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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11240
Xenophon, Hellenica, 5.4.4


nanAs for Phillidas, since the polemarchs always celebrate a festival of Aphrodite upon the expiration of their term of office, he was making all the arrangements for them, and in particular, having long ago promised to bring them women, and the most stately and beautiful women there were in Thebes, he said he would do so at that time. And they — for they were that sort of men — expected to spend the night very pleasantly.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 136, 937, 135 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

135. Their prudent judgment. Chaos then created
2. Homer, Iliad, 4.407, 22.170-22.171 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.407. /We declare ourselves to be better men by far than our fathers: we took the seat of Thebe of the seven gates, when we twain had gathered a lesser host against a stronger wall, putting our trust in the portents of the gods and in the aid of Zeus; whereas they perished through their own blind folly. 22.170. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.171. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel
3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 106, 105 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

105. Ἄρης, τὰν τεάν; 105. your own land, Ares, where you have dwelt since long ago? God of the golden helmet, look, look upon the city that you once cherished! Chorus
4. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
5. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-941, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
6. Euripides, Orestes, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.1.1. The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos
8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1.3, 1.21.1, 1.22.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.3. For though the events of remote antiquity, and even those that more immediately precede the war, could not from lapse of time be clearly ascertained, yet the evidences which an inquiry carried as far back as was practicable leads me to trust, all point to the conclusion that there was nothing on a great scale, either in war or in other matters. 1.21.1. On the whole, however, the conclusions I have drawn from the proofs quoted may, I believe, safely be relied on. Assuredly they will not be disturbed either by the lays of a poet displaying the exaggeration of his craft, or by the compositions of the chroniclers that are attractive at truth's expense; the subjects they treat of being out of the reach of evidence, and time having robbed most of them of historical value by enthroning them in the region of legend. Turning from these, we can rest satisfied with having proceeded upon the clearest data, and having arrived at conclusions as exact as can be expected in matters of such antiquity. 1.22.4. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time.
9. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.2.10, 7.3.26-7.3.31, 7.8.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.3.26. When the drinking was well under way, there came in a Thracian with a white horse, and taking a full horn he said: I drink your health, Seuthes, and present to you this horse; on his back pursuing you shall catch whomever you choose, and retreating you shall not fear the enemy. 7.3.27. Another brought in a boy and presented him in the same way, with a health to Seuthes, while another presented clothes for his wife. Timasion also drank his health and presented to him a silver bowl and a carpet worth ten minas. See note on Xen. Anab. 1.4.13 . 7.3.28. Then one Gnesippus, an Athenian, arose and said that it was an ancient and most excellent custom that those who had possessions should give to the king for honour’s sake, and that to those who had nought the king should give, so that, he continued, I too may be able to bestow gifts upon you and do you honour. 7.3.29. As for Xenophon, he was at a loss to know what he should do; for he chanced, as one held in honour, to be seated on the stool nearest to Seuthes. And Heracleides directed the cupbearer to proffer him the horn. Then Xenophon, who already as it happened had been drinking a little, arose courageously after taking the horn and said: 7.3.30. And I, Seuthes, give you myself and these my comrades to be your faithful friends; and not one of them do I give against his will, but all are even more desirous than I of being your friends. 7.3.31. And now they are here, asking you for nothing more, but rather putting themselves in your hands and willing to endure toil and danger on your behalf. With them, if the gods so will, you will acquire great territory, recovering all that belonged to your fathers and gaining yet more, and you will acquire many horses, and many men and fair women; and these things you will not need to take as plunder, but my comrades of their own accord shall bring them before you as gifts. 7.8.3. And Xenophon said, Well, really, with weather of the sort you describe and provisions used up and no chance even to get a smell of wine, when many of us were becoming exhausted with hardships and the enemy were at our heels, if at such a time as that I wantonly abused you, I admit that I am more wanton even than the ass, which, because of its wantonness, so the saying runs, is not subject to fatigue. Nevertheless, do tell us, he said, for what reason you were struck. 7.8.3. But when the Lampsacenes sent gifts of hospitality to Xenophon and he was sacrificing to Apollo, he gave Eucleides a place beside him; and when Eucleides saw the vitals of the victims, he said that he well believed that Xenophon had no money. But I am sure, he went on, that even if money should ever be about to come to you, some obstacle always appears—if nothing else, your own self. In this Xenophon agreed with him.
10. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.12, 1.4.18, 1.7, 3.3.3-3.3.4, 3.4.23, 4.3.13, 5.4.1-5.4.2, 5.4.7, 5.4.10, 5.4.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.12. And when he found that the temper of the Athenians was kindly, that they had chosen him general, and that his friends were urging him by personal messages to return, he sailed in to Piraeus, arriving on the day when the city was celebrating the Plynteria When the clothing of the ancient wooden statue of Athena Polias was removed and washed ( πλύνειν ). and the statue of Athena was veiled from sight,—a circumstance which some people imagined was of ill omen, both for him and for the state; for on that day no Athenian would venture to engage in any serious business. 1.4.18. Meanwhile Alcibiades, who had come to anchor close to the shore, did not at once disembark, through fear of his enemies; but mounting upon the deck of 407 B.C. his ship, he looked to see whether his friends were present. 3.3.3. But Diopeithes, a man very well versed in oracles, said in support of Leotychides that there was also an oracle of Apollo which bade the Lacedaemonians beware of the lame kingship. Agesilaus was lame. Lysander, however, made reply to him, on behalf of Agesilaus, that he did not suppose the god was bidding them beware lest a king of theirs should get a sprain and become lame, but rather lest one who was not of the royal stock should become king. For the kingship would be lame in very truth when it was not the descendants of Heracles who were at the head of the state. 3.3.4. After hearing such arguments from both claimants the state chose Agesilaus king. When Agesilaus had been not yet a year in the kingly office, once while he was offering one of the appointed sacrifices in behalf of the state, the seer said that the gods revealed a conspiracy of the most 397 B.C. terrible sort. And when he sacrificed again, the seer said that the signs appeared still more terrible. And upon his sacrificing for the third time, he said: Agesilaus, just such a sign is given me as would be given if we were in the very midst of the enemy. There-upon they made offerings to the gods who avert evil and to those who grant safety, and having with difficulty obtained favourable omens, ceased sacrificing. And within five days after the sacrifice was ended a man reported to the ephors a conspiracy, and Cinadon as the head of the affair. 3.4.23. Then Agesilaus, aware that the infantry of the enemy was not yet at hand, while on his side none of the arms which had been made ready was missing, deemed it a fit time to join battle if he could. Therefore, after offering sacrifice, he at once led his phalanx against the opposing line of horsemen, ordering the first ten year-classes Cp. II. iv. 32 and the note thereon. of the hoplites to run to close quarters with the enemy, and bidding the peltasts lead the way at a double-quick. He also sent word to his cavalry to attack, in the assurance that he and the whole army were following them. 4.3.13. Now Agesilaus, on learning these things, at first was overcome with sorrow; but when he had considered that the most of his troops were the sort of men to share gladly in good fortune if good fortune came, but that if they saw anything unpleasant, they were under no compulsion to share in it, I.e., being practically volunteers (cp. ii. 4). —thereupon, changing the report, he said that word had come that Peisander was dead, but victorious in the naval battle. 5.4.1. Now one could mention many other incidents, both among Greeks and barbarians, to prove that the gods do not fail to take heed of the wicked or of those who do unrighteous things; but at present I will speak of the case which is before me. The Lacedaemonians, namely, who had sworn that they would leave the states independent, after seizing possession of the Acropolis of Thebes were punished by the very men, unaided, who had been thus wronged, although before that time they had not been conquered by any single one of all the peoples that ever existed; while as for those among the Theban citizens who had led them into the Acropolis and had wanted the state to be in subjection to the Lacedaemonians in order that they might rule despotically themselves, just seven of the exiles were enough to destroy the government of these men. 379 B.C. How all this came to pass I will proceed to relate. 5.4.2. There was a certain Phillidas, who acted as secretary to Archias and his fellow polemarchs See note on ii. 25. It seems likely that the polemarchs were three in number, although Archias and Philippus (see below) are the only ones whom Xenophon mentions by name. and in other ways served them, as it seemed, most excellently. Now this man went to Athens on a matter of business, and there met Melon, one of the Thebans in exile at Athens and a man who had been an acquaintance of his even before this time. Melon, after learning of the doings of the polemarch Archias and the tyrannous rule of Philippus, and finding out that Phillidas hated the conditions that existed at home even more than he himself did, exchanged pledges with him and came to an agreement as to how everything should be managed. 5.4.7. It was in this way, then, as some tell the story, that the polemarchs were killed, while others say that Melon and his followers came in as though they were revellers and killed them. After this Phillidas took three of his men and proceeded to the house of Leontiades and knocking at the door he said that he wished to give him a message from the polemarchs. Now it chanced that Leontiades had dined by himself and was still reclining on his couch after dinner, while his wife sat beside him, working with wool. And believing Phillidas trustworthy he bade him come in. When the party had entered, they killed Leontiades and frightened his wife into silence. And as they went out, they ordered that the door should remain shut; and they threatened that if they found it open, they would kill all who were in the house. 5.4.10. Now when the Lacedaemonian governor in the Acropolis heard the proclamation of the night, he at once sent to Plataea and Thespiae for help. And the Theban horsemen, upon perceiving that the Plataeans were approaching, went out to meet them and killed more than twenty of them; then as soon as they had re-entered the city after this achievement, and the Athenians from the borders had arrived, they made an attack upon the Acropolis. 5.4.12. As they were on their way out, however, the citizens seized and killed all whom they recognized as belonging to the number of their political foes. There were some, indeed, who were spirited away and saved by the Athenians who had come from the borders with their supporting force. But the Thebans even seized the children of those who had been killed, whenever they had children, and slaughtered them.
11. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 7.2.19-7.2.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.2.20. Knowing thyself, O Croesus—thus shalt thou live and be happy. There is a reference to the famous inscription on the temple at Delphi — γνῶθι σεαυτόν.
12. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.2.13. And yet, when you are resolved to cultivate these, you don’t think courtesy is due to your mother, who loves you more than all? Don’t you know that even the state ignores all other forms of ingratitude and pronounces no judgment on them, Cyropaedia I. ii. 7. caring nothing if the recipient of a favour neglects to thank his benefactor, but inflicts penalties on the man who is discourteous to his parents and rejects him as unworthy of office, holding that it would be a sin for him to offer sacrifices on behalf of the state and that he is unlikely to do anything else honourably and rightly? Aye, and if one fail to honour his parents’ graves, the state inquires into that too, when it examines the candidates for office.
13. Xenophon of Ephesus, The Ephesian Story of Anthica And Habrocomes, 1.3.1, 1.5.6-1.5.8, 2.13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.1.2, 2.12.3, 2.15.2-2.15.3, 2.18.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 3.2.15, 3.7.7, 3.8.3, 6.2.4, 6.4.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.2-3.5, 4.16.8, 5.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

17. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 3.10, 4.25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 81



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
"justice, divine" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
achilles tatius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 172
aeschylus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 331
alcestis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
aphrodisia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
aphrodite, ares and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
aphrodite, as martial goddess Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
aphrodite, origins and development Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
ares, aphrodite and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
ares, dionysus and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
ares, dragon of thebes, slaying of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
ares, origins and development Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
ares Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
augustus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 331
bithynia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
boeotia, ares and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
cadmus and cadmeians Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
chariton Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
delphi Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 331
dionysus, ares and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
dionysus, pillar as cult statue of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
dionysus, thebes, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
dionysus cadmeios Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
dragons, ares slaying dragon of thebes Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
drunkenness Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
fortune Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
harmonia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
heliodorus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 172
henrichs, a. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
herms Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
herodotus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 364; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 172
ishtar Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
jesus christ Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 331
longus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
macedon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
mythical patterning Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 364
nicias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
persians Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
philip v Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
phoenicians Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
pillars/columns, dionysus worshipped in form of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
plautus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 331
polybius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
prusias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
seven against thebes, Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
sexual immoderation Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
sicily Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
thebes, association of ares, dionysus, and aphrodite with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
thebes, cult of dionysus in Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
thebes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
thracian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
thucydides Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 364; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 172
tyrants Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237
weddings and marriages, ares and aphrodite Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
weddings and marriages, harmonias marriage to cadmus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 286
xenophon' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
xenophon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 237; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 364; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171