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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 4.228-4.280


Si quando sedem angustam servataque mellaNot otherwise, to measure small with great


thesauris relines, prius haustu sparsus aquarumThe love of getting planted in their breast


ora fove fumosque manu praetende sequaces.Goads on the bees, that haunt old Cecrops' heights


Bis gravidos cogunt fetus, duo tempora messisEach in his sphere to labour. The old have charge


Taygete simul os terris ostendit honestumTo keep the town, and build the walled combs


Pleas et Oceani spretos pede reppulit amnesAnd mould the cunning chambers; but the youth


aut eadem sidus fugiens ubi Piscis aquosiTheir tired legs packed with thyme, come labouring home


tristior hibernas caelo descendit in undas.Belated, for afar they range to feed


Illis ira modum supra est, laesaeque venenumOn arbutes and the grey-green willow-leaves


morsibus inspirant et spicula caeca relinquuntAnd cassia and the crocus blushing red


adfixae venis animasque in vulnere ponunt.Glue-yielding limes, and hyacinths dusky-eyed.


Sin duram metues hiemem parcesque futuroOne hour for rest have all, and one for toil:


contunsosque animos et res miserabere fractasWith dawn they hurry from the gates—no room


at suffire thymo cerasque recidere inanesFor loiterers there: and once again, when even


quis dubitet? nam saepe favos ignotus adeditNow bids them quit their pasturing on the plain


stellio et lucifugis congesta cubilia blattisThen homeward make they, then refresh their strength:


immunisque sedens aliena ad pabula fucusA hum arises: hark! they buzz and buzz


aut asper crabro imparibus se immiscuit armisAbout the doors and threshold; till at length


aut dirum tiniae genus, aut invisa MinervaeSafe laid to rest they hush them for the night


laxos in foribus suspendit aranea casses.And welcome slumber laps their weary limbs.


Quo magis exhaustae fuerint, hoc acrius omnesBut from the homestead not too far they fare


incumbent generis lapsi sarcire ruinasWhen showers hang like to fall, nor, east winds nigh


complebuntque foros et floribus horrea texent.Confide in heaven, but 'neath the city wall


Si vero, quoniam casus apibus quoque nostrosSafe-circling fetch them water, or essay


vita tulit, tristi languebunt corpora morbo—Brief out-goings, and oft weigh-up tiny stones


quod iam non dubiis poteris cognoscere signis:As light craft ballast in the tossing tide


continuo est aegris alius color, horrida vultumWherewith they poise them through the cloudy vast.


deformat macies, tum corpora luce carentumThis law of life, too, by the bees obeyed


exportant tectis et tristia funera ducunt;Will move thy wonder, that nor sex with sex


aut illae pedibus conexae ad limina pendentYoke they in marriage, nor yield their limbs to love


aut intus clausis cunctantur in aedibus, omnesNor know the pangs of labour, but alone


ignavaeque fame et contracto frigore pigrae.From leaves and honied herbs, the mothers, each


Tum sonus auditur gravior, tractimque susurrantGather their offspring in their mouths, alone


frigidus ut quondam silvis immurmurat AusterSupply new kings and pigmy commonwealth


ut mare sollicitum stridit refluentibus undisAnd their old court and waxen realm repair.


aestuat ut clausis rapidus fornacibus ignis:Oft, too, while wandering, against jagged stone


hic iam galbaneos suadebo incendere odoresTheir wings they fray, and 'neath the burden yield


mellaque harundineis inferre canalibus, ultroTheir liberal lives: so deep their love of flowers


hortantem et fessas ad pabula nota vocantem.So glorious deem they honey's proud acquist.


Proderit et tunsum gallae admiscere saporemTherefore, though each a life of narrow span


Arentesque rosas aut igni pinguia multoNe'er stretched to summers more than seven, befalls


defruta vel psithia passos de vite racemosYet deathless doth the race endure, and still


Cecropiumque thymum et grave olentia centaurea.Perennial stands the fortune of their line


Est etiam flos in pratis, cui nomen amelloFrom grandsire unto grandsire backward told.


fecere agricolae, facilis quaerentibus herba;Moreover, not


namque uno ingentem tollit de caespite silvamOf boundless


aureus ipse, sed in foliis, quae plurima circumNor Median Hydaspes, to their king


funduntur, violae sublucet purpura nigrae;Do such obeisance: lives the king unscathed


saepe deum nexis ornatae torquibus araeOne will inspires the million: is he dead


asper in ore sapor; tonsis in vallibus illumSnapt is the bond of fealty; they themselve


pastores et curva legunt prope flumina Mellae.Ravage their toil-wrought honey, and rend amain


Huius odorato radices incoque BacchoTheir own comb's waxen trellis. He is the lord


pabulaque in foribus plenis adpone canistris.Of all their labour; him with awful eye


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.8, 1.250-1.261, 1.928, 1.947, 2.1-2.19, 2.33, 2.40-2.49, 2.398-2.399, 2.504, 3.11, 4.3, 4.22, 4.967-4.968, 4.1133-4.1134, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1226-5.1232 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Vergil, Georgics, 3.525, 3.534-3.535, 4.1-4.50, 4.59-4.61, 4.67-4.115, 4.125-4.146, 4.149-4.215, 4.217-4.227, 4.229-4.280 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 4.1. of air-born honey, gift of heaven, I now 4.2. Take up the tale. Upon this theme no le 4.3. Look thou, Maecenas, with indulgent eye. 4.4. A marvellous display of puny powers 4.5. High-hearted chiefs, a nation's history 4.6. Its traits, its bent, its battles and its clans 4.7. All, each, shall pass before you, while I sing. 4.8. Slight though the poet's theme, not slight the praise 4.9. So frown not heaven, and Phoebus hear his call. 4.10. First find your bees a settled sure abode 4.11. Where neither winds can enter (winds blow back 4.12. The foragers with food returning home) 4.13. Nor sheep and butting kids tread down the flowers 4.14. Nor heifer wandering wide upon the plain 4.15. Dash off the dew, and bruise the springing blades. 4.16. Let the gay lizard too keep far aloof 4.17. His scale-clad body from their honied stalls 4.18. And the bee-eater, and what birds beside 4.19. And Procne smirched with blood upon the breast 4.20. From her own murderous hands. For these roam wide 4.21. Wasting all substance, or the bees themselve 4.22. Strike flying, and in their beaks bear home, to glut 4.23. Those savage nestlings with the dainty prey. 4.24. But let clear springs and moss-green pools be near 4.25. And through the grass a streamlet hurrying run 4.26. Some palm-tree o'er the porch extend its shade 4.27. Or huge-grown oleaster, that in Spring 4.28. Their own sweet Spring-tide, when the new-made chief 4.29. Lead forth the young swarms, and, escaped their comb 4.30. The colony comes forth to sport and play 4.31. The neighbouring bank may lure them from the heat 4.32. Or bough befriend with hospitable shade. 4.33. O'er the mid-waters, whether swift or still 4.34. Cast willow-branches and big stones enow 4.35. Bridge after bridge, where they may footing find 4.36. And spread their wide wings to the summer sun 4.37. If haply Eurus, swooping as they pause 4.38. Have dashed with spray or plunged them in the deep. 4.39. And let green cassias and far-scented thymes 4.40. And savory with its heavy-laden breath 4.41. Bloom round about, and violet-beds hard by 4.42. Sip sweetness from the fertilizing springs. 4.43. For the hive's self, or stitched of hollow bark 4.44. Or from tough osier woven, let the door 4.45. Be strait of entrance; for stiff winter's cold 4.46. Congeals the honey, and heat resolves and thaws 4.47. To bees alike disastrous; not for naught 4.48. So haste they to cement the tiny pore 4.49. That pierce their walls, and fill the crevice 4.50. With pollen from the flowers, and glean and keep 4.59. But near their home let neither yew-tree grow 4.60. Nor reddening crabs be roasted, and mistrust 4.61. Deep marish-ground and mire with noisome smell 4.67. Forthwith they roam the glades and forests o'er 4.68. Rifle the painted flowers, or sip the streams 4.69. Light-hovering on the surface. Hence it i 4.70. With some sweet rapture, that we know not of 4.71. Their little ones they foster, hence with skill 4.72. Work out new wax or clinging honey mould. 4.73. So when the cage-escaped hosts you see 4.74. Float heavenward through the hot clear air, until 4.75. You marvel at yon dusky cloud that spread 4.76. And lengthens on the wind, then mark them well; 4.77. For then 'tis ever the fresh springs they seek 4.78. And bowery shelter: hither must you bring 4.79. The savoury sweets I bid, and sprinkle them 4.80. Bruised balsam and the wax-flower's lowly weed 4.81. And wake and shake the tinkling cymbals heard 4.82. By the great Mother: on the anointed spot 4.83. Themselves will settle, and in wonted wise 4.84. Seek of themselves the cradle's inmost depth. 4.85. But if to battle they have hied them forth— 4.86. For oft 'twixt king and king with uproar dire 4.87. Fierce feud arises, and at once from far 4.88. You may discern what passion sways the mob 4.89. And how their hearts are throbbing for the strife; 4.90. Hark! the hoarse brazen note that warriors know 4.91. Chides on the loiterers, and the ear may catch 4.92. A sound that mocks the war-trump's broken blasts; 4.93. Then in hot haste they muster, then flash wings 4.94. Sharpen their pointed beaks and knit their thews 4.95. And round the king, even to his royal tent 4.96. Throng rallying, and with shouts defy the foe. 4.97. So, when a dry Spring and clear space is given 4.98. Forth from the gates they burst, they clash on high; 4.99. A din arises; they are heaped and rolled 4.100. Into one mighty mass, and headlong fall 4.101. Not denselier hail through heaven, nor pelting so 4.102. Rains from the shaken oak its acorn-shower. 4.103. Conspicuous by their wings the chiefs themselve 4.104. Press through the heart of battle, and display 4.105. A giant's spirit in each pigmy frame 4.106. Steadfast no inch to yield till these or those 4.107. The victor's ponderous arm has turned to flight. 4.108. Such fiery passions and such fierce assault 4.109. A little sprinkled dust controls and quells. 4.110. And now, both leaders from the field recalled 4.111. Who hath the worser seeming, do to death 4.112. Lest royal waste wax burdensome, but let 4.113. His better lord it on the empty throne. 4.114. One with gold-burnished flakes will shine like fire 4.115. For twofold are their kinds, the nobler he 4.125. Symmetric: this the likelier breed; from these 4.126. When heaven brings round the season, thou shalt strain 4.127. Sweet honey, nor yet so sweet as passing clear 4.128. And mellowing on the tongue the wine-god's fire. 4.129. But when the swarms fly aimlessly abroad 4.130. Disport themselves in heaven and spurn their cells 4.131. Leaving the hive unwarmed, from such vain play 4.132. Must you refrain their volatile desires 4.133. Nor hard the task: tear off the monarchs' wings; 4.134. While these prove loiterers, none beside will dare 4.135. Mount heaven, or pluck the standards from the camp. 4.136. Let gardens with the breath of saffron flower 4.137. Allure them, and the lord of placeName key= 4.138. Priapus, wielder of the willow-scythe 4.139. Safe in his keeping hold from birds and thieves. 4.140. And let the man to whom such cares are dear 4.141. Himself bring thyme and pine-trees from the heights 4.142. And strew them in broad belts about their home; 4.143. No hand but his the blistering task should ply 4.144. Plant the young slips, or shed the genial showers. 4.145. And I myself, were I not even now 4.146. Furling my sails, and, nigh the journey's end 4.149. Makes the trim garden smile; of placeName key= 4.150. Whose roses bloom and fade and bloom again; 4.151. How endives glory in the streams they drink 4.152. And green banks in their parsley, and how the gourd 4.153. Twists through the grass and rounds him to paunch; 4.154. Nor of Narcissus had my lips been dumb 4.155. That loiterer of the flowers, nor supple-stemmed 4.156. Acanthus, with the praise of ivies pale 4.157. And myrtles clinging to the shores they love. 4.158. For 'neath the shade of tall Oebalia's towers 4.159. Where dark Galaesus laves the yellowing fields 4.160. An old man once I mind me to have seen— 4.161. From Corycus he came—to whom had fallen 4.162. Some few poor acres of neglected land 4.163. And they nor fruitful' neath the plodding steer 4.164. Meet for the grazing herd, nor good for vines. 4.165. Yet he, the while his meagre garden-herb 4.166. Among the thorns he planted, and all round 4.167. White lilies, vervains, and lean poppy set 4.168. In pride of spirit matched the wealth of kings 4.169. And home returning not till night was late 4.170. With unbought plenty heaped his board on high. 4.171. He was the first to cull the rose in spring 4.172. He the ripe fruits in autumn; and ere yet 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive 4.174. The rocks with frost, and with her icy bit 4.175. Curb in the running waters, there was he 4.176. Plucking the rathe faint hyacinth, while he chid 4.177. Summer's slow footsteps and the lagging West. 4.178. Therefore he too with earliest brooding bee 4.179. And their full swarms o'erflowed, and first was he 4.180. To press the bubbling honey from the comb; 4.181. Lime-trees were his, and many a branching pine; 4.182. And all the fruits wherewith in early bloom 4.183. The orchard-tree had clothed her, in full tale 4.184. Hung there, by mellowing autumn perfected. 4.185. He too transplanted tall-grown elms a-row 4.186. Time-toughened pear, thorns bursting with the plum 4.187. And plane now yielding serviceable shade 4.188. For dry lips to drink under: but these things 4.189. Shut off by rigorous limits, I pass by 4.190. And leave for others to sing after me. 4.191. Come, then, I will unfold the natural power 4.192. Great Jove himself upon the bees bestowed 4.193. The boon for which, led by the shrill sweet strain 4.194. of the Curetes and their clashing brass 4.195. They fed the King of heaven in Dicte's cave. 4.196. Alone of all things they receive and hold 4.197. Community of offspring, and they house 4.198. Together in one city, and beneath 4.199. The shelter of majestic laws they live; 4.200. And they alone fixed home and country know 4.201. And in the summer, warned of coming cold 4.202. Make proof of toil, and for the general store 4.203. Hoard up their gathered harvesting. For some 4.204. Watch o'er the victualling of the hive, and these 4.205. By settled order ply their tasks afield; 4.206. And some within the confines of their home 4.207. Plant firm the comb's first layer, Narcissus' tear 4.208. And sticky gum oozed from the bark of trees 4.209. Then set the clinging wax to hang therefrom. 4.210. Others the while lead forth the full-grown young 4.211. Their country's hope, and others press and pack 4.212. The thrice repured honey, and stretch their cell 4.213. To bursting with the clear-strained nectar sweet. 4.214. Some, too, the wardship of the gates befalls 4.215. Who watch in turn for showers and cloudy skies 4.217. Or form a band and from their precincts drive 4.218. The drones, a lazy herd. How glows the work! 4.219. How sweet the honey smells of perfumed thyme 4.220. Like the Cyclopes, when in haste they forge 4.221. From the slow-yielding ore the thunderbolts 4.222. Some from the bull's-hide bellows in and out 4.223. Let the blasts drive, some dip i' the water-trough 4.224. The sputtering metal: with the anvil's weight 4.225. Groans placeName key= 4.226. With giant strength uplift their sinewy arms 4.227. Or twist the iron with the forceps' grip— 4.229. The love of getting planted in their breast 4.230. Goads on the bees, that haunt old Cecrops' heights 4.231. Each in his sphere to labour. The old have charge 4.232. To keep the town, and build the walled combs 4.233. And mould the cunning chambers; but the youth 4.234. Their tired legs packed with thyme, come labouring home 4.235. Belated, for afar they range to feed 4.236. On arbutes and the grey-green willow-leaves 4.237. And cassia and the crocus blushing red 4.238. Glue-yielding limes, and hyacinths dusky-eyed. 4.239. One hour for rest have all, and one for toil: 4.240. With dawn they hurry from the gates—no room 4.241. For loiterers there: and once again, when even 4.242. Now bids them quit their pasturing on the plain 4.243. Then homeward make they, then refresh their strength: 4.244. A hum arises: hark! they buzz and buzz 4.245. About the doors and threshold; till at length 4.246. Safe laid to rest they hush them for the night 4.247. And welcome slumber laps their weary limbs. 4.248. But from the homestead not too far they fare 4.249. When showers hang like to fall, nor, east winds nigh 4.250. Confide in heaven, but 'neath the city wall 4.251. Safe-circling fetch them water, or essay 4.252. Brief out-goings, and oft weigh-up tiny stones 4.253. As light craft ballast in the tossing tide 4.254. Wherewith they poise them through the cloudy vast. 4.255. This law of life, too, by the bees obeyed 4.256. Will move thy wonder, that nor sex with sex 4.257. Yoke they in marriage, nor yield their limbs to love 4.258. Nor know the pangs of labour, but alone 4.259. From leaves and honied herbs, the mothers, each 4.260. Gather their offspring in their mouths, alone 4.261. Supply new kings and pigmy commonwealth 4.262. And their old court and waxen realm repair. 4.263. oft, too, while wandering, against jagged stone 4.264. Their wings they fray, and 'neath the burden yield 4.265. Their liberal lives: so deep their love of flowers 4.266. So glorious deem they honey's proud acquist. 4.267. Therefore, though each a life of narrow span 4.268. Ne'er stretched to summers more than seven, befalls 4.269. Yet deathless doth the race endure, and still 4.270. Perennial stands the fortune of their line 4.271. From grandsire unto grandsire backward told. 4.272. Moreover, not placeName key= 4.273. of boundless placeName key= 4.274. Nor Median Hydaspes, to their king 4.275. Do such obeisance: lives the king unscathed 4.276. One will inspires the million: is he dead 4.277. Snapt is the bond of fealty; they themselve 4.278. Ravage their toil-wrought honey, and rend amain 4.279. Their own comb's waxen trellis. He is the lord 4.280. of all their labour; him with awful eye


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 168
anthropos (heavenly) Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
aseneth Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
bees, as roman paradigm Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 123
bees, in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 123
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
containment Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
corycian gardener Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
cycnus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 169
death Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
dido Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 168
domitian, palace of Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 169
ekphrasis, in statius poetry' Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 169
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
food Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
gardens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
golden age, in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 123
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
honey (comb) Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
ingestion Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
phaethon Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 169
picus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 169
plague, as reflection on golden age ideals in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 123
priam Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 168
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
spirit, spirit Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 54
tarentum Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
technology, futility of Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 123
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182