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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 1.464-1.514


audeat. Ille etiam caecos instare tumultusFrom heaven shoot headlong, and through murky night


saepe monet fraudemque et operta tumescere bella.Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake


Ille etiam exstincto miseratus Caesare RomamOr light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves


cum caput obscura nitidum ferrugine texitOr feathers on the wave-top float and play.


inpiaque aeternam timuerunt saecula noctem.But when from regions of the furious North


Tempore quamquam illo tellus quoque et aequora pontiIt lightens, and when thunder fills the hall


obscenaeque canes inportunaeque volucresOf Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field


signa dabant. Quotiens Cyclopum effervere in agrosWith brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea


vidimus undantem ruptis fornacibus AetnamNo mariner but furls his dripping sails.


flammarumque globos liquefactaque volvere saxa!Never at unawares did shower annoy:


Armorum sonitum toto Germania caeloOr, as it rises, the high-soaring crane


audiit, insolitis tremuerunt motibus Alpes.Flee to the vales before it, with face


Vox quoque per lucos volgo exaudita silentisUpturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale


ingens et simulacra modis pallentia mirisThrough gaping nostrils, or about the mere


visa sub obscurum noctis, pecudesque locutaeShrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog


infandum! sistunt amnes terraeque dehiscuntCrouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old.


et maestum inlacrimat templis ebur aeraque sudant.Oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells


Proluit insano contorquens vertice silvasFretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys;


fluviorum rex Eridanus camposque per omnisOr the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host


cum stabulis armenta tulit. Nec tempore eodemOf rooks from food returning in long line


tristibus aut extis fibrae adparere minacesClamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see


aut puteis manare cruor cessavit et altaeThe various ocean-fowl and those that pry


per noctem resonare lupis ululantibus urbes.Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools


Non alias caelo ceciderunt plura serenoCayster, as in eager rivalry


fulgura nec diri totiens arsere cometae.About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray


ergo inter sese paribus concurrere telisNow duck their head beneath the wave, now run


Romanas acies iterum videre Philippi;Into the billows, for sheer idle joy


nec fuit indignum superis, bis sanguine nostroOf their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow


Emathiam et latos Haemi pinguescere campos.With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain


Scilicet et tempus veniet, cum finibus illisStalks on the dry sand mateless and alone.


agricola incurvo terram molitus aratroNor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task


exesa inveniet scabra robigine pilaKnow not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock


aut gravibus rastris galeas pulsabit inanisThey see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth


grandiaque effossis mirabitur ossa sepulchris.Of mouldy snuff-clots.


Di patrii, Indigetes, et Romule Vestaque materSo too, after rain


quae Tuscum Tiberim et Romana Palatia servasSunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast


hunc saltem everso iuvenem succurrere saecloAnd learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed


ne prohibete! Satis iam pridem sanguine nostroAppear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon


Laomedonteae luimus periuria Troiae;As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise


iam pridem nobis caeli te regia, CaesarNor fleecy films to float along the sky.


invidet atque hominum queritur curare triumphos;Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore


quippe ubi fas versum atque nefas: tot bella per orbemDo halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings


tam multae scelerum facies; non ullus aratroNor filthy swine take thought to toss on high


dignus honos, squalent abductis arva colonisWith scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud


et curvae rigidum falces conflantur in ensem.Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain


Hinc movet Euphrates, illinc Germania bellum;And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught


vicinae ruptis inter se legibus urbesWatching the sunset plies her 'lated song.


arma ferunt; saevit toto Mars inpius orbe;Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen


ut cum carceribus sese effudere quadrigaeTowering, and Scylla for the purple lock


addunt in spatia et frustra retinacula tendensPays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing


fertur equis auriga neque audit currus habenas.The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Homer, Iliad, 5.303-5.304, 12.381-12.383 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.303. /eager to slay the man whosoever should come to seize the corpse, and crying a terrible cry. But the son of Tydeus grasped in his hand a stone—a mighty deed—one that not two men could bear, such as mortals now are; yet lightly did he wield it even alone. 5.304. /eager to slay the man whosoever should come to seize the corpse, and crying a terrible cry. But the son of Tydeus grasped in his hand a stone—a mighty deed—one that not two men could bear, such as mortals now are; yet lightly did he wield it even alone. 12.381. /for he smote him with a huge jagged rock, that lay the topmost of all within the wall by the battlements. Not easily with both hands could a man, such as mortals now are, hold it, were he never so young and strong, but Aias lifted it on high and hurled it, and he shattered the four-horned helmet, and crushed together 12.382. /for he smote him with a huge jagged rock, that lay the topmost of all within the wall by the battlements. Not easily with both hands could a man, such as mortals now are, hold it, were he never so young and strong, but Aias lifted it on high and hurled it, and he shattered the four-horned helmet, and crushed together 12.383. /for he smote him with a huge jagged rock, that lay the topmost of all within the wall by the battlements. Not easily with both hands could a man, such as mortals now are, hold it, were he never so young and strong, but Aias lifted it on high and hurled it, and he shattered the four-horned helmet, and crushed together
3. Pindar, Paeanes, 9.11-9.20 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 738-741, 737 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Herodotus, Histories, 1.68 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.68. It was Lichas, one of these men, who found the tomb in Tegea by a combination of luck and skill. At that time there was free access to Tegea, so he went into a blacksmith's shop and watched iron being forged, standing there in amazement at what he saw done. ,The smith perceived that he was amazed, so he stopped what he was doing and said, “My Laconian guest, if you had seen what I saw, then you would really be amazed, since you marvel so at ironworking. ,I wanted to dig a well in the courtyard here, and in my digging I hit upon a coffin twelve feet long. I could not believe that there had ever been men taller than now, so I opened it and saw that the corpse was just as long as the coffin. I measured it and then reburied it.” So the smith told what he had seen, and Lichas thought about what was said and reckoned that this was Orestes, according to the oracle. ,In the smith's two bellows he found the winds, hammer and anvil were blow upon blow, and the forging of iron was woe upon woe, since he figured that iron was discovered as an evil for the human race. ,After reasoning this out, he went back to Sparta and told the Lacedaemonians everything. They made a pretence of bringing a charge against him and banishing him. Coming to Tegea, he explained his misfortune to the smith and tried to rent the courtyard, but the smith did not want to lease it. ,Finally he persuaded him and set up residence there. He dug up the grave and collected the bones, then hurried off to Sparta with them. Ever since then the Spartans were far superior to the Tegeans whenever they met each other in battle. By the time of Croesus' inquiry, the Spartans had subdued most of the Peloponnese .
6. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 2 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. ἄρρητον· μεσταὶ δέ Διὸς πᾶσαι μὲν ἀγυιαί
7. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.597-4.600 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.597. ἔνθα ποτʼ αἰθαλόεντι τυπεὶς πρὸς στέρνα κεραυνῷ 4.598. ἡμιδαὴς Φαέθων πέσεν ἅρματος Ἠελίοιο 4.599. λίμνης ἐς προχοὰς πολυβενθέος· ἡ δʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 4.600. τραύματος αἰθομένοιο βαρὺν ἀνακηκίει ἀτμόν.
8. Varro, On Agriculture, 3.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Horace, Odes, 1.12.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.123, 1.150, 1.159-1.214, 1.250-1.261, 3.1-3.2, 3.1042-3.1044, 5.980-5.981, 5.1241-5.1378, 6.7-6.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Ovid, Amores, 1.9.27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.81-2.85, 2.329-2.331 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Ovid, Tristia, 1.8.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Propertius, Elegies, 2.9.35 (1st cent. BCE

15. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.279, 1.286-1.296, 4.663-4.665, 6.857, 7.785 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.291. in long discourse of their lost mates they tell 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 1.294. or heed no more whatever voice may call? 1.295. Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends 1.296. Orontes brave and fallen Amycus 4.663. the manner and the time her secret soul 4.664. prepares, and, speaking to her sister sad 4.665. he masks in cheerful calm her fatal will: 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood
16. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.42, 1.73, 3.60, 9.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.42. no hope of freedom, and no thought to save. 1.73. Sooner shall light stags, therefore, feed in air 3.60. have I set lip to them, but lay them by. 9.47. or Cinna deem I, but account myself
17. Vergil, Georgics, 1.21-1.23, 1.86, 1.100, 1.127-1.128, 1.276-1.283, 1.316-1.334, 1.351-1.355, 1.357, 1.365-1.369, 1.388-1.389, 1.394, 1.410-1.423, 1.425-1.435, 1.439, 1.446-1.447, 1.463, 1.465-1.514, 2.11, 2.47, 2.54, 2.82, 2.103-2.108, 2.277, 2.475-2.482, 2.490-2.494, 3.1-3.48, 3.272-3.277, 3.478-3.566, 4.197, 4.309, 4.554, 4.560-4.561 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.86. With shallower trench uptilt it—'twill suffice; 1.100. With refuse rich to soak the thirsty soil 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.276. Opens the year, before whose threatening front 1.277. Routed the dog-star sinks. But if it be 1.278. For wheaten harvest and the hardy spelt 1.279. Thou tax the soil, to corn-ears wholly given 1.280. Let Atlas' daughters hide them in the dawn 1.281. The Cretan star, a crown of fire, depart 1.282. Or e'er the furrow's claim of seed thou quit 1.283. Or haste thee to entrust the whole year's hope 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.352. And those sworn brethren banded to break down 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.355. Aye, and on Ossa to up-roll amain 1.357. Their mountain-stair the Sire asunder smote. 1.388. And hunt the long-eared hares, then pierce the doe 1.389. With whirl of hempen-thonged Balearic sling 1.394. When Spring the rain-bringer comes rushing down 1.410. And with a great rain floods the smiling crops 1.411. The oxen's labour: now the dikes fill fast 1.412. And the void river-beds swell thunderously 1.413. And all the panting firths of Ocean boil. 1.414. The Sire himself in midnight of the cloud 1.415. Wields with red hand the levin; through all her bulk 1.416. Earth at the hurly quakes; the beasts are fled 1.417. And mortal hearts of every kindred sunk 1.418. In cowering terror; he with flaming brand 1.419. Athos , or Rhodope, or Ceraunian crag 1.420. Precipitates: then doubly raves the South 1.421. With shower on blinding shower, and woods and coast 1.422. Wail fitfully beneath the mighty blast. 1.423. This fearing, mark the months and Signs of heaven 1.425. And through what heavenly cycles wandereth 1.426. The glowing orb Cyllenian. Before all 1.427. Worship the Gods, and to great Ceres pay 1.428. Her yearly dues upon the happy sward 1.429. With sacrifice, anigh the utmost end 1.430. of winter, and when Spring begins to smile. 1.431. Then lambs are fat, and wines are mellowest then; 1.432. Then sleep is sweet, and dark the shadows fall 1.433. Upon the mountains. Let your rustic youth 1.434. To Ceres do obeisance, one and all; 1.435. And for her pleasure thou mix honeycomb 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come 1.446. That bring the frost, the Sire of all himself 1.447. Ordained what warnings in her monthly round 1.463. oft, too, when wind is toward, the stars thou'lt see 1.465. Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.467. Or feathers on the wave-top float and play. 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.469. It lightens, and when thunder fills the hall 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.474. Or, as it rises, the high-soaring crane 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.476. Upturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.484. Clamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see 1.485. The various ocean-fowl and those that pry 1.486. Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry 1.488. About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 1.490. Into the billows, for sheer idle joy 1.491. of their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow 1.492. With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise 1.503. Nor fleecy films to float along the sky. 1.504. Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore 1.505. Do halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 1.509. And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught 1.510. Watching the sunset plies her 'lated song. 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.47. Come then, and learn what tilth to each belong 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.277. Which vapoury mist and flitting smoke exhales 2.475. So scathe it, as the flocks with venom-bite 2.476. of their hard tooth, whose gnawing scars the stem. 2.477. For no offence but this to Bacchus bleed 2.478. The goat at every altar, and old play 2.479. Upon the stage find entrance; therefore too 2.480. The sons of Theseus through the country-side— 2.481. Hamlet and crossway—set the prize of wit 2.482. And on the smooth sward over oiled skin 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.272. With mighty groaning; all the forest-side 3.273. And far placeName key= 3.274. Nor wont the champions in one stall to couch; 3.275. But he that's worsted hies him to strange clime 3.276. Far off, an exile, moaning much the shame 3.277. The blows of that proud conqueror, then love's lo 3.478. Many there be who from their mothers keep 3.479. The new-born kids, and straightway bind their mouth 3.480. With iron-tipped muzzles. What they milk at dawn 3.481. Or in the daylight hours, at night they press; 3.482. What darkling or at sunset, this ere morn 3.483. They bear away in baskets—for to town 3.484. The shepherd hies him—or with dash of salt 3.485. Just sprinkle, and lay by for winter use. 3.486. Nor be thy dogs last cared for; but alike 3.487. Swift Spartan hounds and fierce Molossian feed 3.488. On fattening whey. Never, with these to watch 3.489. Dread nightly thief afold and ravening wolves 3.490. Or Spanish desperadoes in the rear. 3.491. And oft the shy wild asses thou wilt chase 3.492. With hounds, too, hunt the hare, with hounds the doe; 3.493. oft from his woodland wallowing-den uprouse 3.494. The boar, and scare him with their baying, and drive 3.495. And o'er the mountains urge into the toil 3.496. Some antlered monster to their chiming cry. 3.497. Learn also scented cedar-wood to burn 3.498. Within the stalls, and snakes of noxious smell 3.499. With fumes of galbanum to drive away. 3.500. oft under long-neglected cribs, or lurk 3.501. A viper ill to handle, that hath fled 3.502. The light in terror, or some snake, that wont 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 3.504. Its bane among the cattle, hugs the ground 3.505. Fell scourge of kine. Shepherd, seize stakes, seize stones! 3.506. And as he rears defiance, and puffs out 3.507. A hissing throat, down with him! see how low 3.508. That cowering crest is vailed in flight, the while 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep 3.531. When chilly showers have probed them to the quick 3.532. And winter stark with hoar-frost, or when sweat 3.533. Unpurged cleaves to them after shearing done 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 3.536. While, plunged beneath the flood, with drenched fell 3.537. The ram, launched free, goes drifting down the tide. 3.538. Else, having shorn, they smear their bodies o'er 3.539. With acrid oil-lees, and mix silver-scum 3.540. And native sulphur and Idaean pitch 3.541. Wax mollified with ointment, and therewith 3.542. Sea-leek, strong hellebores, bitumen black. 3.543. Yet ne'er doth kindlier fortune crown his toil 3.544. Than if with blade of iron a man dare lance 3.545. The ulcer's mouth ope: for the taint is fed 3.546. And quickened by confinement; while the swain 3.547. His hand of healing from the wound withholds 3.548. Or sits for happier signs imploring heaven. 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.551. By thirsty fever are consumed, 'tis good 3.552. To draw the enkindled heat therefrom, and pierce 3.553. Within the hoof-clefts a blood-bounding vein. 3.554. of tribes Bisaltic such the wonted use 3.555. And keen Gelonian, when to 3.556. He flies, or Getic desert, and quaffs milk 3.557. With horse-blood curdled. Seest one far afield 3.558. oft to the shade's mild covert win, or pull 3.559. The grass tops listlessly, or hindmost lag 3.560. Or, browsing, cast her down amid the plain 3.561. At night retire belated and alone; 3.562. With quick knife check the mischief, ere it creep 3.563. With dire contagion through the unwary herd. 3.564. Less thick and fast the whirlwind scours the main 3.565. With tempest in its wake, than swarm the plague 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone 4.197. Community of offspring, and they house 4.309. And let the sting lie buried, and leave their live 4.554. The steers from pasture to their stall repair 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft
18. Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.540-5.556 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.73-7.74 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Iulius, 82 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Claudianus, De Sexto Consulatu Honorii, 172 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 236
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
aeneas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
aeneid (vergil) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34
agriculture Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
atedius melior Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 80
augustus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 234
autocracy, roman Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
bougonia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
caesar, gaius iulius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 236
caesar Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
catiline Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
civil war, in the georgics Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
civil war, roman Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
consulatus suus (cicero's poem)" Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 234
consulatus suus (cicero's poem)" '168.0_234@golden age Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
deification, of epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
deification, of octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35
eclipse Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
elegy/elegiac Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
epic Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36, 245; Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153
eridanus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34, 35
fasti (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 207, 208, 245
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
genre criticism Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
georgics , language of science in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153, 157
gigantomachy, as poetic theme Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
gigantomachy, as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
gigantomachy, jupiter and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 34, 35, 207
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
hardie, philip Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
harrison, e.l. Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 157
helios Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
ides of march Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221, 234
imagery, agricultural Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 245
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35, 36
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34, 245
imagery, solar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35, 36
intertextuality Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
julius caesar, c. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221, 234
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 35, 36, 207
juno Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 234
jupiter, in the aeneid Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 234
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 34, 207
jupiter (zeus), gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
lamentation Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
lucretius, laws of nature in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
lucretius, mirabilia in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207, 208
lucretius, on plural causes Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
makarismos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
marcus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
mars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34
meliboeus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 80
meteorology Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
mirabilia, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207, 208
mirabilia, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207, 208
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
octavian, and the sidus julium Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221, 234
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 35, 36, 245
ovid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35
pan Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 80
perseus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
phaethon Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35, 36
philippi Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34
pholoe Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 80
pindar Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 236
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
politics, and agriculture in vergils georgics Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
politics, gigantomachy as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 35, 36
polyphony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
portents, as divine signs Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 157
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 34, 207, 208
prayer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
prodigy, in virgil Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
propertius, in vergil Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
quintus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
ritual, in ink Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
ritual Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
science, language of, and myth Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153
science, language of, for sign theory Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153, 157
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35
sicily Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34
sidus julium Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 234
signs' Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
signs, in the ancient world Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 153, 157
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 35
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 34
sun Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
thomas, r. Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 157
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 207
thomas, richard f. Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
trees, in statius poetry Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 80
tullius cicero, m. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 56
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 208
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
virgil Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 236; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 221, 234
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 34, 35, 245
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 34, 35, 36, 245
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 245
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
weather signs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 207
zeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 36