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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 1.425-1.426


ordine respicies, numquam te crastina falletAnd through what heavenly cycles wandereth


hora neque insidiis noctis capiere serenae.The glowing orb Cyllenian. Before all


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 46, 462-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-544, 45 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

45. τὰς δέ διʼ ἀμφοτέρας οἵη ποταμοῖο ἀπορρώξ
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.250-1.261, 5.195-5.234 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 1.9.27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 2.9.35 (1st cent. BCE

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.663-4.665 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.663. the manner and the time her secret soul 4.664. prepares, and, speaking to her sister sad 4.665. he masks in cheerful calm her fatal will:
7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.176-1.186, 1.197-1.203, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.351-1.355, 1.357, 1.365-1.369, 1.388-1.389, 1.394, 1.410-1.423, 1.426, 1.432, 1.439, 1.463-1.514 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.176. And hem with hounds the mighty forest-glades. 1.177. Soon one with hand-net scourges the broad stream 1.178. Probing its depths, one drags his dripping toil 1.179. Along the main; then iron's unbending might 1.180. And shrieking saw-blade,—for the men of old 1.181. With wedges wont to cleave the splintering log;— 1.182. Then divers arts arose; toil conquered all 1.183. Remorseless toil, and poverty's shrewd push 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.186. When now the awful groves 'gan fail to bear 1.197. Prune with thy hook the dark field's matted shade 1.198. Pray down the showers, all vainly thou shalt eye 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.352. And those sworn brethren banded to break down 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.355. Aye, and on Ossa to up-roll amain 1.357. Their mountain-stair the Sire asunder smote. 1.388. And hunt the long-eared hares, then pierce the doe 1.389. With whirl of hempen-thonged Balearic sling 1.394. When Spring the rain-bringer comes rushing down 1.410. And with a great rain floods the smiling crops 1.411. The oxen's labour: now the dikes fill fast 1.412. And the void river-beds swell thunderously 1.413. And all the panting firths of Ocean boil. 1.414. The Sire himself in midnight of the cloud 1.415. Wields with red hand the levin; through all her bulk 1.416. Earth at the hurly quakes; the beasts are fled 1.417. And mortal hearts of every kindred sunk 1.418. In cowering terror; he with flaming brand 1.419. Athos , or Rhodope, or Ceraunian crag 1.420. Precipitates: then doubly raves the South 1.421. With shower on blinding shower, and woods and coast 1.422. Wail fitfully beneath the mighty blast. 1.423. This fearing, mark the months and Signs of heaven 1.426. The glowing orb Cyllenian. Before all 1.432. Then sleep is sweet, and dark the shadows fall 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come 1.463. oft, too, when wind is toward, the stars thou'lt see 1.464. From heaven shoot headlong, and through murky night 1.465. Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.467. Or feathers on the wave-top float and play. 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.469. It lightens, and when thunder fills the hall 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.474. Or, as it rises, the high-soaring crane 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.476. Upturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.484. Clamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see 1.485. The various ocean-fowl and those that pry 1.486. Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry 1.488. About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 1.490. Into the billows, for sheer idle joy 1.491. of their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow 1.492. With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise 1.503. Nor fleecy films to float along the sky. 1.504. Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore 1.505. Do halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 1.509. And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught 1.510. Watching the sunset plies her 'lated song. 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.540-5.556 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acrostics, funerary Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 57
acrostics, gamma Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 50, 51
acrostics, syllabic Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 50, 51
acrostics Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 50, 51, 57
amycus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 57
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
astraea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 51
autocracy, roman Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
cacus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 57
civil war, roman Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
elegy/elegiac Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
epic Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
genre criticism Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
georgics , language of science in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 158
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83; Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
lamentation' Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 178
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
pleiades Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 51
pollux Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 57
polyphemus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 57
portents, as divine signs Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 158
portents at death of Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 158
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
science, language of, for sign theory Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 158
signs, as portents Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 158
tiphys Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 51
valerius flaccus, and aratean tradition Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 50, 51, 57
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
zeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83