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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.455


Bacchus et ad culpam causas dedit; ille furentisFrom story up to story.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 118-119, 202-212, 117 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

117. High on Olympus first devised a race
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 720 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

720. And be your allies in this dread discord
3. Homer, Iliad, 4.442-4.443, 8.16, 12.131-12.134, 16.148-16.154, 19.400, 19.404-19.418 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.442. /and Terror, and Rout, and Discord that rageth incessantly, sister and comrade of man-slaying Ares; she at the first rears her crest but little, yet thereafter planteth her head in heaven, while her feet tread on earth. She it was that now cast evil strife into their midst 4.443. /and Terror, and Rout, and Discord that rageth incessantly, sister and comrade of man-slaying Ares; she at the first rears her crest but little, yet thereafter planteth her head in heaven, while her feet tread on earth. She it was that now cast evil strife into their midst 8.16. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 12.131. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.132. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.133. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.134. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 16.148. /And the horses he bade Automedon yoke speedily, even him that he honoured most after Achilles, breaker of the ranks of men, and that in his eyes was faithful above all to abide his call in battle. At his bidding then Automedon led beneath the yoke the fleet horses, Xanthus and Balius, that flew swift as the winds, horses 16.149. /And the horses he bade Automedon yoke speedily, even him that he honoured most after Achilles, breaker of the ranks of men, and that in his eyes was faithful above all to abide his call in battle. At his bidding then Automedon led beneath the yoke the fleet horses, Xanthus and Balius, that flew swift as the winds, horses 16.150. /that the Harpy Podarge conceived to the West Wind, as she grazed on the meadow beside the stream of Oceanus. And in the side-traces he set the goodly Pedasus that on a time Achilles had brought away, when he took the city of Eetion; and he, being but mortal, kept pace with immortal steeds. 16.151. /that the Harpy Podarge conceived to the West Wind, as she grazed on the meadow beside the stream of Oceanus. And in the side-traces he set the goodly Pedasus that on a time Achilles had brought away, when he took the city of Eetion; and he, being but mortal, kept pace with immortal steeds. 16.152. /that the Harpy Podarge conceived to the West Wind, as she grazed on the meadow beside the stream of Oceanus. And in the side-traces he set the goodly Pedasus that on a time Achilles had brought away, when he took the city of Eetion; and he, being but mortal, kept pace with immortal steeds. 16.153. /that the Harpy Podarge conceived to the West Wind, as she grazed on the meadow beside the stream of Oceanus. And in the side-traces he set the goodly Pedasus that on a time Achilles had brought away, when he took the city of Eetion; and he, being but mortal, kept pace with immortal steeds. 16.154. /that the Harpy Podarge conceived to the West Wind, as she grazed on the meadow beside the stream of Oceanus. And in the side-traces he set the goodly Pedasus that on a time Achilles had brought away, when he took the city of Eetion; and he, being but mortal, kept pace with immortal steeds. 19.400. / Xanthus and Balius, ye far-famed children of Podarge, in some other wise bethink you to bring your charioteer back safe to the host of the Danaans, when we have had our fill of war, and leave ye not him there dead, as ye did Patroclus. Then from beneath the yoke spake to him the horse Xanthus, of the swift-glancing feet; 19.404. / Xanthus and Balius, ye far-famed children of Podarge, in some other wise bethink you to bring your charioteer back safe to the host of the Danaans, when we have had our fill of war, and leave ye not him there dead, as ye did Patroclus. Then from beneath the yoke spake to him the horse Xanthus, of the swift-glancing feet; 19.405. /on a sudden he bowed his head, and all his mane streamed from beneath the yoke-pad beside the yoke, and touched the ground; and the goddess, white-armed Hera, gave him speech: Aye verily, yet for this time will we save thee, mighty Achilles, albeit the day of doom is nigh thee, nor shall we be the cause thereof 19.406. /on a sudden he bowed his head, and all his mane streamed from beneath the yoke-pad beside the yoke, and touched the ground; and the goddess, white-armed Hera, gave him speech: Aye verily, yet for this time will we save thee, mighty Achilles, albeit the day of doom is nigh thee, nor shall we be the cause thereof 19.407. /on a sudden he bowed his head, and all his mane streamed from beneath the yoke-pad beside the yoke, and touched the ground; and the goddess, white-armed Hera, gave him speech: Aye verily, yet for this time will we save thee, mighty Achilles, albeit the day of doom is nigh thee, nor shall we be the cause thereof 19.408. /on a sudden he bowed his head, and all his mane streamed from beneath the yoke-pad beside the yoke, and touched the ground; and the goddess, white-armed Hera, gave him speech: Aye verily, yet for this time will we save thee, mighty Achilles, albeit the day of doom is nigh thee, nor shall we be the cause thereof 19.409. /on a sudden he bowed his head, and all his mane streamed from beneath the yoke-pad beside the yoke, and touched the ground; and the goddess, white-armed Hera, gave him speech: Aye verily, yet for this time will we save thee, mighty Achilles, albeit the day of doom is nigh thee, nor shall we be the cause thereof 19.410. /but a mighty god and overpowering Fate. For it was not through sloth or slackness of ours that the Trojans availed to strip the harness from the shoulders of Patroclus, but one, far the best of gods, even he that fair-haired Leto bare, slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. 19.411. /but a mighty god and overpowering Fate. For it was not through sloth or slackness of ours that the Trojans availed to strip the harness from the shoulders of Patroclus, but one, far the best of gods, even he that fair-haired Leto bare, slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. 19.412. /but a mighty god and overpowering Fate. For it was not through sloth or slackness of ours that the Trojans availed to strip the harness from the shoulders of Patroclus, but one, far the best of gods, even he that fair-haired Leto bare, slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. 19.413. /but a mighty god and overpowering Fate. For it was not through sloth or slackness of ours that the Trojans availed to strip the harness from the shoulders of Patroclus, but one, far the best of gods, even he that fair-haired Leto bare, slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. 19.414. /but a mighty god and overpowering Fate. For it was not through sloth or slackness of ours that the Trojans availed to strip the harness from the shoulders of Patroclus, but one, far the best of gods, even he that fair-haired Leto bare, slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. 19.415. /But for us twain, we could run swift as the blast of the West Wind, which, men say, is of all winds the fleetest; nay, it is thine own self that art fated to be slain in fight by a god and a mortal. When he had thus spoken, the Erinyes checked his voice. Then, his heart mightily stirred, spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 19.416. /But for us twain, we could run swift as the blast of the West Wind, which, men say, is of all winds the fleetest; nay, it is thine own self that art fated to be slain in fight by a god and a mortal. When he had thus spoken, the Erinyes checked his voice. Then, his heart mightily stirred, spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 19.417. /But for us twain, we could run swift as the blast of the West Wind, which, men say, is of all winds the fleetest; nay, it is thine own self that art fated to be slain in fight by a god and a mortal. When he had thus spoken, the Erinyes checked his voice. Then, his heart mightily stirred, spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 19.418. /But for us twain, we could run swift as the blast of the West Wind, which, men say, is of all winds the fleetest; nay, it is thine own self that art fated to be slain in fight by a god and a mortal. When he had thus spoken, the Erinyes checked his voice. Then, his heart mightily stirred, spake to him swift-footed Achilles:
4. Homer, Odyssey, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 109-113, 115-136, 108 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

108. οὔπω λευγαλέου τότε νείκεος ἠπίσταντο
6. Cicero, On Old Age, 51 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Catullus, Poems, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Horace, Letters, 2.1.139-2.1.146 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Livy, History, 7.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.40, 1.56-1.57, 1.62-1.79, 1.250-1.261, 1.803-1.811, 1.922-1.930, 2.1-2.19, 2.650, 2.662, 2.1116-2.1117, 3.9-3.12, 4.2-4.3, 4.1058, 4.1068, 5.30, 5.394-5.395, 5.737-5.740, 5.780-5.820, 5.901-5.906, 5.917, 5.925-5.1010, 5.1076, 5.1143-5.1160, 5.1297-5.1307, 5.1379-5.1404, 6.1-6.6, 6.73, 6.224, 6.357-6.378, 6.642, 6.1132, 6.1145, 6.1168, 6.1176 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Ovid, Fasti, 1.694 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.694. I offer this for you, farmers, do so yourselves
12. Ovid, Remedia Amoris, 173 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.444, 3.619-3.620, 3.678, 4.177, 10.767, 11.492-11.497, 12.82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.444. one of my sisters in this wood astray? 3.619. on leaves inscribing the portentous song 3.620. he sets in order, and conceals them well 3.678. “Accept these gifts, sweet youth, memorials 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 10.767. against Jove's thunder;—so Aeneas raged 11.492. and front thy own brave bosom to the foe. 11.493. for, lo, that Turnus on his wedding day 11.494. may win a princess, our cheap, common lives— 11.495. we the mere mob, unwept, unsepulchred— 11.496. must be spilled forth in battle! Thou, I say 11.497. if there be mettle in thee and some drops 12.82. from these new terms of duel, wept aloud
14. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.40. yet shall there lurk within of ancient wrong
15. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15, 1.33, 1.61-1.63, 1.127-1.128, 1.229, 1.338-1.350, 1.415-1.423, 2.1-2.3, 2.103-2.108, 2.113, 2.136-2.176, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.294-2.295, 2.303-2.314, 2.323-2.345, 2.362-2.366, 2.370, 2.380-2.396, 2.438-2.439, 2.458-2.474, 2.490-2.540, 3.1-3.48, 3.81-3.82, 3.100, 3.115-3.117, 3.242-3.246, 3.250-3.254, 3.258-3.263, 3.266-3.268, 3.280-3.283, 3.440, 3.444, 3.454-3.458, 3.461-3.469, 3.509-3.514, 3.549-3.550, 4.1-4.7, 4.15-4.17, 4.90, 4.488, 4.511-4.515, 4.520-4.522 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 1.338. Nay even on holy days some tasks to ply 1.339. Is right and lawful: this no ban forbids 1.340. To turn the runnel's course, fence corn-fields in 1.341. Make springes for the birds, burn up the briars 1.342. And plunge in wholesome stream the bleating flock. 1.343. oft too with oil or apples plenty-cheap 1.344. The creeping ass's ribs his driver packs 1.345. And home from town returning brings instead 1.346. A dented mill-stone or black lump of pitch. 1.347. The moon herself in various rank assign 1.348. The days for labour lucky: fly the fifth; 1.349. Then sprang pale Orcus and the Eumenides; 1.350. Earth then in awful labour brought to light 1.415. Wields with red hand the levin; through all her bulk 1.416. Earth at the hurly quakes; the beasts are fled 1.417. And mortal hearts of every kindred sunk 1.418. In cowering terror; he with flaming brand 1.419. Athos , or Rhodope, or Ceraunian crag 1.420. Precipitates: then doubly raves the South 1.421. With shower on blinding shower, and woods and coast 1.422. Wail fitfully beneath the mighty blast. 1.423. This fearing, mark the months and Signs of heaven 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.113. of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.294. All back again, and stamp the surface smooth. 2.295. If it suffice not, loose will be the land 2.303. Barren for fruits, by tilth untamable 2.304. Nor grape her kind, nor apples their good name 2.305. Maintaining—will in this wise yield thee proof: 2.306. Stout osier-baskets from the rafter-smoke 2.307. And strainers of the winepress pluck thee down; 2.308. Hereinto let that evil land, with fresh 2.309. Spring-water mixed, be trampled to the full; 2.310. The moisture, mark you, will ooze all away 2.311. In big drops issuing through the osier-withes 2.312. But plainly will its taste the secret tell 2.313. And with a harsh twang ruefully distort 2.314. The mouths of them that try it. Rich soil again 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 2.362. In equal rows symmetric, not alone 2.363. To feed an idle fancy with the view 2.364. But since not otherwise will earth afford 2.365. Vigour to all alike, nor yet the bough 2.366. Have power to stretch them into open space. 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.438. Take heed to hide them, and dig in withal 2.439. Rough shells or porous stone, for therebetween 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.461. With keen-edged sickle, but let the leaves alone 2.462. Be culled with clip of fingers here and there. 2.463. But when they clasp the elms with sturdy trunk 2.464. Erect, then strip the leaves off, prune the boughs; 2.465. Sooner they shrink from steel, but then put forth 2.466. The arm of power, and stem the branchy tide. 2.467. Hedges too must be woven and all beast 2.468. Barred entrance, chiefly while the leaf is young 2.469. And witless of disaster; for therewith 2.470. Beside harsh winters and o'erpowering sun 2.471. Wild buffaloes and pestering goats for ay 2.472. Besport them, sheep and heifers glut their greed. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.502. Round on the labourer spins the wheel of toil 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 2.505. And the chill north wind from the forests shook 2.506. Their coronal, even then the careful swain 2.507. Looks keenly forward to the coming year 2.508. With Saturn's curved fang pursues and prune 2.509. The vine forlorn, and lops it into shape. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.511. And burn the refuse-branches, first to house 2.512. Again your vine-poles, last to gather fruit. 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 2.527. When once they have gripped the soil, and borne the breeze. 2.528. Earth of herself, with hooked fang laid bare 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 2.530. The ploughshare aiding; therewithal thou'lt rear 2.531. The olive's fatness well-beloved of Peace. 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.81. Survives within them, loose the males: be first 3.82. To speed thy herds of cattle to their loves 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.242. The north wind stoops, and scatters from his path 3.243. Dry clouds and storms of placeName key= 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.245. A sound is heard among the forest-tops; 3.246. Long waves come racing shoreward: fast he flies 3.250. Red foam-flakes from his mouth, or, kindlier task 3.251. With patient neck support the Belgian car. 3.252. Then, broken at last, let swell their burly frame 3.253. With fattening corn-mash, for, unbroke, they will 3.254. With pride wax wanton, and, when caught, refuse 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.280. So with all heed his strength he practiseth 3.281. And nightlong makes the hard bare stones his bed 3.282. And feeds on prickly leaf and pointed rush 3.283. And proves himself, and butting at a tree 3.440. Whole pools are turned; and on their untrimmed beard 3.444. Stand island-like amid the frost, and stag 3.454. Oak-logs and elm-trees whole, and fire them there 3.455. There play the night out, and in festive glee 3.456. With barm and service sour the wine-cup mock. 3.457. So 'neath the seven-starred Hyperborean wain 3.458. The folk live tameless, buffeted with blast 3.461. If wool delight thee, first, be far removed 3.462. All prickly boskage, burrs and caltrops; shun 3.463. Luxuriant pastures; at the outset choose 3.464. White flocks with downy fleeces. For the ram 3.465. How white soe'er himself, be but the tongue 3.466. 'Neath his moist palate black, reject him, lest 3.467. He sully with dark spots his offspring's fleece 3.468. And seek some other o'er the teeming plain. 3.469. Even with such snowy bribe of wool, if ear 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 4.1. of air-born honey, gift of heaven, I now 4.2. Take up the tale. Upon this theme no le 4.3. Look thou, Maecenas, with indulgent eye. 4.4. A marvellous display of puny powers 4.5. High-hearted chiefs, a nation's history 4.6. Its traits, its bent, its battles and its clans 4.7. All, each, shall pass before you, while I sing. 4.15. Dash off the dew, and bruise the springing blades. 4.16. Let the gay lizard too keep far aloof 4.17. His scale-clad body from their honied stalls 4.90. Hark! the hoarse brazen note that warriors know 4.488. “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said 4.511. His wiles will break and spend themselves in vain. 4.512. I, when the sun has lit his noontide fires 4.513. When the blades thirst, and cattle love the shade 4.514. Myself will guide thee to the old man's haunt 4.515. Whither he hies him weary from the waves 4.520. To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled 4.521. And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522. A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of
16. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98
aeetes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
amor, and metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
amor, as destructive force Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98, 100
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98, 100, 138, 261
apollo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 138
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 170
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 37, 38, 44, 72, 73, 74, 75, 98, 138; Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
birds Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 74, 98, 100, 171, 261; Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 74
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 98, 138
clay, j. s. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 171
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
cyllarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98
deucalion Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
diomedes, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98, 261
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
eris Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
eurydice Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 171
finales, book 3 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100, 138
finales, book 4 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
furor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74, 100, 138, 170
georgics , language of science in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 75, 100
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 37, 38, 72, 73, 74, 75
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 171, 219
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 75, 219
hippomanes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 98, 100, 261
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100
imagery, dionysiac Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98, 100, 138, 261
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 261
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 261
imagery, triumphal Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
invidia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75, 170, 171
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 219
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 219
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
lucretius, on atoms (unseen particles) Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 171
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
mars, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 171
mirabilia, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 37
nightingale Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74, 170, 261
orpheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100, 138
otium Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 171
pales Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
pan Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38
philomela Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
philyra Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 74
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 171
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 44
polyphony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 219
prayer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
primary opposites Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
procne Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 138
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 170, 171
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 75, 171
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 98, 171
science, language of, for primary opposites Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
sheep Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 261
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 100, 138, 219
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74, 138, 170, 219
truth, georgic poet's, expressed in myth, metaphor, and mystery" Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 176
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 37, 75
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 74, 100, 138, 170, 171, 219, 261
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 75
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 74
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 37, 38, 44, 72, 73, 74, 75, 138, 261
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 38, 98, 261
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 170, 171, 261
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
wine' Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 75
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 73, 74, 100, 170, 261