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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 3.196


qualis Hyperboreis Aquilo cum densus ab orisAnd which to rear for breeding, or devote


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.144-2.148, 20.226-20.229, 23.369 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.144. /let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main 2.145. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.146. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.147. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.148. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 20.226. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.227. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.228. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.229. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 23.369. /away from the ships and beneath their breasts the dust arose and stood, as it were a cloud or a whirlwind, and their manes streamed on the blasts of the wind. And the chariots would now course over the bounteous earth, and now again would bound on high; and they that drave
2. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1259-3.1261 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1259. ὡς δʼ ὅτʼ ἀρήιος ἵππος ἐελδόμενος πολέμοιο 3.1260. σκαρθμῷ ἐπιχρεμέθων κρούει πέδον, αὐτὰρ ὕπερθεν 3.1261. κυδιόων ὀρθοῖσιν ἐπʼ οὔασιν αὐχένʼ ἀείρει·
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.272, 2.263-2.265, 3.60, 5.388, 5.487-5.488, 5.886-5.887, 5.944, 6.1, 6.405, 6.624, 6.1142-6.1143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48, 3.66-3.68, 3.89-3.100, 3.102, 3.116, 3.158, 3.339-3.383, 3.509-3.514, 4.561-4.562 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.66. Be his prime care a shapely dam to choose. 3.67. of kine grim-faced is goodliest, with coarse head 3.68. And burly neck, whose hanging dewlaps reach 3.89. Renew them still; with yearly choice of young 3.90. Preventing losses, lest too late thou rue. 3.91. Nor steeds crave less selection; but on those 3.92. Thou think'st to rear, the promise of their line 3.93. From earliest youth thy chiefest pains bestow. 3.94. See from the first yon high-bred colt afield 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.102. And sorrel. Then lo! if arms are clashed afar 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.158. The herd itself of purpose they reduce 3.339. Not toward thy rising, Eurus, or the sun's 3.340. But westward and north-west, or whence up-spring 3.341. Black Auster, that glooms heaven with rainy cold. 3.342. Hence from their groin slow drips a poisonous juice 3.343. By shepherds truly named hippomanes 3.344. Hippomanes, fell stepdames oft have culled 3.345. And mixed with herbs and spells of baneful bode. 3.346. Fast flies meanwhile the irreparable hour 3.347. As point to point our charmed round we trace. 3.348. Enough of herds. This second task remains 3.349. The wool-clad flocks and shaggy goats to treat. 3.350. Here lies a labour; hence for glory look 3.351. Brave husbandmen. Nor doubtfully know 3.352. How hard it is for words to triumph here 3.353. And shed their lustre on a theme so slight: 3.354. But I am caught by ravishing desire 3.355. Above the lone Parnassian steep; I love 3.356. To walk the heights, from whence no earlier track 3.357. Slopes gently downward to Castalia's spring. 3.358. Now, awful Pales, strike a louder tone. 3.359. First, for the sheep soft pencotes I decree 3.360. To browse in, till green summer's swift return; 3.361. And that the hard earth under them with straw 3.362. And handfuls of the fern be littered deep 3.363. Lest chill of ice such tender cattle harm 3.364. With scab and loathly foot-rot. Passing thence 3.365. I bid the goats with arbute-leaves be stored 3.366. And served with fresh spring-water, and their pen 3.367. Turned southward from the blast, to face the sun 3.368. of winter, when Aquarius' icy beam 3.369. Now sinks in showers upon the parting year. 3.370. These too no lightlier our protection claim 3.371. Nor prove of poorer service, howsoe'er 3.372. Milesian fleeces dipped in Tyrian red 3.373. Repay the barterer; these with offspring teem 3.374. More numerous; these yield plenteous store of milk: 3.375. The more each dry-wrung udder froths the pail 3.376. More copious soon the teat-pressed torrents flow. 3.377. Ay, and on Cinyps' bank the he-goats too 3.378. Their beards and grizzled chins and bristling hair 3.379. Let clip for camp-use, or as rugs to wrap 3.380. Seafaring wretches. But they browse the wood 3.381. And summits of Lycaeus, and rough briers 3.382. And brakes that love the highland: of themselve 3.383. Right heedfully the she-goats homeward troop 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
amor, as destructive force Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99, 262
anthropomorphism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
archive Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
augustus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
cardinal points Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
catullus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99, 262
christian salvation Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
cold Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
cosmovision Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
horses Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99, 262
hymns Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
imagination Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
intertextuality Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
landscape Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
mars, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
neptune Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
nexus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
rhipaean mountains Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
rome Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
scythians Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
shepherds Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
speed Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
sphragis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
winds Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 388
wine' Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262