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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.380-2.396


Non aliam ob culpam Baccho caper omnibus arisNor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take


caeditur et veteres ineunt proscaenia ludiThe topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top


praemiaque ingeniis pagos et compita circumOf the supporting tree your suckers tear;


thesidae posuere atque inter pocula laetiSo deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant


mollibus in pratis unctos saluere per utres.With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse


Nec non Ausonii, Troia gens missa, coloniOf the wild olive: for oft from careless swain


versibus incomptis ludunt risuque solutoA spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind


oraque corticibus sumunt horrenda cavatisHid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole


et te, Bacche, vocant per carmina laeta tibiqueAnd mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth


oscilla ex alta suspendunt mollia pinu.A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough


Hinc omnis largo pubescit vinea fetuAnd airy summits reigns victoriously


conplentur vallesque cavae saltusque profundiWraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro


et quocumque deus circum caput egit honestum.With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek


Ergo rite suum Baccho dicemus honoremSkyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped


carminibus patriis lancesque et liba feremusDown on the forest, and a driving wind


et ductus cornu stabit sacer hircus ad aramRolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so


pinguiaque in veribus torrebimus exta colurnis.Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 585 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

585. of an ox to keep the downpour from your back
2. Homer, Odyssey, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Cato, Marcus Porcius, On Agriculture, 134, 141, 132 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

132. The offering is to be made in this way: offer to Jupiter Dapalis a cup of wine of any size you wish, observing the day as a holiday for the oxen, the teamsters, and those who make the offering. In making the offering use this formula: "Jupiter Dapalis, forasmuch as it is fitting that a cup of wine be offered thee, in my house and in the midst of my people, for they sacred feast; and to that end, be thou honoured by the offering of this food." Wash the hands, then take the wine, and say: "Jupiter Dapalis, be thou honoured by the offering of thy feast, and be thou honoured by the wine placed before thee." You may make an offering to Vesta if you wish. Present it to Jupiter religiously, in the fitting form. The feast to Jupiter consists of roasted meat and an urn of wine. After the offering is made plant millet, panic grass, garlic, and lentils.
4. Horace, Letters, 2.1.139-2.1.146 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 7.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.79, 1.803-1.811, 1.922-1.930, 5.737-5.740, 5.780-5.820, 5.1379-5.1404, 6.1-6.6, 6.357-6.378 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15, 1.33, 1.160-1.166, 1.229, 1.338-1.350, 2.1-2.3, 2.103-2.108, 2.113, 2.143-2.144, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.323-2.345, 2.370, 2.381-2.396, 2.455, 2.490-2.494, 2.514-2.515, 2.529, 3.1-3.48, 3.115-3.117, 3.266-3.268, 3.509-3.514, 3.549-3.550, 4.1-4.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.160. Even this was impious; for the common stock 1.161. They gathered, and the earth of her own will 1.162. All things more freely, no man bidding, bore. 1.163. He to black serpents gave their venom-bane 1.164. And bade the wolf go prowl, and ocean toss; 1.165. Shooed from the leaves their honey, put fire away 1.166. And curbed the random rivers running wine 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 1.338. Nay even on holy days some tasks to ply 1.339. Is right and lawful: this no ban forbids 1.340. To turn the runnel's course, fence corn-fields in 1.341. Make springes for the birds, burn up the briars 1.342. And plunge in wholesome stream the bleating flock. 1.343. oft too with oil or apples plenty-cheap 1.344. The creeping ass's ribs his driver packs 1.345. And home from town returning brings instead 1.346. A dented mill-stone or black lump of pitch. 1.347. The moon herself in various rank assign 1.348. The days for labour lucky: fly the fifth; 1.349. Then sprang pale Orcus and the Eumenides; 1.350. Earth then in awful labour brought to light 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.113. of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.455. From story up to story. 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 4.1. of air-born honey, gift of heaven, I now 4.2. Take up the tale. Upon this theme no le 4.3. Look thou, Maecenas, with indulgent eye. 4.4. A marvellous display of puny powers 4.5. High-hearted chiefs, a nation's history 4.6. Its traits, its bent, its battles and its clans 4.7. All, each, shall pass before you, while I sing.
8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 2.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74, 106, 107, 108, 109
animals, sacrificial Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106, 107, 108, 109
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106, 107, 108, 109
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 108
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 72, 73, 74, 106
birds Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
cato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106, 107, 108, 109
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 74
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 74, 106, 107
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
dionysiac attributes, thyrsus Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
dionysus (bacchus) Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
emperors, augustus Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106, 107
frescoes Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
furor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 73, 74
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107, 108
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 108
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
iacchus Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
imagery, dionysiac Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
imagery, triumphal Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
initiation Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
invidia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
iphigenia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 107
kômos, cortège Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
liknon Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
locus amoenus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
metaphor Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
mystes/ai Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
mystikos Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
orgia, orgiasmos, orgiazo Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
ovid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107, 108, 109
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 74
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
polyphony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72
pythagoras Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107, 108, 109
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 106, 107, 108, 109
rome, villa farnesina Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
romulus and remus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107
satyres, silenus Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 185
sheep Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 74
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 74, 106
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 107
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 74
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 72, 73, 74
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
wine' Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 106
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 72, 73, 74