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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.207-2.211


aut unde iratus silvam devexit aratorOr sing her harbours, and the barrier cast


et nemora evertit multos ignava per annosAthwart the Lucrine, and how ocean chafe


antiquasque domos avium cum stirpibus imisWith mighty bellowings, where the Julian wave


eruit; illae altum nidis petiere relictisEchoes the thunder of his rout, and through


at rudis enituit inpulso vomere campus.Avernian inlets pours the Tuscan tide?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 643 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

643. In all his strength, upon the windy, worn
2. Homer, Iliad, 21.257-21.262 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

21.257. /the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.258. /the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.259. /the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.260. /and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.261. /and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.262. /and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River
3. Homer, Odyssey, 9.233-9.234, 9.319-9.324, 16.216-16.218 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Cato, Marcus Porcius, On Agriculture, 2.7 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.156-2.158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.156. Then the earth, teeming with grain and vegetables of various kinds, which she pours forth in lavish abundance — does she appear to give birth to this produce for the sake of the wild beasts or for the sake of men? What shall I say of the vines and olives, whose bounteous and delightful fruits do not concern the lower animals at all? In fact the beasts of the field are entirely ignorant of the arts of sowing and cultivating, and of reaping and gathering the fruits of the earth in due season and storing them in garners; all these products are both enjoyed and tended by men. 2.157. Just as therefore we are bound to say that lyres and flutes were made for the sake of those who can use them, so it must be agreed that the things of which I have spoken have been provided for those only who make use of them, and even if some portion of them is filched or plundered by some of the lower animals, we shall not admit that they were created for the sake of these animals also. Men do not store up corn for the sake of mice and ants but for their wives and children and households; so the animals share these fruits of the earth only by stealth as I have said, whereas the masters enjoy them openly and freely. 2.158. It must therefore be admitted that all this abundance was provided for the sake of men, unless perchance the bounteous plenty and variety of our orchard fruit and the delightfulness not only of its flavour but also of its scent and appearance lead us to doubt whether nature intended this gift for man alone! So far is it from being true that the furs of the earth were provided for the sake of animals as well as men, that the animals themselves, as we may see, were created for the benefit of men. What other use have sheep save that their fleeces are dressed and woven into clothing for men? and in fact they could not have been reared nor sustained nor have produced anything of value without man's care and tendance. Then think of the dog, with its trusty watchfulness, its fawning affection for its master and hatred of strangers, its incredible keenness of scent in following a trail and its eagerness in hunting — what do these qualities imply except that they were created to serve the conveniences of men?
6. Varro, On Agriculture, 3.16.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.165-1.166, 1.250-1.264, 1.586, 2.97, 2.123-2.124, 2.300-2.302, 2.317-2.332, 2.357-2.359, 3.416, 5.937-5.938, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1367-5.1369, 5.1376-5.1378, 6.253-6.256, 6.906-6.907 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.430-1.436, 6.852, 8.364-8.365 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.430. Deep to the midmost wood he went, and there 1.431. his Mother in his path uprose; she seemed 1.432. in garb and countece a maid, and bore 1.433. like Spartan maids, a weapon; in such guise 1.434. Harpalyce the Thracian urges on 1.435. her panting coursers and in wild career 1.436. outstrips impetuous Hebrus as it flows. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows
9. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.39. and stubborn oaks sweat honey-dew. Nathle
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.100, 1.106, 1.160, 1.293, 1.338, 1.493-1.497, 1.506-1.508, 2.10-2.21, 2.23-2.24, 2.29, 2.39-2.46, 2.54-2.56, 2.58, 2.60-2.64, 2.70, 2.73-2.82, 2.103-2.109, 2.114, 2.140-2.154, 2.170, 2.181-2.193, 2.208-2.211, 2.217-2.225, 2.230-2.232, 2.239, 2.277-2.278, 2.325-2.328, 2.333, 2.343, 2.345, 2.370, 2.397, 2.405, 2.412, 2.417, 2.420, 2.438-2.439, 2.459-2.460, 2.494, 2.501, 2.514-2.515, 2.524, 3.63-3.71, 3.95-3.100, 3.258-3.263, 3.291-3.292, 3.332-3.334, 3.339-3.383, 3.457-3.458, 3.464-3.469, 4.8-4.50, 4.59-4.61, 4.67-4.115, 4.158-4.169, 4.176, 4.193, 4.204, 4.217-4.218, 4.239-4.242, 4.245, 4.251-4.252, 4.271, 4.299-4.302, 4.315-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.100. With refuse rich to soak the thirsty soil 1.106. Whether that earth therefrom some hidden strength 1.160. Even this was impious; for the common stock 1.293. Into fixed parts dividing, rules his way 1.338. Nay even on holy days some tasks to ply 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 2.10. And stripped of buskin stain thy bared limb 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.12. First, nature's law 2.13. For generating trees is manifold; 2.14. For some of their own force spontaneous spring 2.15. No hand of man compelling, and posse 2.16. The plains and river-windings far and wide 2.17. As pliant osier and the bending broom 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.23. Deemed by the Greeks of old. With some sprouts forth 2.24. A forest of dense suckers from the root 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.58. With my poor verse would comprehend the whole 2.60. Were mine, a voice of iron; be thou at hand 2.61. Skirt but the nearer coast-line; see the shore 2.62. Is in our grasp; not now with feigned song 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.73. To follow. So likewise will the barren shaft 2.74. That from the stock-root issueth, if it be 2.75. Set out with clear space amid open fields: 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.77. Darken, despoil of increase as it grows 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.79. Which from shed seed ariseth, upward win 2.80. But slowly, yielding promise of its shade 2.81. To late-born generations; apples wane 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.109. To heaven upshot with teeming boughs, the tree 2.114. Fat olives, orchades, and radii 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.181. Sown with the monstrous dragon's teeth, nor crop 2.182. of warriors bristled thick with lance and helm; 2.183. But heavy harvests and the Massic juice 2.184. of Bacchus fill its borders, overspread 2.185. With fruitful flocks and olives. Hence arose 2.186. The war-horse stepping proudly o'er the plain; 2.187. Hence thy white flocks, placeName key= 2.188. of victims mightiest, which full oft have led 2.189. Bathed in thy sacred stream, the triumph-pomp 2.190. of Romans to the temples of the gods. 2.191. Here blooms perpetual spring, and summer here 2.192. In months that are not summer's; twice teem the flocks; 2.193. Twice doth the tree yield service of her fruit. 2.208. Athwart the Lucrine, and how ocean chafe 2.209. With mighty bellowings, where the Julian wave 2.210. Echoes the thunder of his rout, and through 2.211. Avernian inlets pours the Tuscan tide? 2.217. To hardship, the Ligurian, and with these 2.218. The Volscian javelin-armed, the Decii too 2.219. The Marii and Camilli, names of might 2.220. The Scipios, stubborn warriors, ay, and thee 2.221. Great Caesar, who in placeName key= 2.222. With conquering arm e'en now art fending far 2.223. The unwarlike Indian from the heights of placeName key= 2.224. Hail! land of Saturn, mighty mother thou 2.225. of fruits and heroes; 'tis for thee I dare 2.230. What powers hath each, what hue, what natural bent 2.231. For yielding increase. First your stubborn land 2.232. And churlish hill-sides, where are thorny field 2.239. That teems with grasses on its fruitful breast 2.277. Which vapoury mist and flitting smoke exhales 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.397. Can they recover, and from the earth beneath 2.405. Comes the white bird long-bodied snakes abhor 2.412. With quickening showers to his glad wife's embrace 2.417. Then the boon earth yields increase, and the field 2.420. Face the new suns, and safely trust them now; 2.438. Take heed to hide them, and dig in withal 2.439. Rough shells or porous stone, for therebetween 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 3.63. From the first birth-dawn of Tithonus old. 3.64. If eager for the prized Olympian palm 3.65. One breed the horse, or bullock strong to plough 3.66. Be his prime care a shapely dam to choose. 3.67. of kine grim-faced is goodliest, with coarse head 3.68. And burly neck, whose hanging dewlaps reach 3.69. From chin to knee; of boundless length her flank; 3.70. Large every way she is, large-footed even 3.71. With incurved horns and shaggy ears beneath. 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.291. Its rounded breast, and, onward rolled to land 3.292. Falls with prodigious roar among the rocks 3.332. The fire, in Spring-tide chiefly, for with Spring 3.333. Warmth doth their frames revisit, then they stand 3.334. All facing westward on the rocky heights 3.339. Not toward thy rising, Eurus, or the sun's 3.340. But westward and north-west, or whence up-spring 3.341. Black Auster, that glooms heaven with rainy cold. 3.342. Hence from their groin slow drips a poisonous juice 3.343. By shepherds truly named hippomanes 3.344. Hippomanes, fell stepdames oft have culled 3.345. And mixed with herbs and spells of baneful bode. 3.346. Fast flies meanwhile the irreparable hour 3.347. As point to point our charmed round we trace. 3.348. Enough of herds. This second task remains 3.349. The wool-clad flocks and shaggy goats to treat. 3.350. Here lies a labour; hence for glory look 3.351. Brave husbandmen. Nor doubtfully know 3.352. How hard it is for words to triumph here 3.353. And shed their lustre on a theme so slight: 3.354. But I am caught by ravishing desire 3.355. Above the lone Parnassian steep; I love 3.356. To walk the heights, from whence no earlier track 3.357. Slopes gently downward to Castalia's spring. 3.358. Now, awful Pales, strike a louder tone. 3.359. First, for the sheep soft pencotes I decree 3.360. To browse in, till green summer's swift return; 3.361. And that the hard earth under them with straw 3.362. And handfuls of the fern be littered deep 3.363. Lest chill of ice such tender cattle harm 3.364. With scab and loathly foot-rot. Passing thence 3.365. I bid the goats with arbute-leaves be stored 3.366. And served with fresh spring-water, and their pen 3.367. Turned southward from the blast, to face the sun 3.368. of winter, when Aquarius' icy beam 3.369. Now sinks in showers upon the parting year. 3.370. These too no lightlier our protection claim 3.371. Nor prove of poorer service, howsoe'er 3.372. Milesian fleeces dipped in Tyrian red 3.373. Repay the barterer; these with offspring teem 3.374. More numerous; these yield plenteous store of milk: 3.375. The more each dry-wrung udder froths the pail 3.376. More copious soon the teat-pressed torrents flow. 3.377. Ay, and on Cinyps' bank the he-goats too 3.378. Their beards and grizzled chins and bristling hair 3.379. Let clip for camp-use, or as rugs to wrap 3.380. Seafaring wretches. But they browse the wood 3.381. And summits of Lycaeus, and rough briers 3.382. And brakes that love the highland: of themselve 3.383. Right heedfully the she-goats homeward troop 3.457. So 'neath the seven-starred Hyperborean wain 3.458. The folk live tameless, buffeted with blast 3.464. White flocks with downy fleeces. For the ram 3.465. How white soe'er himself, be but the tongue 3.466. 'Neath his moist palate black, reject him, lest 3.467. He sully with dark spots his offspring's fleece 3.468. And seek some other o'er the teeming plain. 3.469. Even with such snowy bribe of wool, if ear 4.8. Slight though the poet's theme, not slight the praise 4.9. So frown not heaven, and Phoebus hear his call. 4.10. First find your bees a settled sure abode 4.11. Where neither winds can enter (winds blow back 4.12. The foragers with food returning home) 4.13. Nor sheep and butting kids tread down the flowers 4.14. Nor heifer wandering wide upon the plain 4.15. Dash off the dew, and bruise the springing blades. 4.16. Let the gay lizard too keep far aloof 4.17. His scale-clad body from their honied stalls 4.18. And the bee-eater, and what birds beside 4.19. And Procne smirched with blood upon the breast 4.20. From her own murderous hands. For these roam wide 4.21. Wasting all substance, or the bees themselve 4.22. Strike flying, and in their beaks bear home, to glut 4.23. Those savage nestlings with the dainty prey. 4.24. But let clear springs and moss-green pools be near 4.25. And through the grass a streamlet hurrying run 4.26. Some palm-tree o'er the porch extend its shade 4.27. Or huge-grown oleaster, that in Spring 4.28. Their own sweet Spring-tide, when the new-made chief 4.29. Lead forth the young swarms, and, escaped their comb 4.30. The colony comes forth to sport and play 4.31. The neighbouring bank may lure them from the heat 4.32. Or bough befriend with hospitable shade. 4.33. O'er the mid-waters, whether swift or still 4.34. Cast willow-branches and big stones enow 4.35. Bridge after bridge, where they may footing find 4.36. And spread their wide wings to the summer sun 4.37. If haply Eurus, swooping as they pause 4.38. Have dashed with spray or plunged them in the deep. 4.39. And let green cassias and far-scented thymes 4.40. And savory with its heavy-laden breath 4.41. Bloom round about, and violet-beds hard by 4.42. Sip sweetness from the fertilizing springs. 4.43. For the hive's self, or stitched of hollow bark 4.44. Or from tough osier woven, let the door 4.45. Be strait of entrance; for stiff winter's cold 4.46. Congeals the honey, and heat resolves and thaws 4.47. To bees alike disastrous; not for naught 4.48. So haste they to cement the tiny pore 4.49. That pierce their walls, and fill the crevice 4.50. With pollen from the flowers, and glean and keep 4.59. But near their home let neither yew-tree grow 4.60. Nor reddening crabs be roasted, and mistrust 4.61. Deep marish-ground and mire with noisome smell 4.67. Forthwith they roam the glades and forests o'er 4.68. Rifle the painted flowers, or sip the streams 4.69. Light-hovering on the surface. Hence it i 4.70. With some sweet rapture, that we know not of 4.71. Their little ones they foster, hence with skill 4.72. Work out new wax or clinging honey mould. 4.73. So when the cage-escaped hosts you see 4.74. Float heavenward through the hot clear air, until 4.75. You marvel at yon dusky cloud that spread 4.76. And lengthens on the wind, then mark them well; 4.77. For then 'tis ever the fresh springs they seek 4.78. And bowery shelter: hither must you bring 4.79. The savoury sweets I bid, and sprinkle them 4.80. Bruised balsam and the wax-flower's lowly weed 4.81. And wake and shake the tinkling cymbals heard 4.82. By the great Mother: on the anointed spot 4.83. Themselves will settle, and in wonted wise 4.84. Seek of themselves the cradle's inmost depth. 4.85. But if to battle they have hied them forth— 4.86. For oft 'twixt king and king with uproar dire 4.87. Fierce feud arises, and at once from far 4.88. You may discern what passion sways the mob 4.89. And how their hearts are throbbing for the strife; 4.90. Hark! the hoarse brazen note that warriors know 4.91. Chides on the loiterers, and the ear may catch 4.92. A sound that mocks the war-trump's broken blasts; 4.93. Then in hot haste they muster, then flash wings 4.94. Sharpen their pointed beaks and knit their thews 4.95. And round the king, even to his royal tent 4.96. Throng rallying, and with shouts defy the foe. 4.97. So, when a dry Spring and clear space is given 4.98. Forth from the gates they burst, they clash on high; 4.99. A din arises; they are heaped and rolled 4.100. Into one mighty mass, and headlong fall 4.101. Not denselier hail through heaven, nor pelting so 4.102. Rains from the shaken oak its acorn-shower. 4.103. Conspicuous by their wings the chiefs themselve 4.104. Press through the heart of battle, and display 4.105. A giant's spirit in each pigmy frame 4.106. Steadfast no inch to yield till these or those 4.107. The victor's ponderous arm has turned to flight. 4.108. Such fiery passions and such fierce assault 4.109. A little sprinkled dust controls and quells. 4.110. And now, both leaders from the field recalled 4.111. Who hath the worser seeming, do to death 4.112. Lest royal waste wax burdensome, but let 4.113. His better lord it on the empty throne. 4.114. One with gold-burnished flakes will shine like fire 4.115. For twofold are their kinds, the nobler he 4.158. For 'neath the shade of tall Oebalia's towers 4.159. Where dark Galaesus laves the yellowing fields 4.160. An old man once I mind me to have seen— 4.161. From Corycus he came—to whom had fallen 4.162. Some few poor acres of neglected land 4.163. And they nor fruitful' neath the plodding steer 4.164. Meet for the grazing herd, nor good for vines. 4.165. Yet he, the while his meagre garden-herb 4.166. Among the thorns he planted, and all round 4.167. White lilies, vervains, and lean poppy set 4.168. In pride of spirit matched the wealth of kings 4.169. And home returning not till night was late 4.176. Plucking the rathe faint hyacinth, while he chid 4.193. The boon for which, led by the shrill sweet strain 4.204. Watch o'er the victualling of the hive, and these 4.217. Or form a band and from their precincts drive 4.218. The drones, a lazy herd. How glows the work! 4.239. One hour for rest have all, and one for toil: 4.240. With dawn they hurry from the gates—no room 4.241. For loiterers there: and once again, when even 4.242. Now bids them quit their pasturing on the plain 4.245. About the doors and threshold; till at length 4.251. Safe-circling fetch them water, or essay 4.252. Brief out-goings, and oft weigh-up tiny stones 4.271. From grandsire unto grandsire backward told. 4.299. And spread before thee fumes of trailing smoke. 4.300. Twice is the teeming produce gathered in 4.301. Twofold their time of harvest year by year 4.302. Once when Taygete the Pleiad uplift 4.315. Or cut the empty wax away? for oft 4.316. Into their comb the newt has gnawed unseen 4.317. And the light-loathing beetles crammed their bed 4.318. And he that sits at others' board to feast 4.319. The do-naught drone; or 'gainst the unequal foe 4.320. Swoops the fierce hornet, or the moth's fell tribe; 4.321. Or spider, victim of Minerva's spite 4.322. Athwart the doorway hangs her swaying net. 4.323. The more impoverished they, the keenlier all 4.324. To mend the fallen fortunes of their race 4.325. Will nerve them, fill the cells up, tier on tier 4.326. And weave their granaries from the rifled flowers. 4.327. Now, seeing that life doth even to bee-folk bring 4.328. Our human chances, if in dire disease 4.329. Their bodies' strength should languish—which anon 4.330. By no uncertain tokens may be told— 4.331. Forthwith the sick change hue; grim leanness mar 4.332. Their visage; then from out the cells they bear 4.333. Forms reft of light, and lead the mournful pomp; 4.334. Or foot to foot about the porch they hang 4.335. Or within closed doors loiter, listless all 4.336. From famine, and benumbed with shrivelling cold. 4.337. Then is a deep note heard, a long-drawn hum 4.338. As when the chill South through the forests sighs 4.339. As when the troubled ocean hoarsely boom 4.340. With back-swung billow, as ravening tide of fire 4.341. Surges, shut fast within the furnace-walls. 4.342. Then do I bid burn scented galbanum 4.343. And, honey-streams through reeden troughs instilled 4.344. Challenge and cheer their flagging appetite 4.345. To taste the well-known food; and it shall boot 4.346. To mix therewith the savour bruised from gall 4.347. And rose-leaves dried, or must to thickness boiled 4.348. By a fierce fire, or juice of raisin-grape 4.349. From Psithian vine, and with its bitter smell 4.350. Centaury, and the famed Cecropian thyme. 4.351. There is a meadow-flower by country folk 4.352. Hight star-wort; 'tis a plant not far to seek; 4.353. For from one sod an ample growth it rears 4.354. Itself all golden, but girt with plenteous leaves 4.355. Where glory of purple shines through violet gloom. 4.356. With chaplets woven hereof full oft are decked 4.357. Heaven's altars: harsh its taste upon the tongue; 4.358. Shepherds in vales smooth-shorn of nibbling flock 4.359. By placeName key= 4.360. The roots of this, well seethed in fragrant wine 4.361. Set in brimmed baskets at their doors for food. 4.362. But if one's whole stock fail him at a stroke 4.363. Nor hath he whence to breed the race anew 4.364. 'Tis time the wondrous secret to disclose 4.365. Taught by the swain of Arcady, even how 4.366. The blood of slaughtered bullocks oft has borne 4.367. Bees from corruption. I will trace me back 4.368. To its prime source the story's tangled thread 4.369. And thence unravel. For where thy happy folk 4.370. Canopus , city of Pellaean fame 4.371. Dwell by the placeName key= 4.372. And high o'er furrows they have called their own 4.373. Skim in their painted wherries; where, hard by 4.374. The quivered Persian presses, and that flood 4.375. Which from the swart-skinned Aethiop bears him down 4.376. Swift-parted into sevenfold branching mouth 4.377. With black mud fattens and makes Aegypt green 4.378. That whole domain its welfare's hope secure 4.379. Rests on this art alone. And first is chosen 4.380. A strait recess, cramped closer to this end 4.381. Which next with narrow roof of tiles atop 4.382. 'Twixt prisoning walls they pinch, and add hereto 4.383. From the four winds four slanting window-slits. 4.384. Then seek they from the herd a steer, whose horn 4.385. With two years' growth are curling, and stop fast 4.386. Plunge madly as he may, the panting mouth 4.387. And nostrils twain, and done with blows to death 4.388. Batter his flesh to pulp i' the hide yet whole 4.389. And shut the doors, and leave him there to lie. 4.390. But 'neath his ribs they scatter broken boughs 4.391. With thyme and fresh-pulled cassias: this is done 4.392. When first the west winds bid the waters flow 4.393. Ere flush the meadows with new tints, and ere 4.394. The twittering swallow buildeth from the beams. 4.395. Meanwhile the juice within his softened bone 4.396. Heats and ferments, and things of wondrous birth 4.397. Footless at first, anon with feet and wings 4.398. Swarm there and buzz, a marvel to behold; 4.399. And more and more the fleeting breeze they take 4.400. Till, like a shower that pours from summer-clouds 4.401. Forth burst they, or like shafts from quivering string 4.402. When 4.403. Say what was he, what God, that fashioned forth 4.404. This art for us, O Muses? of man's skill 4.405. Whence came the new adventure? From thy vale 4.406. Peneian Tempe, turning, bee-bereft 4.407. So runs the tale, by famine and disease 4.408. Mournful the shepherd Aristaeus stood 4.409. Fast by the haunted river-head, and thu 4.410. With many a plaint to her that bare him cried: 4.411. “Mother, Cyrene, mother, who hast thy home 4.412. Beneath this whirling flood, if he thou sayest 4.413. Apollo, lord of Thymbra, be my sire 4.414. Sprung from the Gods' high line, why barest thou me 4.415. With fortune's ban for birthright? Where is now 4.416. Thy love to me-ward banished from thy breast? 4.417. O! wherefore didst thou bid me hope for heaven? 4.418. Lo! even the crown of this poor mortal life 4.419. Which all my skilful care by field and fold 4.420. No art neglected, scarce had fashioned forth 4.421. Even this falls from me, yet thou call'st me son. 4.422. Nay, then, arise! With thine own hands pluck up 4.423. My fruit-plantations: on the homestead fling 4.424. Pitiless fire; make havoc of my crops; 4.425. Burn the young plants, and wield the stubborn axe 4.426. Against my vines, if there hath taken the 4.427. Such loathing of my greatness.” 4.428. But that cry 4.429. Even from her chamber in the river-deeps 4.430. His mother heard: around her spun the nymph 4.431. Milesian wool stained through with hyaline dye 4.432. Drymo, Xantho, Ligea, Phyllodoce 4.433. Their glossy locks o'er snowy shoulders shed 4.434. Cydippe and Lycorias yellow-haired 4.435. A maiden one, one newly learned even then 4.436. To bear Lucina's birth-pang. Clio, too 4.437. And Beroe, sisters, ocean-children both 4.438. Both zoned with gold and girt with dappled fell 4.439. Ephyre and Opis, and from Asian mead 4.440. Deiopea, and, bow at length laid by 4.441. Fleet-footed Arethusa. But in their midst 4.442. Fair Clymene was telling o'er the tale 4.443. of Vulcan's idle vigilance and the stealth 4.444. of Mars' sweet rapine, and from Chaos old 4.445. Counted the jostling love-joys of the Gods. 4.446. Charmed by whose lay, the while their woolly task 4.447. With spindles down they drew, yet once again 4.448. Smote on his mother's ears the mournful plaint 4.449. of Aristaeus; on their glassy throne 4.450. Amazement held them all; but Arethuse 4.451. Before the rest put forth her auburn head 4.452. Peering above the wave-top, and from far 4.453. Exclaimed, “Cyrene, sister, not for naught 4.454. Scared by a groan so deep, behold! 'tis he 4.455. Even Aristaeus, thy heart's fondest care 4.456. Here by the brink of the Peneian sire 4.457. Stands woebegone and weeping, and by name 4.458. Cries out upon thee for thy cruelty.” 4.459. To whom, strange terror knocking at her heart 4.460. “Bring, bring him to our sight,” the mother cried; 4.461. “His feet may tread the threshold even of Gods.” 4.462. So saying, she bids the flood yawn wide and yield 4.463. A pathway for his footsteps; but the wave 4.464. Arched mountain-wise closed round him, and within 4.465. Its mighty bosom welcomed, and let speed 4.466. To the deep river-bed. And now, with eye 4.467. of wonder gazing on his mother's hall 4.468. And watery kingdom and cave-prisoned pool 4.469. And echoing groves, he went, and, stunned by that 4.470. Stupendous whirl of waters, separate saw 4.471. All streams beneath the mighty earth that glide 4.472. Phasis and Lycus, and that fountain-head 4.473. Whence first the deep Enipeus leaps to light 4.474. Whence father placeName key= 4.475. And Hypanis that roars amid his rocks 4.476. And Mysian Caicus, and, bull-browed 4.477. 'Twixt either gilded horn, placeName key= 4.478. Than whom none other through the laughing plain 4.479. More furious pours into the purple sea. 4.480. Soon as the chamber's hanging roof of stone 4.481. Was gained, and now Cyrene from her son 4.482. Had heard his idle weeping, in due course 4.483. Clear water for his hands the sisters bring 4.484. With napkins of shorn pile, while others heap 4.485. The board with dainties, and set on afresh 4.486. The brimming goblets; with Panchaian fire 4.487. Upleap the altars; then the mother spake 4.488. “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said 4.489. “Pour we to Ocean.” Ocean, sire of all 4.490. She worships, and the sister-nymphs who guard 4.491. The hundred forests and the hundred streams; 4.492. Thrice Vesta's fire with nectar clear she dashed 4.493. Thrice to the roof-top shot the flame and shone: 4.494. Armed with which omen she essayed to speak: 4.495. “In Neptune's gulf Carpathian dwells a seer 4.496. Caerulean Proteus, he who metes the main 4.497. With fish-drawn chariot of two-footed steeds; 4.498. Now visits he his native home once more 4.499. Pallene and the Emathian ports; to him 4.500. We nymphs do reverence, ay, and Nereus old; 4.501. For all things knows the seer, both those which are 4.502. And have been, or which time hath yet to bring; 4.503. So willed it Neptune, whose portentous flocks 4.504. And loathly sea-calves 'neath the surge he feeds. 4.505. Him first, my son, behoves thee seize and bind 4.506. That he may all the cause of sickness show 4.507. And grant a prosperous end. For save by force 4.508. No rede will he vouchsafe, nor shalt thou bend 4.509. His soul by praying; whom once made captive, ply 4.510. With rigorous force and fetters; against these 4.511. His wiles will break and spend themselves in vain. 4.512. I, when the sun has lit his noontide fires 4.513. When the blades thirst, and cattle love the shade 4.514. Myself will guide thee to the old man's haunt 4.515. Whither he hies him weary from the waves 4.516. That thou mayst safelier steal upon his sleep. 4.517. But when thou hast gripped him fast with hand and gyve 4.518. Then divers forms and bestial semblance 4.519. Shall mock thy grasp; for sudden he will change 4.520. To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled 4.521. And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522. A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of 4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524. Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525. His endless transformations, thou, my son 4.526. More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until 4.527. His body's shape return to that thou sawest 4.528. When with closed eyelids first he sank to sleep.” 4.529. So saying, an odour of ambrosial dew 4.530. She sheds around, and all his frame therewith 4.531. Steeps throughly; forth from his trim-combed lock 4.532. Breathed effluence sweet, and a lithe vigour leapt 4.533. Into his limbs. There is a cavern vast 4.534. Scooped in the mountain-side, where wave on wave 4.535. By the wind's stress is driven, and breaks far up 4.536. Its inmost creeks—safe anchorage from of old 4.537. For tempest-taken mariners: therewithin 4.538. Behind a rock's huge barrier, Proteus hides. 4.539. Here in close covert out of the sun's eye 4.540. The youth she places, and herself the while 4.541. Swathed in a shadowy mist stands far aloof. 4.542. And now the ravening dog-star that burns up 4.543. The thirsty Indians blazed in heaven; his course 4.544. The fiery sun had half devoured: the blade 4.545. Were parched, and the void streams with droughty jaw 4.546. Baked to their mud-beds by the scorching ray 4.547. When Proteus seeking his accustomed cave 4.548. Strode from the billows: round him frolicking 4.549. The watery folk that people the waste sea 4.550. Sprinkled the bitter brine-dew far and wide. 4.551. Along the shore in scattered groups to feed 4.552. The sea-calves stretch them: while the seer himself 4.553. Like herdsman on the hills when evening bid 4.554. The steers from pasture to their stall repair 4.555. And the lambs' bleating whets the listening wolves 4.556. Sits midmost on the rock and tells his tale. 4.557. But Aristaeus, the foe within his clutch 4.558. Scarce suffering him compose his aged limbs 4.559. With a great cry leapt on him, and ere he rose 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing 4.563. Fire and a fearful beast, and flowing stream. 4.564. But when no trickery found a path for flight 4.565. Baffled at length, to his own shape returned 4.566. With human lips he spake, “Who bade thee, then


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253
aetiology of labor Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
amor,absence of,in the beehive Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
amor,and metamorphosis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
amor,poetry and Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
anchises Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
animals,sacrificial Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102, 137
animals Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88, 102, 137, 266
anthropomorphism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102
aristaeus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 55, 137, 273
aristaeus and orpheus Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 31, 35, 38, 47
ataraxia Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 185
atedius melior Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
aventine hill Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
bacchus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87
beehive,as paradigm for human society Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
bees Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102, 137, 185, 266, 268, 273
birds Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 102, 137, 185, 256
bougonia Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
caelian hill Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
caesar,octavian,in the georgics Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 38
capitoline hill Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
cato Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102; Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 31
cattle Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102, 137, 185
centaurs Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88
cereal crops Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253
cicero Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
cotta Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
cura Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168
cyclopes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
cyrene Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
death,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102
eidothea Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54
ennius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257
epicureanism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 185
eurydice Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 137
farmer,,as roman man Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 31
farmer,,as soldier Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 31, 35
farmer,,morally ambiguous status of Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 38
farmer Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 31, 35, 38
finales,book 1 Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266, 268
finales,book 4 Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 55, 137, 185
formulae Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168
furor Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
georgics ,pity in Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 47
gods,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87, 168
golden age,pity in Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 47
golden age Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 80, 87
heraclitus (the allegorist) Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54
hesiod,allusions to Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168, 253
homer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
homeric similes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137, 253
horses Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
hyperbole Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 80, 88
imagery,military Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168, 253, 256, 257, 266, 268
imagery,storms Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 268
intertextuality Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
iron age,moral ambiguity of Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 38
iron age,technology of Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 35, 38
juno Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
labor,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 185
labor,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168, 185, 266, 273
lapiths Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88
laudes italiae Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87
livy Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 256
lucretius,agriculture in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 80, 257
lucretius,formulae in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168
lucretius,labor in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 185
lucretius,natura in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257
lucretius,war in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257, 268
mars Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 268
metamorphosis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
metus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 168
myth,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
natura Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88, 257
nightingale Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 137
nymphs Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
olives Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88, 185
orpheus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 55, 137, 185
pan Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
pastoral Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
personification Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87, 256
pessimism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257
philippi Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 38
philomela Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
pholoe Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
pity,in the georgics Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 47
plague Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
poetry and poetics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55, 185
procne Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
proteus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 55
providentialism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87
religion,in ciceros de natura deorum Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
religion,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102, 273
scepticism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
scythia Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
sheep Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 102
similes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 137, 253, 257
sphragis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 54, 55
storms Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 268
technology,as aggression Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 35, 38
tereus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137
tityrus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
trees,in statius poetry' Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 53
trees Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 87, 88, 168, 185, 256, 266
varro Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 266
vines Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88, 168, 185, 256, 257
virgil,and ennius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257
virgil,and hesiod Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253
virgil,and homer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 137, 253
virgil,and scepticism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 273
virgil,as pastoral figure Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 55
virgil,reception of lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 80
war,and agriculture Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253, 256, 257, 268
war,civil war Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253, 256, 257, 266, 268
war,in agricultural writers Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257
war,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 257, 268
war,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 253, 256, 257, 266, 268
wine Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 88