric' König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
rhetoric Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
socratic writers Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
thucydides Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92, 98, 99; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
xenophon Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339