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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 3.236


signa movet praecepsque oblitum fertur in hostem:Alternately to curve each bending leg


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 204-210, 203 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

203. The bad will harm the good whom they shall maim
2. Homer, Iliad, 4.275-4.279, 4.422-4.426 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.275. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.276. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.277. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.278. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.279. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.422. /and terribly rang the bronze upon the breast of the prince as he moved; thereat might terror have seized even one that was steadfast of heart.As when on a sounding beach the swell of the sea beats, wave after wave, before the driving of the West Wind; out on the deep at the first is it gathered in a crest, but thereafter 4.423. /and terribly rang the bronze upon the breast of the prince as he moved; thereat might terror have seized even one that was steadfast of heart.As when on a sounding beach the swell of the sea beats, wave after wave, before the driving of the West Wind; out on the deep at the first is it gathered in a crest, but thereafter 4.424. /and terribly rang the bronze upon the breast of the prince as he moved; thereat might terror have seized even one that was steadfast of heart.As when on a sounding beach the swell of the sea beats, wave after wave, before the driving of the West Wind; out on the deep at the first is it gathered in a crest, but thereafter 4.425. /is broken upon the land and thundereth aloud, and round about the headlands it swelleth and reareth its head, and speweth forth the salt brine: even in such wise on that day did the battalions of the Danaans move, rank after rank, without cease, into battle; and each captain gave charge to his own men, and the rest marched on in silence; thou wouldst not have deemed 4.426. /is broken upon the land and thundereth aloud, and round about the headlands it swelleth and reareth its head, and speweth forth the salt brine: even in such wise on that day did the battalions of the Danaans move, rank after rank, without cease, into battle; and each captain gave charge to his own men, and the rest marched on in silence; thou wouldst not have deemed
3. Xenophon, On Household Management, 4.21 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.21. Now Lysander admired the beauty of the trees in it, the accuracy of the spacing, the straightness of the rows, the regularity of the angles and the multitude of the sweet scents that clung round them as they walked; and for wonder of these things he cried, Cyrus , I really do admire all these lovely things, but I am far more impressed with your agent’s skill in measuring and arranging everything so exactly.
4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 2.88-2.89 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.88. ἂψ δʼ αὖτις συνόρουσαν ἐναντίοι, ἠύτε ταύρω 2.89. φορβάδος ἀμφὶ βοὸς κεκοτηότε δηριάασθον.
5. Cicero, On Old Age, 59 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.4.1-1.4.2, 2.1.18, 2.5.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.20, 1.159-1.214, 1.250-1.261, 1.263-1.264, 1.557, 1.562, 2.5-2.6, 2.123-2.124, 3.965, 4.1107, 4.1269-4.1273, 5.939-5.942, 5.970-5.972, 5.987, 5.1076, 5.1304, 5.1376-5.1378, 6.108, 6.131-6.159, 6.170, 6.256-6.257, 6.306-6.308, 6.691, 6.1142-6.1143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Statius, Thebais, 2.323, 2.331-2.332 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 12.715-12.722

12.716. Behold Murranus, boasting his high birth 12.717. from far-descended sires of storied name 12.718. the line of Latium 's kings! Aeneas now 12.719. with mountain-boulder lays him low in dust 12.720. mitten with whirlwind of the monster stone; 12.721. and o'er him fallen under yoke and rein 12.722. roll his own chariot wheels, while with swift tread
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.229, 1.239, 1.257, 1.316-1.334, 1.351, 1.354, 1.439, 1.463, 1.471, 1.489, 2.303-2.314, 2.362-2.370, 3.34, 3.64-3.65, 3.70, 3.95-3.100, 3.215-3.235, 3.237-3.241, 3.243-3.244, 3.258-3.263, 3.266-3.269, 3.272-3.277, 3.440, 3.503, 4.86-4.90, 4.108, 4.176, 4.219, 4.253, 4.488, 4.538-4.553

1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come 1.463. oft, too, when wind is toward, the stars thou'lt see 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 2.303. Barren for fruits, by tilth untamable 2.304. Nor grape her kind, nor apples their good name 2.305. Maintaining—will in this wise yield thee proof: 2.306. Stout osier-baskets from the rafter-smoke 2.307. And strainers of the winepress pluck thee down; 2.308. Hereinto let that evil land, with fresh 2.309. Spring-water mixed, be trampled to the full; 2.310. The moisture, mark you, will ooze all away 2.311. In big drops issuing through the osier-withes 2.312. But plainly will its taste the secret tell 2.313. And with a harsh twang ruefully distort 2.314. The mouths of them that try it. Rich soil again 2.362. In equal rows symmetric, not alone 2.363. To feed an idle fancy with the view 2.364. But since not otherwise will earth afford 2.365. Vigour to all alike, nor yet the bough 2.366. Have power to stretch them into open space. 2.367. Shouldst haply of the furrow's depth inquire 2.368. Even to a shallow trench I dare commit 2.369. The vine; but deeper in the ground is fixed 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.64. If eager for the prized Olympian palm 3.65. One breed the horse, or bullock strong to plough 3.70. Large every way she is, large-footed even 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.215. But corn-ears with thy hand pluck from the crops. 3.216. Nor shall the brood-kine, as of yore, for thee 3.217. Brim high the snowy milking-pail, but spend 3.218. Their udders' fullness on their own sweet young. 3.219. But if fierce squadrons and the ranks of war 3.220. Delight thee rather, or on wheels to glide 3.221. At placeName key= 3.222. And in the grove of Jupiter urge on 3.223. The flying chariot, be your steed's first task 3.224. To face the warrior's armed rage, and brook 3.225. The trumpet, and long roar of rumbling wheels 3.226. And clink of chiming bridles in the stall; 3.227. Then more and more to love his master's voice 3.228. Caressing, or loud hand that claps his neck. 3.229. Ay, thus far let him learn to dare, when first 3.230. Weaned from his mother, and his mouth at time 3.231. Yield to the supple halter, even while yet 3.232. Weak, tottering-limbed, and ignorant of life. 3.233. But, three years ended, when the fourth arrives 3.234. Now let him tarry not to run the ring 3.235. With rhythmic hoof-beat echoing, and now learn 3.237. And be like one that struggleth; then at last 3.238. Challenge the winds to race him, and at speed 3.239. Launched through the open, like a reinless thing 3.240. Scarce print his footsteps on the surface-sand. 3.241. As when with power from Hyperborean clime 3.243. Dry clouds and storms of placeName key= 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.269. While each on each the furious rivals run; 3.272. With mighty groaning; all the forest-side 3.273. And far placeName key= 3.274. Nor wont the champions in one stall to couch; 3.275. But he that's worsted hies him to strange clime 3.276. Far off, an exile, moaning much the shame 3.277. The blows of that proud conqueror, then love's lo 3.440. Whole pools are turned; and on their untrimmed beard 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 4.86. For oft 'twixt king and king with uproar dire 4.87. Fierce feud arises, and at once from far 4.88. You may discern what passion sways the mob 4.89. And how their hearts are throbbing for the strife; 4.90. Hark! the hoarse brazen note that warriors know 4.108. Such fiery passions and such fierce assault 4.176. Plucking the rathe faint hyacinth, while he chid 4.219. How sweet the honey smells of perfumed thyme 4.253. As light craft ballast in the tossing tide 4.488. “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said 4.538. Behind a rock's huge barrier, Proteus hides. 4.539. Here in close covert out of the sun's eye 4.540. The youth she places, and herself the while 4.541. Swathed in a shadowy mist stands far aloof. 4.542. And now the ravening dog-star that burns up 4.543. The thirsty Indians blazed in heaven; his course 4.544. The fiery sun had half devoured: the blade 4.545. Were parched, and the void streams with droughty jaw 4.546. Baked to their mud-beds by the scorching ray 4.547. When Proteus seeking his accustomed cave 4.548. Strode from the billows: round him frolicking 4.549. The watery folk that people the waste sea 4.550. Sprinkled the bitter brine-dew far and wide. 4.551. Along the shore in scattered groups to feed 4.552. The sea-calves stretch them: while the seer himself 4.553. Like herdsman on the hills when evening bid


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amor,as destructive force Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96
amor,in georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 263
animals Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 176, 263
anthropomorphism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 176, 263
apollonius rhodius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96
aristaeus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
aristotle Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 263
battle scenes in homer,in roman epic Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
beehive,as paradigm for human society Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
bees Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 259
caesar,julius,crossing the rubicon Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
cattle Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 176, 259, 260, 263
cereal crops Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
columella Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
comminus Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
cyrene Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
georgics ,language of science in Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 154
hero Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
homeric similes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 260, 263
horses Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 263
imagery,agricultural Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
imagery,fire Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 263
imagery,military Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259, 260, 263
imagery,storms Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 263
labor,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 259
leander Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
lucan,portrayal of caesar Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
lucretius,natura in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96
lucretius,war in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
natura Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96
olives Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
orpheus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
personification Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 260
pessimism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
plague Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
polyneices Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
proems,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
roma Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
science,language of,for sign theory Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 154
sextus empiricus Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 154
signs,in the ancient world Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 154
similes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260, 263
sphragis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
statira,thebaid Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
storms Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260, 263
thornton,agathe Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
trees Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
varro Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 263
venus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
vines Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
virgil,and homer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 263
virgil,and ira Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
virgil,reception of lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
virgil Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 258
war,and agriculture Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
war,civil war Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 96, 259, 260, 263
war,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259
war,in the georgics' Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 260
war,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 259, 263