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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 7.594


Frangimur heu fatis, inquit, ferimurque procella!while he but faltered speechless. She upraised


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 12.352-12.373, 23.306-23.309 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.115-3.123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.148-1.156, 2.337, 2.725, 3.78, 4.110, 4.376, 5.628, 7.373-7.374, 7.585-7.593, 7.595-7.597, 7.600, 7.641-7.817, 8.18-8.21, 8.55, 10.442, 10.670 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.148. an east wind, blowing landward from the deep 1.149. drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— 1.150. and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. 1.151. That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore 1.152. the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave 1.153. truck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. 1.154. Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side 1.155. fell headlong, while three times the circling flood 1.156. pun the light bark through swift engulfing seas. 2.337. and in the consecrated citadel 2.725. when Priam was his foe. With flush of shame 3.78. he scorned all honor and did murder foul 4.110. essays to speak and frembling dies away: 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 5.628. For this last victory and joyful day 7.373. and the abandoned ships. With bitter grief 7.374. he stands at gaze: then with storm-shaken brows 7.641. with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close 7.642. and combed the creature, or would bring to bathe 7.643. at a clear, crystal spring. It knew the hands 7.644. of all its gentle masters, and would feed 7.645. from their own dish; or wandering through the wood 7.646. come back unguided to their friendly door 7.647. though deep the evening shade. Iulus' dogs 7.648. now roused this wanderer in their ravening chase 7.649. as, drifted down-stream far from home it lay 7.650. on a green bank a-cooling. From bent bow 7.651. Ascanius, eager for a hunter's praise 7.652. let go his shaft; nor did Alecto fail 7.653. his aim to guide: but, whistling through the air 7.654. the light-winged reed pierced deep in flank and side. 7.655. Swift to its cover fled the wounded thing 7.656. and crept loud-moaning to its wonted stall 7.657. where, like a blood-stained suppliant, it seemed 7.658. to fill that shepherd's house with plaintive prayer. 7.659. Then Silvia the sister, smiting oft 7.660. on breast and arm, made cry for help, and called 7.661. the sturdy rustics forth in gathering throng. 7.662. These now (for in the silent forest couched 7.663. the cruel Fury) swift to battle flew. 7.664. One brandished a charred stake, another swung 7.665. a knotted cudgel, as rude anger shapes 7.666. its weapon of whate'er the searching eye 7.667. first haps to fall on. Tyrrhus roused his clans 7.668. just when by chance he split with blows of wedge 7.669. an oak in four; and, panting giant breath 7.670. houldered his woodman's axe. Alecto then 7.671. prompt to the stroke of mischief, soared aloft 7.672. from where she spying sate, to the steep roof 7.673. of a tall byre, and from its peak of straw 7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far 7.676. that all the forest shuddered, and the grove 7.677. throbbed to its deepest glen. Cold Trivia's lake 7.678. from end to end gave ear, and every wave 7.679. of the white stream of Nar, the lonely pools 7.680. of still Velinus heard: while at the sound 7.681. pale mothers to their breasts their children drew. 7.682. Swift to the signal of the dreadful horn 7.683. natching their weapons rude, the freeborn swains 7.684. assembled for the fray; the Trojan bands 7.685. poured from their bivouac with instant aid 7.686. for young Ascanius. In array of war 7.687. both stand confronting. Not mere rustic brawl 7.688. with charred oak-staff and cudgel is the fight 7.689. but with the two-edged steel; the naked swords 7.690. wave like dark-bladed harvest-field, while far 7.691. the brazen arms flash in the smiting sun 7.692. and skyward fling their beam: so some wide sea 7.693. at first but whitened in the rising wind 7.694. wells its slow-rolling mass and ever higher 7.695. its billows rears, until the utmost deep 7.696. lifts in one surge to heaven. The first to fall 7.697. was Almo, eldest-born of Tyrrhus' sons 7.698. whom, striding in the van, a loud-winged shaft 7.699. laid low in death; deep in his throat it clung 7.700. and silenced with his blood the dying cry 7.701. of his frail life. Around him fell the forms 7.702. of many a brave and strong; among them died 7.703. gray-haired Galaesus pleading for a truce: 7.704. righteous he was, and of Ausonian fields 7.705. a prosperous master; five full flocks had he 7.706. of bleating sheep, and from his pastures came 7.707. five herds of cattle home; his busy churls 7.709. While o'er the battle-field thus doubtful swung 7.710. the scales of war, the Fury (to her task 7.711. now equal proven) having dyed the day 7.712. a deep-ensanguined hue, and opened fight 7.713. with death and slaughter, made no tarrying 7.714. within Hesperia, but skyward soared 7.715. and, Ioud in triumph, insolently thus 7.716. to Juno called: “See, at thy will, their strife 7.717. full-blown to war and woe! Could even thyself 7.718. command them now to truce and amity? 7.719. But I, that with Ausonia's blood befoul 7.720. their Trojan hands, yet more can do, if thou 7.721. hift not thy purpose. For with dire alarms 7.722. I will awake the bordering states to war 7.723. enkindling in their souls the frenzied lust 7.724. the war-god breathes; till from th' horizon round 7.725. the reinforcement pours—I scattering seeds 7.726. of carnage through the land.” In answer spoke 7.727. juno: “Enough of artifice and fear! 7.728. Thy provocation works. Now have they joined 7.729. in close and deadly combat, and warm blood 7.730. those sudden-leaping swords incarnadines 7.731. which chance put in their hands. Such nuptial joys 7.732. uch feast of wedlock, let the famous son 7.733. of Venus with the King Latinus share! 7.734. But yon Olympian Sire and King no more 7.735. permits thee freely in our skies to roam. 7.736. Go, quit the field! Myself will take control 7.737. of hazards and of labors yet to be.” 7.738. Thus Saturn's daughter spoke. Alecto then 7.739. unfolding far her hissing, viperous wings 7.740. turned toward her Stygian home, and took farewell 7.741. of upper air. Deep in Italia lies 7.742. a region mountain-girded, widely famed 7.743. and known in olden songs from land to land: 7.744. the valley of Amsanctus; deep, dark shades 7.745. enclose it between forest-walls, whereby 7.746. through thunderous stony channel serpentines 7.747. a roaring fall. Here in a monstrous cave 7.748. are breathing-holes of hell, a vast abyss 7.749. where Acheron opes wide its noisome jaws: 7.750. in this Alecto plunged, concealing so 7.751. her execrable godhead, while the air 7.753. Forthwith the sovereign hands of Juno haste 7.754. to consummate the war. The shepherds bear 7.755. back from the field of battle to the town 7.756. the bodies of the slain: young Almo's corse 7.757. and gray Galaesus' bleeding head. They call 7.758. just gods in heaven to Iook upon their wrong 7.759. and bid Latinus see it. Turnus comes 7.760. and, while the angry mob surveys the slain 7.761. adds fury to the hour. “Shall the land 7.762. have Trojan lords? Shall Phrygian marriages 7.763. debase our ancient, royal blood—and I 7.764. be spurned upon the threshold?” Then drew near 7.765. the men whose frenzied women-folk had held 7.766. bacchantic orgies in the pathless grove 7.767. awed by Amata's name: these, gathering 7.768. ued loud for war. Yea, all defied the signs 7.769. and venerable omens; all withstood 7.770. divine decrees, and clamored for revenge 7.771. prompted by evil powers. They besieged 7.772. the house of King Latinus, shouting-loud 7.773. with emulous rage. But like a sea-girt rock 7.774. unmoved he stood; like sea-girt rock when surge 7.775. of waters o'er it sweeps, or howling waves 7.776. urround; it keeps a ponderous front of power 7.777. though foaming cliffs around it vainly roar; 7.778. from its firm base the broken sea-weeds fall. 7.779. But when authority no whit could change 7.780. their counsels blind, and each event fulfilled 7.781. dread Juno's will, then with complaining prayer 7.782. the aged sire cried loud upon his gods 7.783. and on th' unheeding air: “Alas,” said he 7.784. “My doom is shipwreck, and the tempest bears 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood 7.786. hall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. 7.787. O Turnus! O abominable deed! 7.788. Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods 7.789. thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. 7.790. Now was my time to rest. But as I come 7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me 7.792. of comfort in my death.” With this the King 7.794. A sacred custom the Hesperian land 7.795. of Latium knew, by all the Alban hills 7.796. honored unbroken, which wide-ruling Rome 7.797. keeps to this day, when to new stroke she stirs 7.798. the might of Mars; if on the Danube 's wave 7.799. resolved to fling the mournful doom of war 7.800. or on the Caspian folk or Arabs wild; 7.801. or chase the morning far as India 's verge 7.802. ind from the Parthian despot wrest away 7.803. our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be 7.804. of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: 7.805. a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength 7.806. of uncorrupting steel; in sleepless watch 7.807. Janus the threshold keeps. 'T is here, what time 7.808. the senate's voice is war, the consul grave 7.809. in Gabine cincture and Quirinal shift 7.810. himself the griding hinges backward moves 7.811. and bids the Romans arm; obedient then 7.812. the legionary host makes Ioud acclaim 7.813. and hoarse consent the brazen trumpets blow. 7.814. Thus King Latinus on the sons of Troy 7.815. was urged to open war, and backward roll 7.816. those gates of sorrow: but the aged king 7.817. recoiled, refused the loathsome task, and fled 8.18. through Latium waxes large. But what the foe 8.19. by such attempt intends, what victory 8.20. is his presumptuous hope, if Fortune smile 8.21. Aetolia 's lord will not less wisely fear 8.55. has stilled its swollen wave. A sign I tell: 10.442. while following in ill-omened haste the steps 10.670. of youthful company by treason slain
4. Lucan, Pharsalia, 4.548-4.556, 9.227-9.236, 9.290 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 6.402-6.412, 7.637-7.638 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
amata Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
analogues Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 66
anchises Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
cybele Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
iolcus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
iris Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italians, as iliadic greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
jason Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
kings, kingship theory Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latinus, good king Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latinus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 66; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
lavinia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
lemnos Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
livius andronicus, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
m. antonius Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 66
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
naevius, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
pallanteum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
pallas (see also athena, minerva)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
simile' Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
tisiphone Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
turnus, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 66
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 165
wandering, odyssean theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
xenophon, anti-augustan? Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 66