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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.143-2.144


sed gravidae fruges et Bacchi Massicus humorNot that all soils can all things bear alike.


inplevere; tenent oleae armentaque laeta.Willows by water-courses have their birth


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 173, 202-212, 639-640, 172 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

172. Live far from others. Thus they came to dwell
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 720 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

720. And be your allies in this dread discord
3. Homer, Iliad, 4.442-4.443, 8.16, 12.131-12.134 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.442. /and Terror, and Rout, and Discord that rageth incessantly, sister and comrade of man-slaying Ares; she at the first rears her crest but little, yet thereafter planteth her head in heaven, while her feet tread on earth. She it was that now cast evil strife into their midst 4.443. /and Terror, and Rout, and Discord that rageth incessantly, sister and comrade of man-slaying Ares; she at the first rears her crest but little, yet thereafter planteth her head in heaven, while her feet tread on earth. She it was that now cast evil strife into their midst 8.16. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 12.131. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.132. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.133. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long; 12.134. /and the other Leonteus, peer of Ares the bane of men. These twain before the high gate stood firm even as oaks of lofty crest among the mountains, that ever abide the wind and rain day by day, firm fixed with roots great and long;
4. Homer, Odyssey, 4.567-4.568, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Plato, Statesman, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

271e. o that no creature was wild, nor did they eat one another, and there was no war among them, nor any strife whatsoever. To tell all the other consequences of such an order of the world would be an endless task. But the reason for the story of the spontaneous life of mankind is as follows: Str. God himself was their shepherd, watching over them, just as man, being an animal of different and more divine nature than the rest, now tends the lower species of animals. And under his care there were no states
6. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.2.3-1.2.7, 1.7.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Catullus, Poems, 68.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.36-1.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.36. 1.  There is another legend related by the inhabitants, to the effect that before the reign of Jupiter Saturn was lord in this land and that the celebrated manner of life in his reign, abounding in the produce of every season, was enjoyed by none more than them.,2.  And, indeed, if anyone, setting aside the fabulous part of this account, will examine the merit of any country from which mankind received the greatest enjoyments immediately after their birth, whether they sprang from the earth, according to the ancient tradition, or came into being in some other manner, he will find none more beneficent to them than this. For, to compare one country with another of the same extent, Italy is, in my opinion, the best country, not only of Europe, but even of all the rest of the world.,3.  And yet I am not unaware that I shall not be believed by many when they reflect on Egypt, Libya, Babylonia and any other fertile countries there may be. But I, for my part, do not limit the wealth derived from the soil to one sort of produce, nor do I feel any eagerness to live where there are only rich arable lands and little or nothing else that is useful; but I account that country the best which is the most self-sufficient and generally stands least in need of imported commodities. And I am persuaded that Italy enjoys this universal fertility and diversity of advantages beyond any other land. 1.37. 1.  For Italy does not, while possessing a great deal of good arable land, lack trees, as does a grain-bearing country; nor, on the other hand, while suitable for growing all manner of trees, does it, when sown to grain, produce scanty crops, as does a timbered country; nor yet, while yielding both grain and trees in abundance, is it unsuitable for the grazing of cattle; nor can anyone say that, while it bears rich produce of crops and timber and herds, it is nevertheless disagreeable for men to live in. Nay, on the contrary, it abounds in practically everything that affords either pleasure or profit.,2.  To what grain-bearing country, indeed, watered, not with rivers, but with rains from heaven, do the plains of Campania yield, in which I have seen fields that produce even three crops in a year, summer's harvest following upon that of winter and autumn's upon that of summer? To what olive orchards are those of the Messapians, the Daunians, the Sabines and many others inferior? To what vineyards those of Tyrrhenia and the Alban and the Falernian districts, where the soil is wonderfully kind to vines and with the least labour produces the finest grapes in the greatest abundance?,3.  And besides the land that is cultivated one will find much that is left untilled as pasturage for sheep and goats, and still more extensive and more wonderful is the land suitable for grazing horses and cattle; for not only the marsh and meadow grass, which is very plentiful, but the dewy and well-watered grass of the glades, infinite in its abundance, furnish grazing for them in summer as well as in winter and keep them always in good condition.,4.  But most wonderful of all are the forests growing upon the rocky heights, in the glens and on the uncultivated hills, from which the inhabitants are abundantly supplied with fine timber suitable for the building of ships as well as for all other purposes. Nor are any of these materials hard to come at or at a distance from human need, but they are easy to handle and readily available, owing to the multitude of rivers that flow through the whole peninsula and make the transportation and exchange of everything the land produces inexpensive.,5.  Springs also of hot water have been discovered in many places, affording most pleasant baths and sovereign cures for chronic ailments. There are also mines of all sorts, plenty of wild beasts for hunting, and a great variety of sea fish, besides innumerable other things, some useful and others of a nature to excite wonder. But the finest thing of all is the climate, admirably tempered by the seasons, so that less than elsewhere is harm done by excessive cold or inordinate heat either to the growing fruits and grains or to the bodies of animals.
9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.117-1.119, 1.156-1.214, 1.250-1.264, 1.923, 1.926-1.950, 2.342-2.380, 2.589-2.660, 2.993, 2.1030-2.1039, 3.316-3.318, 3.741-3.742, 4.414-4.419, 5.186, 5.862-5.863, 5.878-5.924, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1105-5.1160, 5.1241-5.1307, 5.1345, 5.1361-5.1378, 5.1403-5.1404, 6.1-6.6, 6.654-6.655, 6.675-6.677 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Ovid, Fasti, 1.337-1.348 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.337. Cornmeal, and glittering grains of pure salt 1.338. Were once the means for men to placate the gods. 1.339. No foreign ship had yet brought liquid myrrh 1.340. Extracted from tree’s bark, over the ocean waves: 1.341. Euphrates had not sent incense, nor India balm 1.342. And the threads of yellow saffron were unknown. 1.343. The altar was happy to fume with Sabine juniper 1.344. And the laurel burned with a loud crackling. 1.345. He was rich, whoever could add violet 1.346. To garlands woven from meadow flowers. 1.347. The knife that bares the entrails of the stricken bull 1.348. Had no role to perform in the sacred rites.
11. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.107-1.108 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Propertius, Elegies, 3.22.17 (1st cent. BCE

13. Strabo, Geography, 6.4.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.4.1. Such, indeed, is the size and such the character of Italy. And while I have already mentioned many things which have caused the Romans at the present time to be exalted to so great a height, I shall now indicate the most important things. One is, that, like an island, Italy is securely guarded by the seas on all sides, except in a few regions, and even these are fortified by mountains that are hardly passable. A second is that along most of its coast it is harborless and that the harbors it does have are large and admirable. The former is useful in meeting attacks from the outside, while the latter is helpful in making counter-attacks and in promoting an abundant commerce. A third is that it is characterized by many differences of air and temperature, on which depend the greater variation, whether for better or for worse, in animals, plants, and, in short, everything that is useful for the support of life. Its length extends from north to south, generally speaking, and Sicily counts as an addition to its length, already so great. Now mild temperature and harsh temperature of the air are judged by heat, cold, and their intermediates; and so from this it necessarily follows that what is now Italy, situated as it is between the two extremes and extending to such a length, shares very largely in the temperate zone and in a very large number of ways. And the following is still another advantage which has fallen to the lot of Italy; since the Apennine Mountains extend through the whole of its length and leave on both sides plains and hills which bear fine fruits, there is no part of it which does not enjoy the blessings of both mountain and plain. And add also to this the size and number of its rivers and its lakes, and, besides these, the fountains of water, both hot and cold, which in many places nature has provided as an aid to health, and then again its good supply of mines of all sorts. Neither can one worthily describe Italy's abundant supply of fuel, and of food both for men and beast, and the excellence of its fruits. Further, since it lies intermediate between the largest races on the one hand, and Greece and the best parts of Libya on the other, it not only is naturally well-suited to hegemony, because it surpasses the countries that surround it both in the valor of its people and in size, but also can easily avail itself of their services, because it is close to them.
14. Vergil, Aeneis, 3.619-3.620, 3.678, 4.177, 10.767 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.619. on leaves inscribing the portentous song 3.620. he sets in order, and conceals them well 3.678. “Accept these gifts, sweet youth, memorials 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 10.767. against Jove's thunder;—so Aeneas raged
15. Vergil, Eclogues, 2.45-2.55, 4.21-4.22, 4.24, 4.32, 4.39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.45. ‘Mine once,’ quoth he, ‘now yours, as heir to own.’ 2.46. Foolish Amyntas heard and envied me. 2.47. Ay, and two fawns, I risked my neck to find 2.48. in a steep glen, with coats white-dappled still 2.49. from a sheep's udders suckled twice a day— 2.50. these still I keep for you; which Thestili 2.51. implores me oft to let her lead away; 2.52. and she shall have them, since my gifts you spurn. 2.53. Come hither, beauteous boy; for you the Nymph 2.54. bring baskets, see, with lilies brimmed; for you 2.55. plucking pale violets and poppy-heads 4.21. be seen of them, and with his father's worth 4.22. reign o'er a world at peace. For thee, O boy 4.24. her childish gifts, the gadding ivy-spray 4.32. die shall the treacherous poison-plant, and far 4.39. and stubborn oaks sweat honey-dew. Nathle
16. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15, 1.33, 1.127-1.130, 1.229, 2.1-2.3, 2.9-2.82, 2.103-2.142, 2.144-2.176, 2.207-2.211, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.294-2.295, 2.303-2.314, 2.323-2.345, 2.362-2.366, 2.370, 2.380-2.396, 2.406, 2.438-2.439, 2.455, 2.460, 2.473-2.474, 2.500-2.501, 2.524-2.525, 2.532-2.540, 3.115-3.117, 3.224, 3.244, 3.264, 3.266-3.268, 3.440, 3.444, 3.454-3.456, 3.461-3.469, 3.509-3.514, 3.549-3.550 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.9. Hither, O Father of the wine-press, come 2.10. And stripped of buskin stain thy bared limb 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.12. First, nature's law 2.13. For generating trees is manifold; 2.14. For some of their own force spontaneous spring 2.15. No hand of man compelling, and posse 2.16. The plains and river-windings far and wide 2.17. As pliant osier and the bending broom 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.22. Jove's Aesculus, and oaks, oracular 2.23. Deemed by the Greeks of old. With some sprouts forth 2.24. A forest of dense suckers from the root 2.25. As elms and cherries; so, too, a pigmy plant 2.26. Beneath its mother's mighty shade upshoot 2.27. The bay-tree of placeName key= 2.28. Nature imparted first; hence all the race 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.30. Springs into verdure. Other means there are 2.31. Which use by method for itself acquired. 2.32. One, sliving suckers from the tender frame 2.33. of the tree-mother, plants them in the trench; 2.34. One buries the bare stumps within his field 2.35. Truncheons cleft four-wise, or sharp-pointed stakes; 2.36. Some forest-trees the layer's bent arch await 2.37. And slips yet quick within the parent-soil; 2.38. No root need others, nor doth the pruner's hand 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.47. Come then, and learn what tilth to each belong 2.48. According to their kinds, ye husbandmen 2.49. And tame with culture the wild fruits, lest earth 2.50. Lie idle. O blithe to make all Ismaru 2.51. One forest of the wine-god, and to clothe 2.52. With olives huge Tabernus! And be thou 2.53. At hand, and with me ply the voyage of toil 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.57. Spread sail like wings to waft thee. Not that I 2.58. With my poor verse would comprehend the whole 2.59. Nay, though a hundred tongues, a hundred mouth 2.60. Were mine, a voice of iron; be thou at hand 2.61. Skirt but the nearer coast-line; see the shore 2.62. Is in our grasp; not now with feigned song 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.65. Those that lift their head 2.66. Into the realms of light spontaneously 2.67. Fruitless indeed, but blithe and strenuous spring 2.68. Since Nature lurks within the soil. And yet 2.69. Even these, should one engraft them, or transplant 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.71. Their woodland temper, and, by frequent tilth 2.72. To whatso craft thou summon them, make speed 2.73. To follow. So likewise will the barren shaft 2.74. That from the stock-root issueth, if it be 2.75. Set out with clear space amid open fields: 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.77. Darken, despoil of increase as it grows 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.79. Which from shed seed ariseth, upward win 2.80. But slowly, yielding promise of its shade 2.81. To late-born generations; apples wane 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.109. To heaven upshot with teeming boughs, the tree 2.110. Strange leaves admires and fruitage not its own. 2.111. Nor of one kind alone are sturdy elms 2.112. Willow and lotus, nor the cypress-tree 2.113. of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring 2.114. Fat olives, orchades, and radii 2.115. And bitter-berried pausians, no, nor yet 2.116. Apples and the forests of Alcinous; 2.117. Nor from like cuttings are Crustumian pear 2.118. And Syrian, and the heavy hand-fillers. 2.119. Not the same vintage from our trees hangs down 2.120. Which placeName key= 2.121. Vines Thasian are there, Mareotids white 2.122. These apt for richer soils, for lighter those: 2.123. Psithian for raisin-wine more useful, thin 2.124. Lageos, that one day will try the feet 2.125. And tie the tongue: purples and early-ripes 2.126. And how, O Rhaetian, shall I hymn thy praise? 2.127. Yet cope not therefore with Falernian bins. 2.128. Vines Aminaean too, best-bodied wine 2.129. To which the Tmolian bows him, ay, and king 2.130. Phanaeus too, and, lesser of that name 2.131. Argitis, wherewith not a grape can vie 2.132. For gush of wine-juice or for length of years. 2.133. Nor thee must I pass over, vine of placeName key= 2.134. Welcomed by gods and at the second board 2.135. Nor thee, Bumastus, with plump clusters swollen. 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.207. Or sing her harbours, and the barrier cast 2.208. Athwart the Lucrine, and how ocean chafe 2.209. With mighty bellowings, where the Julian wave 2.210. Echoes the thunder of his rout, and through 2.211. Avernian inlets pours the Tuscan tide? 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.294. All back again, and stamp the surface smooth. 2.295. If it suffice not, loose will be the land 2.303. Barren for fruits, by tilth untamable 2.304. Nor grape her kind, nor apples their good name 2.305. Maintaining—will in this wise yield thee proof: 2.306. Stout osier-baskets from the rafter-smoke 2.307. And strainers of the winepress pluck thee down; 2.308. Hereinto let that evil land, with fresh 2.309. Spring-water mixed, be trampled to the full; 2.310. The moisture, mark you, will ooze all away 2.311. In big drops issuing through the osier-withes 2.312. But plainly will its taste the secret tell 2.313. And with a harsh twang ruefully distort 2.314. The mouths of them that try it. Rich soil again 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 2.362. In equal rows symmetric, not alone 2.363. To feed an idle fancy with the view 2.364. But since not otherwise will earth afford 2.365. Vigour to all alike, nor yet the bough 2.366. Have power to stretch them into open space. 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.406. Or on the eve of autumn's earliest frost 2.438. Take heed to hide them, and dig in withal 2.439. Rough shells or porous stone, for therebetween 2.455. From story up to story. 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.224. To face the warrior's armed rage, and brook 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.264. His strength with smouldering fire, till he forget 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.440. Whole pools are turned; and on their untrimmed beard 3.444. Stand island-like amid the frost, and stag 3.454. Oak-logs and elm-trees whole, and fire them there 3.455. There play the night out, and in festive glee 3.456. With barm and service sour the wine-cup mock. 3.461. If wool delight thee, first, be far removed 3.462. All prickly boskage, burrs and caltrops; shun 3.463. Luxuriant pastures; at the outset choose 3.464. White flocks with downy fleeces. For the ram 3.465. How white soe'er himself, be but the tongue 3.466. 'Neath his moist palate black, reject him, lest 3.467. He sully with dark spots his offspring's fleece 3.468. And seek some other o'er the teeming plain. 3.469. Even with such snowy bribe of wool, if ear 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb
17. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.1.9-6.1.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

18. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 3.40-3.42, 7.20, 36.101, 37.202 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 52.22 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adriatic sea, head of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 214, 215, 218
aeetes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
aetiology of labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248
age, golden Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
amor, as destructive force Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 251
animals, sacrificial Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216, 251
apennines Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
augustus (emperor), and italy Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
baetis, river, barbarian Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
bruttium, bruttians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
campania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
castor and pollux Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 249, 250
catullus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
china Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
corydon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
countryside, charms imagined Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
cybele Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
dionysius of halicarnassus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
egypt Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
eris Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
ethiopia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
euphrates Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249, 250, 251
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
gods, presence in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
gods, presence in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
golden age, in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 102
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 80, 218, 219, 248
grafting Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 214
greek cultural influences Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 248, 249, 250, 251
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 80, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
imagery, agricultural Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 249
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250, 251
india Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
istria Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
italy, roman perception of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
italy Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, jupiter in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 219
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 209, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 248, 249, 250, 251
lesbia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
liburnia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
libya, libyan Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
ligures, ligurians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 80, 209
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249, 250
lucretius, mirabilia in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 214
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 218
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
mars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 251
medes Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
metanarrative perspectives Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
mirabilia, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 214
mirabilia, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 218, 219
mirabilia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209, 217, 250, 251
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209, 218
natural marvels Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
nile, danube (also hister) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
nile, inundation (flood) of the Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
nile, po (also eridanus) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 251
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 251
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
paradoxography Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
periplous, periploi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
persia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
philippi, battle of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
pliny Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249, 250
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 218, 219
praises of italy, reminiscent of golden age Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 102
propertius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
rivers, symbols of their lands Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 65
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
sabaean imports Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
strabo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
temples, gods present in' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
theophrastus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 214, 215
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209, 214, 215, 219
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
varus river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 251
vergil Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
vertumnus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
vesuvius, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 133
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 214, 219
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 219
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 80
vitruvius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 249, 250, 251
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 249, 250, 251
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248, 249, 250, 251
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 248
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 217
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217, 218