Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11241
Xenophon, The Education Of Cyrus, 1.6.46
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.353 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.353. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan
2. Herodotus, Histories, 1.157.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.157.3. After this, he sent messengers to Cyme demanding that Pactyes be surrendered. The Cymaeans resolved to make the god at Branchidae their judge as to what course they should take; for there was an ancient place of divination there, which all the Ionians and Aeolians used to consult; the place is in the land of Miletus, above the harbor of Panormus .
3. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24c. new spiritual beings.Such is the accusation. But let us examine each point of this accusation. He says I am a wrongdoer because I corrupt the youth. But I, men of Athens, say Meletus is a wrongdoer, because he jokes in earnest, lightly involving people in a lawsuit, pretending to be zealous and concerned about things or which he never cared at all. And that this is so I will try to make plain to you also.Come here, Meletus, tell me: don’t you consider it
4. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3b. Socrates. Absurd things, my friend, at first hearing. For he says I am a maker of gods; and because I make new gods and do not believe in the old ones, he indicted me for the sake of these old ones, as he says. Euthyphro. I understand, Socrates; it is because you say the divine monitor keeps coming to you. So he has brought the indictment against you for making innovations in religion, and he is going into court to slander you, knowing that slanders on such subjects are readily accepted by the people. Why, they even laugh at me and say I am crazy
5. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 299, 484, 496-501, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.8.15, 2.2.3, 3.1.5-3.1.8, 5.6.29, 6.1.24, 6.1.31, 6.2.15, 6.4.15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.2.3. After this, when the sun was already setting, he called together the generals and captains and spoke as follows: When I sacrificed, gentlemen, the omens did not result favourably for proceeding against the King. And with good reason, it proves, they were not favourable; for, as I now ascertain, between us and the King is the Tigris, a navigable river, which we could not cross without boats—and boats we have none. On the other hand, it is not possible for us to stay where we are, for we cannot get provisions; but the omens were extremely favourable for our going to join the friends of Cyrus . 3.1.5. After reading Proxenus’ letter Xenophon conferred with Socrates, The philosopher, whose follower and friend Xenophon had been from his youth. the Athenian, about the proposed journey; and Socrates, suspecting that his becoming a friend of Cyrus might be a cause for accusation against Xenophon on the part of the Athenian government, for the reason that Cyrus was thought to have given the Lacedaemonians zealous aid in their war against Athens, See Introd., pp. 231-233. advised Xenophon to go to Delphi and consult the god in regard to this journey. 3.1.6. So Xenophon went and asked Apollo to what one of the gods he should sacrifice and pray in order best and most successfully to perform the journey which he had in mind and, after meeting with good fortune, to return home in safety; and Apollo in his response told him to what gods he must sacrifice. 3.1.7. When Xenophon came back from Delphi, he reported the oracle to Socrates; and upon hearing about it Socrates found fault with him because he did not first put the question whether it were better for him to go or stay, but decided for himself that he was to go and then asked the god as to the best way of going. However, he added, since you did put the question in that way, you must do all that the god directed. 3.1.8. Xenophon, accordingly, after offering the sacrifices to the gods that Apollo’s oracle prescribed, set sail, overtook Proxenus and Cyrus at Sardis as they were on the point of beginning the upward march, and was introduced to Cyrus . 6.1.24. So it was, then, that Xenophon made sacrifice, and the god signified to him quite clearly that he should neither strive for the command nor accept it in case he should be chosen. Such was the issue of this matter. 6.1.31. Then Xenophon, seeing that something more was needed, came forward and spoke again: Well, soldiers, he said, that you may understand the matter fully I swear to you by all the gods and goddesses that in very truth, so soon as I became aware of your intention, I offered sacrifices to learn whether it was best for you to entrust to me this command and for me to undertake it; and the gods gave me such signs in the sacrifices that even a layman could perceive that I must withhold myself from accepting the sole command. 6.2.15. For a time, indeed, Xenophon did try to get clear of the army and sail away home; but when he sacrificed to Heracles the Leader, consulting him as to whether it was better and more proper for him to continue the journey with such of the soldiers as had remained with him, or to be rid of them, the god indicated to him by the sacrifices that he should stay with them. 6.4.15. Consequently he made public proclamation that on the morrow any one who so chose might be present at the sacrifice, and if a man were a soothsayer, he sent him word to be at hand to participate in the inspection of the victims; so he made the offering in the immediate presence of many witnesses.
7. Xenophon, Apology, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Xenophon, On Horsemanship, 9.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Xenophon, The Cavalry General, 9.8-9.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 1.6.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.6.2. My son, it is evident both from the sacrifices and from the signs from the skies that the gods are sending you forth with their grace and favour; and you yourself must recognize it, for I had you taught this art on purpose that you might not have to learn the counsels of the gods through others as interpreters, but that you yourself, both seeing what is to be seen and hearing what is to be heard, might understand; for I would not have you at the mercy of the soothsayers, in case they should wish to deceive you by saying other things than those revealed by the gods; and furthermore, if ever you should be without a soothsayer, I would not have you in doubt as to what to make of the divine revelations, but by your soothsayer’s art I would have you understand the counsels of the gods and obey them.
11. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.1.2, 1.1.9, 1.4.15-1.4.18, 4.8.11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.2. First then, that he rejected the gods acknowledged by the state — what evidence did they produce of that? He offered sacrifices constantly, and made no secret of it, now in his home, now at the altars of the state temples, and he made use of divination with as little secrecy. Indeed it had become notorious that Socrates claimed to be guided by the deity: That immanent divine something, as Cicero terms it, which Socrates claimed as his peculiar possession. it was out of this claim, I think, that the charge of bringing in strange deities arose. 1.1.9. If any man thinks that these matters are wholly within the grasp of the human mind and nothing in them is beyond our reason, that man, he said, is irrational. But it is no less irrational to seek the guidance of heaven in matters which men are permitted by the gods to decide for themselves by study: to ask, for instance, Is it better to get an experienced coachman to drive my carriage or a man without experience? Cyropaedia I. vi. 6. Is it better to get an experienced seaman to steer my ship or a man without experience? So too with what we may know by reckoning, measurement or weighing. To put such questions to the gods seemed to his mind profane. In short, what the gods have granted us to do by help of learning, we must learn; what is hidden from mortals we should try to find out from the gods by divination: for to him that is in their grace the gods grant a sign. 1.4.15. I will believe when they send counsellors, as you declare they do, saying, Do this, avoid that. But when the Athenians inquire of them by divination and they reply, do you not suppose that to you, too, the answer is given? Or when they send portents for warning to the Greeks, or to all the world? Are you their one exception, the only one consigned to neglect? 1.4.16. Or do you suppose that the gods would have put into man a belief in their ability to help and harm, if they had not that power; and that man throughout the ages would never have detected the fraud? Do you not see that the wisest and most enduring of human institutions, cities and nations, are most god-fearing, and that the most thoughtful period of life is the most religious? 1.4.17. Be well assured, my good friend, that the mind within you directs your body according to its will; and equally you must think that Thought indwelling in the Universal disposes all things according to its pleasure. For think not that your eye can travel over many furlongs and yet god’s eye cannot see the the whole world at once; that your soul can ponder on things in Egypt and in Sicily, and god’s thought is not sufficient to pay heed to the whole world at once. 1.4.18. Nay, but just as by serving men you find out who is willing to serve you in return, by being kind who will be kind to you in return, and by taking counsel, discover the masters of thought, so try the gods by serving them, and see whether they will vouchsafe to counsel you in matters hidden from man. Then you will know that such is the greatness and such the nature of the deity that he sees all things Cyropaedia VIII. vii. 22. and hears all things alike, and is present in all places and heedful of all things. 4.8.11. This was the tenor of his conversation with Hermogenes and with the others. All who knew what manner of man Socrates was and who seek after virtue continue to this day to miss him beyond all others, as the chief of helpers in the quest of virtue. For myself, I have described him as he was: so religious that he did nothing without counsel from the gods; so just that he did no injury, however small, to any man, but conferred the greatest benefits on all who dealt with him; so self-controlled that he never chose the pleasanter rather than the better course; so wise that he was unerring in his judgment of the better and the worse, and needed no counsellor, but relied on himself for his knowledge of them; masterly in expounding and defining such things; no less masterly in putting others to the test, and convincing them of error and exhorting them to follow virtue and gentleness. To me then he seemed to be all that a truly good and happy man must be. But if there is any doubter, let him set the character of other men beside these things; then let him judge.
12. Xenophon, Symposium, 4.47-4.49 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.47. Very well; in the first place, it is clear as day that both Greeks and barbarians believe that the gods know everything both present and to come; at any rate, all cities and all races ask the gods, by the diviner’s art, for advice as to what to do and what to avoid. Second, it is likewise manifest that we consider them able to work us good or ill; at all events, every one prays the gods to avert evil and grant blessings. 4.48. Well, these gods, omniscient and omnipotent, feel so friendly toward me that their watchfulness over me never lets me out of their ken night or day, no matter where I am going or what business I have in view. They know the results also that will follow any act; and so they send me as messengers omens of sounds, dreams, and birds, and thus indicate what I ought to do and what I ought not to do. And when I do their bidding, I never regret it; on the other hand, I have before now disregarded them and have been punished for it. 4.49. None of these statements, said Socrates , is incredible. But what I should like very much to know is how you serve them to keep them so friendly. A very economical service it is, I declare! responded Hermogenes. I sound their praises,—which costs nothing; I always restore them part of what they give me; I avoid profanity of speech as far as I can; and I never wittingly lie in matters wherein I have invoked them to be my witnesses. Truly, said Socrates , if it is conduct like this that gives you their friendship, then the gods also, it would seem, take delight in nobility of soul! Such was the serious turn given to the discussion of this topic.
13. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
calchas Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
daimones, daimonion of socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
denyer, n. Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 108
divination, and approximation to the divine Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination, and intuition Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 11
divination, and knowledge-claims Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
divination, as conjectural Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination, practised by amateurs Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 108, 110
forster, e.m., nan Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 242
homer, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 108, 110
lack of respect for gods', and introducing new gods" Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
lack of respect for gods', and socrates" Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
phryne Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
proper respect for gods, and divination Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
proper respect for gods, and introducing new gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
proper respect for gods, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
prophecy Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 11
rationality, in divination' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
recognizing the gods, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
sacrifice, and decision-making Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 242
sacrifices, and divination Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 114
sophocles Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
stoicism, teiresias Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
wisdom Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 11
xenophanes, his attitude to divine disclosure, his attitude to divine disclosure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 108, 110
xenophon, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 108, 110
zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110