Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.217-2.225


Quae tenuem exhalat nebulam fumosque volucrisTo hardship, the Ligurian, and with these


et bibit humorem et, cum volt, ex se ipsa remittitThe Volscian javelin-armed, the Decii too


quaeque suo semper viridi se gramine vestitThe Marii and Camilli, names of might


nec scabie et salsa laedit robigine ferrum:The Scipios, stubborn warriors, ay, and thee


illa tibi laetis intexet vitibus ulmosGreat Caesar, who in


illa ferax oleo est, illam experiere colendoWith conquering arm e'en now art fending far


et facilem pecori et patientem vomeris unci.The unwarlike Indian from the heights of


Talem dives arat Capua et vicina VesevoHail! land of Saturn, mighty mother thou


ora iugo et vacuis Clanius non aequus Acerris.Of fruits and heroes; 'tis for thee I dare


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 643 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

643. In all his strength, upon the windy, worn
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 275-283, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

274. καθʼ Ἑλλάδʼ ἔσται. δύο γάρ, ὦ νεανία
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.156-2.158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.156. Then the earth, teeming with grain and vegetables of various kinds, which she pours forth in lavish abundance — does she appear to give birth to this produce for the sake of the wild beasts or for the sake of men? What shall I say of the vines and olives, whose bounteous and delightful fruits do not concern the lower animals at all? In fact the beasts of the field are entirely ignorant of the arts of sowing and cultivating, and of reaping and gathering the fruits of the earth in due season and storing them in garners; all these products are both enjoyed and tended by men. 2.157. Just as therefore we are bound to say that lyres and flutes were made for the sake of those who can use them, so it must be agreed that the things of which I have spoken have been provided for those only who make use of them, and even if some portion of them is filched or plundered by some of the lower animals, we shall not admit that they were created for the sake of these animals also. Men do not store up corn for the sake of mice and ants but for their wives and children and households; so the animals share these fruits of the earth only by stealth as I have said, whereas the masters enjoy them openly and freely. 2.158. It must therefore be admitted that all this abundance was provided for the sake of men, unless perchance the bounteous plenty and variety of our orchard fruit and the delightfulness not only of its flavour but also of its scent and appearance lead us to doubt whether nature intended this gift for man alone! So far is it from being true that the furs of the earth were provided for the sake of animals as well as men, that the animals themselves, as we may see, were created for the benefit of men. What other use have sheep save that their fleeces are dressed and woven into clothing for men? and in fact they could not have been reared nor sustained nor have produced anything of value without man's care and tendance. Then think of the dog, with its trusty watchfulness, its fawning affection for its master and hatred of strangers, its incredible keenness of scent in following a trail and its eagerness in hunting — what do these qualities imply except that they were created to serve the conveniences of men?
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.165-1.166, 5.251-5.254, 5.261-5.272, 5.463-5.464, 5.937-5.938, 5.999-5.1010, 6.253-6.256 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 11.595-11.596, 14.365-14.371 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Strabo, Geography, 5.4.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.39. and stubborn oaks sweat honey-dew. Nathle
8. Vergil, Georgics, 2.11, 2.18-2.21, 2.23-2.24, 2.29, 2.37, 2.43, 2.45-2.82, 2.103-2.109, 2.181-2.193, 2.207-2.211, 2.216, 2.218-2.225, 2.230-2.232, 2.239, 2.277, 2.333, 2.343, 2.370, 2.397, 2.405-2.406, 2.412, 2.417, 2.420, 2.500-2.501, 2.503-2.504, 3.332-3.334, 4.271 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.11. In the new must with me. 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.23. Deemed by the Greeks of old. With some sprouts forth 2.24. A forest of dense suckers from the root 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.37. And slips yet quick within the parent-soil; 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.47. Come then, and learn what tilth to each belong 2.48. According to their kinds, ye husbandmen 2.49. And tame with culture the wild fruits, lest earth 2.50. Lie idle. O blithe to make all Ismaru 2.51. One forest of the wine-god, and to clothe 2.52. With olives huge Tabernus! And be thou 2.53. At hand, and with me ply the voyage of toil 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.57. Spread sail like wings to waft thee. Not that I 2.58. With my poor verse would comprehend the whole 2.59. Nay, though a hundred tongues, a hundred mouth 2.60. Were mine, a voice of iron; be thou at hand 2.61. Skirt but the nearer coast-line; see the shore 2.62. Is in our grasp; not now with feigned song 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.65. Those that lift their head 2.66. Into the realms of light spontaneously 2.67. Fruitless indeed, but blithe and strenuous spring 2.68. Since Nature lurks within the soil. And yet 2.69. Even these, should one engraft them, or transplant 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.71. Their woodland temper, and, by frequent tilth 2.72. To whatso craft thou summon them, make speed 2.73. To follow. So likewise will the barren shaft 2.74. That from the stock-root issueth, if it be 2.75. Set out with clear space amid open fields: 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.77. Darken, despoil of increase as it grows 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.79. Which from shed seed ariseth, upward win 2.80. But slowly, yielding promise of its shade 2.81. To late-born generations; apples wane 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.109. To heaven upshot with teeming boughs, the tree 2.181. Sown with the monstrous dragon's teeth, nor crop 2.182. of warriors bristled thick with lance and helm; 2.183. But heavy harvests and the Massic juice 2.184. of Bacchus fill its borders, overspread 2.185. With fruitful flocks and olives. Hence arose 2.186. The war-horse stepping proudly o'er the plain; 2.187. Hence thy white flocks, placeName key= 2.188. of victims mightiest, which full oft have led 2.189. Bathed in thy sacred stream, the triumph-pomp 2.190. of Romans to the temples of the gods. 2.191. Here blooms perpetual spring, and summer here 2.192. In months that are not summer's; twice teem the flocks; 2.193. Twice doth the tree yield service of her fruit. 2.207. Or sing her harbours, and the barrier cast 2.208. Athwart the Lucrine, and how ocean chafe 2.209. With mighty bellowings, where the Julian wave 2.210. Echoes the thunder of his rout, and through 2.211. Avernian inlets pours the Tuscan tide? 2.216. The Marsi and Sabellian youth, and, schooled 2.218. The Volscian javelin-armed, the Decii too 2.219. The Marii and Camilli, names of might 2.220. The Scipios, stubborn warriors, ay, and thee 2.221. Great Caesar, who in placeName key= 2.222. With conquering arm e'en now art fending far 2.223. The unwarlike Indian from the heights of placeName key= 2.224. Hail! land of Saturn, mighty mother thou 2.225. of fruits and heroes; 'tis for thee I dare 2.230. What powers hath each, what hue, what natural bent 2.231. For yielding increase. First your stubborn land 2.232. And churlish hill-sides, where are thorny field 2.239. That teems with grasses on its fruitful breast 2.277. Which vapoury mist and flitting smoke exhales 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.397. Can they recover, and from the earth beneath 2.405. Comes the white bird long-bodied snakes abhor 2.406. Or on the eve of autumn's earliest frost 2.412. With quickening showers to his glad wife's embrace 2.417. Then the boon earth yields increase, and the field 2.420. Face the new suns, and safely trust them now; 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 3.332. The fire, in Spring-tide chiefly, for with Spring 3.333. Warmth doth their frames revisit, then they stand 3.334. All facing westward on the rocky heights 4.271. From grandsire unto grandsire backward told.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
aphrodite (goddess) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
augustus (emperor), and wine Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87; Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
caecubian wine Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
caecubus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
calenus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
campania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
cercei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
ceres Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
circei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
demeter Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
dionysos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
empedocles Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 238
falernian wine Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
formiae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
formulae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87, 168
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87
grain Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
hormiae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
hydraulics Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
latium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87
liber, father Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
licinius mucianus, c. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
liris river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
lucretius, formulae in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
lucretius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 238
metamorphoses, memnon and the memnonides Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 238
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 168
minturnae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
odysseus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87
pontus (region) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87
rubens, peter paul Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
setinian wine Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
sinope, towns so named Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
sinuessa Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
sirens Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 87, 88, 168
venus (planet) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
vesuvius, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88, 168
wine' Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 144
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 88