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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4540
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 5.42-5.47, 5.55, 5.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.42. Now Cleomenes, as the story goes, was not in his right mind and really quite mad, while Dorieus was first among all of his peers and fully believed that he would be made king for his manly worth. ,Since he was of this opinion, Dorieus was very angry when at Anaxandrides' death the Lacedaemonians followed their custom and made Cleomenes king by right of age. Since he would not tolerate being made subject to Cleomenes, he asked the Spartans for a group of people whom he took away as colonists. He neither inquired of the oracle at Delphi in what land he should establish his settlement, nor did anything else that was customary but set sail in great anger for Libya, with men of Thera to guide him. ,When he arrived there, he settled by the Cinyps river in the fairest part of Libya, but in the third year he was driven out by the Macae, the Libyans and the Carchedonians and returned to the Peloponnesus. 5.43. There Antichares, a man of Eleon, advised him, on the basis of the oracles of Laius, to plant a colony at Heraclea in Sicily, for Heracles himself, said Antichares, had won all the region of Eryx, which accordingly belonged to his descendants. When Dorieus heard that, he went away to Delphi to enquire of the oracle if he should seize the place to which he was preparing to go. The priestess responded that it should be so, and he took with him the company that he had led to Libya and went to Italy. 5.44. Now at this time, as the Sybarites say, they and their king Telys were making ready to march against Croton, and the men of Croton, who were very much afraid, entreated Dorieus to come to their aid. Their request was granted, and Dorieus marched with them to Sybaris helping them to take it. ,This is the story which the Sybarites tell of Dorieus and his companions, but the Crotoniats say that they were aided by no stranger in their war with Sybaris with the exception of Callias, an Elean diviner of the Iamid clan. About him there was a story that he had fled to Croton from Telys, the tyrant of Sybaris, because as he was sacrificing for victory over Croton, he could obtain no favorable omens. 5.45. This is their tale, and both cities have proof of the truth of what they say. The Sybarites point to a precinct and a temple beside the dry bed of the Crathis, which, they say, Dorieus founded in honor of Athena of Crathis after he had helped to take their city. and find their strongest proof in his death. He perished through doing more than the oracle bade him, for if he had accomplished no more than that which he set out to do, he would have taken and held the Erycine region without bringing about the death of himself and his army. ,The Crotoniats, on the other hand, show many plots of land which had been set apart for and given to Callias of Elis and on which Callias' posterity dwelt even to my time but show no gift to Dorieus and his descendants. They claim, however,that if Dorieus had aided them in their war with Sybaris, he would have received a reward many times greater than what was given to Callias. This, then is the evidence brought forward by each party, and each may side with that which seems to him to deserve more credence. 5.46. Other Spartans too sailed with Dorieus to found his colony, namely, Thessalus, Paraebates, Celees, and Euryleon. When these men had come to Sicily with all their company, they were all overcome and slain in battle by the Phoenicians and Egestans, all, that is, except Euryleon, who was the only settler that survived this disaster. ,He mustered the remt of his army and took Minoa, the colony from Selinus, and aided in freeing the people of Selinus from their monarch Pithagoras. After deposing this man, he himself attempted to become tyrant of Selinus but was monarch there for only a little while since the people of the place rose against him and slew him at the altar of Zeus of the marketplace, to which he had fled for refuge. 5.47. Philippus of Croton, son of Butacides, was among those who followed Dorieus and were slain with him. He had been betrothed to the daughter of Telys of Sybaris but was banished from Croton. Cheated out of his marriage, he sailed away to Cyrene, from where he set forth and followed Dorieus, bringing his own trireme and covering all expenses for his men. This Philippus was a victor at Olympia and the fairest Greek of his day. ,For his physical beauty he received from the Egestans honors accorded to no one else. They built a hero's shrine by his grave and offer him sacrifices of propitiation. 5.55. When he was forced to leave Sparta, Aristagoras went to Athens, which had been freed from its ruling tyrants in the manner that I will show. First Hipparchus, son of Pisistratus and brother of the tyrant Hippias, had been slain by Aristogiton and Harmodius, men of Gephyraean descent. This was in fact an evil of which he had received a premonition in a dream. After this the Athenians were subject for four years to a tyranny not less but even more absolute than before. 5.65. The Lacedaemonians would never have taken the Pisistratid stronghold. First of all they had no intention to blockade it, and secondly the Pisistratidae were well furnished with food and drink. The Lacedaemonians would only have besieged the place for a few days and then returned to Sparta. As it was, however, there was a turn of fortune which harmed the one party and helped the other, for the sons of the Pisistratid family were taken as they were being secretly carried out of the country. ,When this happened, all their plans were confounded, and they agreed to depart from Attica within five days on the terms prescribed to them by the Athenians in return for the recovery of their children. ,Afterwards they departed to Sigeum on the Scamander. They had ruled the Athenians for thirty-six years and were in lineage of the house of Pylos and Neleus, born of the same ancestors as the families of Codrus and Melanthus, who had formerly come from foreign parts to be kings of Athens. ,It was for this reason that Hippocrates gave his son the name Pisistratus as a remembrance, calling him after Pisistratus the son of Nestor. ,This is the way, then, that the Athenians got rid of their tyrants. As regards all the noteworthy things which they did or endured after they were freed and before Ionia revolted from Darius and Aristagoras of Miletus came to Athens to ask help of its people, of these I will first give an account.
2. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 5.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Polybius, Histories, 2.61, 12.15.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.61. 1.  To take another instance, Phylarchus, while narrating with exaggeration and elaboration the calamities of the Mantineans, evidently deeming it a historian's duty to lay stress on criminal acts,,2.  does not even make mention of the noble conduct of the Megalopolitans at nearly the same date, as if it were rather the proper function of history to chronicle the commission of sins than to call attention to right and honourable actions,,3.  or as if readers of his memoirs would be improved less by account of good conduct which we should emulate than by criminal conduct which we should shun.,4.  He tells us how Cleomenes took the city, and before doing any damage to it, sent at once a post to the Megalopolitans at Messene offering to hand back their own native country to them uninjured on condition of their throwing in their lot with him. So much he lets us know, wishing to show the magimity of Cleomenes and his moderation to his enemies,,5.  and he goes on to tell how when the letter was being read out they would not allow the reader to continue until the end, and how they came very near stoning the letter-bearers.,6.  So far he makes everything quite clear to us, but he deprives us of what should follow and what is the special virtue of history, I mean praise and honourable mention of conduct noteworthy for its excellence.,7.  And yet he had an opportunity ready to his hand here. For if we consider those men to be good who by speeches and resolutions only expose themselves to war for the sake of their friends and allies, and if we bestow not only praise but lavish thanks and gifts on those who have suffered their country to be laid waste and their city besieged,,8.  what should we feel for the Megalopolitans? Surely the deepest reverence and the highest regard.,9.  In the first place they left their lands at the mercy of Cleomenes, next they utterly lost their city owing to their support of the Achaeans,,10.  and finally, when quite unexpectedly it was put in their power to get it back undamaged, they preferred to lose their land, their tombs, their temples, their homes, and their possessions, all in fact that is dearest to men, rather than break faith with their allies.,11.  What more noble conduct has there ever been or could there be? To what could an author with more advantage call the attention of his readers, and how could he better stimulate them to loyalty to their engagements and to true and faithful comradeship?,12.  But Phylarchus, blind, as it seems to me, to the most noble actions and those most worthy of an author's attention, has not said a single word on the subject. 12.15.9.  But Timaeus, blinded by his own malice, has chronicled with hostility and exaggeration the defects of Agathocles and has entirely omitted to mention his shining qualities, being unaware that it is just as mendacious for a writer to conceal what did occur as to report what did not occur. I myself, while refraining in order to spare him from giving full expression to my hostility to Timaeus, have omitted nothing less to the object I had in view. . . . .
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, De Veterum Censura, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.1-3.6, 3.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Dion, 36.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Pericles, 13.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Lucian, How To Write History, 12-13, 39-41, 61, 63, 7, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Papyri, P.Oxy., 71.4808



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
against neaera, in general Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
alternatives Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
ancestors Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
assembly, athenian, speeches by demosthenes Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
assembly, athenian, speeches by others Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
assembly, athenian, uses of the past in, in general Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
cicero Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
demosthenes, and foresight Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
demosthenes Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 66
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
dionysius of halicarnassus, ethos (character) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39
dionysius of halicarnassus, explicit assessment of historiographers by Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39
dionysius of halicarnassus, imitation of herodotus by Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 66
dionysius of halicarnassus, narrative style of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 66
dionysius of halicarnassus, prohairesis (deliberate choice) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38
dionysius of halicarnassus, rhetorical works Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 66
dionysius of halicarnassus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39, 66
doxopater Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
duris of samos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
ephorus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
flattery, flatterers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, contrasted with virtue Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, mis- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, success/failure as result of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
hecataeus of miletus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52; Torok, Herodotus In Nubia (2014) 126
herodotus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52; Jonge and Hunter, Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Augustan Rome. Rhetoric, Criticism and Historiography (2019) 182
herodotus and the histories, narratorial style or narratology of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 66
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
identical audience topos Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
imitation, of ancestors Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
imitation, of historical models Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
imitation, of other politicians Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
julius caesar Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52
moderation Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
narrative manners and techniques Torok, Herodotus In Nubia (2014) 126
narrative unity of the histories Torok, Herodotus In Nubia (2014) 126
omissions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
pericles, as model for demosthenes Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
pericles, in thucydides Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
plutarch, on demosthenes Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
plutarch, on pericles Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
sallust Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52
sicily Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
style/stylistic (interest in) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
synēgoros, synēgoria, in general' Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
theopompus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52; Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39
thucydides, and apollodorus Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
thucydides, and demosthenes Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
thucydides, assessment by dionysius of halicarnassus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39
thucydides, on pericles Westwood, The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens (2020) 135
thucydides, son of melesias, chronology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 745
thucydides Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 52; Jonge and Hunter, Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Augustan Rome. Rhetoric, Criticism and Historiography (2019) 182
xenophon Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 38, 39