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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 2.113


Bacchus amat collis, aquilonem et frigora taxi.Of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.2.3-1.2.7, 1.7.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.36-1.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.36. 1.  There is another legend related by the inhabitants, to the effect that before the reign of Jupiter Saturn was lord in this land and that the celebrated manner of life in his reign, abounding in the produce of every season, was enjoyed by none more than them.,2.  And, indeed, if anyone, setting aside the fabulous part of this account, will examine the merit of any country from which mankind received the greatest enjoyments immediately after their birth, whether they sprang from the earth, according to the ancient tradition, or came into being in some other manner, he will find none more beneficent to them than this. For, to compare one country with another of the same extent, Italy is, in my opinion, the best country, not only of Europe, but even of all the rest of the world.,3.  And yet I am not unaware that I shall not be believed by many when they reflect on Egypt, Libya, Babylonia and any other fertile countries there may be. But I, for my part, do not limit the wealth derived from the soil to one sort of produce, nor do I feel any eagerness to live where there are only rich arable lands and little or nothing else that is useful; but I account that country the best which is the most self-sufficient and generally stands least in need of imported commodities. And I am persuaded that Italy enjoys this universal fertility and diversity of advantages beyond any other land. 1.37. 1.  For Italy does not, while possessing a great deal of good arable land, lack trees, as does a grain-bearing country; nor, on the other hand, while suitable for growing all manner of trees, does it, when sown to grain, produce scanty crops, as does a timbered country; nor yet, while yielding both grain and trees in abundance, is it unsuitable for the grazing of cattle; nor can anyone say that, while it bears rich produce of crops and timber and herds, it is nevertheless disagreeable for men to live in. Nay, on the contrary, it abounds in practically everything that affords either pleasure or profit.,2.  To what grain-bearing country, indeed, watered, not with rivers, but with rains from heaven, do the plains of Campania yield, in which I have seen fields that produce even three crops in a year, summer's harvest following upon that of winter and autumn's upon that of summer? To what olive orchards are those of the Messapians, the Daunians, the Sabines and many others inferior? To what vineyards those of Tyrrhenia and the Alban and the Falernian districts, where the soil is wonderfully kind to vines and with the least labour produces the finest grapes in the greatest abundance?,3.  And besides the land that is cultivated one will find much that is left untilled as pasturage for sheep and goats, and still more extensive and more wonderful is the land suitable for grazing horses and cattle; for not only the marsh and meadow grass, which is very plentiful, but the dewy and well-watered grass of the glades, infinite in its abundance, furnish grazing for them in summer as well as in winter and keep them always in good condition.,4.  But most wonderful of all are the forests growing upon the rocky heights, in the glens and on the uncultivated hills, from which the inhabitants are abundantly supplied with fine timber suitable for the building of ships as well as for all other purposes. Nor are any of these materials hard to come at or at a distance from human need, but they are easy to handle and readily available, owing to the multitude of rivers that flow through the whole peninsula and make the transportation and exchange of everything the land produces inexpensive.,5.  Springs also of hot water have been discovered in many places, affording most pleasant baths and sovereign cures for chronic ailments. There are also mines of all sorts, plenty of wild beasts for hunting, and a great variety of sea fish, besides innumerable other things, some useful and others of a nature to excite wonder. But the finest thing of all is the climate, admirably tempered by the seasons, so that less than elsewhere is harm done by excessive cold or inordinate heat either to the growing fruits and grains or to the bodies of animals.
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 6.1-6.6, 6.675-6.677 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 3.22.17 (1st cent. BCE

6. Strabo, Geography, 6.4.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.4.1. Such, indeed, is the size and such the character of Italy. And while I have already mentioned many things which have caused the Romans at the present time to be exalted to so great a height, I shall now indicate the most important things. One is, that, like an island, Italy is securely guarded by the seas on all sides, except in a few regions, and even these are fortified by mountains that are hardly passable. A second is that along most of its coast it is harborless and that the harbors it does have are large and admirable. The former is useful in meeting attacks from the outside, while the latter is helpful in making counter-attacks and in promoting an abundant commerce. A third is that it is characterized by many differences of air and temperature, on which depend the greater variation, whether for better or for worse, in animals, plants, and, in short, everything that is useful for the support of life. Its length extends from north to south, generally speaking, and Sicily counts as an addition to its length, already so great. Now mild temperature and harsh temperature of the air are judged by heat, cold, and their intermediates; and so from this it necessarily follows that what is now Italy, situated as it is between the two extremes and extending to such a length, shares very largely in the temperate zone and in a very large number of ways. And the following is still another advantage which has fallen to the lot of Italy; since the Apennine Mountains extend through the whole of its length and leave on both sides plains and hills which bear fine fruits, there is no part of it which does not enjoy the blessings of both mountain and plain. And add also to this the size and number of its rivers and its lakes, and, besides these, the fountains of water, both hot and cold, which in many places nature has provided as an aid to health, and then again its good supply of mines of all sorts. Neither can one worthily describe Italy's abundant supply of fuel, and of food both for men and beast, and the excellence of its fruits. Further, since it lies intermediate between the largest races on the one hand, and Greece and the best parts of Libya on the other, it not only is naturally well-suited to hegemony, because it surpasses the countries that surround it both in the valor of its people and in size, but also can easily avail itself of their services, because it is close to them.
7. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.701-1.702, 8.180-8.181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.701. emerging tallest of her beauteous train; 1.702. while joy unutterable thrills the breast 8.180. my conscious worth, great oracles from Heaven 8.181. the kinship of our sires, thy own renown
8. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15, 1.33, 1.229, 2.1-2.3, 2.103-2.112, 2.114-2.176, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.370, 2.380-2.396, 2.455, 3.115-3.117, 3.266-3.268, 3.509-3.514, 3.549-3.550 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.109. To heaven upshot with teeming boughs, the tree 2.110. Strange leaves admires and fruitage not its own. 2.111. Nor of one kind alone are sturdy elms 2.112. Willow and lotus, nor the cypress-tree 2.114. Fat olives, orchades, and radii 2.115. And bitter-berried pausians, no, nor yet 2.116. Apples and the forests of Alcinous; 2.117. Nor from like cuttings are Crustumian pear 2.118. And Syrian, and the heavy hand-fillers. 2.119. Not the same vintage from our trees hangs down 2.120. Which placeName key= 2.121. Vines Thasian are there, Mareotids white 2.122. These apt for richer soils, for lighter those: 2.123. Psithian for raisin-wine more useful, thin 2.124. Lageos, that one day will try the feet 2.125. And tie the tongue: purples and early-ripes 2.126. And how, O Rhaetian, shall I hymn thy praise? 2.127. Yet cope not therefore with Falernian bins. 2.128. Vines Aminaean too, best-bodied wine 2.129. To which the Tmolian bows him, ay, and king 2.130. Phanaeus too, and, lesser of that name 2.131. Argitis, wherewith not a grape can vie 2.132. For gush of wine-juice or for length of years. 2.133. Nor thee must I pass over, vine of placeName key= 2.134. Welcomed by gods and at the second board 2.135. Nor thee, Bumastus, with plump clusters swollen. 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.455. From story up to story. 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb
9. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.1.9-6.1.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 3.40-3.42, 7.20, 36.101, 37.202 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Statius, Siluae, 4.2.30-4.2.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
aeneas Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
age, golden Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73; Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
castor and pollux Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
catullus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
ceres Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
china Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
corydon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
countryside, charms imagined Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
dionysius of halicarnassus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
domitian, as god Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
domitian, banquet of Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
domitian, palace of Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
egypt Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
ethiopia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
euphrates Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
evander Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
gods, presence in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
gods, presence in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
greek cultural influences Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
india Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
italy, roman perception of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, jupiter in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 215
lesbia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
medes Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
mirabilia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 179
paradoxography Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
persia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
philippi, battle of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
pliny Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
propertius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
sabaean imports Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
statius, and domitian Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
strabo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
temples, gods present in' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 125
theophrastus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
triptolemus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 199
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
vertumnus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
vitruvius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 215
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73