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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11094
Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15


Neptune; et cultor nemorum, cui pinguia CeaeAnd Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing.


ter centum nivei tondent dumeta iuvenci;And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.514-1.527, 2.484-2.493 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.514. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.515. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.516. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.517. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.518. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.519. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.520. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.521. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.522. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.523. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.524. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.525. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.526. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.527. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.493. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains
3. Homer, Odyssey, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 11-13, 2, 10 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. αὐτὸς γὰρ τά γε σήματʼ ἐν οὐρανῷ ἐστήριξεν
5. Callimachus, Aetia, 75 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6. Theocritus, Idylls, 1.123-1.124 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.1-1.4, 2.500-2.527 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1. ἀρχόμενος σέο, Φοῖβε, παλαιγενέων κλέα φωτῶν 1.2. μνήσομαι, οἳ Πόντοιο κατὰ στόμα καὶ διὰ πέτρας 1.3. Κυανέας βασιλῆος ἐφημοσύνῃ Πελίαο 1.4. χρύσειον μετὰ κῶας ἐύζυγον ἤλασαν Ἀργώ. 2.500. Κυρήνη πέφαταί τις ἕλος πάρα Πηνειοῖο 2.501. μῆλα νέμειν προτέροισι παρʼ ἀνδράσιν· εὔαδε γάρ οἱ 2.502. παρθενίη καὶ λέκτρον ἀκήρατον. αὐτὰρ Ἀπόλλων 2.503. τήνγʼ ἀνερεψάμενος ποταμῷ ἔπι ποιμαίνουσαν 2.504. τηλόθεν Αἱμονίης, χθονίῃς παρακάτθετο νύμφαις 2.505. αἳ Λιβύην ἐνέμοντο παραὶ Μυρτώσιον αἶπος. 2.506. ἔνθα δʼ Ἀρισταῖον Φοίβῳ τέκεν, ὃν καλέουσιν 2.507. Ἀγρέα καὶ Νόμιον πολυλήιοι Αἱμονιῆες. 2.508. τὴν μὲν γὰρ φιλότητι θεὸς ποιήσατο νύμφην 2.509. αὐτοῦ μακραίωνα καὶ ἀγρότιν· υἷα δʼ ἔνεικεν 2.510. νηπίαχον Χείρωνος ὑπʼ ἄντροισιν κομέεσθαι. 2.511. τῷ καὶ ἀεξηθέντι θεαὶ γάμον ἐμνήστευσαν 2.512. Μοῦσαι, ἀκεστορίην τε θεοπροπίας τʼ ἐδίδαξαν· 2.513. καί μιν ἑῶν μήλων θέσαν ἤρανον, ὅσσʼ ἐνέμοντο 2.514. ἂμ πεδίον Φθίης Ἀθαμάντιον ἀμφί τʼ ἐρυμνὴν 2.515. Ὄθρυν καὶ ποταμοῦ ἱερὸν ῥόον Ἀπιδανοῖο. 2.516. ἦμος δʼ οὐρανόθεν Μινωίδας ἔφλεγε νήσους 2.517. Σείριος, οὐδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἔην ἄκος ἐνναέτῃσιν 2.518. τῆμος τόνγʼ ἐκάλεσσαν ἐφημοσύναις Ἑκάτοιο 2.519. λοιμοῦ ἀλεξητῆρα. λίπεν δʼ ὅγε πατρὸς ἐφετμῇ 2.520. Φθίην, ἐν δὲ Κέῳ κατενάσσατο, λαὸν ἀγείρας 2.521. Παρράσιον, τοίπερ τε Λυκάονός εἰσι γενέθλης 2.522. καὶ βωμὸν ποίησε μέγαν Διὸς Ἰκμαίοιο 2.523. ἱερά τʼ εὖ ἔρρεξεν ἐν οὔρεσιν ἀστέρι κείνῳ 2.524. Σειρίῳ αὐτῷ τε Κρονίδῃ Διί. τοῖο δʼ ἕκητι 2.525. γαῖαν ἐπιψύχουσιν ἐτήσιαι ἐκ Διὸς αὖραι 2.526. ἤματα τεσσαράκοντα· Κέῳ δʼ ἔτι νῦν ἱερῆες 2.527. ἀντολέων προπάροιθε Κυνὸς ῥέζουσι θυηλάς.
8. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5, 1.18.7-1.18.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Catullus, Poems, 64.1-64.22, 66.63-66.64 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Horace, Odes, 1.2.45, 1.12.51-1.12.52, 1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.34. 2. Now Antiochus was not satisfied either with his unexpected taking the city, or with its pillage, or with the great slaughter he had made there; but being overcome with his violent passions, and remembering what he had suffered during the siege, he compelled the Jews to dissolve the laws of their country, and to keep their infants uncircumcised, and to sacrifice swine’s flesh upon the altar; 1.34. 7. Now when at the evening Herod had already dismissed his friends to refresh themselves after their fatigue, and when he was gone himself, while he was still hot in his armor, like a common soldier, to bathe himself, and had but one servant that attended him, and before he was gotten into the bath, one of the enemies met him in the face with a sword in his hand, and then a second, and then a third, and after that more of them;
11. Horace, Letters, 1.1.1-1.1.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.2-1.4, 1.7, 1.29-1.49, 1.54-1.55, 1.160, 1.188, 1.199-1.203, 1.250-1.261, 2.9-2.19, 2.648, 2.700-2.707, 3.9, 3.59-3.86, 3.978-3.1023, 4.580-4.594, 5.7-5.21, 5.917, 5.933, 5.1105-5.1160, 5.1289-5.1296, 5.1361-5.1369, 5.1379-5.1404, 5.1416, 5.1436-5.1439, 5.1452, 6.1-6.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1, 4.144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way 4.144. has our long war? Why not from this day forth
14. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.13, 1.15-1.42, 1.47, 1.50, 1.63, 1.100, 1.118-1.166, 1.199-1.204, 1.229, 1.237, 1.324-1.326, 1.338, 1.415-1.423, 1.439, 1.446-1.447, 1.493-1.501, 1.511-1.514, 2.1-2.3, 2.41, 2.103-2.108, 2.113, 2.143-2.144, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.370, 2.380-2.396, 2.405, 2.455, 2.510, 2.532-2.542, 3.1-3.48, 3.97-3.98, 3.115-3.117, 3.244, 3.258-3.263, 3.266-3.268, 3.313, 3.455-3.456, 3.509-3.514, 3.517, 3.525, 3.549-3.550, 3.566, 4.1-4.7, 4.149-4.152, 4.170-4.175, 4.281-4.310, 4.315-4.316, 4.321, 4.491-4.492, 4.512, 4.560-4.562 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.6. Such are my themes. O universal light 1.7. Most glorious! ye that lead the gliding year 1.8. Along the sky, Liber and Ceres mild 1.9. If by your bounty holpen earth once changed 1.10. Chaonian acorn for the plump wheat-ear 1.11. And mingled with the grape, your new-found gift 1.12. The draughts of Achelous; and ye Faun 1.13. To rustics ever kind, come foot it, Faun 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.16. Sprang from earth's womb at thy great trident's stroke 1.17. Neptune; and haunter of the groves, for whom 1.18. Three hundred snow-white heifers browse the brakes 1.19. The fertile brakes of placeName key= 1.20. Thy native forest and Lycean lawns 1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.24. Minerva, from whose hand the olive sprung; 1.25. And boy-discoverer of the curved plough; 1.26. And, bearing a young cypress root-uptorn 1.27. Silvanus, and Gods all and Goddesses 1.28. Who make the fields your care, both ye who nurse 1.29. The tender unsown increase, and from heaven 1.30. Shed on man's sowing the riches of your rain: 1.31. And thou, even thou, of whom we know not yet 1.32. What mansion of the skies shall hold thee soon 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.34. Great Caesar, and to take the earth in charge 1.35. That so the mighty world may welcome thee 1.36. Lord of her increase, master of her times 1.37. Binding thy mother's myrtle round thy brow 1.38. Or as the boundless ocean's God thou come 1.39. Sole dread of seamen, till far placeName key= 1.40. Before thee, and Tethys win thee to her son 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 1.47. For neither Tartarus hopes to call thee king 1.50. Elysium's fields, and Proserpine not heed 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.100. With refuse rich to soak the thirsty soil 1.118. Hales o'er them; from the far Olympian height 1.119. Him golden Ceres not in vain regards; 1.120. And he, who having ploughed the fallow plain 1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.147. But no whit the more 1.148. For all expedients tried and travail borne 1.149. By man and beast in turning oft the soil 1.150. Do greedy goose and Strymon-haunting crane 1.151. And succory's bitter fibres cease to harm 1.152. Or shade not injure. The great Sire himself 1.153. No easy road to husbandry assigned 1.154. And first was he by human skill to rouse 1.155. The slumbering glebe, whetting the minds of men 1.156. With care on care, nor suffering realm of hi 1.157. In drowsy sloth to stagnate. Before Jove 1.158. Fields knew no taming hand of husbandmen; 1.159. To mark the plain or mete with boundary-line— 1.160. Even this was impious; for the common stock 1.161. They gathered, and the earth of her own will 1.162. All things more freely, no man bidding, bore. 1.163. He to black serpents gave their venom-bane 1.164. And bade the wolf go prowl, and ocean toss; 1.165. Shooed from the leaves their honey, put fire away 1.166. And curbed the random rivers running wine 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.204. Without which, neither can be sown nor reared 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.338. Nay even on holy days some tasks to ply 1.415. Wields with red hand the levin; through all her bulk 1.416. Earth at the hurly quakes; the beasts are fled 1.417. And mortal hearts of every kindred sunk 1.418. In cowering terror; he with flaming brand 1.419. Athos , or Rhodope, or Ceraunian crag 1.420. Precipitates: then doubly raves the South 1.421. With shower on blinding shower, and woods and coast 1.422. Wail fitfully beneath the mighty blast. 1.423. This fearing, mark the months and Signs of heaven 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come 1.446. That bring the frost, the Sire of all himself 1.447. Ordained what warnings in her monthly round 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.113. of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.405. Comes the white bird long-bodied snakes abhor 2.455. From story up to story. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 2.541. To plant, nor lavish of their pains? Why trace 2.542. Things mightier? Willows even and lowly broom 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.313. Hardens each wallowing shoulder to the wound. 3.455. There play the night out, and in festive glee 3.456. With barm and service sour the wine-cup mock. 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone 4.1. of air-born honey, gift of heaven, I now 4.2. Take up the tale. Upon this theme no le 4.3. Look thou, Maecenas, with indulgent eye. 4.4. A marvellous display of puny powers 4.5. High-hearted chiefs, a nation's history 4.6. Its traits, its bent, its battles and its clans 4.7. All, each, shall pass before you, while I sing. 4.149. Makes the trim garden smile; of placeName key= 4.150. Whose roses bloom and fade and bloom again; 4.151. How endives glory in the streams they drink 4.152. And green banks in their parsley, and how the gourd 4.170. With unbought plenty heaped his board on high. 4.171. He was the first to cull the rose in spring 4.172. He the ripe fruits in autumn; and ere yet 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive 4.174. The rocks with frost, and with her icy bit 4.175. Curb in the running waters, there was he 4.281. They reverence, and with murmuring throngs surround 4.282. In crowds attend, oft shoulder him on high 4.283. Or with their bodies shield him in the fight 4.284. And seek through showering wounds a glorious death. 4.285. Led by these tokens, and with such traits to guide 4.286. Some say that unto bees a share is given 4.287. of the Divine Intelligence, and to drink 4.288. Pure draughts of ether; for God permeates all— 4.289. Earth, and wide ocean, and the vault of heaven— 4.290. From whom flocks, herds, men, beasts of every kind 4.291. Draw each at birth the fine essential flame; 4.292. Yea, and that all things hence to Him return 4.293. Brought back by dissolution, nor can death 4.294. Find place: but, each into his starry rank 4.295. Alive they soar, and mount the heights of heaven. 4.296. If now their narrow home thou wouldst unseal 4.297. And broach the treasures of the honey-house 4.298. With draught of water first toment thy lips 4.299. And spread before thee fumes of trailing smoke. 4.300. Twice is the teeming produce gathered in 4.301. Twofold their time of harvest year by year 4.302. Once when Taygete the Pleiad uplift 4.303. Her comely forehead for the earth to see 4.304. With foot of scorn spurning the ocean-streams 4.305. Once when in gloom she flies the watery Fish 4.306. And dips from heaven into the wintry wave. 4.307. Unbounded then their wrath; if hurt, they breathe 4.308. Venom into their bite, cleave to the vein 4.309. And let the sting lie buried, and leave their live 4.310. Behind them in the wound. But if you dread 4.315. Or cut the empty wax away? for oft 4.316. Into their comb the newt has gnawed unseen 4.321. Or spider, victim of Minerva's spite 4.491. The hundred forests and the hundred streams; 4.492. Thrice Vesta's fire with nectar clear she dashed 4.512. I, when the sun has lit his noontide fires 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing
15. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.2-1.4, 1.63 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 302, 301 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Servius, In Vergilii Georgicon Libros, 1.7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

20. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.61



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31, 124
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 29, 30
allegory Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
amor, and metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
amor Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 29, 124
apollo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 28, 30, 73; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
ars Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
augustus, deification of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
augustus, divine honours Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 91, 92
augustus (see also octavian) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 73
barthes, roland Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 31
berenice Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 92, 93
bonus eventus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28
bougonia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
bugonia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28
callimachus, aetia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
catullus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29, 73
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28, 29, 30; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 93, 94
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
cyrene Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
deification, of epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
deification, of octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 27, 29
didactic poetry, assumptions of Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
divinization of emperors Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
divinization of nature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
domitian Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 155; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
egypt Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
emperors divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 29, 30, 31; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 93, 94
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
fauns Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
faunus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
finales Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
flora Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
georgic poet, mission of pity and community Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
georgics , unresolved oppositions in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
gods, emperors divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 73
gods, nature divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
golden age, in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 98
golden age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 28, 124
grafting Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29
hellenistic ruler cult Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 92, 93
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 29, 30, 124
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
horace, and maecenas Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
horace, autobiographical details Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29, 73
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
iron age, instituted by jove Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 98
iron age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
italianness of roman religion Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
janus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
jason Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
jove, and iron age Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 98
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 91, 92
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
liber Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28, 29, 30
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 29, 30
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
luna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
lympha Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28
maecenas, and horace Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
maecenas Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
minerva Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28, 30
miniaturization Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
muses, mystery Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
muses, naulochus, battle of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 93
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 91, 92
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
mythology in roman religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29
nature divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
neptune Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 29
nightingale, as victim of farmer Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 88
nymphs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
orpheus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
pales Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
pan Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
parthia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 92
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
phoebus (see also apollo) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 27, 31
praecepta and causae Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
primitivism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 29
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19, 27
readers of georgics and ambiguity of text, learn sympathy for loss Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 88
recusatio Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
redundancy, types of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
redundancy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
religions, roman, emperors divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
religions, roman, italianness Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
religions, roman, mythology Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
religions, roman, nature divinized' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 214
robigo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29, 124
silvanus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
silver age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 156
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
sol Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
technology, as central theme of georgics Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 98
tellus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
titus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 155; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
triptolemus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28, 30
truth, georgic, and the poet's truth" Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
truth, georgic, in signs and precepts Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
truth, georgic poet's, expressed in myth, metaphor, and mystery" Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 145
underworld Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
valerius flaccus, ideological epic of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 155, 156
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 28, 31
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
vergil, georgics Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 11
vespasian, and augustus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 155, 156
vespasian, deification of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 155, 156
vespasian Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 28
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31, 124
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 52
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 19
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 29