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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4540
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.6. Croesus was a Lydian by birth, son of Alyattes, and sovereign of all the nations west of the river Halys, which flows from the south between Syria and Paphlagonia and empties into the sea called Euxine . ,This Croesus was the first foreigner whom we know who subjugated some Greeks and took tribute from them, and won the friendship of others: the former being the Ionians, the Aeolians, and the Dorians of Asia, and the latter the Lacedaemonians. ,Before the reign of Croesus, all Greeks were free: for the Cimmerian host which invaded Ionia before his time did not subjugate the cities, but raided and robbed them.
2. Polybius, Histories, 1.4.1, 8.8.4-8.8.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

8.8.4.  others, owing either to their regard for the kings or their fear of them, have explained to us unreservedly, that not only did the outrages committed by Philip against the Messenians in defiance of divine or human law deserve no censure, but that on the contrary all his acts were to be regarded as praiseworthy achievements. 8.8.5.  It is not only with regard to the Messenians that we find the historians of Philip's life to be thus biased but in other cases 8.8.6.  the result being that their works much more resemble panegyrics than histories. 8.8.7.  My own opinion is that we should neither revile nor extol kings falsely, as has so often been done, but always give an account of them consistent with our previous statements and in accord with the character of each. 8.8.8.  It may be said that it is easy enough to say this but exceedingly difficult to do it, because there are so many and various conditions and circumstances in life, yielding to which men are prevented from uttering or writing their real opinions. 8.8.9.  Bearing this in mind we must pardon these writers in some cases, but in others we should not.
3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 11.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 11.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, De Veterum Censura, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.1, 3.3-3.21, 4.1-4.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 18.13-18.17 (1st cent. CE

18.13.  when we are convinced that in the comparison we should be found to be not inferior to them, with the chance, occasionally, of being even superior. I shall now turn to the Socratics, writers who, I affirm, are quite indispensable to every man who aspires to become an orator. For just as no meat without salt will be gratifying to the taste, so no branch of literature, as it seems to me, could possibly be pleasing to the ear if it lacked the Socratic grace. It would be a long task to eulogize the others; even to read them is no light thing. 18.14.  But it is my own opinion that Xenophon, and he alone of the ancients, can satisfy all the requirements of a man in public life. Whether one is commanding an army in time of war, or is guiding the affairs of a state, or is addressing a popular assembly or a senate, or even if he were addressing a court of law and desired, not as a professional master of eloquence merely, but as a statesman or a royal prince, to utter sentiments appropriate to such a character at the bar of justice, the best exemplar of all, it seems to me, and the most profitable for all these purposes is Xenophon. For not only are his ideas clear and simple and easy for everyone to grasp, but the character of his narrative style is attractive, pleasing, and convincing, being in a high degree true to life in the representation of character, with much charm also and effectiveness, so that his power suggests not cleverness but actual wizardry. 18.15.  If, for instance, you should be willing to read his work on the March Inland very carefully, you will find no speech, such as you will one day possess the ability to make, whose subject matter he has not dealt with and can offer as a kind of norm to any man who wishes to steer his course by him or imitate him. If it is needful for the statesman to encourage those who are in the depths of despondency, time and again our writer shows how to do this; or if the need is to incite and exhort, no one who understands the Greek language could fail to be aroused by Xenophon's hortatory speeches. 18.16.  My own heart, at any rate, is deeply moved and at times I weep even as I read his account of all those deeds of valour. Or, if it is necessary to deal prudently with those who are proud and conceited and to avoid, on the one hand, being affected in any way by their displeasure, or, on the other, enslaving one's own spirit to them in unseemly fashion and doing their will in everything, guidance in this also is to be found in him. And also how to hold secret conferences both with generals apart from the common soldiers and with the soldiers in the same way; the proper manner of conversing with kings and princes; how to deceive enemies to their hurt and friends for their own benefit; how to tell the plain truth to those who are needlessly disturbed without giving offence, and to make them believe it; how not to trust too readily those in authority over you, and the means by which such persons deceive their inferiors, and the way in which men outwit and are outwitted — 18.17.  on all these points Xenophon's treatise gives adequate information. For I imagine that it is because he combines deeds with words, because he did not learn by hearsay nor by copying, but by doing deeds himself as well as telling of them, that he made his speeches most convincingly true to life in all his works and especially in this one which I chanced to mention. And be well assured that you will have no occasion to repent, but that both in the senate and before the people you will find this great man reaching out a hand to you if you earnestly and diligently read him.
8. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 16.184-16.187, 20.157 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16.184. for he wrote in Herod’s lifetime, and under his reign, and so as to please him, and as a servant to him, touching upon nothing but what tended to his glory, and openly excusing many of his notorious crimes, and very diligently concealing them. 16.185. And as he was desirous to put handsome colors on the death of Mariamne and her sons, which were barbarous actions in the king, he tells falsehoods about the incontinence of Mariamne, and the treacherous designs of his sons upon him; and thus he proceeded in his whole work, making a pompous encomium upon what just actions he had done, but earnestly apologizing for his unjust ones. 16.186. Indeed, a man, as I said, may have a great deal to say by way of excuse for Nicolaus; for he did not so properly write this as a history for others, as somewhat that might be subservient to the king himself. 16.187. As for ourselves, who come of a family nearly allied to the Asamonean kings, and on that account have an honorable place, which is the priesthood, we think it indecent to say any thing that is false about them, and accordingly we have described their actions after an unblemished and upright manner. And although we reverence many of Herod’s posterity, who still reign, yet do we pay a greater regard to truth than to them, and this though it sometimes happens that we incur their displeasure by so doing. 20.157. but as to ourselves, who have made truth our direct aim, we shall briefly touch upon what only belongs remotely to this undertaking, but shall relate what hath happened to us Jews with great accuracy, and shall not grudge our pains in giving an account both of the calamities we have suffered, and of the crimes we have been guilty of. I will now therefore return to the relation of our own affairs.
9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. 1. Whereas the war which the Jews made with the Romans hath been the greatest of all those, not only that have been in our times, but, in a manner, of those that ever were heard of; both of those wherein cities have fought against cities, or nations against nations; while some men who were not concerned in the affairs themselves have gotten together vain and contradictory stories by hearsay, and have written them down after a sophistical manner; 1.1. For that it was a seditious temper of our own that destroyed it; and that they were the tyrants among the Jews who brought the Roman power upon us, who unwillingly attacked us, and occasioned the burning of our holy temple; Titus Caesar, who destroyed it, is himself a witness, who, during the entire war, pitied the people who were kept under by the seditious, and did often voluntarily delay the taking of the city, and allowed time to the siege, in order to let the authors have opportunity for repentance. 1.1. But still he was not able to exclude Antiochus, for he burnt the towers, and filled up the trenches, and marched on with his army. And as he looked upon taking his revenge on Alexander, for endeavoring to stop him, as a thing of less consequence, he marched directly against the Arabians
10. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.55 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.55. and as for the History of the War, I wrote it as having been an actor myself in many of its transactions, an eyewitness in the greatest part of the rest, and was not unacquainted with any thing whatsoever that was either said or done in it.
11. Josephus Flavius, Life, 358, 357 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Lucian, How To Write History, 50 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
cicero Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
claudius, roman emperor, expulsion of jews from rome by Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 359
dio chrysostom, on training for public speaking Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
dionysius of halicarnassus, ethos (character) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 49
dionysius of halicarnassus, explicit assessment of historiographers by Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 89
dionysius of halicarnassus, globalism and unity, herodotuss role in ideas of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 89
dionysius of halicarnassus, laypersons Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 49
dionysius of halicarnassus, on imitation Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
dionysius of halicarnassus, prohairesis (deliberate choice) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
dionysius of halicarnassus, rhetorical works Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 49
dionysius of halicarnassus, roman antiquities Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 89
dionysius of halicarnassus, rome and roman history Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 89
dionysius of halicarnassus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92; Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 49, 89
emotion Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
grandeur (of language) Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
hellanicus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92
herodotus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
herodotus and the histories, globalism of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 89
historiography Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
longinus, on the sublime Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 42
persia and persians, persian wars, reception of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 41, 42
philistus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
polybius Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 41
prose style Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
quintilian Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
reading lists Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
rhetoric' König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
rhetoric Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
rome, as empire Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 89
socratic writers Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
theopompus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39
thucydides, assessment by dionysius of halicarnassus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 49
thucydides Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 92; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339
xenophon Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 339