Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11220
Xenocrates Historicus, Fragments, 82
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 1.35 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.35. sed Zeno, cum Arcesilam Archesilaum p 1 w anteiret aetate valdeque subtiliter dissereret et peracute moveretur, corrigere conatus est disciplinam. eam quoque si videtur correctionem explicabo, sicut solebat Antiochus.” Mihi vero inquam videtur, quod vides idem significare Pomponium. VA. 'Zeno igitur nullo modo is erat qui ut Theophrastus nervos neruis p virtutis inciderit, incideret s Lb. -rent n sed contra qui omnia quae que om. s quaecumque Reid ad beatam vitam pertinerent in una virtute poneret nec quicquam aliud numeraret in bonis idque appellaret honestum quod esset simplex quoddam et solum et unum bonum.
2. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 4.5, 4.51, 4.61 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.5. quarum cum una sit, qua mores conformari confirmari (' emendqvisse videtur A, Man.' Mdv. ) putantur, differo eam partem, quae quasi stirps est huius quaestionis. qui sit enim finis bonorum, mox, hoc loco tantum dico, a veteribus Peripateticis Academicisque, qui re consentientes vocabulis differebant, eum locum, quem civilem recte appellaturi videmur, Graeci politiko/n, graviter et copiose esse tractatum. Quam multa illi de re publica scripserunt, quam multa de legibus! quam multa non solum praecepta in artibus, sed etiam exempla in orationibus bene dicendi reliquerunt! primum enim ipsa illa, quae subtiliter disserenda erant, polite apteque dixerunt tum definientes, tum partientes, ut vestri etiam; sed vos squalidius, illorum vides quam niteat oratio. 4.51. dabit hoc Zenoni Polemo, etiam magister eius et tota illa gens et reliqui, qui virtutem omnibus rebus multo anteponentes adiungunt ei tamen aliquid summo in bono finiendo. si enim virtus digna est gloriatione, ut est, tantumque praestat reliquis rebus, ut dici vix possit, et beatus esse poterit (25 poterit, sc. non Polemo, sed qui virtute una praeditus est, caret ceteris) virtute una praeditus carens ceteris, nec tamen illud tibi concedetur, concedetur Se. concedet praeter virtutem nihil in bonis esse ducendum. illi autem, quibus summum bonum sine virtute est, non dabunt fortasse vitam beatam habere, in quo iure possit possit iure BE gloriari, etsi illi quidem etiam voluptates faciunt interdum gloriosas. 4.61. quid, si reviviscant Platonis illi et deinceps qui eorum auditores fuerunt, et tecum ita loquantur? Nos cum te, M. Cato, studiosissimum philosophiae, iustissimum virum, optimum iudicem, religiosissimum testem, audiremus, admirati sumus, quid esset cur nobis Stoicos anteferres, qui de rebus bonis et malis sentirent ea, quae ab hoc Polemone Zeno cognoverat, nominibus uterentur iis, quae prima specie admirationem, re explicata risum moverent. tu autem, si tibi illa probabantur, cur non propriis verbis ea ea NV eas R illa BE tenebas? sin te auctoritas commovebat, nobisne omnibus et Platoni ipsi nescio quem illum anteponebas? praesertim cum in re publica princeps esse velles ad eamque tuendam cum summa tua dignitate maxime a nobis ornari atque instrui posses. a nobis enim ista quaesita, a nobis descripta, notata, add. Lamb. praecepta sunt, omniumque rerum publicarum rectionis rectionis Mdv. rectiones BERN rectores V genera, status, mutationes, leges etiam et leges etiam et ERN leges et etiam B et etiam leges et V instituta ac mores civitatum perscripsimus. eloquentiae vero, quae et principibus maximo ornamento maximo ornamento RV maximo e ornamento B maximo cornamento E maxime (e ex corr. m. alt. ) ornamento N est, et qua te audimus audivimus RV valere plurimum, et qua te ... plurimum om. N quantum tibi ex monumentis monimentis RV nostris addidisses! Ea cum dixissent, quid tandem talibus viris responderes? 4.5.  One of these departments is the science that is held to give rules for the formation of moral character; this part, which is the foundation of our present discussion, I defer. For I shall consider later the question, what is the End of Goods. For the present I only say that the topic of what I think may fitly be entitled Civic Science (the adjective in Greek is politikos) was handled with authority and fullness by the early Peripatetics and Academics, who agreed in substance though they differed in terminology."What a vast amount they have written on politics and on jurisprudence! how many precepts of oratory they have left us in their treatises, and how many examples in their discourses! In the first place, even the topics that required close reasoning they handled in a neat and polished manner, employing now definition, now division; as indeed your school does also, but your style is rather out-at‑elbows, while theirs is noticeably elegant. 4.51.  The minor premise Polemo will concede to Zeno, and so will his master and the whole of their clan, as well as all the other philosophers that while ranking virtue far above all else yet couple some other thing with it in defining the Chief Good; since if virtue is a thing to be proud of, as it is, and excels everything else to a degree hardly to be expressed in words, Polemo will be able to be happy if endowed solely with virtue, and destitute of all besides, and yet he will not grant you that nothing except virtue is to be reckoned as a good. Those on the other hand whose Supreme Good dispenses with virtue will perhaps decline to grant that happiness contains any just ground for pride; although they, it is true, sometimes represent even pleasures as things to be proud of. 4.61.  What if those pupils of Plato were to come to life again, and their pupils again in succession, and were to address you in this fashion? 'As we listened, Marcus Cato, to so devoted a student of philosophy, so just a man, so upright a judge, so scrupulous a witness as yourself, we marvelled what reason could induce you to reject us for the Stoics, whose views on good and evil were the views that Zeno learnt from Polemo here, but who expressed those views in terms at first sight startling but upon examination ridiculous. If you accepted those views on their merits, why did you not hold them under their own terminology? or if you were swayed by authority, could you prefer that nobody to all of us, even to Plato himself? especially when you aspired to play a leading part in the state, and we were the very persons to arm and equip you to protect the state with the highest honour to yourself. Why, it is we who invented political philosophy; and reduced it to a system; its nomenclature, its principles are our creation; on all the various forms of government, their stability, their revolutions, the laws, institutions and customs of states, we have written exhaustively. Oratory again is the proudest distinction of the statesman, and in it you, we are told, are pre‑eminent; but how vastly you might have enriched your eloquence from the records of our genius.' What answer, pray, could you give to these words from such men as those?
3. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.16, 7.141-7.144 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academic philosophy, attitude towards auctoritas Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
academy, old Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
andronicus of rhodes Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
antiochus Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
antiochus of ascalon Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
aristotle Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92
arius didymus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
arrangement (classification), of aristotles writings Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
auctor Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
auctoritas Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
boethus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
cicero Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
corpus, aristotles Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
demonstration Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
dialectic Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
dialogue Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
didactic plan/path Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
doxography Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
ethics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92
logic Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92
master Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
metaphysics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
nicolaus of damascus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
old academy Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
peripatetic Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92
peripatetics Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
philoponus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
physics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92
plato Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
platonism Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
platonists Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
polemo Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
principle Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
representation Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
rhetorical, arts/theories Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
sextus empiricus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
stoicism Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
stoics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
system (σύστηµα/συστήµατα), of philosophy, of doctrine / metaphysical Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
teacher Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17
teaching (διδασκαλία) Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92
xenocrates Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 17, 92; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
xenophanes Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
zeno of citium Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 269
τάξις' Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 92