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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 9.422-9.432


Tu tamen interea calido mihi sanguine poenasand sheathed in ivory. On Nisus then


nanMnestheus bestowed a shaggy mantle torn


ibat in Euryalum. Tum vero exterritus, amensfrom a slain lion; good Aletes gave


conclamat Nisus, nec se celare tenebrisexchange of crested helms. In such array


amplius aut tantum potuit perferre dolorem.they hastened forth; and all the princely throng


Me me, adsum qui feci, in me convertite ferrumyoung men and old, ran with them to the gates


O Rutuli, mea fraus omnis; nihil iste nec aususpraying all gods to bless. Iulus then


nec potuit, caelum hoc et conscia sidera testora fair youth, but of grave, heroic soul


tantum infelicem nimium dilexit amicum.beyond his years, gave them in solemn charge


Talia dicta dabat; sed viribus ensis adactusfull many a message for his sire, but these


transabiit costas et candida pectora rumpit.the hazard of wild winds soon scattered far


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.308-9.313, 9.340-9.341, 19.56-19.73, 19.78-19.144, 19.146-19.275 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.308. /in his baneful rage, for he deemeth there is no man like unto him among the Danaans that the ships brought hither. Then in answer to him spake swift-footed Achilles:Zeus-born son of Laërtes, Odysseus of many wiles, needs must I verily speak my word outright, even as I am minded 9.309. /in his baneful rage, for he deemeth there is no man like unto him among the Danaans that the ships brought hither. Then in answer to him spake swift-footed Achilles:Zeus-born son of Laërtes, Odysseus of many wiles, needs must I verily speak my word outright, even as I am minded 9.310. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.311. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.312. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.313. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.340. /Do they then alone of mortal men love their wives, these sons of Atreus? Nay, for whoso is a true man and sound of mind, loveth his own and cherisheth her, even as I too loved her with all my heart, though she was but the captive of my spear. But now, seeing he hath taken from my arms my prize, and hath deceived me 9.341. /Do they then alone of mortal men love their wives, these sons of Atreus? Nay, for whoso is a true man and sound of mind, loveth his own and cherisheth her, even as I too loved her with all my heart, though she was but the captive of my spear. But now, seeing he hath taken from my arms my prize, and hath deceived me 19.56. /Achilles, swift of foot, arose among them and said:Son of Atreus, was this then the better for us twain, for thee and for me, what time with grief at heart we raged in soul-devouring strife for the sake of a girl? Would that amid the ships Artemis had slain her with an arrow 19.57. /Achilles, swift of foot, arose among them and said:Son of Atreus, was this then the better for us twain, for thee and for me, what time with grief at heart we raged in soul-devouring strife for the sake of a girl? Would that amid the ships Artemis had slain her with an arrow 19.58. /Achilles, swift of foot, arose among them and said:Son of Atreus, was this then the better for us twain, for thee and for me, what time with grief at heart we raged in soul-devouring strife for the sake of a girl? Would that amid the ships Artemis had slain her with an arrow 19.59. /Achilles, swift of foot, arose among them and said:Son of Atreus, was this then the better for us twain, for thee and for me, what time with grief at heart we raged in soul-devouring strife for the sake of a girl? Would that amid the ships Artemis had slain her with an arrow 19.60. /on the day when I took her from out the spoil after I had laid waste Lyrnessus! Then had not so many Achaeans bitten the vast earth with their teeth beneath the hands of the foemen, by reason of the fierceness of my wrath. For Hector and the Trojans was this the better, but long shall the Achaeans, methinks, remember the strife betwixt me and thee. 19.61. /on the day when I took her from out the spoil after I had laid waste Lyrnessus! Then had not so many Achaeans bitten the vast earth with their teeth beneath the hands of the foemen, by reason of the fierceness of my wrath. For Hector and the Trojans was this the better, but long shall the Achaeans, methinks, remember the strife betwixt me and thee. 19.62. /on the day when I took her from out the spoil after I had laid waste Lyrnessus! Then had not so many Achaeans bitten the vast earth with their teeth beneath the hands of the foemen, by reason of the fierceness of my wrath. For Hector and the Trojans was this the better, but long shall the Achaeans, methinks, remember the strife betwixt me and thee. 19.63. /on the day when I took her from out the spoil after I had laid waste Lyrnessus! Then had not so many Achaeans bitten the vast earth with their teeth beneath the hands of the foemen, by reason of the fierceness of my wrath. For Hector and the Trojans was this the better, but long shall the Achaeans, methinks, remember the strife betwixt me and thee. 19.64. /on the day when I took her from out the spoil after I had laid waste Lyrnessus! Then had not so many Achaeans bitten the vast earth with their teeth beneath the hands of the foemen, by reason of the fierceness of my wrath. For Hector and the Trojans was this the better, but long shall the Achaeans, methinks, remember the strife betwixt me and thee. 19.65. /Howbeit, these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts because we must. Now verily make I my wrath to cease: it beseemeth me not to be wroth for ever unrelentingly; but come, rouse thou speedily to battle the long-haired Achaeans 19.66. /Howbeit, these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts because we must. Now verily make I my wrath to cease: it beseemeth me not to be wroth for ever unrelentingly; but come, rouse thou speedily to battle the long-haired Achaeans 19.67. /Howbeit, these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts because we must. Now verily make I my wrath to cease: it beseemeth me not to be wroth for ever unrelentingly; but come, rouse thou speedily to battle the long-haired Achaeans 19.68. /Howbeit, these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts because we must. Now verily make I my wrath to cease: it beseemeth me not to be wroth for ever unrelentingly; but come, rouse thou speedily to battle the long-haired Achaeans 19.69. /Howbeit, these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts because we must. Now verily make I my wrath to cease: it beseemeth me not to be wroth for ever unrelentingly; but come, rouse thou speedily to battle the long-haired Achaeans 19.70. /to the end that I may go forth against the Trojans and make trial of them yet again, whether they be fain to spend the night hard by the ships. Nay, many a one of them, methinks, will be glad to bend his knees in rest, whosoever shall escape from the fury of war, and from my spear. 19.71. /to the end that I may go forth against the Trojans and make trial of them yet again, whether they be fain to spend the night hard by the ships. Nay, many a one of them, methinks, will be glad to bend his knees in rest, whosoever shall escape from the fury of war, and from my spear. 19.72. /to the end that I may go forth against the Trojans and make trial of them yet again, whether they be fain to spend the night hard by the ships. Nay, many a one of them, methinks, will be glad to bend his knees in rest, whosoever shall escape from the fury of war, and from my spear. 19.73. /to the end that I may go forth against the Trojans and make trial of them yet again, whether they be fain to spend the night hard by the ships. Nay, many a one of them, methinks, will be glad to bend his knees in rest, whosoever shall escape from the fury of war, and from my spear. 19.78. /renounced his wrath. And among them spake the king of men, Agamemnon, even from the place where he sat, not standing forth in their midst: My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, meet is it to give ear to him that standeth to speak 19.79. /renounced his wrath. And among them spake the king of men, Agamemnon, even from the place where he sat, not standing forth in their midst: My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, meet is it to give ear to him that standeth to speak 19.80. /nor is it seemly to break in upon his words; grievous were that even for one well-skilled. And amid the uproar of many how should a man either hear or speak? —hampered is he then, clear-voiced talker though he be. To the son of Peleus will I declare my mind, but do ye other Argives give heed, and mark well my words each man of you. 19.81. /nor is it seemly to break in upon his words; grievous were that even for one well-skilled. And amid the uproar of many how should a man either hear or speak? —hampered is he then, clear-voiced talker though he be. To the son of Peleus will I declare my mind, but do ye other Argives give heed, and mark well my words each man of you. 19.82. /nor is it seemly to break in upon his words; grievous were that even for one well-skilled. And amid the uproar of many how should a man either hear or speak? —hampered is he then, clear-voiced talker though he be. To the son of Peleus will I declare my mind, but do ye other Argives give heed, and mark well my words each man of you. 19.83. /nor is it seemly to break in upon his words; grievous were that even for one well-skilled. And amid the uproar of many how should a man either hear or speak? —hampered is he then, clear-voiced talker though he be. To the son of Peleus will I declare my mind, but do ye other Argives give heed, and mark well my words each man of you. 19.84. /nor is it seemly to break in upon his words; grievous were that even for one well-skilled. And amid the uproar of many how should a man either hear or speak? —hampered is he then, clear-voiced talker though he be. To the son of Peleus will I declare my mind, but do ye other Argives give heed, and mark well my words each man of you. 19.85. /Full often have the Achaeans spoken unto me this word, and were ever fain to chide me; howbeit it is not I that am at fault, but Zeus and Fate and Erinys, that walketh in darkness, seeing that in the midst of the place of gathering they cast upon my soul fierce blindness on that day, when of mine own arrogance I took from Achilles his prize. 19.86. /Full often have the Achaeans spoken unto me this word, and were ever fain to chide me; howbeit it is not I that am at fault, but Zeus and Fate and Erinys, that walketh in darkness, seeing that in the midst of the place of gathering they cast upon my soul fierce blindness on that day, when of mine own arrogance I took from Achilles his prize. 19.87. /Full often have the Achaeans spoken unto me this word, and were ever fain to chide me; howbeit it is not I that am at fault, but Zeus and Fate and Erinys, that walketh in darkness, seeing that in the midst of the place of gathering they cast upon my soul fierce blindness on that day, when of mine own arrogance I took from Achilles his prize. 19.88. /Full often have the Achaeans spoken unto me this word, and were ever fain to chide me; howbeit it is not I that am at fault, but Zeus and Fate and Erinys, that walketh in darkness, seeing that in the midst of the place of gathering they cast upon my soul fierce blindness on that day, when of mine own arrogance I took from Achilles his prize. 19.89. /Full often have the Achaeans spoken unto me this word, and were ever fain to chide me; howbeit it is not I that am at fault, but Zeus and Fate and Erinys, that walketh in darkness, seeing that in the midst of the place of gathering they cast upon my soul fierce blindness on that day, when of mine own arrogance I took from Achilles his prize. 19.90. /But what could I do? It is God that bringeth all things to their issue. Eldest daughter of Zeus is Ate that blindeth all—a power fraught with bane; delicate are her feet, for it is not upon the ground that she fareth, but she walketh over the heads of men, bringing men to harm, and this one or that she ensnareth. 19.91. /But what could I do? It is God that bringeth all things to their issue. Eldest daughter of Zeus is Ate that blindeth all—a power fraught with bane; delicate are her feet, for it is not upon the ground that she fareth, but she walketh over the heads of men, bringing men to harm, and this one or that she ensnareth. 19.92. /But what could I do? It is God that bringeth all things to their issue. Eldest daughter of Zeus is Ate that blindeth all—a power fraught with bane; delicate are her feet, for it is not upon the ground that she fareth, but she walketh over the heads of men, bringing men to harm, and this one or that she ensnareth. 19.93. /But what could I do? It is God that bringeth all things to their issue. Eldest daughter of Zeus is Ate that blindeth all—a power fraught with bane; delicate are her feet, for it is not upon the ground that she fareth, but she walketh over the heads of men, bringing men to harm, and this one or that she ensnareth. 19.94. /But what could I do? It is God that bringeth all things to their issue. Eldest daughter of Zeus is Ate that blindeth all—a power fraught with bane; delicate are her feet, for it is not upon the ground that she fareth, but she walketh over the heads of men, bringing men to harm, and this one or that she ensnareth. 19.95. /Aye, and on a time she blinded Zeus, albeit men say that he is the greatest among men and gods; yet even him Hera, that was but a woman, beguiled in her craftiness on the day when Alcmene in fair-crowned Thebe was to bring forth the mighty Heracles. 19.96. /Aye, and on a time she blinded Zeus, albeit men say that he is the greatest among men and gods; yet even him Hera, that was but a woman, beguiled in her craftiness on the day when Alcmene in fair-crowned Thebe was to bring forth the mighty Heracles. 19.97. /Aye, and on a time she blinded Zeus, albeit men say that he is the greatest among men and gods; yet even him Hera, that was but a woman, beguiled in her craftiness on the day when Alcmene in fair-crowned Thebe was to bring forth the mighty Heracles. 19.98. /Aye, and on a time she blinded Zeus, albeit men say that he is the greatest among men and gods; yet even him Hera, that was but a woman, beguiled in her craftiness on the day when Alcmene in fair-crowned Thebe was to bring forth the mighty Heracles. 19.99. /Aye, and on a time she blinded Zeus, albeit men say that he is the greatest among men and gods; yet even him Hera, that was but a woman, beguiled in her craftiness on the day when Alcmene in fair-crowned Thebe was to bring forth the mighty Heracles. 19.100. /Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about 19.101. /Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about 19.102. /Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about 19.103. /Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about 19.104. /Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about 19.105. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.106. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.107. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.108. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.109. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.110. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.111. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.112. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.113. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.114. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. But Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus 19.115. /and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. 19.116. /and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. 19.117. /and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. 19.118. /and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. 19.119. /and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. 19.120. /And herself spake to Zeus, son of Cronos, to bear him word: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the bright lightning, a word will I speak for thy heeding. Lo, even now, is born a valiant man that shall be lord over the Argives, even Eurystheus, son of Sthenelus, the son of Perseus, of thine own lineage; not unmeet is it that he be lord over the Argives.’ 19.121. /And herself spake to Zeus, son of Cronos, to bear him word: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the bright lightning, a word will I speak for thy heeding. Lo, even now, is born a valiant man that shall be lord over the Argives, even Eurystheus, son of Sthenelus, the son of Perseus, of thine own lineage; not unmeet is it that he be lord over the Argives.’ 19.122. /And herself spake to Zeus, son of Cronos, to bear him word: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the bright lightning, a word will I speak for thy heeding. Lo, even now, is born a valiant man that shall be lord over the Argives, even Eurystheus, son of Sthenelus, the son of Perseus, of thine own lineage; not unmeet is it that he be lord over the Argives.’ 19.123. /And herself spake to Zeus, son of Cronos, to bear him word: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the bright lightning, a word will I speak for thy heeding. Lo, even now, is born a valiant man that shall be lord over the Argives, even Eurystheus, son of Sthenelus, the son of Perseus, of thine own lineage; not unmeet is it that he be lord over the Argives.’ 19.124. /And herself spake to Zeus, son of Cronos, to bear him word: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the bright lightning, a word will I speak for thy heeding. Lo, even now, is born a valiant man that shall be lord over the Argives, even Eurystheus, son of Sthenelus, the son of Perseus, of thine own lineage; not unmeet is it that he be lord over the Argives.’ 19.125. /So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.126. /So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.127. /So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.128. /So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.129. /So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.130. /So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm 19.131. /So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm 19.132. /So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm 19.133. /So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm 19.134. /So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm 19.135. /was making havoc of the Argives at the sterns of the ships, could not forget Ate, of whom at the first I was made blind. Howbeit seeing I was blinded, and Zeus robbed me of my wits, fain am I to make amends and to give requital past counting. Nay, rouse thee for battle, and rouse withal the rest of thy people. 19.136. /was making havoc of the Argives at the sterns of the ships, could not forget Ate, of whom at the first I was made blind. Howbeit seeing I was blinded, and Zeus robbed me of my wits, fain am I to make amends and to give requital past counting. Nay, rouse thee for battle, and rouse withal the rest of thy people. 19.137. /was making havoc of the Argives at the sterns of the ships, could not forget Ate, of whom at the first I was made blind. Howbeit seeing I was blinded, and Zeus robbed me of my wits, fain am I to make amends and to give requital past counting. Nay, rouse thee for battle, and rouse withal the rest of thy people. 19.138. /was making havoc of the Argives at the sterns of the ships, could not forget Ate, of whom at the first I was made blind. Howbeit seeing I was blinded, and Zeus robbed me of my wits, fain am I to make amends and to give requital past counting. Nay, rouse thee for battle, and rouse withal the rest of thy people. 19.139. /was making havoc of the Argives at the sterns of the ships, could not forget Ate, of whom at the first I was made blind. Howbeit seeing I was blinded, and Zeus robbed me of my wits, fain am I to make amends and to give requital past counting. Nay, rouse thee for battle, and rouse withal the rest of thy people. 19.140. /Gifts am I here ready to offer thee, even all that goodly Odysseus promised thee yesternight, when he had come to thy hut. Or, if thou wilt, abide a while, eager though thou be for war, and the gifts shall squires take and bring thee from my ship, to the end that thou mayest see that I will give what will satisfy thy heart. Then swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said: 19.141. /Gifts am I here ready to offer thee, even all that goodly Odysseus promised thee yesternight, when he had come to thy hut. Or, if thou wilt, abide a while, eager though thou be for war, and the gifts shall squires take and bring thee from my ship, to the end that thou mayest see that I will give what will satisfy thy heart. Then swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said: 19.142. /Gifts am I here ready to offer thee, even all that goodly Odysseus promised thee yesternight, when he had come to thy hut. Or, if thou wilt, abide a while, eager though thou be for war, and the gifts shall squires take and bring thee from my ship, to the end that thou mayest see that I will give what will satisfy thy heart. Then swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said: 19.143. /Gifts am I here ready to offer thee, even all that goodly Odysseus promised thee yesternight, when he had come to thy hut. Or, if thou wilt, abide a while, eager though thou be for war, and the gifts shall squires take and bring thee from my ship, to the end that thou mayest see that I will give what will satisfy thy heart. Then swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said: 19.144. /Gifts am I here ready to offer thee, even all that goodly Odysseus promised thee yesternight, when he had come to thy hut. Or, if thou wilt, abide a while, eager though thou be for war, and the gifts shall squires take and bring thee from my ship, to the end that thou mayest see that I will give what will satisfy thy heart. Then swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said: 19.146. / Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, for the gifts, to give them if thou wilt, as is but seemly, or to withhold them, rests with thee. But now let us bethink us of battle with all speed; it beseemeth not to dally here in talk 19.147. / Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, for the gifts, to give them if thou wilt, as is but seemly, or to withhold them, rests with thee. But now let us bethink us of battle with all speed; it beseemeth not to dally here in talk 19.148. / Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, for the gifts, to give them if thou wilt, as is but seemly, or to withhold them, rests with thee. But now let us bethink us of battle with all speed; it beseemeth not to dally here in talk 19.149. / Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, for the gifts, to give them if thou wilt, as is but seemly, or to withhold them, rests with thee. But now let us bethink us of battle with all speed; it beseemeth not to dally here in talk 19.150. /neither to make delay, for yet is a great work undone—to the end that many a one may again behold Achilles amid the foremost laying waste with his spear of bronze the battalions of the men of Troy. Thereon let each one of you take thought as he fighteth with his man. 19.151. /neither to make delay, for yet is a great work undone—to the end that many a one may again behold Achilles amid the foremost laying waste with his spear of bronze the battalions of the men of Troy. Thereon let each one of you take thought as he fighteth with his man. 19.152. /neither to make delay, for yet is a great work undone—to the end that many a one may again behold Achilles amid the foremost laying waste with his spear of bronze the battalions of the men of Troy. Thereon let each one of you take thought as he fighteth with his man. 19.153. /neither to make delay, for yet is a great work undone—to the end that many a one may again behold Achilles amid the foremost laying waste with his spear of bronze the battalions of the men of Troy. Thereon let each one of you take thought as he fighteth with his man. 19.154. /neither to make delay, for yet is a great work undone—to the end that many a one may again behold Achilles amid the foremost laying waste with his spear of bronze the battalions of the men of Troy. Thereon let each one of you take thought as he fighteth with his man. Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him and said: 19.155. / Nay, valiant though thou art, godlike Achilles, urge not on this wise the sons of the Achaeans to go fasting against Ilios to do battle with the men of Troy, since not for a short space shall the battle last when once the ranks of men are met and the god breathes might into either host. 19.156. / Nay, valiant though thou art, godlike Achilles, urge not on this wise the sons of the Achaeans to go fasting against Ilios to do battle with the men of Troy, since not for a short space shall the battle last when once the ranks of men are met and the god breathes might into either host. 19.157. / Nay, valiant though thou art, godlike Achilles, urge not on this wise the sons of the Achaeans to go fasting against Ilios to do battle with the men of Troy, since not for a short space shall the battle last when once the ranks of men are met and the god breathes might into either host. 19.158. / Nay, valiant though thou art, godlike Achilles, urge not on this wise the sons of the Achaeans to go fasting against Ilios to do battle with the men of Troy, since not for a short space shall the battle last when once the ranks of men are met and the god breathes might into either host. 19.159. / Nay, valiant though thou art, godlike Achilles, urge not on this wise the sons of the Achaeans to go fasting against Ilios to do battle with the men of Troy, since not for a short space shall the battle last when once the ranks of men are met and the god breathes might into either host. 19.160. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.161. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.162. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.163. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.164. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.165. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.166. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.167. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.168. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.169. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.170. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.171. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.172. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.173. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.174. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.175. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.176. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.177. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.178. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.179. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.180. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.181. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.182. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.183. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.184. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. To him then spake again the king of men, Agamemnon: 19.185. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.186. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.187. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.188. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.189. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.190. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.191. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.192. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.193. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.194. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.195. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.196. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.197. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.198. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.199. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.200. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.201. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.202. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.203. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.204. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.205. /and ye twain are bidding us to meat! Verily for mine own part would I even now bid the sons of the Achaeans do battle fasting and unfed, and at set of sun make them ready a mighty meal, when we shall have avenged the shame. Till that shall be, down my throat, at least 19.206. /and ye twain are bidding us to meat! Verily for mine own part would I even now bid the sons of the Achaeans do battle fasting and unfed, and at set of sun make them ready a mighty meal, when we shall have avenged the shame. Till that shall be, down my throat, at least 19.207. /and ye twain are bidding us to meat! Verily for mine own part would I even now bid the sons of the Achaeans do battle fasting and unfed, and at set of sun make them ready a mighty meal, when we shall have avenged the shame. Till that shall be, down my throat, at least 19.208. /and ye twain are bidding us to meat! Verily for mine own part would I even now bid the sons of the Achaeans do battle fasting and unfed, and at set of sun make them ready a mighty meal, when we shall have avenged the shame. Till that shall be, down my throat, at least 19.209. /and ye twain are bidding us to meat! Verily for mine own part would I even now bid the sons of the Achaeans do battle fasting and unfed, and at set of sun make them ready a mighty meal, when we shall have avenged the shame. Till that shall be, down my throat, at least 19.210. /neither drink nor food shall pass, seeing my comrade is dead, who in my hut lieth mangled by the sharp bronze, his feet turned toward the door, while round about him our comrades mourn; wherefore it is nowise on these things that my heart is set, but on slaying, and blood, and the grievous groanings of men. 19.211. /neither drink nor food shall pass, seeing my comrade is dead, who in my hut lieth mangled by the sharp bronze, his feet turned toward the door, while round about him our comrades mourn; wherefore it is nowise on these things that my heart is set, but on slaying, and blood, and the grievous groanings of men. 19.212. /neither drink nor food shall pass, seeing my comrade is dead, who in my hut lieth mangled by the sharp bronze, his feet turned toward the door, while round about him our comrades mourn; wherefore it is nowise on these things that my heart is set, but on slaying, and blood, and the grievous groanings of men. 19.213. /neither drink nor food shall pass, seeing my comrade is dead, who in my hut lieth mangled by the sharp bronze, his feet turned toward the door, while round about him our comrades mourn; wherefore it is nowise on these things that my heart is set, but on slaying, and blood, and the grievous groanings of men. 19.214. /neither drink nor food shall pass, seeing my comrade is dead, who in my hut lieth mangled by the sharp bronze, his feet turned toward the door, while round about him our comrades mourn; wherefore it is nowise on these things that my heart is set, but on slaying, and blood, and the grievous groanings of men. 19.215. /Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him, and said:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, better art thou than I and mightier not a little with the spear, howbeit in counsel might I surpass thee by far, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more; 19.216. /Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him, and said:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, better art thou than I and mightier not a little with the spear, howbeit in counsel might I surpass thee by far, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more; 19.217. /Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him, and said:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, better art thou than I and mightier not a little with the spear, howbeit in counsel might I surpass thee by far, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more; 19.218. /Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him, and said:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, better art thou than I and mightier not a little with the spear, howbeit in counsel might I surpass thee by far, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more; 19.219. /Then Odysseus of many wiles answered him, and said:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, better art thou than I and mightier not a little with the spear, howbeit in counsel might I surpass thee by far, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more; 19.220. /wherefore let thine heart endure to hearken to my words. Quickly have men surfeit of battle, wherein the bronze streweth most straw upon the ground, albeit the harvest is scantiest, whenso Zeus inclineth his balance, he that is for men the dispenser of battle. 19.221. /wherefore let thine heart endure to hearken to my words. Quickly have men surfeit of battle, wherein the bronze streweth most straw upon the ground, albeit the harvest is scantiest, whenso Zeus inclineth his balance, he that is for men the dispenser of battle. 19.222. /wherefore let thine heart endure to hearken to my words. Quickly have men surfeit of battle, wherein the bronze streweth most straw upon the ground, albeit the harvest is scantiest, whenso Zeus inclineth his balance, he that is for men the dispenser of battle. 19.223. /wherefore let thine heart endure to hearken to my words. Quickly have men surfeit of battle, wherein the bronze streweth most straw upon the ground, albeit the harvest is scantiest, whenso Zeus inclineth his balance, he that is for men the dispenser of battle. 19.224. /wherefore let thine heart endure to hearken to my words. Quickly have men surfeit of battle, wherein the bronze streweth most straw upon the ground, albeit the harvest is scantiest, whenso Zeus inclineth his balance, he that is for men the dispenser of battle. 19.225. /But with the belly may it nowise be that the Achaeans should mourn a corpse, for full many are ever falling one after another day by day; when then could one find respite from toil? Nay, it behoveth to bury him that is slain, steeling our hearts and weeping but the one day's space; 19.226. /But with the belly may it nowise be that the Achaeans should mourn a corpse, for full many are ever falling one after another day by day; when then could one find respite from toil? Nay, it behoveth to bury him that is slain, steeling our hearts and weeping but the one day's space; 19.227. /But with the belly may it nowise be that the Achaeans should mourn a corpse, for full many are ever falling one after another day by day; when then could one find respite from toil? Nay, it behoveth to bury him that is slain, steeling our hearts and weeping but the one day's space; 19.228. /But with the belly may it nowise be that the Achaeans should mourn a corpse, for full many are ever falling one after another day by day; when then could one find respite from toil? Nay, it behoveth to bury him that is slain, steeling our hearts and weeping but the one day's space; 19.229. /But with the belly may it nowise be that the Achaeans should mourn a corpse, for full many are ever falling one after another day by day; when then could one find respite from toil? Nay, it behoveth to bury him that is slain, steeling our hearts and weeping but the one day's space; 19.230. /but all they that are left alive from hateful war must needs bethink them of drink and of food, to the end that yet the more we may fight with the foemen ever incessantly, clothed about with stubborn bronze. And let no man of all the host hold back awaiting other summons beside 19.231. /but all they that are left alive from hateful war must needs bethink them of drink and of food, to the end that yet the more we may fight with the foemen ever incessantly, clothed about with stubborn bronze. And let no man of all the host hold back awaiting other summons beside 19.232. /but all they that are left alive from hateful war must needs bethink them of drink and of food, to the end that yet the more we may fight with the foemen ever incessantly, clothed about with stubborn bronze. And let no man of all the host hold back awaiting other summons beside 19.233. /but all they that are left alive from hateful war must needs bethink them of drink and of food, to the end that yet the more we may fight with the foemen ever incessantly, clothed about with stubborn bronze. And let no man of all the host hold back awaiting other summons beside 19.234. /but all they that are left alive from hateful war must needs bethink them of drink and of food, to the end that yet the more we may fight with the foemen ever incessantly, clothed about with stubborn bronze. And let no man of all the host hold back awaiting other summons beside 19.235. /for the summons is this: Ill shall it be for him whoso is left at the ships of the Argives. Nay, setting out in one throng let us rouse keen battle against the horse-taming Trojans. 19.236. /for the summons is this: Ill shall it be for him whoso is left at the ships of the Argives. Nay, setting out in one throng let us rouse keen battle against the horse-taming Trojans. 19.237. /for the summons is this: Ill shall it be for him whoso is left at the ships of the Argives. Nay, setting out in one throng let us rouse keen battle against the horse-taming Trojans. 19.238. /for the summons is this: Ill shall it be for him whoso is left at the ships of the Argives. Nay, setting out in one throng let us rouse keen battle against the horse-taming Trojans. 19.239. /for the summons is this: Ill shall it be for him whoso is left at the ships of the Argives. Nay, setting out in one throng let us rouse keen battle against the horse-taming Trojans. He spake, and took to him the sons of glorious Nestor, and Meges, son of Phyleus, and Thoas and Meriones and Lycomedes 19.240. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.241. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.242. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.243. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.244. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.245. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.246. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.247. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.248. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.249. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.250. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.251. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.252. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.253. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.254. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.255. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.256. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.257. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.258. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.261. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.262. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.263. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.264. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.265. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.266. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.267. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.268. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.269. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.270. / Father Zeus, great in good sooth is the blindness thou sendest upon men. Never would the son of Atreus have utterly roused the wrath within my breast, nor led off the girl ruthlessly in my despite, but mayhap it was the good pleasure of Zeus that on many of the Achaeans death should come. 19.271. / Father Zeus, great in good sooth is the blindness thou sendest upon men. Never would the son of Atreus have utterly roused the wrath within my breast, nor led off the girl ruthlessly in my despite, but mayhap it was the good pleasure of Zeus that on many of the Achaeans death should come. 19.272. / Father Zeus, great in good sooth is the blindness thou sendest upon men. Never would the son of Atreus have utterly roused the wrath within my breast, nor led off the girl ruthlessly in my despite, but mayhap it was the good pleasure of Zeus that on many of the Achaeans death should come. 19.273. / Father Zeus, great in good sooth is the blindness thou sendest upon men. Never would the son of Atreus have utterly roused the wrath within my breast, nor led off the girl ruthlessly in my despite, but mayhap it was the good pleasure of Zeus that on many of the Achaeans death should come. 19.274. / Father Zeus, great in good sooth is the blindness thou sendest upon men. Never would the son of Atreus have utterly roused the wrath within my breast, nor led off the girl ruthlessly in my despite, but mayhap it was the good pleasure of Zeus that on many of the Achaeans death should come. 19.275. /But now go ye to your meal, that we may join in battle.
2. Sophocles, Ajax, 551, 550 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.827-1.831, 1.865-1.866, 1.888-1.908 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.827. τῶ ὑμεῖς στρωφᾶσθʼ ἐπιδήμιοι· εἰ δέ κεν αὖθι 1.828. ναιετάειν ἐθέλοις, καί τοι ἅδοι, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔπειτα 1.829. πατρὸς ἐμεῖο Θόαντος ἔχοις γέρας· οὐδέ τί σʼ οἴω 1.830. γαῖαν ὀνόσσεσθαι· περὶ γὰρ βαθυλήιος ἄλλων 1.831. νήσων, Αἰγαίῃ ὅσαι εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν. 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.888. ‘Νίσσεο, καὶ σὲ θεοὶ σὺν ἀπηρέσιν αὖτις ἑταίροις 1.889. χρύσειον βασιλῆι δέρος κομίσειαν ἄγοντα 1.890. αὔτως, ὡς ἐθέλεις καί τοι φίλον. ἥδε δὲ νῆσος 1.891. σκῆπτρά τε πατρὸς ἐμεῖο παρέσσεται, ἢν καὶ ὀπίσσω 1.892. δή ποτε νοστήσας ἐθέλῃς ἄψορρον ἱκέσθαι. 1.893. ῥηιδίως δʼ ἂν ἑοῖ καὶ ἀπείρονα λαὸν ἀγείραις 1.894. ἄλλων ἐκ πολίων· ἀλλʼ οὐ σύγε τήνδε μενοινὴν 1.895. σχήσεις, οὔτʼ αὐτὴ προτιόσσομαι ὧδε τελεῖσθαι. 1.896. μνώεο μὴν ἀπεών περ ὁμῶς καὶ νόστιμος ἤδη 1.897. Ὑψιπύλης· λίπε δʼ ἧμιν ἔπος, τό κεν ἐξανύσαιμι 1.898. πρόφρων, ἢν ἄρα δή με θεοὶ δώωσι τεκέσθαι.’ 1.899. τὴν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀγαιόμενος προσέειπεν· 1.900. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, τὰ μὲν οὕτω ἐναίσιμα πάντα γένοιτο 1.901. ἐκ μακάρων· τύνη δʼ ἐμέθεν πέρι θυμὸν ἀρείω 1.902. ἴσχανʼ, ἐπεὶ πάτρην μοι ἅλις Πελίαο ἕκητι 1.903. ναιετάειν· μοῦνόν με θεοὶ λύσειαν ἀέθλων. 1.904. εἰ δʼ οὔ μοι πέπρωται ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 1.905. τηλοῦ ἀναπλώοντι, σὺ δʼ ἄρσενα παῖδα τέκηαι 1.906. πέμπε μιν ἡβήσαντα Πελασγίδος ἔνδον Ἰωλκοῦ 1.907. πατρί τʼ ἐμῷ καὶ μητρὶ δύης ἄκος, ἢν ἄρα τούσγε 1.908. τέτμῃ ἔτι ζώοντας, ἵνʼ ἄνδιχα τοῖο ἄνακτος
4. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.70. Sed poëtas ludere sinamus, quorum fabulis in hoc flagitio versari ipsum videmus Iovem: ad at G 1 magistros virtutis philosophos veniamus, qui amorem quimorem quā orem K 1 -i amorem in r. G 2 negant stupri esse St. fr. 3, 653 Epic. 483 et in eo litigant cum Epicuro non multum, ut opinio mea fert, mentiente. quis est enim iste ista K 1 amor amicitiae? cur neque deformem adulescentem quisquam amat neque formosum senem? mihi quidem haec in Graecorum gymnasiis nata consuetudo videtur, in quibus isti liberi et concessi sunt amores. bene ergo Ennius: Ennius sc. 395 Fla/giti flagitii X cives G(?)R rec princi/pium est nudare i/nter civis co/rpora. qui ut sint, quod fieri posse video, pudici, solliciti tamen et anxii sunt, eoque magis, quod se ipsi continent et coërcent.
5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 7.71 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.71. 1.  Anyone else might have assumed that the ceremonies now practised in the city were enough even by themselves to afford no slight indication of the ancient observances. But for my part, lest anyone should hold this to be weak evidence, according to that improbable assumption that after the Romans had conquered the whole Greek world they would gladly have scorned their own customs and adopted the better ones in their stead, I shall adduce my evidence from the time when they did not as yet possess the supremacy over Greece or dominion over any other country beyond the sea; and I shall cite Quintus Fabius as my authority, without requiring any further confirmation. For he is the most ancient of all the Roman historians and offers proof of what he asserts, not only from the information of others, but also from his own knowledge.,2.  This festival, therefore, the Roman senate ordered to be celebrated, as I said before, pursuant to the vow made by the dictator Aulus Postumius when he was upon the point of giving battle to the Latins, who had revolted from the Romans and were endeavouring to restore Tarquinius to power; and they ordered five hundred minae of silver to be expended every year upon the sacrifices and the games, a sum the Romans laid out on the festival till the time of the Punic War.,3.  During these holidays not only were many other observances carried out according to the customs of the Greeks, in connection with the general assemblies, the reception of strangers, and the cessation of hostilities, which it would be a big task to describe, but also those relating to the procession, the sacrifice, and the games — these are sufficient to give an idea of those I do not mention — which were as follows:
6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 12.210-12.535 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.335-1.370, 1.522-1.574, 1.731-1.733, 4.305-4.387, 5.263, 5.292-5.361, 5.493, 5.510-5.511, 9.3, 9.5-9.13, 9.18-9.19, 9.40-9.44, 9.138-9.139, 9.176-9.421, 9.423-9.458, 9.465-9.502, 9.741-9.742, 9.781, 9.812, 12.437, 12.948-12.949 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.335. to a new land and race; the Trojan arms 1.336. were hung on temple walls; and, to this day 1.337. lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. 1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 1.339. a station in the arch of heaven assign 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.341. a single god is angry; we endure 1.342. this treachery and violence, whereby 1.343. wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. 1.344. Is this what piety receives? Or thus 1.346. Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men 1.347. with such a look as clears the skies of storm 1.348. chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: 1.349. “Let Cytherea cast her fears away! 1.350. Irrevocably blest the fortunes be 1.351. of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see 1.352. that City, and the proud predestined wall 1.353. encompassing Lavinium . Thyself 1.354. hall starward to the heights of heaven bear 1.355. Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves 1.356. my will once uttered. Since such carking cares 1.357. consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth 1.358. and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. 1.359. Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war 1.360. and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall 1.361. and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond 1.362. about his gathered people. Summers three 1.363. hall Latium call him king; and three times pass 1.364. the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. 1.365. His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called 1.366. (Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood) 1.367. full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne 1.368. from the Lavinian citadel, and build 1.370. Here three full centuries shall Hector's race 1.522. from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm 1.523. cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. 1.524. I am Aeneas, faithful evermore 1.525. to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear 1.526. my gods ancestral, which I snatched away 1.527. from peril of the foe. My fame is known 1.528. above the stars. I travel on in quest 1.529. of Italy, my true home-land, and I 1.530. from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. 1.531. With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main 1.532. I launched away. My mother from the skies 1.533. gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. 1.534. Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive 1.535. the shock of wind and wave; and I myself 1.536. friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down 1.537. this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here 1.538. from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.542. I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers 1.543. with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither 1.544. unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on 1.545. and to the royal threshold make thy way! 1.546. I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all 1.547. are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed 1.548. by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; 1.549. or else in vain my parents gave me skill 1.550. to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! 1.551. A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file 1.552. erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down 1.553. from his ethereal haunt, now form anew 1.554. their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place 1.555. or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground 1.556. or soaring high, with whir of happy wings 1.557. re-circle heaven in triumphant song: 1.558. likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners 1.559. are landed, or fly landward at full sail. 1.561. She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam 1.562. from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair 1.563. breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes 1.564. fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed 1.565. the veritable goddess. Now he knew 1.566. that vision was his mother, and his words 1.567. pursued the fading phantom as it fled: 1.568. “Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er 1.569. with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? 1.570. Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange 1.571. of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” 1.572. Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way 1.573. toward the city's rampart. Venus then 1.574. o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— 1.731. “O Queen, who hast authority of Jove 1.732. to found this rising city, and subdue 1.733. with righteous goverce its people proud 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy, a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.331. If such a glory and event supreme 4.332. enkindle not his bosom; if such task 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap 4.337. of enemies, considering no more 4.338. the land Lavinian and Ausonia's sons. 4.339. Let him to sea! Be this our final word: 4.341. He spoke. The god a prompt obedience gave 4.342. to his great sire's command. He fastened first 4.343. those sandals of bright gold, which carry him 4.344. aloft o'er land or sea, with airy wings 4.345. that race the fleeting wind; then lifted he 4.346. his wand, wherewith he summons from the grave 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.348. to doleful Tartarus; or by its power 4.349. gives slumber or dispels; or quite unseals 4.350. the eyelids of the dead: on this relying 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.356. is girdled evermore with misty gloom 4.357. and lashed of wind and rain; a cloak of snow 4.358. melts on his shoulder; from his aged chin 4.359. drop rivers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice 4.360. glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed 4.361. the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; 4.362. here making pause, from hence he headlong flung 4.363. his body to the sea; in motion like 4.364. ome sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus, I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 5.263. the Malean promontory! Mnestheus now 5.292. where her safe house and pretty nestlings lie 5.293. oars from her nest, with whirring wings—but soon 5.294. through the still sky she takes her path of air 5.295. on pinions motionless. So Pristis sped 5.296. with Mnestheus, cleaving her last stretch of sea 5.297. by her own impulse wafted. She outstripped 5.298. Sergestus first; for he upon the reef 5.299. fought with the breakers, desperately shouting 5.300. for help, for help in vain, with broken oars 5.301. contriving to move on. Then Mnestheus ran 5.302. past Gyas, in Chimaera's ponderous hulk 5.303. of pilot now bereft; at last remains 5.304. Cloanthus his sole peer, whom he pursues 5.305. with a supreme endeavor. From the shore 5.306. burst echoing cheers that spur him to the chase 5.307. and wild applause makes all the welkin ring. 5.308. The leaders now with eager souls would scorn 5.309. to Iose their glory, and faint-hearted fail 5.310. to grasp a prize half-won, but fain would buy 5.311. honor with life itself; the followers too 5.312. are flushed with proud success, and feel them strong 5.313. because their strength is proven. Both ships now 5.314. with indistinguishable prows had sped 5.315. to share one prize,—but with uplifted hands 5.316. pread o'er the sea, Cloanthus, suppliant 5.317. called on the gods to bless his votive prayer: 5.318. “Ye gods who rule the waves, whose waters be 5.319. my pathway now; for you on yonder strand 5.320. a white bull at the altar shall be slain 5.321. in grateful tribute for a granted vow; 5.322. and o'er the salt waves I will scatter far 5.323. the entrails, and outpour the flowing wine.” 5.324. He spoke; and from the caverns under sea 5.325. Phorcus and virgin Panopea heard 5.326. and all the sea-nymphs' choir; while with strong hand 5.327. the kindly God of Havens rose and thrust 5.328. the gliding ship along, that swifter flew 5.329. than south wind, or an arrow from the string 5.331. Aeneas then, assembling all to hear 5.332. by a far-sounding herald's voice proclaimed 5.333. Cloanthus victor, and arrayed his brows 5.334. with the green laurel-garland; to the crews 5.335. three bulls, at choice, were given, and plenteous wine 5.336. and talent-weight of silver; to the chiefs 5.337. illustrious gifts beside; the victor had 5.338. a gold-embroidered mantle with wide band 5.339. of undulant Meliboean purple rare 5.340. where, pictured in the woof, young Ganymede 5.341. through Ida's forest chased the light-foot deer 5.342. with javelin; all flushed and panting he. 5.343. But lo! Jove's thunder-bearing eagle fell 5.344. and his strong talons snatched from Ida far 5.345. the royal boy, whose aged servitors 5.346. reached helpless hands to heaven; his faithful hound 5.347. bayed fiercely at the air. To him whose worth 5.348. the second place had won, Aeneas gave 5.349. a smooth-linked golden corselet, triple-chained 5.350. of which his own victorious hand despoiled 5.351. Demoleos, by the swift, embattled stream 5.352. of Simois, under Troy,—and bade it be 5.353. a glory and defence on valor's field; 5.354. carce might the straining shoulders of two slaves 5.355. Phegeus and Sagaris, the load endure 5.356. yet oft Demoleos in this armor dressed 5.357. charged down full speed on routed hosts of Troy . 5.358. The third gift was two cauldrons of wrought brass 5.359. and bowls of beaten silver, cunningly 5.360. embossed with sculpture fair. Bearing such gifts 5.361. th' exultant victors onward moved, each brow 5.493. Such Dares was, who now held high his head 5.510. on grassy bank and couch of pleasant green: 5.511. “O my Entellus, in the olden days 9.3. celestial Iris. In a sacred vale 9.5. Pilumnus, Faunus' son, the hero mused. 9.6. And thus the wonder-child of Thaumas called 9.7. with lips of rose: “O Turnus, what no god 9.8. dared give for reward of thy fondest vow 9.9. has come unbidden on its destined day. 9.10. Behold, Aeneas, who has left behind 9.11. the city with his fleet and followers 9.12. is gone to kingly Palatine, the home 9.13. of good Evander. Yea, his march invades 9.18. She spoke; and heavenward on poising wings 9.19. oared, cleaving as she fled from cloud to cloud 9.40. of fructifying Nile from many a field 9.41. back to his channel flows. A swift-blown cloud 9.42. of black, uprolling dust the Teucrians see 9.43. o'ershadowing the plain; Calcus calls 9.44. from lofty outpost: “O my countrymen 9.138. divide the foaming wave.” He said, and swore 9.139. by his Tartarean brother's mournful stream 9.176. is ours already; thousands of sharp swords 9.177. Italia 's nations bring. Small fear have I 9.178. of Phrygia 's boasted omens. What to me 9.179. their oracles from heaven? The will of Fate 9.180. and Venus have achieved their uttermost 9.181. in casting on Ausonia's fruitful shore 9.182. yon sons of Troy . I too have destinies: 9.183. and mine, good match for theirs, with this true blade 9.184. will spill the blood of all the baneful brood 9.185. in vengeance for my stolen wife. Such wrongs 9.186. move not on Atreus' sons alone, nor rouse 9.187. only Mycenae to a righteous war. 9.188. Say you, ‘ Troy falls but once?’ One crime, say I 9.189. hould have contented them; and now their souls 9.190. hould little less than loathe all womankind. 9.191. These are the sort of soldiers that be brave 9.192. behind entrenchment, where the moated walls 9.193. may stem the foe and make a little room 9.194. betwixt themselves and death. Did they not see 9.195. how Troy 's vast bulwark built by Neptune's hand 9.196. crumbled in flame? Forward, my chosen brave! 9.197. Who follows me to cleave his deadly way 9.198. through yonder battlement, and leap like storm 9.199. upon its craven guard? I have no need 9.200. of arms from Vulcan's smithy; nor of ships 9.201. a thousand strong against our Teucrian foes 9.202. though all Etruria's league enlarge their power. 9.203. Let them not fear dark nights, nor coward theft 9.204. of Pallas' shrine, nor murdered sentinels 9.205. on their acropolis. We shall not hide 9.206. in blinding belly of a horse. But I 9.207. in public eye and open day intend 9.208. to compass their weak wall with siege and fire. 9.209. I'll prove them we be no Pelasgic band 9.210. no Danaan warriors, such as Hector's arm 9.211. ten years withstood. But look! this day hath spent 9.212. its better part. In what remains, rejoice 9.213. in noble deeds well done; let weary flesh 9.214. have rest and food. My warriors, husband well 9.215. your strength against to-morrow's hopeful war.” 9.216. Meanwhile to block their gates with wakeful guard 9.217. is made Messapus' work, and to gird round 9.218. their camp with watchfires. Then a chosen band 9.219. twice seven Rutulian chieftains, man the walls 9.220. with soldiery; each leads a hundred men 9.221. crested with crimson, armed with glittering gold. 9.222. Some post to separate sentries, and prepare 9.223. alternate vigil; others, couched on grass 9.224. laugh round the wine and lift the brazen bowls. 9.225. The camp-fires cheerly burn; the jovial guard 9.227. The Trojans peering from the lofty walls 9.228. urvey the foe, and arm for sure defence 9.229. of every point exposed. They prove the gates 9.230. with fearful care, bind bridge with tower, and bring 9.231. good store of javelins. Serestus bold 9.232. and Mnestheus to their labors promptly fly 9.233. whom Sire Aeneas bade in time of stress 9.234. to have authority and free command 9.235. over his warriars. Along the walls 9.236. the legions, by the cast of lots, divide 9.237. the pain and peril, giving each his due 9.239. Nisus kept sentry at the gate: a youth 9.240. of eager heart for noble deeds, the son 9.241. of Hyrtacus, whom in Aeneas' train 9.242. Ida the huntress sent; swift could he speed 9.243. the spear or light-winged arrow to its aim. 9.244. Beside him was Euryalus, his friend: 9.245. of all th' Aeneadae no youth more fair 9.246. wore Trojan arms; upon his cheek unshorn 9.247. the tender bloom of boyhood lingered still. 9.248. Their loving hearts were one, and oft in war 9.249. they battled side by side, as in that hour 9.250. a common sentry at the gate they shared. 9.251. Said Nisus: “Is it gods above that breathe 9.252. this fever in my soul, Euryalus? 9.253. or is the tyrant passion of each breast 9.254. the god it serves? Me now my urgent mind 9.255. to battles or some mighty deed impels 9.256. and will not give me rest. Look yonder, where 9.257. the Rutuli in dull security 9.258. the siege maintain. Yet are their lights but few. 9.259. They are asleep or drunk, and in their line 9.260. is many a silent space. O, hear my thought 9.261. and what my heart is pondering. To recall 9.262. Aeneas is the dearest wish to-night 9.263. of all, both high and low. They need true men 9.264. to find him and bring tidings. If our chiefs 9.265. but grant me leave to do the thing I ask 9.266. (Claiming no reward save what honor gives) 9.267. methinks I could search out by yonder hill 9.268. a path to Pallanteum.” The amazed 9.269. Euryalus, flushed warm with eager love 9.270. for deeds of glory, instantly replied 9.271. to his high-hearted friend: “Dost thou refuse 9.272. my Nisus, to go with me hand in hand 9.273. when mighty deeds are done? Could I behold 9.274. thee venturing alone on danger? Nay! 9.275. Not thus my sire Opheltes, schooled in war 9.276. taught me his true child, 'mid the woes of Troy 9.277. and Argive terrors reared; not thus with thee 9.278. have I proved craven, since we twain were leal 9.279. to great Aeneas, sharing all his doom. 9.280. In this breast also is a heart which knows 9.281. contempt of life, and deems such deeds, such praise 9.282. well worth a glorious death.” Nisus to him: 9.283. “I have not doubted thee, nor e'er could have 9.284. one thought disloyal. May almighty Jove 9.285. or whatsoe'er good power my purpose sees 9.286. bring me triumphant to thy arms once more! 9.287. But if, as oft in doubtful deeds befalls 9.288. ome stroke of chance, or will divine, should turn 9.289. to adverse, 't is my fondest prayer that thou 9.290. houldst live the longer of us twain. Thy years 9.291. uit better with more life. Oh! let there be 9.292. one mourner true to carry to its grave 9.293. my corpse, recaptured in the desperate fray 9.294. or ransomed for a price. Or if this boon 9.295. hould be—'t is Fortune's common way—refused 9.296. then pay the debt of grief and loyal woe 9.297. unto my far-off dust, and garlands leave 9.298. upon an empty tomb. No grief I give 9.299. to any sorrowing mother; one alone 9.300. of many Trojan mothers, had the heart 9.301. to follow thee, her child, and would not stay 9.302. in great Acestes' land.” His friend replied: 9.303. “Thou weavest but a web of empty words 9.304. and reasons vain, nor dost thou shake at all 9.305. my heart's resolve. Come, let us haste away!” 9.306. He answered so, and summoned to the gate 9.307. a neighboring watch, who, bringing prompt relief 9.308. the sentry-station took; then quitted he 9.309. his post assigned; at Nisus' side he strode 9.311. Now in all lands all creatures that have breath 9.312. lulled care in slumber, and each heart forgot 9.313. its load of toil and pain. But they who led 9.314. the Teucrian cause, with all their chosen brave 9.315. took counsel in the kingdom's hour of need 9.316. what action to command or whom dispatch 9.317. with tidings to Aeneas. In mid-camp 9.318. on long spears leaning and with ready shield 9.319. to leftward slung, th' assembled warriors stood. 9.320. Thither in haste arrived the noble pair 9.321. brave Nisus with Euryalus his friend 9.322. and craved a hearing, for their suit, they said 9.323. was urgent and well-worth a patient ear. 9.324. Iulus to the anxious striplings gave 9.325. a friendly welcome, bidding Nisus speak. 9.326. The son of Hyrtacus obeyed: “O, hear 9.327. Princes of Teucria, with impartial mind 9.328. nor judge by our unseasoned youth the worth 9.329. of what we bring. Yon Rutule watch is now 9.330. in drunken sleep, and all is silent there. 9.331. With our own eyes we picked out a good place 9.332. to steal a march, that cross-road by the gate 9.333. close-fronting on the bridge. Their lines of fire 9.334. are broken, and a murky, rolling smoke 9.335. fills all the region. If ye grant us leave 9.336. by this good luck to profit, we will find 9.337. Aeneas and the walls of Palatine 9.338. and after mighty slaughter and huge spoil 9.339. ye soon shall see us back. Nor need ye fear 9.340. we wander from the way. oft have we seen 9.341. that city's crest loom o'er the shadowy vales 9.342. where we have hunted all day long and know 9.343. each winding of yon river.” Then uprose 9.344. aged Aletes, crowned with wisdom's years: 9.345. “Gods of our fathers, who forevermore 9.346. watch over Troy, ye surely had no mind 9.347. to blot out Teucria's name, when ye bestowed 9.348. uch courage on young hearts, and bade them be 9.349. o steadfast and so leal.” Joyful he clasped 9.350. their hands in his, and on their shoulders leaned 9.351. his aged cheek and visage wet with tears. 9.352. “What reward worthy of such actions fair 9.353. dear heroes, could be given? Your brightest prize 9.354. will come from Heaven and your own hearts. The rest 9.355. Aeneas will right soon bestow; nor will 9.356. Ascanius, now in youth's unblemished prime 9.357. ever forget your praise.” Forthwith replied 9.358. Aeneas' son, “By all our household gods 9.359. by great Assaracus, and every shrine 9.360. of venerable Vesta, I confide 9.361. my hopes, my fortunes, and all future weal 9.362. to your heroic hearts. O, bring me back 9.363. my father! Set him in these eyes once more! 9.364. That day will tears be dry; and I will give 9.365. two silver wine-cups graven and o'erlaid 9.366. with clear-cut figures, which my father chose 9.367. out of despoiled Arisbe; also two 9.368. full talents of pure gold, and tripods twain 9.369. and ancient wine-bowl, Tyrian Dido's token. 9.370. But if indeed our destiny shall be 9.371. to vanquish Italy in prosperous war 9.372. to seize the sceptre and divide the spoil, — 9.373. aw you that steed of Turnus and the arms 9.374. in which he rode, all golden? That same steed 9.375. that glittering shield and haughty crimson crest 9.376. I will reserve thee, e'er the lots are cast 9.377. and, Nisus, they are thine. Hereto my sire 9.378. will add twelve captive maids of beauty rare 9.379. and slaves in armor; last, thou hast the fields 9.380. which now Latinus holds. But as for thee 9.381. to whom my youth but binds me closer still 9.382. thee, kingly boy, my whole heart makes my own 9.383. and through all changeful fortune we shall be 9.384. inseparable peers: nor will I seek 9.385. renown and glory, or in peace or war 9.386. forgetting thee: but trust thee from this day 9.387. in deed and word.” To him in answer spoke 9.388. euryalus, “O, may no future show 9.389. this heart unworthy thy heroic call! 9.390. And may our fortune ever prosperous prove 9.391. not adverse. But I now implore of thee 9.392. a single boon worth all beside. I have 9.393. a mother, from the venerated line 9.394. of Priam sprung, whom not the Trojan shore 9.395. nor King Acestes' city could detain 9.396. alas! from following me. I leave her now 9.397. without farewell; nor is her love aware 9.398. of my supposed peril. For I swear 9.399. by darkness of this night and thy right hand 9.400. that all my courage fails me if I see 9.401. a mother's tears. O, therefore, I implore 9.402. be thou her sorrow's comfort and sustain 9.403. her solitary day. Such grace from thee 9.404. equip me for my war, and I shall face 9.405. with braver heart whatever fortune brings.” 9.406. With sudden sorrow thrilled, the veteran lords 9.407. of Teucria showed their tears. But most of all 9.408. uch likeness of his own heart's filial love 9.409. on fair Iulus moved, and thus he spoke: 9.410. “Promise thyself what fits thy generous deeds. 9.411. Thy mother shall be mine, Creusa's name 9.412. alone not hers; nor is the womb unblest 9.413. that bore a child like thee. Whate'er success 9.414. may follow, I make oath immutable 9.415. by my own head, on which my father swore 9.416. that all I promise thee of gift or praise 9.417. if home thou comest triumphing, shall be 9.418. the glory of thy mother and thy kin.” 9.419. Weeping he spoke, and from his shoulder drew 9.420. the golden sword, well-wrought and wonderful 9.421. which once in Crete Lycaon's cunning made 9.423. Mnestheus bestowed a shaggy mantle torn 9.424. from a slain lion; good Aletes gave 9.425. exchange of crested helms. In such array 9.426. they hastened forth; and all the princely throng 9.427. young men and old, ran with them to the gates 9.428. praying all gods to bless. Iulus then 9.429. a fair youth, but of grave, heroic soul 9.430. beyond his years, gave them in solemn charge 9.431. full many a message for his sire, but these 9.432. the hazard of wild winds soon scattered far 9.434. Forth through the moat they climb, and steal away 9.435. through midnight shades, to where their foemen lie 9.436. encamped in arms; of whom, before these fall 9.437. a host shall die. Along the turf were seen 9.438. laid low in heavy slumber and much wine 9.439. a prostrate troop; the horseless chariots 9.440. tood tilted on the shore, 'twixt rein and wheel 9.441. the drivers dozed, wine-cups and idle swords 9.442. trewn round them without heed. The first to speak 9.443. was Nisus. “Look, Euryalus,” he cried 9.444. “Now boldly strike. The hour to do the deed 9.445. is here, the path this way. Keep wide-eyed watch 9.446. that no man smite behind us. I myself 9.447. will mow the mighty fieid, and lead thee on 9.448. in a wide swath of slaughter.” With this word 9.449. he shut his lips; and hurled him with his sword 9.450. on haughty Rhamnes, who lay propped at ease 9.451. on pillows huge, and from his heaving breast 9.452. poured slumber loud: of royal stem was he 9.453. and honored of King Turnus for his skill 9.454. in augury; yet could no augur's charm 9.455. that bloody stroke forefend. And Nisus slew 9.456. three slaves near by, that lay in reckless sleep 9.457. upon their spears; then him that bore the shield 9.458. of Remus, then the driver of his car 9.465. had gamed the midnight through and sleeping lay 9.466. his fair young body to the wine-god given; 9.467. but happier now had that long-revelling night 9.468. been merry till the dawn! Thus round full folds 9.469. of sheep a famished lion fiercely prowls; 9.470. mad hunger moves him; he devours and rends 9.471. with bloody, roaring mouth, the feeble flock 9.472. that trembles and is dumb. Nor was the sword 9.473. of fair Euryalus less fatal found; 9.474. but fiercely raging on his path of death 9.475. he pressed on through a base and nameless throng 9.476. Rhoetus, Herbesus, Fadus, Abaris; 9.477. urprising all save Rhoetus, who awake 9.478. aw every stroke, and crouched in craven fear 9.479. behind a mighty wine-bowl; but not less 9.480. clean through his bare breast as he started forth 9.481. the youth thrust home his sword, then drew it back 9.482. death-dripping, while the bursting purple stream 9.483. of life outflowed, with mingling blood and wine. 9.484. Then, flushed with stealthy slaughter, he crept near 9.485. the followers of Messapus, where he saw 9.486. their camp-fire dying down, and tethered steeds 9.487. upon the meadow feeding. Nisus then 9.488. knew the hot lust of slaughter had swept on 9.489. too far, and cried, “Hold off! For, lo 9.490. the monitory dawn is nigh. Revenge 9.491. has fed us to the full. We have achieved 9.492. clean passage through the foe.” Full many a prize 9.493. was left untaken: princely suits of mail 9.494. enwrought with silver pure, huge drinking-bowls 9.495. and broideries fair. Yet grasped Euryalus 9.496. the blazonry at Rhamnes' corselet hung 9.497. and belt adorned with gold: which were a gift 9.498. to Remulus of Tibur from the store 9.499. of opulent Caedicus, who sued from far 9.500. to be a friend; and these in death he gave 9.501. to his son's son, who slain in battle fell 9.502. and proud Rutulians seized them with the spoil. 9.741. that thundered through the sky. Along the ground 9.742. half dead the warriors fell (the crushing mass 9.781. Ilioneus with mountain-mass of stone 9.812. 'T was then Ascanius first shot forth in war 12.437. and all its terms agreed. 'T is only I 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy, Rutulia, and Italy
9. Martial, Epigrams, 1.23, 1.96, 9.27, 9.33, 11.75 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Martial, Epigrams, 1.23, 1.96, 9.27, 9.33, 11.75 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Statius, Siluae, 1.6.33, 4.2.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Statius, Thebais, 2.482-2.483, 2.511-2.512, 2.537-2.546, 2.548-2.549, 2.554-2.556, 2.656, 2.668-2.681, 2.688, 2.700, 2.704-2.742 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Suetonius, Nero, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Tacitus, Annals, 14.20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.20.  In the consulate of Nero — his fourth term — and of Cornelius Cossus, a quinquennial competition on the stage, in the style of a Greek contest, was introduced at Rome. Like almost all innovations it was variously canvassed. Some insisted that "even Pompey had been censured by his elders for establishing the theatre in a permanent home. Before, the games had usually been exhibited with the help of improvised tiers of benches and a stage thrown up for the occasion; or, to go further into the past, the people stood to watch: seats in the theatre, it was feared, might tempt them to pass whole days in indolence. By all means let the spectacles be retained in their old form, whenever the praetor presided, and so long as no citizen lay under any obligation to compete. But the national morality, which had gradually fallen into oblivion, was being overthrown from the foundations by this imported licentiousness; the aim of which was that every production of every land, capable of either undergoing or engendering corruption, should be on view in the capital, and that our youth, under the influence of foreign tastes, should degenerate into votaries of the gymnasia, of indolence, and of dishonourable amours, — and this at the instigation of the emperor and senate, who, not content with conferring immunity upon vice, were applying compulsion, in order that Roman nobles should pollute themselves on the stage under pretext of delivering an oration or a poem. What remained but to strip to the skin as well, put on the gloves, and practise that mode of conflict instead of the profession of arms? Would justice be promoted, would the equestrian decuries better fulfil their great judicial functions, if they had lent an expert ear to emasculated music and dulcet voices? Even night had been re­quisitioned for scandal, so that virtue should not be left with a breathing-space, but that amid a promiscuous crowd every vilest profligate might venture in the dark the act for which he had lusted in the light.
15. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 3.14-3.266, 3.290-3.313, 3.323, 3.334-3.342, 3.352-3.361 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 1.20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.22 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.22. To Sempronius Rufus. I have been called in by our excellent Emperor to take part and advise upon the following case. Under the will of a certain person, it has been the custom at Vienna * to hold a gymnastic contest. Trebonius Rufus, a man of high principle and a personal friend of mine, in his capacity of duumvir, discontinued and abolished the custom, and it was objected that he had no legal authority to do so. He pleaded his case not only with eloquence but to good effect, and what lent force to his pleading was that he spoke with discretion and dignity, as a Roman and a good citizen should, in a matter that concerned himself. When the opinion of the Council was taken, Junius Mauricus, who stands second to none for strength of will and devotion to truth, was against restoring the contest to the people of Vienna, and he added, "I wish the games could be abolished at Rome as well." That is a bold consistent line, you will say. So it is, but that is no new thing with Mauricus. He spoke just as frankly before the Emperor Nerva. Nerva was dining with a few friends; Veiento was sitting next to him and was leaning on his shoulder - I need say no more after mentioning the man's name. The conversation turned upon Catullus Messalinus, who was blind, and had that curse to bear in addition to his savage disposition. He was void of fear, shame, and pity, and on that account Domitian often used him as a tool for the destruction of the best men in the State, just as though he were a dart urging on its blind and sightless course. All at table were speaking of this man's villainy and bloody counsels, when the Emperor himself said
18. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.22 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.22. To Sempronius Rufus. I have been called in by our excellent Emperor to take part and advise upon the following case. Under the will of a certain person, it has been the custom at Vienna * to hold a gymnastic contest. Trebonius Rufus, a man of high principle and a personal friend of mine, in his capacity of duumvir, discontinued and abolished the custom, and it was objected that he had no legal authority to do so. He pleaded his case not only with eloquence but to good effect, and what lent force to his pleading was that he spoke with discretion and dignity, as a Roman and a good citizen should, in a matter that concerned himself. When the opinion of the Council was taken, Junius Mauricus, who stands second to none for strength of will and devotion to truth, was against restoring the contest to the people of Vienna, and he added, "I wish the games could be abolished at Rome as well." That is a bold consistent line, you will say. So it is, but that is no new thing with Mauricus. He spoke just as frankly before the Emperor Nerva. Nerva was dining with a few friends; Veiento was sitting next to him and was leaning on his shoulder - I need say no more after mentioning the man's name. The conversation turned upon Catullus Messalinus, who was blind, and had that curse to bear in addition to his savage disposition. He was void of fear, shame, and pity, and on that account Domitian often used him as a tool for the destruction of the best men in the State, just as though he were a dart urging on its blind and sightless course. All at table were speaking of this man's villainy and bloody counsels, when the Emperor himself said


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accius, lucius, the award of the arms Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
achilles, absence from battle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
achilles, death of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
achilles, greatest of greek warriors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
achilles, quarrel with agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
achilles, successors, ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
achilles, successors, turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
achilles, successors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
achilles, unlike odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 266
achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256, 257
adultery, roman Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252
aeneas, absence from battle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257
aeneas, death wish Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
aeneas, intertextual identities, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
aeneas, intertextual identities, ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257, 266
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257, 266
agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256, 257
ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
alcestis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
alcibiades Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 117
anchises, as aeneas teacher Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
ascanius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 266
biography, and greek athletics Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252, 253
briseis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
centaurs Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
characters, tragic/mythical, dolon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
characters, tragic/mythical, muse Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
cloanthus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 224
comedy, comic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
curio Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
death, death wish Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
diana Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
dido, intertexutal identities, alcestis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
dido, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42
diomedes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
doliones Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
ennius, time and space in Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
euryalus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
eurytus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
failure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257, 266
gaze, erotic, of spectators Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252, 253
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
hera Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
homer Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
honor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
ilioneus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42
infibulation Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252
intertextuality, window reference (two-tier allusion) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256, 266
iris Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
italians, as iliadic greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
jupiter Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
laertes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
lapiths Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
leadership vacuum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257
longus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
love Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
macrobius, as reader of epic Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
marriage, weddings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
menelaus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
mnestheus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 224
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
nestor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
nisus, and euryalus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 224
nisus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
nisus and euryalus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257, 266
nudity, athletics Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252, 253
odysseus, achilles successor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
pederasty, and the roman empire Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 117, 118
pederasty, in athens Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 118
philosophy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
plots, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
polynices Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
prizes, rewards Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256, 257, 266
promiscuity, of greeks Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 117
psychology Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
quarrel Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
reception in antiquity Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
revenge, vengeance Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
romulus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
rutulian Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
satire, hexameter Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 253
servius, as reader Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
silius italicus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
simile Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
sophocles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
stage set (scaena, skênê) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
strength Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
stuprum, 0' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 252
success Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
suicide Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
tiber Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
tragic, mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
trojans, intertextual identities, iliadic greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257, 266
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256, 266
turnus, intertextual identity, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
turnus, intertextual identity, agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
turnus, intertextual identity, ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
turnus, intertextual identity, menelaus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
turnus, intertextual identity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 266
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 257
tydeus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 332
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 256, 257, 266
vergil/virgil Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 87
virgil Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 102
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
winds Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 256
words Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 257
zeus, in the iliad Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254, 257
zeus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 254