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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 9.641-9.642


Macte nova virtute, puer: sic itur ad astraTumultuously shouting, they impaled


nanon lifted spears—O pitiable sight! —


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 17.322-17.341, 20.307-20.308 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

17.322. /dear to Ares, up to Ilios, vanquished in their cowardice, and the Argives would have won glory even beyond the allotment of Zeus, by reason of their might and their strength, had not Apollo himself aroused Aeneas, taking upon him the form of the herald, Periphas, son of Epytos, that in the house of his old father 17.323. /dear to Ares, up to Ilios, vanquished in their cowardice, and the Argives would have won glory even beyond the allotment of Zeus, by reason of their might and their strength, had not Apollo himself aroused Aeneas, taking upon him the form of the herald, Periphas, son of Epytos, that in the house of his old father 17.324. /dear to Ares, up to Ilios, vanquished in their cowardice, and the Argives would have won glory even beyond the allotment of Zeus, by reason of their might and their strength, had not Apollo himself aroused Aeneas, taking upon him the form of the herald, Periphas, son of Epytos, that in the house of his old father 17.325. /had grown old in his heraldship, and withal was of kindly mind toward him. In his likeness spake unto Aeneas the son of Zeus, Apollo:Aeneas, how could ye ever guard steep Ilios, in defiance of a god? In sooth I have seen other men that had trust in their strength and might, in their valour 17.326. /had grown old in his heraldship, and withal was of kindly mind toward him. In his likeness spake unto Aeneas the son of Zeus, Apollo:Aeneas, how could ye ever guard steep Ilios, in defiance of a god? In sooth I have seen other men that had trust in their strength and might, in their valour 17.327. /had grown old in his heraldship, and withal was of kindly mind toward him. In his likeness spake unto Aeneas the son of Zeus, Apollo:Aeneas, how could ye ever guard steep Ilios, in defiance of a god? In sooth I have seen other men that had trust in their strength and might, in their valour 17.328. /had grown old in his heraldship, and withal was of kindly mind toward him. In his likeness spake unto Aeneas the son of Zeus, Apollo:Aeneas, how could ye ever guard steep Ilios, in defiance of a god? In sooth I have seen other men that had trust in their strength and might, in their valour 17.329. /had grown old in his heraldship, and withal was of kindly mind toward him. In his likeness spake unto Aeneas the son of Zeus, Apollo:Aeneas, how could ye ever guard steep Ilios, in defiance of a god? In sooth I have seen other men that had trust in their strength and might, in their valour 17.330. /and in their host, and that held their realm even in defiance of Zeus. But for us Zeus willeth the victory far more than for the Danaans; yet yourselves ye have measureless fear, and fight not. So spake he, and Aeneas knew Apollo that smiteth afar, when he looked upon his face, and he called aloud, and spake to Hector: 17.331. /and in their host, and that held their realm even in defiance of Zeus. But for us Zeus willeth the victory far more than for the Danaans; yet yourselves ye have measureless fear, and fight not. So spake he, and Aeneas knew Apollo that smiteth afar, when he looked upon his face, and he called aloud, and spake to Hector: 17.332. /and in their host, and that held their realm even in defiance of Zeus. But for us Zeus willeth the victory far more than for the Danaans; yet yourselves ye have measureless fear, and fight not. So spake he, and Aeneas knew Apollo that smiteth afar, when he looked upon his face, and he called aloud, and spake to Hector: 17.333. /and in their host, and that held their realm even in defiance of Zeus. But for us Zeus willeth the victory far more than for the Danaans; yet yourselves ye have measureless fear, and fight not. So spake he, and Aeneas knew Apollo that smiteth afar, when he looked upon his face, and he called aloud, and spake to Hector: 17.334. /and in their host, and that held their realm even in defiance of Zeus. But for us Zeus willeth the victory far more than for the Danaans; yet yourselves ye have measureless fear, and fight not. So spake he, and Aeneas knew Apollo that smiteth afar, when he looked upon his face, and he called aloud, and spake to Hector: 17.335. / Hector, and ye other leaders of the Trojans and allies, shame verily were this, if before the Achaeans, dear to Ares, we be driven back to Ilios, vanquished in our cowardice. Howbeit even yet, declareth one of the gods that stood by my side, is Zeus, the counsellor most high, our helper in the fight. 17.336. / Hector, and ye other leaders of the Trojans and allies, shame verily were this, if before the Achaeans, dear to Ares, we be driven back to Ilios, vanquished in our cowardice. Howbeit even yet, declareth one of the gods that stood by my side, is Zeus, the counsellor most high, our helper in the fight. 17.337. / Hector, and ye other leaders of the Trojans and allies, shame verily were this, if before the Achaeans, dear to Ares, we be driven back to Ilios, vanquished in our cowardice. Howbeit even yet, declareth one of the gods that stood by my side, is Zeus, the counsellor most high, our helper in the fight. 17.338. / Hector, and ye other leaders of the Trojans and allies, shame verily were this, if before the Achaeans, dear to Ares, we be driven back to Ilios, vanquished in our cowardice. Howbeit even yet, declareth one of the gods that stood by my side, is Zeus, the counsellor most high, our helper in the fight. 17.339. / Hector, and ye other leaders of the Trojans and allies, shame verily were this, if before the Achaeans, dear to Ares, we be driven back to Ilios, vanquished in our cowardice. Howbeit even yet, declareth one of the gods that stood by my side, is Zeus, the counsellor most high, our helper in the fight. 17.340. /Wherefore let us make straight for the Danaans, and let it not be at their ease that they bring to the ships the dead Patroclus. So spake he, and leapt forth far to the front of the foremost fighters, and there stood. And they rallied, and took their stand with their faces toward the Achaeans. Then Aeneas wounded with a thrust of his spear Leocritus 17.341. /Wherefore let us make straight for the Danaans, and let it not be at their ease that they bring to the ships the dead Patroclus. So spake he, and leapt forth far to the front of the foremost fighters, and there stood. And they rallied, and took their stand with their faces toward the Achaeans. Then Aeneas wounded with a thrust of his spear Leocritus 20.307. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.308. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come.
2. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 143 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 1.295-1.310 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.295. What prevents me speaking of the stars, and their rising 1.296. And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised. 1.297. Happy minds that first took the trouble to consider 1.298. These things, and to climb to the celestial regions! 1.299. We can be certain that they raised their head 1.300. Above the failings and the homes of men, alike. 1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures 1.302. Nor public business nor military service: 1.303. They were not seduced by trivial ambitions 1.304. Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth. 1.305. They brought the distant stars within our vision 1.306. And subjected the heavens to their genius. 1.307. So we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled 1.308. On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars. 1.309. Following these masters I too will measure out the skies 1.310. And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates.
4. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4, 3.18 (1st cent. BCE

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.50-1.80, 1.223-1.296, 1.588-1.593, 2.42, 2.559-2.587, 2.681-2.704, 3.37-3.38, 3.40-3.43, 3.56-3.59, 3.62-3.65, 3.67-3.68, 3.94-3.100, 3.274-3.288, 4.1-4.53, 4.90-4.128, 4.175, 4.219-4.278, 4.452-4.456, 4.465-4.473, 5.47, 5.796-5.797, 5.803-5.804, 5.812, 5.814-5.817, 5.838-5.841, 6.649, 6.760-6.766, 6.777-6.780, 6.832-6.834, 6.853, 7.286-7.341, 8.1-8.24, 8.370-8.406, 8.608-8.625, 8.678-8.728, 9.106, 9.257-9.289, 9.595-9.640, 9.642-9.658, 10.1-10.95, 10.242-10.243, 10.252, 10.261, 10.606-10.632, 11.532-11.596, 12.134-12.160, 12.435, 12.791-12.842 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.50. Below th' horizon the Sicilian isle 1.51. just sank from view, as for the open sea 1.52. with heart of hope they sailed, and every ship 1.53. clove with its brazen beak the salt, white waves. 1.54. But Juno of her everlasting wound 1.55. knew no surcease, but from her heart of pain 1.56. thus darkly mused: “Must I, defeated, fail 1.57. of what I will, nor turn the Teucrian King 1.58. from Italy away? Can Fate oppose? 1.59. Had Pallas power to lay waste in flame 1.60. the Argive fleet and sink its mariners 1.61. revenging but the sacrilege obscene 1.62. by Ajax wrought, Oileus' desperate son? 1.63. She, from the clouds, herself Jove's lightning threw 1.64. cattered the ships, and ploughed the sea with storms. 1.65. Her foe, from his pierced breast out-breathing fire 1.66. in whirlwind on a deadly rock she flung. 1.67. But I, who move among the gods a queen 1.68. Jove's sister and his spouse, with one weak tribe 1.69. make war so long! Who now on Juno calls? 1.71. So, in her fevered heart complaining still 1.72. unto the storm-cloud land the goddess came 1.73. a region with wild whirlwinds in its womb 1.74. Aeolia named, where royal Aeolus 1.75. in a high-vaulted cavern keeps control 1.76. o'er warring winds and loud concourse of storms. 1.77. There closely pent in chains and bastions strong 1.78. they, scornful, make the vacant mountain roar 1.79. chafing against their bonds. But from a throne 1.80. of lofty crag, their king with sceptred hand 1.223. rises a straight-stemmed grove of dense, dark shade. 1.224. Fronting on these a grotto may be seen 1.225. o'erhung by steep cliffs; from its inmost wall 1.226. clear springs gush out; and shelving seats it has 1.227. of unhewn stone, a place the wood-nymphs love. 1.228. In such a port, a weary ship rides free 1.230. Hither Aeneas of his scattered fleet 1.231. aving but seven, into harbor sailed; 1.232. with passionate longing for the touch of land 1.233. forth leap the Trojans to the welcome shore 1.234. and fling their dripping limbs along the ground. 1.235. Then good Achates smote a flinty stone 1.236. ecured a flashing spark, heaped on light leaves 1.237. and with dry branches nursed the mounting flame. 1.238. Then Ceres' gift from the corrupting sea 1.239. they bring away; and wearied utterly 1.240. ply Ceres' cunning on the rescued corn 1.241. and parch in flames, and mill 'twixt two smooth stones. 1.242. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243. the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there 1.244. torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken 1.245. with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners 1.246. or Capys or Caicus armor-clad 1.247. upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248. but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249. come straying by, and close behind them comes 1.250. the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale 1.251. in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized 1.252. his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend 1.253. trusty Achates, close beside him bore. 1.254. His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads 1.255. of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed 1.256. the general herd, and drove them one and all 1.257. in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased 1.258. the victory of his bow, till on the ground 1.259. lay seven huge forms, one gift for every ship. 1.260. Then back to shore he sped, and to his friends 1.261. distributed the spoil, with that rare wine 1.262. which good Acestes while in Sicily 1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 1.267. calamity till now. O, ye have borne 1.268. far heavier sorrow: Jove will make an end 1.269. also of this. Ye sailed a course hard by 1.270. infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. 1.271. Ye knew the Cyclops' crags. Lift up your hearts! 1.272. No more complaint and fear! It well may be 1.273. ome happier hour will find this memory fair. 1.274. Through chance and change and hazard without end 1.275. our goal is Latium ; where our destinies 1.276. beckon to blest abodes, and have ordained 1.277. that Troy shall rise new-born! Have patience all! 1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 1.280. feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore 1.281. and locked within his heart a hero's pain. 1.282. Now round the welcome trophies of his chase 1.283. they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs 1.284. and bare the flesh below; some slice with knives 1.285. and on keen prongs the quivering strips impale 1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.291. in long discourse of their lost mates they tell 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 1.294. or heed no more whatever voice may call? 1.295. Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends 1.296. Orontes brave and fallen Amycus 1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 1.590. a wall or citadel, from far below 1.591. lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care 1.592. choose where to build, and close the space around 1.593. with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place 2.42. Others, all wonder, scan the gift of doom 2.559. upon his orient steeds—while forests roar 2.567. o'erwhelms us utterly. Coroebus first 2.568. at mailed Minerva's altar prostrate lay 2.569. pierced by Peneleus, blade; then Rhipeus fell; 2.570. we deemed him of all Trojans the most just 2.571. most scrupulously righteous; but the gods 2.572. gave judgment otherwise. There Dymas died 2.573. and Hypanis, by their compatriots slain; 2.574. nor thee, O Panthus, in that mortal hour 2.575. could thy clean hands or Phoebus, priesthood save. 2.576. O ashes of my country! funeral pyre 2.577. of all my kin! bear witness that my breast 2.578. hrank not from any sword the Grecian drew 2.579. and that my deeds the night my country died 2.580. deserved a warrior's death, had Fate ordained. 2.581. But soon our ranks were broken; at my side 2.582. tayed Iphitus and Pelias; one with age 2.583. was Iong since wearied, and the other bore 2.584. the burden of Ulysses' crippling wound. 2.585. Straightway the roar and tumult summoned us 2.586. to Priam's palace, where a battle raged 2.587. as if save this no conflict else were known 2.681. hattered, and in his very hearth and home 2.682. th' exulting foe, the aged King did bind 2.683. his rusted armor to his trembling thews,— 2.684. all vainly,— and a useless blade of steel 2.685. he girded on; then charged, resolved to die 2.686. encircled by the foe. Within his walls 2.687. there stood, beneath the wide and open sky 2.688. a lofty altar; an old laurel-tree 2.689. leaned o'er it, and enclasped in holy shade 2.690. the statues of the tutelary powers. 2.691. Here Hecuba and all the princesses 2.692. took refuge vain within the place of prayer. 2.693. Like panic-stricken doves in some dark storm 2.694. close-gathering they sate, and in despair 2.695. embraced their graven gods. But when the Queen 2.696. aw Priam with his youthful harness on 2.697. “What frenzy, O my wretched lord,” she cried 2.698. “Arrayed thee in such arms? O, whither now? 2.699. Not such defences, nor such arm as thine 2.700. the time requires, though thy companion were 2.701. our Hector's self. O, yield thee, I implore! 2.702. This altar now shall save us one and all 2.703. or we must die together.” With these words 2.704. he drew him to her side, and near the shrine 3.57. a moaning and a wail from that deep grave 3.62. was kin of thine. This blood is not of trees. 3.63. Haste from this murderous shore, this land of greed. 3.64. O, I am Polydorus! Haste away! 3.65. Here was I pierced; a crop of iron spears 3.67. to all these deadly javelins, keen and strong.” 3.68. Then stood I, burdened with dark doubt and fear 3.94. in cypress dark and purple pall of woe. 3.95. Our Ilian women wailed with loosened hair; 3.96. new milk was sprinkled from a foaming cup 3.97. and from the shallow bowl fresh blood out-poured 3.98. upon the sacred ground. So in its tomb 3.99. we laid his ghost to rest, and loudly sang 3.274. Now Phoebus speaks. Obedient let us be 3.275. and, warned by him, our happier Iot pursue!” 3.276. He spoke: with heart of hope we all obeyed; 3.277. again we changed abode; and, leaving there 3.278. a feeble few, again with spreading sails 3.280. When from the deep the shores had faded far 3.281. and only sky and sea were round our way 3.282. full in the zenith hung a purple cloud 3.283. torm-laden, dark as night, and every wave 3.284. grew black and angry, while perpetual gales 3.285. came rolling o'er the main, and mountain-high 3.286. the wreckful surges rose; our ships were hurled 3.287. wide o'er the whirling waters; thunder-clouds 3.288. and misty murk of night made end of all 4.1. Now felt the Queen the sharp, slow-gathering pangs 4.2. of love; and out of every pulsing vein 4.5. keep calling to her soul; his words, his glance 4.6. cling to her heart like lingering, barbed steel 4.9. lit up all lands, and from the vaulted heaven 4.10. Aurora had dispelled the dark and dew; 4.12. of her dear sister spoke the stricken Queen: 4.13. “Anna, my sister, what disturbing dreams 4.14. perplex me and alarm? What guest is this 4.15. new-welcomed to our house? How proud his mien! 4.16. What dauntless courage and exploits of war! 4.20. has smitten him with storms! What dire extremes 4.21. of war and horror in his tale he told! 4.22. O, were it not immutably resolved 4.23. in my fixed heart, that to no shape of man 4.24. I would be wed again (since my first love 4.25. left me by death abandoned and betrayed); 4.26. loathed I not so the marriage torch and train 4.27. I could—who knows?—to this one weakness yield. 4.30. were by a brother's murder dabbled o'er 4.32. has shaken my weak will. I seem to feel 4.33. the motions of love's lost, familiar fire. 4.34. But may the earth gape open where I tread 4.35. and may almighty Jove with thunder-scourge 4.36. hurl me to Erebus' abysmal shade 4.37. to pallid ghosts and midnight fathomless 4.38. before, O Chastity! I shall offend 4.39. thy holy power, or cast thy bonds away! 4.40. He who first mingled his dear life with mine 4.41. took with him all my heart. 'T is his alone — 4.42. o, let it rest beside him in the grave!” 4.47. weet babes at thine own breast, nor gifts of love? 4.51. and long ago in Tyre . Iarbas knew 4.52. thy scorn, and many a prince and captain bred 4.90. with many a votive gift; or, peering deep 4.91. into the victims' cloven sides, she read 4.92. the fate-revealing tokens trembling there. 4.93. How blind the hearts of prophets be! Alas! 4.94. of what avail be temples and fond prayers 4.95. to change a frenzied mind? Devouring ever 4.96. love's fire burns inward to her bones; she feels 4.97. quick in her breast the viewless, voiceless wound. 4.98. Ill-fated Dido ranges up and down 4.99. the spaces of her city, desperate 4.100. her life one flame—like arrow-stricken doe 4.101. through Cretan forest rashly wandering 4.102. pierced by a far-off shepherd, who pursues 4.103. with shafts, and leaves behind his light-winged steed 4.104. not knowing; while she scours the dark ravines 4.105. of Dicte and its woodlands; at her heart 4.106. the mortal barb irrevocably clings. 4.107. around her city's battlements she guides 4.108. aeneas, to make show of Sidon 's gold 4.109. and what her realm can boast; full oft her voice 4.110. essays to speak and frembling dies away: 4.111. or, when the daylight fades, she spreads anew 4.112. a royal banquet, and once more will plead 4.113. mad that she is, to hear the Trojan sorrow; 4.114. and with oblivious ravishment once more 4.115. hangs on his lips who tells; or when her guests 4.116. are scattered, and the wan moon's fading horn 4.117. bedims its ray, while many a sinking star 4.118. invites to slumber, there she weeps alone 4.119. in the deserted hall, and casts her down 4.120. on the cold couch he pressed. Her love from far 4.121. beholds her vanished hero and receives 4.122. his voice upon her ears; or to her breast 4.123. moved by a father's image in his child 4.124. he clasps Ascanius, seeking to deceive 4.125. her unblest passion so. Her enterprise 4.126. of tower and rampart stops: her martial host 4.127. no Ionger she reviews, nor fashions now 4.128. defensive haven and defiant wall; 4.175. to hem the wood with snares, I will arouse 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 4.452. and my own Tyrians hate me. Yes, for thee 4.453. my chastity was slain and honor fair 4.454. by which alone to glory I aspired 4.455. in former days. To whom dost thou in death 4.456. abandon me? my guest!—since but this name 4.466. She said. But he, obeying Jove's decree 4.467. gazed steadfastly away; and in his heart 4.468. with strong repression crushed his cruel pain; 4.469. then thus the silence broke: “O Queen, not one 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged 4.471. would I gainsay. Elissa's memory 4.472. will be my treasure Iong as memory holds 4.473. or breath of life is mine. Hear my brief plea! 5.47. Garbed in rough pelt of Libyan bear was he 5.803. he called the Trojan dames: “O ye ill-starred 5.804. that were not seized and slain by Grecian foes 5.812. of Eryx, of Acestes, friend and kin; 5.814. and build a town? O city of our sires! 5.815. O venerated gods from haughty foes 5.838. her heavenly beauty and her radiant eyes! 5.839. What voice of music and majestic mien 5.840. what movement like a god! Myself am come 5.841. from Beroe sick, and left her grieving sore 6.649. Who ventured, unopposed, so vast a wrong? 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 7.286. that lone wight hears whom earth's remotest isle 7.287. has banished to the Ocean's rim, or he 7.288. whose dwelling is the ample zone that burns 7.289. betwixt the changeful sun-god's milder realms 7.290. far severed from the world. We are the men 7.291. from war's destroying deluge safely borne 7.292. over the waters wide. We only ask 7.293. ome low-roofed dwelling for our fathers' gods 7.294. ome friendly shore, and, what to all is free 7.295. water and air. We bring no evil name 7.296. upon thy people; thy renown will be 7.297. but wider spread; nor of a deed so fair 7.298. can grateful memory die. Ye ne'er will rue 7.299. that to Ausonia's breast ye gathered Troy . 7.300. I swear thee by the favored destinies 7.301. of great Aeneas, by his strength of arm 7.302. in friendship or in war, that many a tribe 7.303. (O, scorn us not, that, bearing olive green 7.304. with suppliant words we come), that many a throne 7.305. has sued us to be friends. But Fate's decree 7.306. to this thy realm did guide. Here Dardanus 7.307. was born; and with reiterate command 7.308. this way Apollo pointed to the stream 7.309. of Tiber and Numicius' haunted spring. 7.310. Lo, these poor tributes from his greatness gone 7.311. Aeneas sends, these relics snatched away 7.312. from Ilium burning: with this golden bowl 7.313. Anchises poured libation when he prayed; 7.314. and these were Priam's splendor, when he gave 7.315. laws to his gathered states; this sceptre his 7.316. this diadem revered, and beauteous pall 7.317. handwork of Asia 's queens.” So ceased to speak 7.318. Ilioneus. But King Latinus gazed 7.319. uswering on the ground, all motionless 7.320. ave for his musing eyes. The broidered pall 7.321. of purple, and the sceptre Priam bore 7.322. moved little on his kingly heart, which now 7.323. pondered of giving to the bridal bed 7.324. his daughter dear. He argues in his mind 7.325. the oracle of Faunus:—might this be 7.326. that destined bridegroom from an alien land 7.327. to share his throne, to get a progeny 7.328. of glorious valor, which by mighty deeds 7.329. hould win the world for kingdom? So at last 7.330. with joyful brow he spoke: “Now let the gods 7.331. our purpose and their own fair promise bless! 7.332. Thou hast, O Trojan, thy desire. Thy gifts 7.333. I have not scorned; nor while Latinus reigns 7.334. hall ye lack riches in my plenteous land 7.335. not less than Trojan store. But where is he 7.336. Aeneas' self? If he our royal love 7.337. o much desire, and have such urgent mind 7.338. to be our guest and friend, let him draw near 7.339. nor turn him from well-wishing looks away! 7.340. My offering and pledge of peace shall be 7.341. to clasp your monarch's hand. Bear back, I pray 8.1. When Turnus from Laurentum's bastion proud 8.2. published the war, and roused the dreadful note 8.3. of the harsh trumpet's song; when on swift steeds 8.4. the lash he laid and clashed his sounding arms; 8.5. then woke each warrior soul; all Latium stirred 8.6. with tumult and alarm; and martial rage 8.7. enkindled youth's hot blood. The chieftains proud 8.8. Messapus, Ufens, and that foe of Heaven 8.9. Mezentius, compel from far and wide 8.10. their loyal hosts, and strip the field and farm 8.11. of husbandmen. To seek auxiliar arms 8.12. they send to glorious Diomed's domain 8.13. the herald Venulus, and bid him cry: 8.14. “ Troy is to Latium come; Aeneas' fleet 8.15. has come to land. He brings his vanquished gods 8.16. and gives himself to be our destined King. 8.17. Cities not few accept him, and his name 8.18. through Latium waxes large. But what the foe 8.19. by such attempt intends, what victory 8.20. is his presumptuous hope, if Fortune smile 8.21. Aetolia 's lord will not less wisely fear 8.23. Thus Latium 's cause moved on. Meanwhile the heir 8.24. of great Laomedon, who knew full well 8.370. acred to Hercules, wove him a wreath 8.371. to shade his silvered brow. The sacred cup 8.372. he raised in his right hand, while all the rest 8.374. Soon from the travelling heavens the western star 8.375. glowed nearer, and Potitius led forth 8.376. the priest-procession, girt in ancient guise 8.377. with skins of beasts and carrying burning brands. 8.378. new feasts are spread, and altars heaped anew 8.379. with gifts and laden chargers. Then with song 8.380. the Salian choir surrounds the blazing shrine 8.381. their foreheads wreathed with poplar. Here the youth 8.382. the elders yonder, in proud anthem sing 8.383. the glory and the deeds of Hercules: 8.384. how first he strangled with strong infant hand 8.385. two serpents, Juno's plague; what cities proud 8.386. Troy and Oechalia, his famous war 8.387. in pieces broke; what labors numberless 8.388. as King Eurystheus' bondman he endured 8.389. by cruel Juno's will. “Thou, unsubdued 8.390. didst strike the twy-formed, cloud-bred centaurs down 8.391. Pholus and tall Hylaeus. Thou hast slain 8.392. the Cretan horror, and the lion huge 8.393. beneath the Nemean crag. At sight of thee 8.394. the Stygian region quailed, and Cerberus 8.395. crouching o'er half-picked bones in gory cave. 8.396. Nothing could bid thee fear. Typhoeus towered 8.397. in his colossal Titan-panoply 8.398. o'er thee in vain; nor did thy cunning fail 8.399. when Lema's wonder-serpent round thee drew 8.400. its multudinous head. Hail, Jove's true son! 8.401. New glory to the gods above, come down 8.402. and these thine altars and thy people bless!” 8.403. Such hymns they chanted, telling oft the tale 8.404. of Cacus' cave and blasting breath of fire: 8.406. Such worship o'er, all take the homeward way 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 9.106. for rib and spar, and soon would put to sea 9.257. the Rutuli in dull security 9.258. the siege maintain. Yet are their lights but few. 9.259. They are asleep or drunk, and in their line 9.260. is many a silent space. O, hear my thought 9.261. and what my heart is pondering. To recall 9.262. Aeneas is the dearest wish to-night 9.263. of all, both high and low. They need true men 9.264. to find him and bring tidings. If our chiefs 9.265. but grant me leave to do the thing I ask 9.266. (Claiming no reward save what honor gives) 9.267. methinks I could search out by yonder hill 9.268. a path to Pallanteum.” The amazed 9.269. Euryalus, flushed warm with eager love 9.270. for deeds of glory, instantly replied 9.271. to his high-hearted friend: “Dost thou refuse 9.272. my Nisus, to go with me hand in hand 9.273. when mighty deeds are done? Could I behold 9.274. thee venturing alone on danger? Nay! 9.275. Not thus my sire Opheltes, schooled in war 9.276. taught me his true child, 'mid the woes of Troy 9.277. and Argive terrors reared; not thus with thee 9.278. have I proved craven, since we twain were leal 9.279. to great Aeneas, sharing all his doom. 9.280. In this breast also is a heart which knows 9.281. contempt of life, and deems such deeds, such praise 9.282. well worth a glorious death.” Nisus to him: 9.283. “I have not doubted thee, nor e'er could have 9.284. one thought disloyal. May almighty Jove 9.285. or whatsoe'er good power my purpose sees 9.286. bring me triumphant to thy arms once more! 9.287. But if, as oft in doubtful deeds befalls 9.288. ome stroke of chance, or will divine, should turn 9.289. to adverse, 't is my fondest prayer that thou 9.595. he did but love his hapless friend too well.” 9.596. But while he spoke, the furious-thrusting sword 9.597. had pierced the tender body, and run through 9.598. the bosom white as snow. Euryalus 9.599. ank prone in death; upon his goodly limbs 9.600. the life-blood ran unstopped, and low inclined 9.601. the drooping head; as when some purpled flower 9.602. cut by the ploughshare, dies, or poppies proud 9.603. with stem forlorn their ruined beauty bow 9.604. before the pelting storm. Then Nisus flew 9.605. traight at his foes; but in their throng would find 9.606. Volscens alone, for none but Volscens stayed: 9.607. they gathered thickly round and grappled him 9.608. in shock of steel with steel. But on he plunged 9.609. winging in ceaseless circles round his head 9.610. his lightning-sword, and thrust it through the face 9.611. of shrieking Volscens, with his own last breath 9.612. triking his foeman down; then cast himself 9.613. upon his fallen comrade's breast; and there 9.615. Heroic pair and blest! If aught I sing 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age 9.617. hall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: 9.618. not while the altars of Aeneas' line 9.619. hall crown the Capitol's unshaken hill 9.620. nor while the Roman Father's hand sustains 9.622. The Rutules seized the spoils of victory 9.623. and slowly to their camp, with wail and cry 9.624. bore Volscens' corse; and in the eamp they made 9.625. like wailing over Rhamnes lifeless found 9.626. o'er Numa and Serranus, and a throng 9.627. of princes dead. The gazing people pressed 9.628. around the slain, the dying, where the earth 9.629. ran red with slaughter and full many a stream 9.630. of trickling gore; nor did they fail to know 9.631. Messapus' glittering helm, his baldric fair 9.633. Now, from Tithonus' saffron couch set free 9.634. Aurora over many a land outpoured 9.635. the rising morn; the sun's advancing beam 9.636. unveiled the world; and Turnus to his host 9.637. gave signal to stand forth, while he arrayed 9.638. himself in glorious arms. Then every chief 9.639. awoke his mail-clad company, and stirred 9.640. their slumbering wrath with tidings from the foe. 9.642. on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! — 9.643. the heads of Nisus and Euryalus. 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 10.1. Meanwhile Olympus, seat of sovereign sway 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair 10.3. the Sire of gods and King of all mankind 10.4. ummoned th' immortals to his starry court 10.5. whence, high-enthroned, the spreading earth he views— 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour 10.16. for war shall be hereafter—speed it not!— 10.17. When cruel Carthage to the towers of Rome 10.18. hall bring vast ruin, streaming fiercely down 10.19. the opened Alp. Then hate with hate shall vie 10.20. and havoc have no bound. Till then, give o'er 10.22. Thus briefly, Jove. But golden Venus made 10.23. less brief reply. “O Father, who dost hold 10.24. o'er Man and all things an immortal sway! 10.25. of what high throne may gods the aid implore 10.26. ave thine? Behold of yonder Rutuli 10.27. th' insulting scorn! Among them Turnus moves 10.28. in chariot proud, and boasts triumphant war 10.29. in mighty words. Nor do their walls defend 10.30. my Teucrians now. But in their very gates 10.31. and on their mounded ramparts, in close fight 10.32. they breast their foes and fill the moats with blood. 10.33. Aeneas knows not, and is far away. 10.34. Will ne'er the siege have done? A second time 10.35. above Troy 's rising walls the foe impends; 10.36. another host is gathered, and once more 10.37. from his Aetolian Arpi wrathful speeds 10.38. a Diomed. I doubt not that for me 10.39. wounds are preparing. Yea, thy daughter dear 10.40. awaits a mortal sword! If by thy will 10.41. unblest and unapproved the Trojans came 10.42. to Italy, for such rebellious crime 10.43. give them their due, nor lend them succor, thou 10.44. with thy strong hand! But if they have obeyed 10.45. unnumbered oracles from gods above 10.46. and sacred shades below, who now has power 10.47. to thwart thy bidding, or to weave anew 10.48. the web of Fate? Why speak of ships consumed 10.49. along my hallowed Erycinian shore? 10.50. Or of the Lord of Storms, whose furious blasts 10.51. were summoned from Aeolia ? Why tell 10.52. of Iris sped from heaven? Now she moves 10.53. the region of the shades (one kingdom yet 10.54. from her attempt secure) and thence lets loose 10.55. Alecto on the world above, who strides 10.56. in frenzied wrath along th' Italian hills. 10.57. No more my heart now cherishes its hope 10.58. of domination, though in happier days 10.59. uch was thy promise. Let the victory fall 10.60. to victors of thy choice! If nowhere lies 10.61. the land thy cruel Queen would deign accord 10.62. unto the Teucrian people,—O my sire 10.63. I pray thee by yon smouldering wreck of Troy 10.64. to let Ascanius from the clash of arms 10.65. escape unscathed. Let my own offspring live! 10.66. Yea, let Aeneas, tossed on seas unknown 10.67. find some chance way; let my right hand avail 10.68. to shelter him and from this fatal war 10.69. in safety bring. For Amathus is mine 10.70. mine are Cythera and the Paphian hills 10.71. and temples in Idalium . Let him drop 10.72. the sword, and there live out inglorious days. 10.73. By thy decree let Carthage overwhelm 10.74. Ausonia's power; nor let defence be found 10.75. to stay the Tyrian arms! What profits it 10.76. that he escaped the wasting plague of war 10.77. and fled Argolic fires? or that he knew 10.78. o many perils of wide wilderness 10.79. and waters rude? The Teucrians seek in vain 10.80. new-born Troy in Latium . Better far 10.81. crouched on their country's ashes to abide 10.82. and keep that spot of earth where once was Troy ! 10.83. Give back, O Father, I implore thee, give 10.84. Xanthus and Simois back! Let Teucer's sons 10.86. Then sovereign Juno, flushed with solemn scorn 10.87. made answer. “Dost thou bid me here profane 10.88. the silence of my heart, and gossip forth 10.89. of secret griefs? What will of god or man 10.90. impelled Aeneas on his path of war 10.91. or made him foeman of the Latin King? 10.92. Fate brought him to Italia ? Be it so! 10.93. Cassandra's frenzy he obeyed. What voice — 10.94. ay, was it mine?—urged him to quit his camp 10.95. risk life in storms, or trust his war, his walls 10.242. to him had Populonia consigned 10.243. (His mother-city, she) six hundred youth 10.252. close lined, with bristling spears, of Pisa all 10.261. of the Ligurians, Cinyrus; nor thine 10.606. canned him from far, hurling defiant words 10.607. in answer to the King's. “My honor now 10.608. hall have the royal trophy of this war 10.609. or glorious death. For either fortune fair 10.610. my sire is ready. Threaten me no more!” 10.611. So saying, to the midmost space he strode 10.612. and in Arcadian hearts the blood stood still. 10.613. Swift from his chariot Turnus leaped, and ran 10.614. to closer fight. As when some lion sees 10.615. from his far mountain-lair a raging bull 10.616. that sniffs the battle from the grassy field 10.617. and down the steep he flies—such picture showed 10.618. grim Turnus as he came. But when he seemed 10.619. within a spear's cast, Pallas opened fight 10.620. expecting Fortune's favor to the brave 10.621. in such unequal match; and thus he prayed: 10.622. “O, by my hospitable father's roof 10.623. where thou didst enter as a stranger-guest 10.624. hear me, Alcides, and give aid divine 10.625. to this great deed. Let Turnus see these hands 10.626. trip from his half-dead breast the bloody spoil! 10.627. and let his eyes in death endure to see 10.628. his conqueror!” Alcides heard the youth: 10.629. but prisoned in his heart a deep-drawn sigh 10.630. and shed vain tears; for Jove, the King and Sire, . 10.631. poke with benigt accents to his son: 10.632. “To each his day is given. Beyond recall 11.532. thou madman! Aye, with thy vile, craven soul 11.533. disturb the general cause. Extol the power 11.534. of a twice-vanquished people, and decry 11.535. Latinus' rival arms. From this time forth 11.536. let all the Myrmidonian princes cower 11.537. before the might of Troy ; let Diomed 11.538. and let Achilles tremble; let the stream 11.539. of Aufidus in panic backward flow 11.540. from Hadria 's wave. But hear me when I say 11.541. that though his guilt and cunning feign to feel 11.542. fear of my vengeance, much embittering so 11.543. his taunts and insult—such a life as his 11.544. my sword disdains. O Drances, be at ease! 11.545. In thy vile bosom let thy breath abide! 11.546. But now of thy grave counsel and thy cause 11.547. O royal sire, I speak. If from this hour 11.548. thou castest hope of armed success away 11.549. if we be so unfriended that one rout 11.550. o'erwhelms us utterly, if Fortune's feet 11.551. never turn backward, let us, then, for peace 11.552. offer petition, lifting to the foe 11.553. our feeble, suppliant hands. Yet would I pray 11.554. ome spark of manhood such as once we knew 11.555. were ours once more! I count him fortunate 11.556. and of illustrious soul beyond us all 11.557. who, rather than behold such things, has fallen 11.558. face forward, dead, his teeth upon the dust. 11.559. But if we still have power, and men-at-arms 11.560. unwasted and unscathed, if there survive 11.561. Italian tribes and towns for help in war 11.562. aye! if the Trojans have but won success 11.563. at bloody cost,—for they dig graves, I ween 11.564. torm-smitten not less than we,—O, wherefore now 11.565. tand faint and shameful on the battle's edge? 11.566. Why quake our knees before the trumpet call? 11.567. Time and the toil of shifting, changeful days 11.568. restore lost causes; ebbing tides of chance 11.569. deceive us oft, which after at their flood 11.570. do lift us safe to shore. If aid come not 11.571. from Diomed in Arpi, our allies 11.572. hall be Mezentius and Tolumnius 11.573. auspicious name, and many a chieftain sent 11.574. from many a tribe; not all inglorious 11.575. are Latium 's warriors from Laurentian land! 11.576. Hither the noble Volscian stem sends down 11.577. Camilla with her beauteous cavalry 11.578. in glittering brass arrayed. But if, forsooth 11.579. the Trojans call me singly to the fight 11.580. if this be what ye will, and I so much 11.581. the public weal impair—when from this sword 11.582. has victory seemed to fly away in scorn? 11.583. I should not hopeless tread in honor's way 11.584. whate'er the venture. Dauntless will I go 11.585. though equal match for great Achilles, he 11.586. and though he clothe him in celestial arms 11.587. in Vulcan's smithy wrought. I, Turnus, now 11.588. not less than equal with great warriors gone 11.589. vow to Latinus, father of my bride 11.590. and to ye all, each drop of blood I owe. 11.591. Me singly doth Aeneas call? I crave 11.592. that challenge. Drances is not called to pay 11.593. the debt of death, if wrath from Heaven impend; 11.595. Thus in their doubtful cause the chieftains strove. 11.596. Meanwhile Aeneas his assaulting line 12.134. which leaned its weight against a column tall 12.135. in the mid-court, Auruncan Actor's spoil 12.136. and waved it wide in air with mighty cry: 12.137. “O spear, that ne'er did fail me when I called 12.138. the hour is come! Once mighty Actor's hand 12.139. but now the hand of Turnus is thy lord. 12.140. Grant me to strike that carcase to the ground 12.141. and with strong hand the corselet rip and rend 12.142. from off that Phrygian eunuch: let the dust 12.143. befoul those tresses, tricked to curl so fine 12.144. with singeing steel and sleeked with odorous oil.” 12.145. Such frenzy goads him: his impassioned brow 12.146. is all on flame, the wild eyes flash with fire. 12.147. Thus, bellowing loud before the fearful fray 12.148. ome huge bull proves the fury of his horns 12.149. pushing against a tree-trunk; his swift thrusts 12.150. would tear the winds in pieces; while his hoofs 12.152. That self-same day with aspect terrible 12.153. Aeneas girt him in the wondrous arms 12.154. his mother gave; made sharp his martial steel 12.155. and roused his heart to ire; though glad was he 12.156. to seal such truce and end the general war. 12.157. Then he spoke comfort to his friends; and soothed 12.158. Iulus' fear, unfolding Heaven's intent; 12.159. but on Latinus bade his heralds lay 12.435. this frantic stir, this quarrel rashly bold? 12.791. dissension 'twixt the frighted citizens: 12.792. ome would give o'er the city and fling wide 12.793. its portals to the Trojan, or drag forth 12.794. the King himself to parley; others fly 12.795. to arms, and at the rampart make a stand. 12.796. 'T is thus some shepherd from a caverned crag 12.797. tirs up the nested bees with plenteous fume 12.798. of bitter smoke; they, posting to and fro 12.799. fly desperate round the waxen citadel 12.800. and whet their buzzing fury; through their halls 12.801. the stench and blackness rolls; within the caves 12.802. noise and confusion ring; the fatal cloud 12.804. But now a new adversity befell 12.805. the weary Latins, which with common woe 12.806. hook the whole city to its heart. The Queen 12.807. when at her hearth she saw the close assault 12.808. of enemies, the walls beset, and fire 12.809. preading from roof to roof, but no defence 12.810. from the Rutulian arms, nor front of war 12.811. with Turnus leading,—she, poor soul, believed 12.812. her youthful champion in the conflict slain; 12.813. and, mad with sudden sorrow, shrieked aloud 12.814. against herself, the guilty chief and cause 12.815. of all this ill; and, babbling her wild woe 12.816. in endless words, she rent her purple pall 12.817. and with her own hand from the rafter swung 12.818. a noose for her foul death. The tidings dire 12.819. among the moaning wives of Latium spread 12.820. and young Lavinia's frantic fingers tore 12.821. her rose-red cheek and hyacinthine hair. 12.822. Then all her company of women shrieked 12.823. in anguish, and the wailing echoed far 12.824. along the royal seat; from whence the tale 12.825. of sorrow through the peopled city flew; 12.826. hearts sank; Latinus rent his robes, appalled 12.827. to see his consort's doom, his falling throne; 12.829. Meanwhile the warrior Turnus far afield 12.830. pursued a scattered few; but less his speed 12.831. for less and less his worn steeds worked his will; 12.832. and now wind-wafted to his straining ear 12.833. a nameless horror came, a dull, wild roar 12.834. the city's tumult and distressful cry. 12.835. “Alack,” he cried, “what stirs in yonder walls 12.836. uch anguish? Or why rings from side to side 12.837. uch wailing through the city?” Asking so 12.838. he tightened frantic grasp upon the rein. 12.839. To him his sister, counterfeiting still 12.840. the charioteer Metiscus, while she swayed 12.841. rein, steeds, and chariot, this answer made: 12.842. “Hither, my Turnus, let our arms pursue
6. Vergil, Georgics, 3.8-3.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed
7. Silius Italicus, Punica, 3.594-3.596, 13.635 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.531-1.535, 1.558-1.563, 4.35-4.36, 4.80-4.81 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absence, conspicuous/meaningful Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 271
achilles Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91
actium Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
aeneas, prefiguring augustus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
aeneas, shield of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
aeneas Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
aenides Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
ages of man, iron Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
agrippa Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
alba longa Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and valerius flaccus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), of hercules Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
ambiguity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58, 59, 60
anchises Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 164, 178
antony, mark Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
apollo, and ascanius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176, 177, 178
apollo, his oracle at delphi Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 164
apollo Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
apotheosis Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
argo, primacy Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
argo Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
ascanius Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 176, 177, 178
astronomical preface, calendar-builders as duces in Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
augustus, as triumphator Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58, 59, 60
augustus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 177
bible, psalms O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
body O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
body and soul O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
catasterism Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
cathemerinon, anaphora O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
cathemerinon, diction and vocabulary O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
celaeno Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
children Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 177, 179, 180
christ, judge O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
clementia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 178
coins Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
cumae Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 164
death, resurrection of body O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
deification, and journey to the stars motif Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
deification, of augustus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
deification, of caesar Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
delphi, oracle at Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 164
dido Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
distance Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91
divination/oracles Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 180
divine councils Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 430
divine visits, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 430
dreams and visions, examples, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 430
dreams and visions, theorematic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 430
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60
epic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60, 196
eschatology, eschatological Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
exempla/exemplarity Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
fama Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 177, 179, 180
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58, 196
gender Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
genealogy Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 270, 271
gens iulia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 163, 164, 177, 178
god, father O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
god, praise of O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
hellenistic ruler cult Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
hercules Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
homer Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 271
hopkins, g. m. O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
hylas Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
imagery, road O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
immortality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 59
imperial ideology, and its investment in collective hope Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 177, 179, 180
imperium Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
iulus (ascanius) Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63, 164
jupiter Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274
latin words, cruciamen O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
leadership Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 180
leucas Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
livy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
mise en abyme Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
narration Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 270, 271
neoptolemus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91, 92
nicopolis Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
numanus remulus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176, 177, 178
omens Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60
osiris Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
ovid Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
paradise O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
pax augusta Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 177
peleus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91
pelides Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
platonist themes, praise, poetry of O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 430
prayer and hymn formulas O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287
presence Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
priam Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 91
primacy, claims of avoidedin astronomical preface Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176, 177, 178
punic wars Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 270, 271
reification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
ring composition Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 271
shield of aeneas Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 60, 196
silius italicus, t., punica Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
silvius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164, 178
soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 274; O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
spes iuli Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 179
star Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 59
syme, ronald Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58, 59, 60
temples, at leucas Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 164
temples, on the palatine Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
tobit O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 311
tragedy Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
triumphus, augustus triple triumph Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 176
troy Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 92
valerius flaccus, g., exempla/exemplarity Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
valerius flaccus, g., labor Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58, 59, 60
vergil (p. vergilius maro), movement, chaotic Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
vergil (p. vergilius maro), movement, horizontal Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
vergil (p. vergilius maro), movement, vertical Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
vergil (p. vergilius maro), shield of aeneas Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
view, from above Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
view, of epic hero Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
virgil, aeneid O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 287, 311
virgil Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 270, 271
virtus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
walls, city Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 164
women' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
zeus (jupiter) Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 63