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11240
Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.12


nanAnd when he found that the temper of the Athenians was kindly, that they had chosen him general, and that his friends were urging him by personal messages to return, he sailed in to Piraeus, arriving on the day when the city was celebrating the Plynteria When the clothing of the ancient wooden statue of Athena Polias was removed and washed ( πλύνειν ). and the statue of Athena was veiled from sight,—a circumstance which some people imagined was of ill omen, both for him and for the state; for on that day no Athenian would venture to engage in any serious business.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.273, 9.534-9.536 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.273. /driver of the spoil, with burnt-offerings, when thou hast gathered together the aged wives; and the robe that seemeth to thee the fairest and amplest in thy hall, and that is dearest far to thine own self, this do thou lay upon the knees of fair-haired Athene and vow to her that thou wilt sacrifice in her temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad 9.534. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.535. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.536. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart.
2. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 4.193-4.200 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Birds, 873-875, 872 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
5. Euripides, Helen, 1307 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1307. ἀρρήτου κούρας.
6. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-941, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
7. Euripides, Orestes, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Lysias, Orations, 21.11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.27-6.28, 6.60 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.2.10, 7.8.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.8.3. And Xenophon said, Well, really, with weather of the sort you describe and provisions used up and no chance even to get a smell of wine, when many of us were becoming exhausted with hardships and the enemy were at our heels, if at such a time as that I wantonly abused you, I admit that I am more wanton even than the ass, which, because of its wantonness, so the saying runs, is not subject to fatigue. Nevertheless, do tell us, he said, for what reason you were struck. 7.8.3. But when the Lampsacenes sent gifts of hospitality to Xenophon and he was sacrificing to Apollo, he gave Eucleides a place beside him; and when Eucleides saw the vitals of the victims, he said that he well believed that Xenophon had no money. But I am sure, he went on, that even if money should ever be about to come to you, some obstacle always appears—if nothing else, your own self. In this Xenophon agreed with him.
11. Xenophon, Apology, 11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.11, 1.4.13-1.4.21, 1.7, 3.3.3-3.3.4, 3.4.23, 4.3.13, 4.5.11, 5.4.4, 5.4.17 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.11. And now Alcibiades sailed from Samos with his twenty ships and his money to Paros, and from there directed his course straight to Gytheium, in order to take a look at the thirty triremes which he heard the Lacedaemonians were making ready there and to see how his city felt toward him, with reference to his homecoming. 1.4.13. When he sailed in, the common crowd of Piraeus and of the city gathered to his ships, filled with wonder and desiring to see the famous Alcibiades. Some of them said that he was the best of the citizens; that he alone was banished without just cause, but rather because he was plotted against by those who had less power than he and spoke less well and ordered their political doings with a view to their own private gain, whereas he was always 407 B.C. advancing the common weal, both by his own means and by the power of the state. 1.4.14. At the time in question, In 415 B.C. , just before the departure of Alcibiades with the Syracusan expedition. they said, he was willing to be brought to trial at once, when the charge had just been made that he had committed sacrilege against the Eleusinian Mysteries; his enemies, however, postponed the trial, which was obviously his right, and then, when he was absent, robbed him of his fatherland; 1.4.15. thereafter, in his exile, helpless as a slave and in danger of his life every day, he was forced to pay court to those whom he hated most The Spartans and the Persians. ; and though he saw those who were dearest to him, his fellow-citizens and kinsmen and all Athens, making mistakes, he was debarred by his banishment from the opportunity of helping them. 1.4.16. It was not the way, they said, of men such as he to desire revolution or a change in government; for under the democracy it had been his fortune to be not only superior to his contemporaries but also not inferior to his elders, while his enemies, on the other hand, were held in precisely the same low estimation after his banishment as before; later, however, when they had gained power, they had slain the best men, and since they alone were left, they were accepted by the citizens merely for the reason that better men were not available. 1.4.17. Others, however, said that Alcibiades alone was responsible for their past troubles, and as for the ills which threatened to befall the state, he alone would probably prove to be the prime cause of them. 1.4.18. Meanwhile Alcibiades, who had come to anchor close to the shore, did not at once disembark, through fear of his enemies; but mounting upon the deck of 407 B.C. his ship, he looked to see whether his friends were present. 1.4.19. But when he sighted his cousin Euryptolemus, the son of Peisianax, and his other relatives and with them his friends, then he disembarked and went up to the city, accompanied by a party who were prepared to quell any attack that anyone might make upon him. 1.4.20. And after he had spoken in his own defence before the Senate and the Assembly, saying that he had not committed sacrilege and that he had been unjustly treated, and after more of the same sort had been said, with no one speaking in opposition because the Assembly would not have tolerated it, he was proclaimed general-in-chief with absolute authority, the people thinking that he was the man to recover for the state its former power; then, as his first act, he led out all his troops and conducted by land the procession From Athens to the temple of Demeter at Eleusis. of the Eleusinian Mysteries, which the Athenians had been conducting by sea on account of the war; 1.4.21. and after this he collected an armament of fifteen hundred hoplites, one hundred and fifty horsemen, and one hundred ships. Then, in the fourth month after his return to Athens, he set sail for Andros, which had revolted from the Athenians; and with him were sent Aristocrates and Adeimantus, the son of Leucolophides, the generals who had been chosen for service by land. 3.3.3. But Diopeithes, a man very well versed in oracles, said in support of Leotychides that there was also an oracle of Apollo which bade the Lacedaemonians beware of the lame kingship. Agesilaus was lame. Lysander, however, made reply to him, on behalf of Agesilaus, that he did not suppose the god was bidding them beware lest a king of theirs should get a sprain and become lame, but rather lest one who was not of the royal stock should become king. For the kingship would be lame in very truth when it was not the descendants of Heracles who were at the head of the state. 3.3.4. After hearing such arguments from both claimants the state chose Agesilaus king. When Agesilaus had been not yet a year in the kingly office, once while he was offering one of the appointed sacrifices in behalf of the state, the seer said that the gods revealed a conspiracy of the most 397 B.C. terrible sort. And when he sacrificed again, the seer said that the signs appeared still more terrible. And upon his sacrificing for the third time, he said: Agesilaus, just such a sign is given me as would be given if we were in the very midst of the enemy. There-upon they made offerings to the gods who avert evil and to those who grant safety, and having with difficulty obtained favourable omens, ceased sacrificing. And within five days after the sacrifice was ended a man reported to the ephors a conspiracy, and Cinadon as the head of the affair. 3.4.23. Then Agesilaus, aware that the infantry of the enemy was not yet at hand, while on his side none of the arms which had been made ready was missing, deemed it a fit time to join battle if he could. Therefore, after offering sacrifice, he at once led his phalanx against the opposing line of horsemen, ordering the first ten year-classes Cp. II. iv. 32 and the note thereon. of the hoplites to run to close quarters with the enemy, and bidding the peltasts lead the way at a double-quick. He also sent word to his cavalry to attack, in the assurance that he and the whole army were following them. 4.3.13. Now Agesilaus, on learning these things, at first was overcome with sorrow; but when he had considered that the most of his troops were the sort of men to share gladly in good fortune if good fortune came, but that if they saw anything unpleasant, they were under no compulsion to share in it, I.e., being practically volunteers (cp. ii. 4). —thereupon, changing the report, he said that word had come that Peisander was dead, but victorious in the naval battle. 4.5.11. Now it was in the following way that the disaster to the regiment happened. The Amyclaeans invariably go back home to the festival of the Hyacinthia for the paean to Apollo, whether they chance to be on a campaign or away from home for any other reason. 390 B.C. Accordingly Agesilaus had on this occasion left behind at Lechaeum all the Amyclaeans in the army. Now the polemarch in command of the garrison there detailed the garrison troops of the allies to guard the wall, and himself with the regiment of hoplites and the regiment of horsemen conducted the Amyclaeans along past the city of the Corinthians. 5.4.4. As for Phillidas, since the polemarchs always celebrate a festival of Aphrodite upon the expiration of their term of office, he was making all the arrangements for them, and in particular, having long ago promised to bring them women, and the most stately and beautiful women there were in Thebes, he said he would do so at that time. And they — for they were that sort of men — expected to spend the night very pleasantly. 5.4.17. While he was on the homeward way, however, an extraordinary wind beset him, which some indeed augured was a sign foreshadowing what was going to happen. cp. VI. iv. 2-15. For it not only did many other violent things, but when he had left Creusis with his army and was crossing the mountain ridge which runs down to the sea, it 379 B.C. hurled down the precipice great numbers of packasses, baggage and all, while very many shields were snatched away from the soldiers and fell into the sea.
13. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 7.2.19-7.2.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.2.20. Knowing thyself, O Croesus—thus shalt thou live and be happy. There is a reference to the famous inscription on the temple at Delphi — γνῶθι σεαυτόν.
14. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.2.13. And yet, when you are resolved to cultivate these, you don’t think courtesy is due to your mother, who loves you more than all? Don’t you know that even the state ignores all other forms of ingratitude and pronounces no judgment on them, Cyropaedia I. ii. 7. caring nothing if the recipient of a favour neglects to thank his benefactor, but inflicts penalties on the man who is discourteous to his parents and rejects him as unworthy of office, holding that it would be a sin for him to offer sacrifices on behalf of the state and that he is unlikely to do anything else honourably and rightly? Aye, and if one fail to honour his parents’ graves, the state inquires into that too, when it examines the candidates for office.
15. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 57.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.5.1.  That the Rape of Corê took place in the manner we have described is attested by many ancient historians and poets. Carcinus the tragic poet, for instance, who often visited in Syracuse and witnessed the zeal which the inhabitants displayed in the sacrifices and festive gatherings for both Demeter and Corê, has the following verses in his writings: Demeter's daughter, her whom none may name, By secret schemings Pluton, men say, stole, And then he dropped into earth's depths, whose light Is darkness. Longing for the vanished girl Her mother searched and visited all lands In turn. And Sicily's land by Aetna's crags Was filled with streams of fire which no man could Approach, and groaned throughout its length; in grief Over the maiden now the folk, beloved of Zeus, was perishing without the corn. Hence honour they these goddesses e'en now.
17. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 4.8.1 (1st cent. CE

4.8.1. ἔνθα δὴ καὶ τὸ Κλείτου τοῦ Δρωπίδου πάθημα καὶ τὴν Ἀλεξάνδρου ἐπʼ αὐτῷ ξυμφοράν, εἰ καὶ ὀλίγον ὕστερον ἐπράχθη, οὐκ ἔξω τοῦ καιροῦ ἀφηγήσομαι. εἶναι μὲν γὰρ ἡμέραν ἱερὰν τοῦ Διονύσου Μακεδόσι καὶ θύειν Διονύσῳ ὅσα ἔτη ἐν αὐτῇ Ἀλέξανδρον·
18. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 33.2-33.3, 34.1-34.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33.2. At this time, In the early summer of 408 B.C. therefore, the people had only to meet in assembly, and Alcibiades addressed them. He lamented and bewailed his own lot, but had only little and moderate blame to lay upon the people. The entire mischief he ascribed to a certain evil fortune and envious genius of his own. Then he descanted at great length upon the vain hopes which their enemies were cherishing, and wrought his hearers up to courage. At last they crowned him with crowns of gold, and elected him general with sole powers by land and sea. 33.3. They voted also that his property be restored to him, and that the Eumolpidae and Heralds revoke the curses wherewith they had cursed him at the command of the people. The others revoked their curses, but Theodorus the High Priest said: Nay, I invoked no evil upon him if he does no wrong to the city. 34.1. But while Alcibiades was thus prospering brilliantly, some were nevertheless disturbed at the particular season of his return. For he had put into harbor on the very day when the Plynteria of the goddess Athena were being celebrated. The Praxiergidae celebrate these rites on the twenty-fifth day of Thargelion in strict secrecy, removing the robes of the goddess and covering up her image. Wherefore the Athenians regard this day as the unluckiest of all days for business of any sort. 34.2. The goddess, therefore, did not appear to welcome Alcibiades with kindly favour and good will, but rather to veil herself from him and repel him. However, all things fell out as he wished, and one hundred triremes were manned for service, with which he was minded to sail off again; but a great and laudable ambition took possession of him and detained him there until the Eleusinian mysteries.
19. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, Dion, 29.2-29.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.15.2-2.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.28.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.28.8. The Athenians have other law courts as well, which are not so famous. We have the Parabystum (Thrust aside) and the Triangle; the former is in an obscure part of the city, and in it the most trivial cases are tried; the latter is named from its shape. The names of Green Court and Red Court, due to their colors, have lasted down to the present day. The largest court, to which the greatest numbers come, is called Heliaea. One of the other courts that deal with bloodshed is called “At Palladium,” into which are brought cases of involuntary homicide. All are agreed that Demophon was the first to be tried there, but as to the nature of the charge accounts differ.
23. Epigraphy, Ig I , 7

24. Epigraphy, Ig I , 7

25. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1006.12, 1011.11

26. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 5.4.14

27. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 489-491, 488

28. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 6.5, 52.5

29. Papyri, Papyri Demoticae Magicae, 14.805



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
agesilaus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
alcestis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
alcibiades, and mother of the gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
alcibiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173, 181
alexander the great Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
apatouria Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
argonautica and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
aristophanes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
arrian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
athena Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
athena (goddess), statues in athens Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens, acropolis Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens, images of the gods Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens, palladion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens, parthenon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens, statues/images of athena Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
badian, e. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
barber, e. j. w. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
bird interpreters Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
black sea Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
council house, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
cultic ritual practice, gifts to the gods Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
cultic ritual practice, processions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
curtius rufus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
cyrus the pretender Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
demargne, p. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
dion (sicily) Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
duris of samos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
dôreai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
egypt, egyptian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
ephorus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
eteonicus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
eubuleus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eukles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
euripides, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
euripides, on the mother of the gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
festivals, panathenaia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
festivals, plynteria Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
gerarai Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
gods and goddesses, offerings of robes (peplos) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
harpalos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
heliodorus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
hellanicus of lesbos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
hellespont Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
henrichs, a. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
hepatoscopy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
herms Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
herodotus, religious perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
herodotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 173
hieros logos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
hippolytus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
impure days Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
initiation and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
kosmêtês Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
kybernêtês Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
law Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
lecanomancy (bowl divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
logos, hieros losgos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
longus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
loutrides Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
lysias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
magic and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
magician, definition of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
mansfield, j. m. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
metroön, at athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
military call-up, command Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
mises Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
mopsus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mother of the gods, and laws Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mother of the gods, and warfare Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mother of the gods, in attic drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mother of the gods, statues and images of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
mysteries, mystery cults, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
myth/mythology, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
neils, jenifer Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
nepos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
nicias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
omen lists, near eastern Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
omens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
osiris Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
papyri, magical Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
paredros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
parke, h. w. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
parker, robert c. t. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
pausanias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
peace, sacrifice to Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
philochoros Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
phrynicus, comicus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
piraeus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
plato Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
plato comicus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
plunteria Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173, 181
plynteria Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
plyntrides Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
praxiergidai Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 478
procession Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 289
procession at Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
processional vessels Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
procharisteria Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
protogonos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
purification and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 148
purifying Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 289
purpose of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
purpose of spectators of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
reuthner, rosa Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
rewards, as dôreai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
robertson, n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
romano, i. b. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
sacrifice by individuals during public festivals Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
samos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183
scheer, tanja Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
sicily Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
sicily and sicilians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
socrates Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
sourvinou-inwood, christiane Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
sparta Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 173
statuary Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
symposium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
taboo, religious Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
taxiarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
theoinia Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 163
theopompus of chios Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
theramenes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
thucydides, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
thucydides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 173
thurii Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
twins Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 515
tyrannus, philoctetes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
tyranny, theology of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
underworld Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 181
women, dedication of clothing (peplos) to goddesses Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
women, participation in festivals Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
women, role in religion and ritual practice' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 169
xenophon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 183; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171, 173, 181
xenophon of athens, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330
xenophon of athens, on religious customs and institutions Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 330