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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 7.445-7.462


Talibus Allecto dictis exarsit in irasStraightway Alecto, through whose body flows


at iuveni oranti subitus tremor occupat artusthe Gorgon poison, took her viewless way


deriguere oculi: tot Erinys sibilat hydristo Latium and the lofty walls and towers


tantaque se facies aperit; tum flammea torquensof the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate


lumina cunctantem et quaerentem dicere plurain silence on the threshold of the bower


reppulit et geminos erexit crinibus anguiswhere Queen Amata in her fevered soul


verberaque insonuit rabidoque haec addidit ore:pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear


En ego victa situ, quam veri effeta senectusupon the Trojans and the marriage-suit


nanof Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend


nana single serpent flung, which stole its way


nanto the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven


Sic effata facem iuveni coniecit et atrohe might on her whole house confusion pour.


lumine fumantis fixit sub pectore taedas.Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound


Olli somnum ingens rumpit pavor, ossaque et artusunfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind


perfundit toto proruptus corpore sudor;instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain


arma amens fremit, arma toro tectisque requirit;around her neck it twined, or stretched along


saevit amor ferri et scelerata insania bellithe fillets on her brow, or with her hair


ira super: magno veluti cum flamma sonoreenwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

41 results
1. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 6.17 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.17. וַיִּתְפַּלֵּל אֱלִישָׁע וַיֹּאמַר יְהוָה פְּקַח־נָא אֶת־עֵינָיו וְיִרְאֶה וַיִּפְקַח יְהוָה אֶת־עֵינֵי הַנַּעַר וַיַּרְא וְהִנֵּה הָהָר מָלֵא סוּסִים וְרֶכֶב אֵשׁ סְבִיבֹת אֱלִישָׁע׃ 6.17. And Elisha prayed, and said: ‘LORD, I pray Thee, open his eyes, that he may see.’ And the LORD opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw; and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha."
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.43-1.52, 10.496-10.497, 23.62-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.43. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.44. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.45. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.46. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.47. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.48. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.49. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.50. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.51. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.52. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 10.496. /him the thirteenth he robbed of honey-sweet life, as he breathed hard, for like to an evil dream there stood above his head that night the son of Oeneus' son, by the devise of Athene. Meanwhile steadfast Odysseus loosed the single-hooved horses and bound them together with the reins, and drave them forth from the throng 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
3. Homer, Odyssey, 19.515-19.533, 19.535-19.553, 19.559-19.569, 20.87-20.90 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1215-1223, 420-428, 891-894, 975, 1214 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1214. ἰοὺ ἰού, ὢ ὢ κακά. 1214. Halloo, halloo, ah, evils!
5. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 33-43, 523-552, 928-929, 32 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

32. τορὸς δὲ Φοῖβος ὀρθόθριξ 32. For with a hair-raising shriek, Terror, the diviner of dreams for our house, breathing wrath out of sleep, uttered a cry of terror in the dead of night from the heart of the palace
6. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 101-103, 94-100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. παθοῦσα δʼ οὕτω δεινὰ πρὸς τῶν φιλτάτων 100. And yet, although I have suffered cruelly in this way from my nearest kin, no divine power is angry on my behalf, slaughtered as I have been by the hands of a matricide. See these gashes in my heart, and from where they came! For the sleeping mind has clear vision
7. Aeschylus, Persians, 176-200, 204-210, 213, 230, 175 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

175. εὐμενεῖς γὰρ ὄντας ἡμᾶς τῶνδε συμβούλους καλεῖς. Ἄτοσσα 175. For we whom you summon as counsellors in these matters are well disposed towards you and your interests. Atossa
8. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 887-889, 886 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

886. ἀτᾷ μʼ·· ἅλαδʼ ἄγει
9. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1332-1344, 1331 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1331. ὦ νυκτὸς κελαινοφαὴς
10. Aristophanes, Wasps, 11-53, 8-10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. τὸν αὐτὸν ἄρ' ἐμοὶ βουκολεῖς Σαβάζιον.
11. Euripides, Alcestis, 355-357, 354 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Hecuba, 69-76, 87-91, 93-95, 68 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

68. ὦ στεροπὰ Διός, ὦ σκοτία νύξ
13. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 823-874, 822 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

822. Courage, old men! she, whom you see, is Madness, daughter of Night, and I am Iris, the handmaid of the gods. We have not come to do your city any hurt
14. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 349-350, 42-60, 348 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Rhesus, 781-789, 780 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Herodotus, Histories, 1.120, 6.117, 7.17-7.18 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.120. Thus Astyages punished Harpagus. But, to help him to decide about Cyrus, he summoned the same Magi who had interpreted his dream as I have said: and when they came, Astyages asked them how they had interpreted his dream. They answered as before, and said that the boy must have been made king had he lived and not died first. ,Then Astyages said, “The boy is safe and alive, and when he was living in the country the boys of his village made him king, and he duly did all that is done by true kings: for he assigned to each individually the roles of bodyguards and sentinels and messengers and everything else, and so ruled. And what do you think is the significance of this?” ,“If the boy is alive,” said the Magi, “and has been made king without premeditation, then be confident on this score and keep an untroubled heart: he will not be made king a second time. Even in our prophecies, it is often but a small thing that has been foretold and the consequences of dreams come to nothing in the end.” ,“I too, Magi,” said Astyages, “am very much of your opinion: that the dream came true when the boy was called king, and that I have no more to fear from him. Nevertheless consider well and advise me what will be safest both for my house and for you.” ,The Magi said, “O King, we too are very anxious that your sovereignty prosper: for otherwise, it passes from your nation to this boy who is a Persian, and so we Medes are enslaved and held of no account by the Persians, as we are of another blood, but while you, our countryman, are established king, we have our share of power, and great honor is shown us by you. ,Thus, then, we ought by all means to watch out for you and for your sovereignty. And if at the present time we saw any danger we would declare everything to you: but now the dream has had a trifling conclusion, and we ourselves are confident and advise you to be so also. As for this boy, send him out of your sight to the Persians and to his parents.” 6.117. In the battle at Marathon about six thousand four hundred men of the foreigners were killed, and one hundred and ninety-two Athenians; that many fell on each side. ,The following marvel happened there: an Athenian, Epizelus son of Couphagoras, was fighting as a brave man in the battle when he was deprived of his sight, though struck or hit nowhere on his body, and from that time on he spent the rest of his life in blindness. ,I have heard that he tells this story about his misfortune: he saw opposing him a tall armed man, whose beard overshadowed his shield, but the phantom passed him by and killed the man next to him. I learned by inquiry that this is the story Epizelus tells. 7.17. So spoke Artabanus and did as he was bid, hoping to prove Xerxes' words vain; he put on Xerxes' robes and sat on the king's throne. Then while he slept there came to him in his sleep the same dream that had haunted Xerxes; it stood over him and spoke thus: ,“Are you the one who dissuades Xerxes from marching against Hellas, because you care for him? Neither in the future nor now will you escape with impunity for striving to turn aside what must be. To Xerxes himself it has been declared what will befall him if he disobeys.” 7.18. With this threat (so it seemed to Artabanus) the vision was about to burn his eyes with hot irons. He leapt up with a loud cry, then sat by Xerxes and told him the whole story of what he had seen in his dream, and next he said: ,“O King, since I have seen, as much as a man may, how the greater has often been brought low by the lesser, I forbade you to always give rein to your youthful spirit, knowing how evil a thing it is to have many desires, and remembering the end of Cyrus' expedition against the Massagetae and of Cambyses' against the Ethiopians, and I myself marched with Darius against the Scythians. ,Knowing this, I judged that you had only to remain in peace for all men to deem you fortunate. But since there is some divine motivation, and it seems that the gods mark Hellas for destruction, I myself change and correct my judgment. Now declare the gods' message to the Persians, and bid them obey your first command for all due preparation. Do this, so that nothing on your part be lacking to the fulfillment of the gods' commission.” ,After this was said, they were incited by the vision, and when daylight came Xerxes imparted all this to the Persians. Artabanus now openly encouraged that course which he alone had before openly discouraged.
17. Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.616-3.635, 4.664-4.669 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.616. κούρην δʼ ἐξ ἀχέων ἀδινὸς κατελώφεεν ὕπνος 3.617. λέκτρῳ ἀνακλινθεῖσαν. ἄφαρ δέ μιν ἠπεροπῆες 3.618. οἷά τʼ ἀκηχεμένην, ὀλοοὶ ἐρέθεσκον ὄνειροι. 3.619. τὸν ξεῖνον δʼ ἐδόκησεν ὑφεστάμεναι τὸν ἄεθλον 3.620. οὔτι μάλʼ ὁρμαίνοντα δέρος κριοῖο κομίσσαι 3.621. οὐδέ τι τοῖο ἕκητι μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 3.622. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δέ μιν σφέτερον δόμον εἰσαγάγοιτο 3.623. κουριδίην παράκοιτιν· ὀίετο δʼ ἀμφὶ βόεσσιν 3.624. αὐτὴ ἀεθλεύουσα μάλʼ εὐμαρέως πονέεσθαι· 3.625. σφωιτέρους δὲ τοκῆας ὑποσχεσίης ἀθερίζειν 3.626. οὕνεκεν οὐ κούρῃ ζεῦξαι βόας, ἀλλά οἱ αὐτῷ 3.627. προύθεσαν· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα τοῦ νεῖκος πέλεν ἀμφήριστον 3.628. πατρί τε καὶ ξείνοις· αὐτῇ δʼ ἐπιέτρεπον ἄμφω 3.629. τὼς ἔμεν, ὥς κεν ἑῇσι μετὰ φρεσὶν ἰθύσειεν. 3.630. ἡ δʼ ἄφνω τὸν ξεῖνον, ἀφειδήσασα τοκήων 3.631. εἵλετο· τοὺς δʼ ἀμέγαρτον ἄχος λάβεν, ἐκ δʼ ἐβόησαν 3.632. χωόμενοι· τὴν δʼ ὕπνος ἅμα κλαγγῇ μεθέηκεν. 3.633. παλλομένη δʼ ἀνόρουσε φόβῳ, περί τʼ ἀμφί τε τοίχους 3.634. πάπτηνεν θαλάμοιο· μόλις δʼ ἐσαγείρατο θυμὸν 3.635. ὡς πάρος ἐν στέρνοις, ἀδινὴν δʼ ἀνενείκατο φωνήν· 4.664. τοῖον γὰρ νυχίοισιν ὀνείρασιν ἐπτοίητο. 4.665. αἵματί οἱ θάλαμοί τε καὶ ἕρκεα πάντα δόμοιο 4.666. μύρεσθαι δόκεον· φλὸξ δʼ ἀθρόα φάρμακʼ ἔδαπτεν 4.667. οἷσι πάρος ξείνους θέλγʼ ἀνέρας, ὅστις ἵκοιτο· 4.668. τὴν δʼ αὐτὴ φονίῳ σβέσεν αἵματι πορφύρουσαν 4.669. χερσὶν ἀφυσσαμένη· λῆξεν δʼ ὀλοοῖο φόβοιο.
19. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 2.21, 3.25-3.26, 3.33-3.34, 10.30, 11.6, 11.8, 15.11-15.18 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.21. and the appearances which came from heaven to those who strove zealously on behalf of Judaism, so that though few in number they seized the whole land and pursued the barbarian hordes,' 3.25. For there appeared to them a magnificently caparisoned horse, with a rider of frightening mien, and it rushed furiously at Heliodorus and struck at him with its front hoofs. Its rider was seen to have armor and weapons of gold.' 3.26. Two young men also appeared to him, remarkably strong, gloriously beautiful and splendidly dressed, who stood on each side of him and scourged him continuously, inflicting many blows on him.' 3.33. While the high priest was making the offering of atonement, the same young men appeared again to Heliodorus dressed in the same clothing, and they stood and said, 'Be very grateful to Onias the high priest, since for his sake the Lord has granted you your life.' 3.34. And see that you, who have been scourged by heaven, report to all men the majestic power of God.'Having said this they vanished.' 10.30. Surrounding Maccabeus and protecting him with their own armor and weapons, they kept him from being wounded. And they showered arrows and thunderbolts upon the enemy, so that, confused and blinded, they were thrown into disorder and cut to pieces.' 11.6. When Maccabeus and his men got word that Lysias was besieging the strongholds, they and all the people, with lamentations and tears, besought the Lord to send a good angel to save Israel.' 11.8. And there, while they were still near Jerusalem, a horseman appeared at their head, clothed in white and brandishing weapons of gold.' 15.11. He armed each of them not so much with confidence in shields and spears as with the inspiration of brave words, and he cheered them all by relating a dream, a sort of vision, which was worthy of belief.' 15.12. What he saw was this: Onias, who had been high priest, a noble and good man, of modest bearing and gentle manner, one who spoke fittingly and had been trained from childhood in all that belongs to excellence, was praying with outstretched hands for the whole body of the Jews.' 15.13. Then likewise a man appeared, distinguished by his gray hair and dignity, and of marvelous majesty and authority.' 15.14. And Onias spoke, saying, 'This is a man who loves the brethren and prays much for the people and the holy city, Jeremiah, the prophet of God.' 15.15. Jeremiah stretched out his right hand and gave to Judas a golden sword, and as he gave it he addressed him thus:' 15.16. Take this holy sword, a gift from God, with which you will strike down your adversaries.' 15.17. Encouraged by the words of Judas, so noble and so effective in arousing valor and awaking manliness in the souls of the young, they determined not to carry on a campaign but to attack bravely, and to decide the matter, by fighting hand to hand with all courage, because the city and the sanctuary and the temple were in danger.' 15.18. Their concern for wives and children, and also for brethren and relatives, lay upon them less heavily; their greatest and first fear was for the consecrated sanctuary.'
20. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 18, 17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 20.12.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20.12.2.  Disturbed by this vision and divining that some great misfortune would ensue, since he had already on an earlier occasion beheld a similar vision in a dream and some dire disaster had followed, he wished to hold back that day, but was not strong enough to defeat fate; for his friends opposed the delay and demanded that he should not let the favourable opportunity slip from his grasp.
22. Horace, Sermones, 1.4.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

23. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.120-1.126 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

24. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.648 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Propertius, Elegies, 4.7 (1st cent. BCE

26. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.299, 1.314-1.417, 2.270-2.297, 2.526-2.532, 2.535-2.538, 2.559-2.623, 2.771-2.795, 3.163-3.171, 3.173-3.175, 3.180, 3.182-3.185, 4.1-4.6, 4.8-4.53, 4.173-4.197, 4.219-4.278, 4.351-4.355, 4.384-4.391, 4.465-4.473, 4.557-4.572, 4.615-4.629, 5.604-5.703, 5.720, 5.733-5.737, 5.841-5.861, 6.264-6.269, 6.273-6.281, 6.285-6.289, 6.292-6.294, 6.296, 6.302-6.304, 6.309-6.310, 6.321, 6.333-6.556, 6.585-6.600, 6.608-6.625, 6.628-6.629, 6.637-6.679, 6.681, 6.687-6.689, 6.692-6.693, 6.695-6.901, 7.56, 7.92-7.101, 7.286-7.444, 7.446-7.571, 8.26-8.67, 8.608-8.625, 9.6-9.13, 9.18-9.19, 9.133, 9.644-9.658, 10.636-10.688, 12.946-12.947 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.314. Hast thou not given us thy covet 1.315. that hence the Romans when the rolling years 1.316. have come full cycle, shall arise to power 1.317. from Troy 's regenerate seed, and rule supreme 1.318. the unresisted lords of land and sea? 1.319. O Sire, what swerves thy will? How oft have I 1.320. in Troy 's most lamentable wreck and woe 1.321. consoled my heart with this, and balanced oft 1.322. our destined good against our destined ill! 1.323. But the same stormful fortune still pursues 1.324. my band of heroes on their perilous way. 1.325. When shall these labors cease, O glorious King? 1.326. Antenor, though th' Achaeans pressed him sore 1.327. found his way forth, and entered unassailed 1.328. Illyria 's haven, and the guarded land 1.329. of the Liburni. Straight up stream he sailed 1.330. where like a swollen sea Timavus pours 1.331. a nine-fold flood from roaring mountain gorge 1.332. and whelms with voiceful wave the fields below. 1.333. He built Patavium there, and fixed abodes 1.334. for Troy 's far-exiled sons; he gave a name 1.335. to a new land and race; the Trojan arms 1.336. were hung on temple walls; and, to this day 1.337. lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. 1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 1.339. a station in the arch of heaven assign 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.341. a single god is angry; we endure 1.342. this treachery and violence, whereby 1.343. wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. 1.344. Is this what piety receives? Or thus 1.346. Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men 1.347. with such a look as clears the skies of storm 1.348. chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: 1.349. “Let Cytherea cast her fears away! 1.350. Irrevocably blest the fortunes be 1.351. of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see 1.352. that City, and the proud predestined wall 1.353. encompassing Lavinium . Thyself 1.354. hall starward to the heights of heaven bear 1.355. Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves 1.356. my will once uttered. Since such carking cares 1.357. consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth 1.358. and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. 1.359. Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war 1.360. and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall 1.361. and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond 1.362. about his gathered people. Summers three 1.363. hall Latium call him king; and three times pass 1.364. the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. 1.365. His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called 1.366. (Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood) 1.367. full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne 1.368. from the Lavinian citadel, and build 1.370. Here three full centuries shall Hector's race 1.371. have kingly power; till a priestess queen 1.372. by Mars conceiving, her twin offspring bear; 1.373. then Romulus, wolf-nursed and proudly clad 1.374. in tawny wolf-skin mantle, shall receive 1.375. the sceptre of his race. He shall uprear 1.376. and on his Romans his own name bestow. 1.377. To these I give no bounded times or power 1.378. but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen 1.379. Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea 1.380. with her dread frown, will find a wiser way 1.381. and at my sovereign side protect and bless 1.382. the Romans, masters of the whole round world 1.383. who, clad in peaceful toga, judge mankind. 1.384. Such my decree! In lapse of seasons due 1.385. the heirs of Ilium 's kings shall bind in chains 1.386. Mycenae 's glory and Achilles' towers 1.387. and over prostrate Argos sit supreme. 1.388. of Trojan stock illustriously sprung 1.389. lo, Caesar comes! whose power the ocean bounds 1.390. whose fame, the skies. He shall receive the name 1.391. Iulus nobly bore, great Julius, he. 1.392. Him to the skies, in Orient trophies dress 1.393. thou shalt with smiles receive; and he, like us 1.394. hall hear at his own shrines the suppliant vow. 1.395. Then will the world grow mild; the battle-sound 1.396. will be forgot; for olden Honor then 1.397. with spotless Vesta, and the brothers twain 1.398. Remus and Romulus, at strife no more 1.399. will publish sacred laws. The dreadful gates 1.400. whence issueth war, shall with close-jointed steel 1.401. be barred impregnably; and prisoned there 1.402. the heaven-offending Fury, throned on swords 1.403. and fettered by a hundred brazen chains 1.405. These words he gave, and summoned Maia's son 1.406. the herald Mercury, who earthward flying 1.407. hould bid the Tyrian realms and new-built towers 1.408. welcome the Trojan waifs; lest Dido, blind 1.409. to Fate's decree, should thrust them from the land. 1.410. He takes his flight, with rhythmic stroke of wing 1.411. across th' abyss of air, and soon draws near 1.412. unto the Libyan mainland. He fulfils 1.413. his heavenly task; the Punic hearts of stone 1.414. grow soft beneath the effluence divine; 1.415. and, most of all, the Queen, with heart at ease 1.417. But good Aeneas, pondering all night long 2.272. our doubt dispelled. His stratagems and tears 2.273. wrought victory where neither Tydeus' son 2.274. nor mountain-bred Achilles could prevail 2.275. nor ten years' war, nor fleets a thousand strong. 2.276. But now a vaster spectacle of fear 2.277. burst over us, to vex our startled souls. 2.279. priest unto Neptune, was in act to slay 2.281. Lo! o'er the tranquil deep from Tenedos 2.289. their monstrous backs wound forward fold on fold. 2.290. Soon they made land; the furious bright eyes 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.293. All terror-pale we fled. Unswerving then 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.296. each dragon coiled, and on the shrinking flesh 2.526. with Dymas and the other soldiery 2.527. repeat the deed, exulting, and array 2.528. their valor in fresh trophies from the slain. 2.529. Now intermingled with our foes we moved 2.530. and alien emblems wore; the long, black night 2.531. brought many a grapple, and a host of Greeks 2.532. down to the dark we hurled. Some fled away 2.536. But woe is me! If gods their help withhold 2.537. 't is impious to be brave. That very hour 2.538. the fair Cassandra passed us, bound in chains 2.559. upon his orient steeds—while forests roar 2.567. o'erwhelms us utterly. Coroebus first 2.568. at mailed Minerva's altar prostrate lay 2.569. pierced by Peneleus, blade; then Rhipeus fell; 2.570. we deemed him of all Trojans the most just 2.571. most scrupulously righteous; but the gods 2.572. gave judgment otherwise. There Dymas died 2.573. and Hypanis, by their compatriots slain; 2.574. nor thee, O Panthus, in that mortal hour 2.575. could thy clean hands or Phoebus, priesthood save. 2.576. O ashes of my country! funeral pyre 2.577. of all my kin! bear witness that my breast 2.578. hrank not from any sword the Grecian drew 2.579. and that my deeds the night my country died 2.580. deserved a warrior's death, had Fate ordained. 2.581. But soon our ranks were broken; at my side 2.582. tayed Iphitus and Pelias; one with age 2.583. was Iong since wearied, and the other bore 2.584. the burden of Ulysses' crippling wound. 2.585. Straightway the roar and tumult summoned us 2.586. to Priam's palace, where a battle raged 2.587. as if save this no conflict else were known 2.588. and all Troy 's dying brave were mustered there. 2.589. There we beheld the war-god unconfined; 2.590. The Greek besiegers to the roof-tops fled; 2.591. or, with shields tortoise-back, the gates assailed. 2.592. Ladders were on the walls; and round by round 2.593. up the huge bulwark as they fight their way 2.594. the shielded left-hand thwarts the falling spears 2.595. the right to every vantage closely clings. 2.596. The Trojans hurl whole towers and roof-tops down 2.597. upon the mounting foe; for well they see 2.598. that the last hour is come, and with what arms 2.599. the dying must resist. Rich gilded beams 2.600. with many a beauteous blazon of old time 2.601. go crashing down. Men armed with naked swords 2.603. Thus were our hearts inflamed to stand and strike 2.604. for the king's house, and to his body-guard 2.605. bring succor, and renew their vanquished powers. 2.606. A certain gate I knew, a secret way 2.607. which gave free passage between Priam's halls 2.608. and exit rearward; hither, in the days 2.609. before our fall, the lone Andromache 2.610. was wont with young Astyanax to pass 2.611. in quest of Priam and her husband's kin. 2.612. This way to climb the palace roof I flew 2.613. where, desperate, the Trojans with vain skill 2.614. hurled forth repellent arms. A tower was there 2.615. reared skyward from the roof-top, giving view 2.616. of Troy 's wide walls and full reconnaissance 2.617. of all Achaea 's fleets and tented field; 2.618. this, with strong steel, our gathered strength assailed 2.619. and as the loosened courses offered us 2.620. great threatening fissures, we uprooted it 2.621. from its aerial throne and thrust it down. 2.622. It fell with instantaneous crash of thunder 2.623. along the Danaan host in ruin wide. 2.771. being of Greece and Troy, full well she knew 2.774. my dying country, and with horrid deed 2.781. my native Troy ? and cloth our Dardan strand 3.163. nor towered Pergama; in lowly vales 3.164. their dwelling; hence the ancient worship given 3.165. to the Protectress of Mount Cybele 3.166. mother of Gods, what time in Ida's grove 3.167. the brazen Corybantic cymbals clang 3.168. or sacred silence guards her mystery 3.169. and lions yoked her royal chariot draw. 3.170. Up, then, and follow the behests divine! 3.171. Pour offering to the winds, and point your keels 3.173. if Jove but bless, the third day's dawn should see 3.174. our ships at Cretan land.” So, having said 3.175. he slew the victims for each altar's praise. 3.180. The tale was told us that Idomeneus 3.182. had left his Crete abandoned, that no foe 3.183. now harbored there, but all its dwellings lay 3.184. unteted of man. So forth we sailed 3.185. out of the port of Delos, and sped far 4.1. Now felt the Queen the sharp, slow-gathering pangs 4.2. of love; and out of every pulsing vein 4.5. keep calling to her soul; his words, his glance 4.6. cling to her heart like lingering, barbed steel 4.9. lit up all lands, and from the vaulted heaven 4.10. Aurora had dispelled the dark and dew; 4.12. of her dear sister spoke the stricken Queen: 4.13. “Anna, my sister, what disturbing dreams 4.14. perplex me and alarm? What guest is this 4.15. new-welcomed to our house? How proud his mien! 4.16. What dauntless courage and exploits of war! 4.20. has smitten him with storms! What dire extremes 4.21. of war and horror in his tale he told! 4.22. O, were it not immutably resolved 4.23. in my fixed heart, that to no shape of man 4.24. I would be wed again (since my first love 4.25. left me by death abandoned and betrayed); 4.26. loathed I not so the marriage torch and train 4.27. I could—who knows?—to this one weakness yield. 4.30. were by a brother's murder dabbled o'er 4.32. has shaken my weak will. I seem to feel 4.33. the motions of love's lost, familiar fire. 4.34. But may the earth gape open where I tread 4.35. and may almighty Jove with thunder-scourge 4.36. hurl me to Erebus' abysmal shade 4.37. to pallid ghosts and midnight fathomless 4.38. before, O Chastity! I shall offend 4.39. thy holy power, or cast thy bonds away! 4.40. He who first mingled his dear life with mine 4.41. took with him all my heart. 'T is his alone — 4.42. o, let it rest beside him in the grave!” 4.47. weet babes at thine own breast, nor gifts of love? 4.51. and long ago in Tyre . Iarbas knew 4.52. thy scorn, and many a prince and captain bred 4.173. black storm-clouds with a burst of heavy hail 4.174. along their way; and as the huntsmen speed 4.175. to hem the wood with snares, I will arouse 4.176. all heaven with thunder. The attending train 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 4.178. while Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.179. to the same cavern fly. My auspices 4.180. I will declare—if thou alike wilt bless; 4.181. and yield her in true wedlock for his bride. 4.182. Such shall their spousal be!” To Juno's will 4.183. Cythera's Queen inclined assenting brow 4.184. and laughed such guile to see. Aurora rose 4.185. and left the ocean's rim. The city's gates 4.186. pour forth to greet the morn a gallant train 4.187. of huntsmen, bearing many a woven snare 4.188. and steel-tipped javelin; while to and fro 4.189. run the keen-scented dogs and Libyan squires. 4.190. The Queen still keeps her chamber; at her doors 4.191. the Punic lords await; her palfrey, brave 4.192. in gold and purple housing, paws the ground 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 4.194. At last, with numerous escort, forth she shines: 4.195. her Tyrian pall is bordered in bright hues 4.196. her quiver, gold; her tresses are confined 4.197. only with gold; her robes of purple rare 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.466. She said. But he, obeying Jove's decree 4.467. gazed steadfastly away; and in his heart 4.468. with strong repression crushed his cruel pain; 4.469. then thus the silence broke: “O Queen, not one 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged 4.471. would I gainsay. Elissa's memory 4.472. will be my treasure Iong as memory holds 4.473. or breath of life is mine. Hear my brief plea! 4.557. rose from his bosom, yet no whit did fail 4.558. to do the will of Heaven, but of his fleet 4.559. resumed command. The Trojans on the shore 4.560. ply well their task and push into the sea 4.561. the lofty ships. Now floats the shining keel 4.562. and oars they bring all leafy from the grove 4.563. with oak half-hewn, so hurried was the flight. 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 4.565. forth-streaming!—just as when a heap of corn 4.566. is thronged with ants, who, knowing winter nigh 4.567. refill their granaries; the long black line 4.568. runs o'er the levels, and conveys the spoil 4.569. in narrow pathway through the grass; a part 4.570. with straining and assiduous shoulder push 4.571. the kernels huge; a part array the file 4.572. and whip the laggards on; their busy track 4.615. betwixt the twain the sorrowing sister bore. 4.616. But no words move, no lamentations bring 4.617. persuasion to his soul; decrees of Fate 4.618. oppose, and some wise god obstructs the way 4.619. that finds the hero's ear. oft-times around 4.620. the aged strength of some stupendous oak 4.621. the rival blasts of wintry Alpine winds 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 5.604. in soothing words: “Ill-starred! What mad attempt 5.605. is in thy mind? Will not thy heart confess 5.606. thy strength surpassed, and auspices averse? 5.607. Submit, for Heaven decrees!” With such wise words 5.608. he sundered the fell strife. But trusty friends 5.609. bore Dares off: his spent limbs helpless trailed 5.610. his head he could not lift, and from his lips 5.611. came blood and broken teeth. So to the ship 5.612. they bore him, taking, at Aeneas' word 5.613. the helmet and the sword—but left behind 5.614. Entellus' prize of victory, the bull. 5.615. He, then, elate and glorying, spoke forth: 5.616. “See, goddess-born, and all ye Teucrians, see 5.617. what strength was mine in youth, and from what death 5.618. ye have clelivered Dares.” Saying so 5.619. he turned him full front to the bull, who stood 5.620. for reward of the fight, and, drawing back 5.621. his right hand, poising the dread gauntlet high 5.622. wung sheer between the horns and crushed the skull; 5.623. a trembling, lifeless creature, to the ground 5.624. the bull dropped forward dead. Above the fallen 5.625. Entellus cried aloud, “This victim due 5.626. I give thee, Eryx, more acceptable 5.627. than Dares' death to thy benigt shade. 5.628. For this last victory and joyful day 5.630. Forthwith Aeneas summons all who will 5.631. to contest of swift arrows, and displays 5.632. reward and prize. With mighty hand he rears 5.633. a mast within th' arena, from the ship 5.634. of good Sergestus taken; and thereto 5.635. a fluttering dove by winding cord is bound 5.636. for target of their shafts. Soon to the match 5.637. the rival bowmen came and cast the lots 5.638. into a brazen helmet. First came forth 5.639. Hippocoon's number, son of Hyrtacus 5.640. by cheers applauded; Mnestheus was the next 5.641. late victor in the ship-race, Mnestheus crowned 5.642. with olive-garland; next Eurytion 5.643. brother of thee, O bowman most renowned 5.644. Pandarus, breaker of the truce, who hurled 5.645. his shaft upon the Achaeans, at the word 5.646. the goddess gave. Acestes' Iot and name 5.647. came from the helmet last, whose royal hand 5.648. the deeds of youth dared even yet to try. 5.649. Each then with strong arm bends his pliant bow 5.650. each from the quiver plucks a chosen shaft. 5.651. First, with loud arrow whizzing from the string 5.652. the young Hippocoon with skyward aim 5.653. cuts through the yielding air; and lo! his barb 5.654. pierces the very wood, and makes the mast 5.655. tremble; while with a fluttering, frighted wing 5.656. the bird tugs hard,—and plaudits fill the sky. 5.657. Boldly rose Mnestheus, and with bow full-drawn 5.658. aimed both his eye and shaft aloft; but he 5.659. failing, unhappy man, to bring his barb 5.660. up to the dove herself, just cut the cord 5.661. and broke the hempen bond, whereby her feet 5.662. were captive to the tree: she, taking flight 5.663. clove through the shadowing clouds her path of air. 5.664. But swiftly—for upon his waiting bow 5.665. he held a shaft in rest—Eurytion 5.666. invoked his brother's shade, and, marking well 5.667. the dove, whose happy pinions fluttered free 5.668. in vacant sky, pierced her, hard by a cloud; 5.669. lifeless she fell, and left in light of heaven 5.670. her spark of life, as, floating down, she bore 5.671. the arrow back to earth. Acestes now 5.672. remained, last rival, though the victor's palm 5.673. to him was Iost; yet did the aged sire 5.674. to show his prowess and resounding bow 5.675. hurl forth one shaft in air; then suddenly 5.676. all eyes beheld such wonder as portends 5.677. events to be (but when fulfilment came 5.678. too late the fearful seers its warning sung): 5.679. for, soaring through the stream of cloud, his shaft 5.680. took fire, tracing its bright path in flame 5.681. then vanished on the wind,—as oft a star 5.682. will fall unfastened from the firmament 5.683. while far behind its blazing tresses flow. 5.684. Awe-struck both Trojan and Trinacrian stood 5.685. calling upon the gods. Nor came the sign 5.686. in vain to great Aeneas. But his arms 5.687. folded the blest Acestes to his heart 5.688. and, Ioading him with noble gifts, he cried: 5.689. “Receive them, sire! The great Olympian King 5.690. ome peerless honor to thy name decrees 5.691. by such an omen given. I offer thee 5.692. this bowl with figures graven, which my sire 5.693. good gray Anchises, for proud gift received 5.694. of Thracian Cisseus, for their friendship's pledge 5.695. and memory evermore.” Thereon he crowned 5.696. his brows with garland of the laurel green 5.697. and named Acestes victor over all. 5.698. Nor could Eurytion, noble youth, think ill 5.699. of honor which his own surpassed, though he 5.700. he only, pierced the bird in upper air. 5.701. Next gift was his whose arrow cut the cord; 5.703. Father Aeneas now, not making end 5.720. two javelins of corner tipped with steel 5.733. bears him along, its white face lifted high. 5.734. Next Atys rode, young Atys, sire to be 5.735. of th' Atian house in Rome, a boy most dear 5.736. unto the boy Iulus; last in line 5.737. and fairest of the throng, Iulus came 5.841. from Beroe sick, and left her grieving sore 5.842. that she, she only, had no gift to bring 5.843. of mournful honor to Anchises' shade.” 5.844. She spoke. The women with ill-boding eyes 5.845. looked on the ships. Their doubting hearts were torn 5.846. 'twixt tearful passion for the beauteous isle 5.847. their feet then trod, and that prophetic call 5.848. of Fate to lands unknown. Then on wide wings 5.849. oared Iris into heaven, and through the clouds 5.850. clove a vast arch of light. With wonder dazed 5.851. the women in a shrieking frenzy rose 5.852. took embers from the hearth-stones, stole the fires 5.853. upon the altars—faggots, branches, brands — 5.854. and rained them on the ships. The god of fire 5.855. through thwarts and oars and bows of painted fir 5.856. ran in unbridled flame. Swift to the tomb 5.857. of Sire Anchises, to the circus-seats 5.858. the messenger Eumelus flew, to bring 5.859. news of the ships on fire; soon every eye 5.860. the clouds of smoke and hovering flame could see. 5.861. Ascanius, who had led with smiling brow 6.264. The lightly-feeding doves flit on and on 6.265. Ever in easy ken of following eyes 6.266. Till over foul Avernus' sulphurous throat 6.267. Swiftly they lift them through the liquid air 6.268. In silent flight, and find a wished-for rest 6.269. On a twy-natured tree, where through green boughs 6.273. Whose seed is never from the parent tree 6.274. O'er whose round limbs its tawny tendrils twine,— 6.275. So shone th' out-leafing gold within the shade 6.276. of dark holm-oak, and so its tinsel-bract 6.277. Rustled in each light breeze. Aeneas grasped 6.278. The lingering bough, broke it in eager haste 6.280. Meanwhile the Trojans on the doleful shore 6.281. Bewailed Misenus, and brought tribute there 6.285. Around it wreathe, and in fair order range 6.286. Funereal cypress; glittering arms are piled 6.287. High over all; on blazing coals they lift 6.288. Cauldrons of brass brimmed o'er with waters pure; 6.289. And that cold, lifeless clay lave and anoint 6.292. With purple vesture and familiar pall. 6.293. Then in sad ministry the chosen few 6.294. With eyes averted, as our sires did use 6.296. They gather up and burn the gifts of myrrh 6.302. With blessed olive branch and sprinkling dew 6.303. Purges the people with ablution cold 6.304. In lustral rite; oft chanting, “Hail! Farewell!” 6.310. After these toils, they hasten to fulfil 6.321. The priestess sprinkled wine; 'twixt the two horns 6.333. An altar dark, and piled upon the flames 6.334. The ponderous entrails of the bulls, and poured 6.335. Free o'er the burning flesh the goodly oil. 6.336. Then lo! at dawn's dim, earliest beam began 6.337. Beneath their feet a groaning of the ground : 6.338. The wooded hill-tops shook, and, as it seemed 6.339. She-hounds of hell howled viewless through the shade 6.340. To hail their Queen. “Away, 0 souls profane! 6.341. Stand far away!” the priestess shrieked, “nor dare 6.342. Unto this grove come near! Aeneas, on! 6.343. Begin thy journey! Draw thy sheathed blade! 6.344. Now, all thy courage! now, th' unshaken soul!” 6.345. She spoke, and burst into the yawning cave 6.346. With frenzied step; he follows where she leads 6.348. Ye gods! who rule the spirits of the dead! 6.349. Ye voiceless shades and silent lands of night! 6.350. 0 Phlegethon! 0 Chaos! let my song 6.351. If it be lawful, in fit words declare 6.352. What I have heard; and by your help divine 6.353. Unfold what hidden things enshrouded lie 6.355. They walked exploring the unpeopled night 6.356. Through Pluto's vacuous realms, and regions void 6.357. As when one's path in dreary woodlands winds 6.358. Beneath a misty moon's deceiving ray 6.359. When Jove has mantled all his heaven in shade 6.360. And night seals up the beauty of the world. 6.361. In the first courts and entrances of Hell 6.362. Sorrows and vengeful Cares on couches lie : 6.363. There sad Old Age abides, Diseases pale 6.364. And Fear, and Hunger, temptress to all crime; 6.365. Want, base and vile, and, two dread shapes to see 6.366. Bondage and Death : then Sleep, Death's next of kin; 6.367. And dreams of guilty joy. Death-dealing War 6.368. Is ever at the doors, and hard thereby 6.369. The Furies' beds of steel, where wild-eyed Strife 6.371. There in the middle court a shadowy elm 6.372. Its ancient branches spreads, and in its leaves 6.373. Deluding visions ever haunt and cling. 6.374. Then come strange prodigies of bestial kind : 6.375. Centaurs are stabled there, and double shapes 6.376. Like Scylla, or the dragon Lerna bred 6.377. With hideous scream; Briareus clutching far 6.378. His hundred hands, Chimaera girt with flame 6.379. A crowd of Gorgons, Harpies of foul wing 6.380. And giant Geryon's triple-monstered shade. 6.381. Aeneas, shuddering with sudden fear 6.382. Drew sword and fronted them with naked steel; 6.383. And, save his sage conductress bade him know 6.384. These were but shapes and shadows sweeping by 6.386. Hence the way leads to that Tartarean stream 6.387. of Acheron, whose torrent fierce and foul 6.388. Disgorges in Cocytus all its sands. 6.389. A ferryman of gruesome guise keeps ward 6.390. Upon these waters,—Charon, foully garbed 6.391. With unkempt, thick gray beard upon his chin 6.392. And staring eyes of flame; a mantle coarse 6.393. All stained and knotted, from his shoulder falls 6.394. As with a pole he guides his craft, tends sail 6.395. And in the black boat ferries o'er his dead;— 6.396. Old, but a god's old age looks fresh and strong. 6.397. To those dim shores the multitude streams on— 6.398. Husbands and wives, and pale, unbreathing forms 6.399. of high-souled heroes, boys and virgins fair 6.400. And strong youth at whose graves fond parents mourned. 6.401. As numberless the throng as leaves that fall 6.402. When autumn's early frost is on the grove; 6.403. Or like vast flocks of birds by winter's chill 6.404. Sent flying o'er wide seas to lands of flowers. 6.405. All stood beseeching to begin their voyage 6.406. Across that river, and reached out pale hands 6.407. In passionate yearning for its distant shore. 6.408. But the grim boatman takes now these, now those 6.409. Or thrusts unpitying from the stream away. 6.410. Aeneas, moved to wonder and deep awe 6.411. Beheld the tumult; “Virgin seer!” he cried, . 6.412. “Why move the thronging ghosts toward yonder stream? 6.413. What seek they there? Or what election holds 6.414. That these unwilling linger, while their peers 6.415. Sweep forward yonder o'er the leaden waves?” 6.416. To him, in few, the aged Sibyl spoke : 6.417. “Son of Anchises, offspring of the gods 6.418. Yon are Cocytus and the Stygian stream 6.419. By whose dread power the gods themselves do fear 6.420. To take an oath in vain. Here far and wide 6.421. Thou seest the hapless throng that hath no grave. 6.422. That boatman Charon bears across the deep 6.423. Such as be sepulchred with holy care. 6.424. But over that loud flood and dreadful shore 6.425. No trav'ler may be borne, until in peace 6.426. His gathered ashes rest. A hundred years 6.427. Round this dark borderland some haunt and roam 6.428. Then win late passage o'er the longed-for wave.” 6.429. Aeneas lingered for a little space 6.430. Revolving in his soul with pitying prayer 6.431. Fate's partial way. But presently he sees 6.432. Leucaspis and the Lycian navy's lord 6.433. Orontes; both of melancholy brow 6.434. Both hapless and unhonored after death 6.435. Whom, while from Troy they crossed the wind-swept seas 6.437. There, too, the helmsman Palinurus strayed : 6.438. Who, as he whilom watched the Libyan stars 6.439. Had fallen, plunging from his lofty seat 6.440. Into the billowy deep. Aeneas now 6.441. Discerned his sad face through the blinding gloom 6.442. And hailed him thus : “0 Palinurus, tell 6.443. What god was he who ravished thee away 6.444. From me and mine, beneath the o'crwhelming wave? 6.445. Speak on! for he who ne'er had spoke untrue 6.446. Apollo's self, did mock my listening mind 6.447. And chanted me a faithful oracle 6.448. That thou shouldst ride the seas unharmed, and touch 6.449. Ausonian shores. Is this the pledge divine?” 6.450. Then he, “0 chieftain of Anchises' race 6.451. Apollo's tripod told thee not untrue. 6.452. No god did thrust me down beneath the wave 6.453. For that strong rudder unto which I clung 6.454. My charge and duty, and my ship's sole guide 6.455. Wrenched from its place, dropped with me as I fell. 6.456. Not for myself—by the rude seas I swear— 6.457. Did I have terror, but lest thy good ship 6.458. Stripped of her gear, and her poor pilot lost 6.459. Should fail and founder in that rising flood. 6.460. Three wintry nights across the boundless main 6.461. The south wind buffeted and bore me on; 6.462. At the fourth daybreak, lifted from the surge 6.463. I looked at last on Italy, and swam 6.464. With weary stroke on stroke unto the land. 6.465. Safe was I then. Alas! but as I climbed 6.466. With garments wet and heavy, my clenched hand 6.467. Grasping the steep rock, came a cruel horde 6.468. Upon me with drawn blades, accounting me— 6.469. So blind they were!—a wrecker's prize and spoil. 6.470. Now are the waves my tomb; and wandering winds 6.471. Toss me along the coast. 0, I implore 6.472. By heaven's sweet light, by yonder upper air 6.473. By thy lost father, by lulus dear 6.474. Thy rising hope and joy, that from these woes 6.475. Unconquered chieftain, thou wilt set me free! 6.476. Give me a grave where Velia 's haven lies 6.477. For thou hast power! Or if some path there be 6.478. If thy celestial mother guide thee here 6.479. (For not, I ween, without the grace of gods 6.480. Wilt cross yon rivers vast, you Stygian pool) 6.481. Reach me a hand! and bear with thee along! 6.482. Until (least gift!) death bring me peace and calm.” 6.483. Such words he spoke: the priestess thus replied: 6.484. “Why, Palinurus, these unblest desires? 6.485. Wouldst thou, unsepulchred, behold the wave 6.486. of Styx, stern river of th' Eumenides? 6.487. Wouldst thou, unbidden, tread its fearful strand? 6.488. Hope not by prayer to change the laws of Heaven! 6.489. But heed my words, and in thy memory 6.490. Cherish and keep, to cheer this evil time. 6.491. Lo, far and wide, led on by signs from Heaven 6.492. Thy countrymen from many a templed town 6.493. Shall consecrate thy dust, and build thy tomb 6.494. A tomb with annual feasts and votive flowers 6.495. To Palinurus a perpetual fame!” 6.496. Thus was his anguish stayed, from his sad heart 6.497. Grief ebbed awhile, and even to this day 6.499. The twain continue now their destined way 6.500. Unto the river's edge. The Ferryman 6.501. Who watched them through still groves approach his shore 6.502. Hailed them, at distance, from the Stygian wave 6.503. And with reproachful summons thus began: 6.504. “Whoe'er thou art that in this warrior guise 6.505. Unto my river comest,—quickly tell 6.506. Thine errand! Stay thee where thou standest now! 6.507. This is ghosts' land, for sleep and slumbrous dark. 6.508. That flesh and blood my Stygian ship should bear 6.509. Were lawless wrong. Unwillingly I took 6.510. Alcides, Theseus, and Pirithous 6.511. Though sons of gods, too mighty to be quelled. 6.512. One bound in chains yon warder of Hell's door 6.513. And dragged him trembling from our monarch's throne: 6.514. The others, impious, would steal away 6.515. Out of her bride-bed Pluto's ravished Queen.” 6.516. Briefly th' Amphrysian priestess made reply: 6.517. “Not ours, such guile: Fear not! This warrior's arms 6.518. Are innocent. Let Cerberus from his cave 6.519. Bay ceaselessly, the bloodless shades to scare; 6.520. Let Proserpine immaculately keep 6.521. The house and honor of her kinsman King. 6.522. Trojan Aeneas, famed for faithful prayer 6.523. And victory in arms, descends to seek 6.524. His father in this gloomy deep of death. 6.525. If loyal goodness move not such as thee 6.526. This branch at least” (she drew it from her breast) 6.527. “Thou knowest well.” 6.528. Then cooled his wrathful heart; 6.529. With silent lips he looked and wondering eyes 6.530. Upon that fateful, venerable wand 6.531. Seen only once an age. Shoreward he turned 6.532. And pushed their way his boat of leaden hue. 6.533. The rows of crouching ghosts along the thwarts 6.534. He scattered, cleared a passage, and gave room 6.535. To great Aeneas. The light shallop groaned 6.536. Beneath his weight, and, straining at each seam 6.537. Took in the foul flood with unstinted flow. 6.538. At last the hero and his priestess-guide 6.539. Came safe across the river, and were moored 6.541. Here Cerberus, with triple-throated roar 6.542. Made all the region ring, as there he lay 6.543. At vast length in his cave. The Sibyl then 6.544. Seeing the serpents writhe around his neck 6.545. Threw down a loaf with honeyed herbs imbued 6.546. And drowsy essences: he, ravenous 6.547. Gaped wide his three fierce mouths and snatched the bait 6.548. Crouched with his large backs loose upon the ground 6.549. And filled his cavern floor from end to end. 6.550. Aeneas through hell's portal moved, while sleep 6.551. Its warder buried; then he fled that shore 6.553. Now hears he sobs, and piteous, lisping cries 6.554. of souls of babes upon the threshold plaining; 6.555. Whom, ere they took their portion of sweet life 6.556. Dark Fate from nursing bosoms tore, and plunged 6.585. Roamed through a mighty wood. The Trojan's eyes 6.586. Beheld her near him through the murky gloom 6.587. As when, in her young month and crescent pale 6.588. One sees th' o'er-clouded moon, or thinks he sees. 6.589. Down dropped his tears, and thus he fondly spoke: 6.590. “0 suffering Dido! Were those tidings true 6.591. That thou didst fling thee on the fatal steel? 6.592. Thy death, ah me! I dealt it. But I swear 6.593. By stars above us, by the powers in Heaven 6.594. Or whatsoever oath ye dead believe 6.595. That not by choice I fled thy shores, 0 Queen! 6.596. Divine decrees compelled me, even as now 6.597. Among these ghosts I pass, and thread my way 6.598. Along this gulf of night and loathsome land. 6.599. How could I deem my cruel taking leave 6.600. Would bring thee at the last to all this woe? 6.608. Were changeless flint or carved in Parian stone. 6.609. Then, after pause, away in wrath she fled 6.610. And refuge took within the cool, dark grove 6.611. Where her first spouse, Sichaeus, with her tears 6.612. Mingled his own in mutual love and true. 6.613. Aeneas, none the less, her guiltless woe 6.614. With anguish knew, watched with dimmed eyes her way 6.616. But now his destined way he must be gone; 6.617. Now the last regions round the travellers lie 6.618. Where famous warriors in the darkness dwell: 6.619. Here Tydeus comes in view, with far-renowned 6.620. Parthenopaeus and Adrastus pale; 6.621. Here mourned in upper air with many a moan 6.622. In battle fallen, the Dardanidae 6.623. Whose long defile Aeneas groans to see: 6.624. Glaucus and Medon and Thersilochus 6.625. Antenor's children three, and Ceres' priest 6.628. Around him left and right the crowding shades 6.629. Not only once would see, but clutch and cling 6.637. A feeble shout, or vainly opened wide 6.639. Here Priam's son, with body rent and torn 6.640. Deiphobus Deïphobus is seen,—his mangled face 6.641. His face and bloody hands, his wounded head 6.642. of ears and nostrils infamously shorn. 6.643. Scarce could Aeneas know the shuddering shade 6.644. That strove to hide its face and shameful scar; 6.645. But, speaking first, he said, in their own tongue: 6.646. “Deiphobus, strong warrior, nobly born 6.647. of Teucer's royal stem, what ruthless foe 6.648. Could wish to wreak on thee this dire revenge? 6.649. Who ventured, unopposed, so vast a wrong? 6.650. The rumor reached me how, that deadly night 6.651. Wearied with slaying Greeks, thyself didst fall 6.652. Prone on a mingled heap of friends and foes. 6.653. Then my own hands did for thy honor build 6.654. An empty tomb upon the Trojan shore 6.655. And thrice with echoing voice I called thy shade. 6.656. Thy name and arms are there. But, 0 my friend 6.657. Thee could I nowhere find, but launched away 6.658. Nor o'er thy bones their native earth could fling.” 6.659. To him the son of Priam thus replied: 6.660. “Nay, friend, no hallowed rite was left undone 6.661. But every debt to death and pity due 6.662. The shades of thy Deiphobus received. 6.663. My fate it was, and Helen's murderous wrong 6.664. Wrought me this woe; of her these tokens tell. 6.665. For how that last night in false hope we passed 6.666. Thou knowest,—ah, too well we both recall! 6.667. When up the steep of Troy the fateful horse 6.668. Came climbing, pregt with fierce men-at-arms 6.669. 't was she, accurst, who led the Phrygian dames 6.670. In choric dance and false bacchantic song 6.671. And, waving from the midst a lofty brand 6.672. Signalled the Greeks from Ilium 's central tower 6.673. In that same hour on my sad couch I lay 6.674. Exhausted by long care and sunk in sleep 6.675. That sweet, deep sleep, so close to tranquil death. 6.676. But my illustrious bride from all the house 6.677. Had stolen all arms; from 'neath my pillowed head 6.678. She stealthily bore off my trusty sword; 6.679. Then loud on Menelaus did she call 6.681. Such gift to her fond lord she fain would send 6.687. If with clean lips upon your wrath I call! 6.688. But, friend, what fortunes have thy life befallen? 6.689. Tell point by point. Did waves of wandering seas 6.693. While thus they talked, the crimsoned car of Morn 6.695. On her ethereal road. The princely pair 6.696. Had wasted thus the whole brief gift of hours; 6.697. But Sibyl spoke the warning: “Night speeds by 6.698. And we, Aeneas, lose it in lamenting. 6.699. Here comes the place where cleaves our way in twain. 6.700. Thy road, the right, toward Pluto's dwelling goes 6.701. And leads us to Elysium. But the left 6.702. Speeds sinful souls to doom, and is their path 6.703. To Tartarus th' accurst.” Deiphobus Deïphobus 6.704. Cried out: “0 priestess, be not wroth with us! 6.705. Back to the ranks with yonder ghosts I go. 6.706. 0 glory of my race, pass on! Thy lot 6.708. Aeneas straightway by the leftward cliff 6.709. Beheld a spreading rampart, high begirt 6.710. With triple wall, and circling round it ran 6.711. A raging river of swift floods of flame 6.712. Infernal Phlegethon, which whirls along 6.713. Loud-thundering rocks. A mighty gate is there 6.714. Columned in adamant; no human power 6.715. Nor even the gods, against this gate prevail. 6.716. Tall tower of steel it has; and seated there 6.717. Tisiphone, in blood-flecked pall arrayed 6.718. Sleepless forever, guards the entering way. 6.719. Hence groans are heard, fierce cracks of lash and scourge 6.720. Loud-clanking iron links and trailing chains. 6.721. Aeneas motionless with horror stood 6.722. o'erwhelmed at such uproar. “0 virgin, say 6.723. What shapes of guilt are these? What penal woe 6.724. Harries them thus? What wailing smites the air?” 6.725. To whom the Sibyl, “Far-famed prince of Troy 6.726. The feet of innocence may never pass 6.727. Into this house of sin. But Hecate 6.728. When o'er th' Avernian groves she gave me power 6.729. Taught me what penalties the gods decree 6.730. And showed me all. There Cretan Rhadamanth 6.731. His kingdom keeps, and from unpitying throne 6.732. Chastises and lays bare the secret sins 6.733. of mortals who, exulting in vain guile 6.734. Elude till death, their expiation due. 6.735. There, armed forever with her vengeful scourge 6.736. Tisiphone, with menace and affront 6.737. The guilty swarm pursues; in her left hand 6.738. She lifts her angered serpents, while she calls 6.739. A troop of sister-furies fierce as she. 6.740. Then, grating loud on hinge of sickening sound 6.741. Hell's portals open wide. 0, dost thou see 6.742. What sentinel upon that threshold sits 6.744. Far, far within the dragon Hydra broods 6.745. With half a hundred mouths, gaping and black; 6.746. And Tartarus slopes downward to the dark 6.747. Twice the whole space that in the realms of light 6.748. Th' Olympian heaven above our earth aspires. — 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 6.750. Roll lightning-blasted in the gulf profound; 6.751. The twin Aloidae Aloïdae , colossal shades 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 6.893. Thy kindred accent mingling with my own? 6.894. I cherished long this hope. My prophet-soul 6.895. Numbered the lapse of days, nor did my thought 6.896. Deceive. 0, o'er what lands and seas wast driven 6.897. To this embrace! What perils manifold 6.898. Assailed thee, 0 my son, on every side! 6.899. How long I trembled, lest that Libyan throne 6.900. Should work thee woe!” 6.901. Aeneas thus replied: 7.56. and loftier task I try. Latinus, then 7.92. when, coming to the shrine with torches pure 7.93. Lavinia kindled at her father's side 7.94. the sacrifice, swift seemed the flame to burn 7.95. along her flowing hair—O sight of woe! 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 7.286. that lone wight hears whom earth's remotest isle 7.287. has banished to the Ocean's rim, or he 7.288. whose dwelling is the ample zone that burns 7.289. betwixt the changeful sun-god's milder realms 7.290. far severed from the world. We are the men 7.291. from war's destroying deluge safely borne 7.292. over the waters wide. We only ask 7.293. ome low-roofed dwelling for our fathers' gods 7.294. ome friendly shore, and, what to all is free 7.295. water and air. We bring no evil name 7.296. upon thy people; thy renown will be 7.297. but wider spread; nor of a deed so fair 7.298. can grateful memory die. Ye ne'er will rue 7.299. that to Ausonia's breast ye gathered Troy . 7.300. I swear thee by the favored destinies 7.301. of great Aeneas, by his strength of arm 7.302. in friendship or in war, that many a tribe 7.303. (O, scorn us not, that, bearing olive green 7.304. with suppliant words we come), that many a throne 7.305. has sued us to be friends. But Fate's decree 7.306. to this thy realm did guide. Here Dardanus 7.307. was born; and with reiterate command 7.308. this way Apollo pointed to the stream 7.309. of Tiber and Numicius' haunted spring. 7.310. Lo, these poor tributes from his greatness gone 7.311. Aeneas sends, these relics snatched away 7.312. from Ilium burning: with this golden bowl 7.313. Anchises poured libation when he prayed; 7.314. and these were Priam's splendor, when he gave 7.315. laws to his gathered states; this sceptre his 7.316. this diadem revered, and beauteous pall 7.317. handwork of Asia 's queens.” So ceased to speak 7.318. Ilioneus. But King Latinus gazed 7.319. uswering on the ground, all motionless 7.320. ave for his musing eyes. The broidered pall 7.321. of purple, and the sceptre Priam bore 7.322. moved little on his kingly heart, which now 7.323. pondered of giving to the bridal bed 7.324. his daughter dear. He argues in his mind 7.325. the oracle of Faunus:—might this be 7.326. that destined bridegroom from an alien land 7.327. to share his throne, to get a progeny 7.328. of glorious valor, which by mighty deeds 7.329. hould win the world for kingdom? So at last 7.330. with joyful brow he spoke: “Now let the gods 7.331. our purpose and their own fair promise bless! 7.332. Thou hast, O Trojan, thy desire. Thy gifts 7.333. I have not scorned; nor while Latinus reigns 7.334. hall ye lack riches in my plenteous land 7.335. not less than Trojan store. But where is he 7.336. Aeneas' self? If he our royal love 7.337. o much desire, and have such urgent mind 7.338. to be our guest and friend, let him draw near 7.339. nor turn him from well-wishing looks away! 7.340. My offering and pledge of peace shall be 7.341. to clasp your monarch's hand. Bear back, I pray 7.342. this answer to your King: my dwelling holds 7.343. a daughter, whom with husband of her blood 7.344. great signs in heaven and from my father's tomb 7.345. forbid to wed. A son from alien shores 7.346. they prophesy for Latium 's heir, whose seed 7.347. hall lift our glory to the stars divine. 7.348. I am persuaded this is none but he 7.349. that man of destiny; and if my heart 7.350. be no false prophet, I desire it so.” 7.351. Thus having said, the sire took chosen steeds 7.352. from his full herd, whereof, well-groomed and fair 7.353. three hundred stood within his ample pale. 7.354. of these to every Teucrian guest he gave 7.355. a courser swift and strong, in purple clad 7.356. and broidered housings gay; on every breast 7.357. hung chains of gold; in golden robes arrayed 7.358. they champed the red gold curb their teeth between. 7.359. For offering to Aeneas, he bade send 7.360. a chariot, with chargers twain of seed 7.361. ethereal, their nostrils breathing fire: 7.362. the famous kind which guileful Circe bred 7.363. cheating her sire, and mixed the sun-god's team 7.364. with brood-mares earthly born. The sons of Troy 7.365. uch gifts and greetings from Latinus bearing 7.367. But lo! from Argos on her voyage of air 7.368. rides the dread spouse of Jove. She, sky-enthroned 7.369. above the far Sicilian promontory 7.370. pachynus, sees Dardania's rescued fleet 7.371. and all Aeneas' joy. The prospect shows 7.372. houses a-building, lands of safe abode 7.373. and the abandoned ships. With bitter grief 7.374. he stands at gaze: then with storm-shaken brows 7.375. thus from her heart lets loose the wrathful word: 7.376. “O hated race! O Phrygian destinies — 7.377. to mine forevermore (unhappy me!) 7.378. a scandal and offense! Did no one die 7.379. on Troy 's embattled plain? Could captured slaves 7.380. not be enslaved again? Was Ilium's flame 7.381. no warrior's funeral pyre? Did they walk safe 7.382. through serried swords and congregated fires? 7.383. At last, methought, my godhead might repose 7.384. and my full-fed revenge in slumber lie. 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.388. hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.391. The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 7.401. outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak 7.402. my own prerogative of godhead be 7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! 7.404. If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. 7.405. To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds 7.406. my fated power. So be it! Fate has given 7.407. Lavinia for his bride. But long delays 7.408. I still can plot, and to the high event 7.409. deferment and obstruction. I can smite 7.410. the subjects of both kings. Let sire and son 7.411. buy with their people's blood this marriage-bond! 7.412. Let Teucrian and Rutulian slaughter be 7.413. thy virgin dower, and Bellona's blaze 7.414. light thee the bridal bed! Not only teemed 7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea 7.467. in gentle accents such as mothers use; 7.468. and many a tear she shed, about her child 7.469. her darling, destined for a Phrygian's bride: 7.470. “O father! can we give Lavinia's hand 7.471. to Trojan fugitives? why wilt thou show 7.472. no mercy on thy daughter, nor thyself; 7.473. nor unto me, whom at the first fair wind 7.474. that wretch will leave deserted, bearing far 7.475. upon his pirate ship my stolen child? 7.476. Was it not thus that Phrygian shepherd came 7.477. to Lacedaemon, ravishing away 7.478. Helen, the child of Leda, whom he bore 7.479. to those false Trojan lands? Hast thou forgot 7.480. thy plighted word? Where now thy boasted love 7.481. of kith and kin, and many a troth-plight given 7.482. unto our kinsman Turnus? If we need 7.483. an alien son, and Father Faunus' words 7.484. irrevocably o'er thy spirit brood 7.485. I tell thee every land not linked with ours 7.486. under one sceptre, but distinct and free 7.487. is alien; and 't is thus the gods intend. 7.488. Indeed, if Turnus' ancient race be told 7.489. it sprang of Inachus, Acrisius 7.490. and out of mid- Mycenae .” But she sees 7.491. her lord Latinus resolute, her words 7.492. an effort vain; and through her body spreads 7.493. the Fury's deeply venomed viper-sting. 7.494. Then, woe-begone, by dark dreams goaded on 7.495. he wanders aimless, fevered and unstrung 7.496. along the public ways; as oft one sees 7.497. beneath the twisted whips a leaping top 7.498. ped in long spirals through a palace-close 7.499. by lads at play: obedient to the thong 7.500. it weaves wide circles in the gaping view 7.501. of its small masters, who admiring see 7.502. the whirling boxwood made a living thing 7.503. under their lash. So fast and far she roved 7.504. from town to town among the clansmen wild. 7.505. Then to the wood she ran, feigning to feel 7.506. the madness Bacchus loves; for she essays 7.507. a fiercer crime, by fiercer frenzy moved. 7.508. Now in the leafy dark of mountain vales 7.509. he hides her daughter, ravished thus away 7.510. from Trojan bridegroom and the wedding-feast. 7.511. “Hail, Bacchus! Thou alone,” she shrieked and raved 7.512. “art worthy such a maid. For thee she bears 7.513. the thyrsus with soft ivy-clusters crowned 7.514. and trips ecstatic in thy beauteous choir. 7.515. For thee alone my daughter shall unbind 7.516. the glory of her virgin hair.” Swift runs 7.517. the rumor of her deed; and, frenzy-driven 7.518. the wives of Latium to the forests fly 7.519. enkindled with one rage. They leave behind 7.520. their desolated hearths, and let rude winds 7.521. o'er neck and tresses blow; their voices fill 7.522. the welkin with convulsive shriek and wail; 7.523. and, with fresh fawn-skins on their bodies bound 7.524. they brandish vine-clad spears. The Queen herself 7.525. lifts high a blazing pine tree, while she sings 7.526. a wedding-song for Turnus and her child. 7.527. With bloodshot glance and anger wild, she cries: 7.528. “Ho! all ye Latin wives, if e'er ye knew 7.529. kindness for poor Amata, if ye care 7.530. for a wronged mother's woes, O, follow me! 7.531. Cast off the matron fillet from your brows 7.532. and revel to our mad, voluptuous song.” 7.533. Thus, through the woodland haunt of creatures wild 7.534. Alecto urges on the raging Queen 7.535. with Bacchus' cruel goad. But when she deemed 7.536. the edge of wrath well whetted, and the house 7.537. of wise Latinus of all reason reft 7.538. then soared the black-winged goddess to the walls 7.539. of the bold Rutule, to the city built 7.540. (So runs the tale) by beauteous Danae 7.541. and her Acrisian people, shipwrecked there 7.542. by south wind strong. Its name was Ardea 7.543. in language of our sires, and that proud name 7.544. of Ardea still it wears, though proud no more. 7.545. Here Turnus in the gloom of midnight lay 7.546. half-sleeping in his regal hall. For him 7.547. Alecto her grim fury-guise put by 7.548. and wore an old crone's face, her baleful brow 7.549. delved deep with wrinkled age, her hoary hair 7.550. in sacred fillet bound, and garlanded 7.551. with leaf of olive: Calybe she seemed 7.552. an aged servitress ot Juno's shrine 7.553. and in this seeming thus the prince addressed:— 7.554. “O Turnus, wilt thou tamely see thy toil 7.555. lavished in vain? and thy true throne consigned 7.556. to Trojan wanderers? The King repels 7.557. thy noble wooing and thy war-won dower. 7.558. He summons him a son of alien stem 7.559. to take his kingdom. Rouse thee now, and front 7.560. corned and without reward, these perilous days. 7.561. Tread down that Tuscan host! Protect the peace 7.562. of Latium from its foe! Such is the word 7.563. which, while in night and slumber thou wert laid 7.564. Saturnia 's godhead, visibly revealed 7.565. bade me declare. Up, therefore, and array 7.566. thy warriors in arms! Swift sallying forth 7.567. from thy strong city-gates, on to the fray 7.568. exultant go! Assail the Phrygian chiefs 7.569. who tent them by thy beauteous river's marge 7.570. and burn their painted galleys! 't is the will 7.571. of gods above that speaks. Yea, even the King 8.26. in troubled seas of care. This way and that 8.27. his swift thoughts flew, and scanned with like dismay 8.28. each partial peril or the general storm. 8.29. Thus the vexed waters at a fountain's brim 8.30. mitten by sunshine or the silver sphere 8.31. of a reflected moon, send forth a beam 8.32. of flickering light that leaps from wall to wall 8.33. or, skyward lifted in ethereal flight 8.34. glances along some rich-wrought, vaulted dome. 8.35. Now night had fallen, and all weary things 8.36. all shapes of beast or bird, the wide world o'er 8.37. lay deep in slumber. So beneath the arch 8.38. of a cold sky Aeneas laid him down 8.39. upon the river-bank, his heart sore tried 8.40. by so much war and sorrow, and gave o'er 8.41. his body to its Iong-delayed repose. 8.42. There, 'twixt the poplars by the gentle stream 8.43. the River-Father, genius of that place 8.44. old Tiberinus visibly uprose; 8.45. a cloak of gray-green lawn he wore, his hair 8.46. o'erhung with wreath of reeds. In soothing words 8.48. “Seed of the gods! who bringest to my shore 8.49. thy Trojan city wrested from her foe 8.50. a stronghold everlasting, Latium 's plain 8.51. and fair Laurentum long have looked for thee. 8.52. Here truly is thy home. Turn not away. 8.53. Here the true guardians of thy hearth shall be. 8.54. Fear not the gathering war. The wrath of Heaven 8.55. has stilled its swollen wave. A sign I tell: 8.56. Lest thou shouldst deem this message of thy sleep 8.57. a vain, deluding dream, thou soon shalt find 8.58. in the oak-copses on my margent green 8.59. a huge sow, with her newly-littered brood 8.60. of thirty young; along the ground she lies 8.61. now-white, and round her udders her white young. 8.62. There shall thy city stand, and there thy toil 8.63. hall find untroubled rest. After the lapse 8.64. of thrice ten rolling years, Ascanius 8.65. hall found a city there of noble name 8.66. White-City, Alba; 't is no dream I sing! 8.67. But I instruct thee now by what wise way 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 9.6. And thus the wonder-child of Thaumas called 9.7. with lips of rose: “O Turnus, what no god 9.8. dared give for reward of thy fondest vow 9.9. has come unbidden on its destined day. 9.10. Behold, Aeneas, who has left behind 9.11. the city with his fleet and followers 9.12. is gone to kingly Palatine, the home 9.13. of good Evander. Yea, his march invades 9.18. She spoke; and heavenward on poising wings 9.19. oared, cleaving as she fled from cloud to cloud 9.133. afe through the seas to yon Laurentian plain 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 10.636. fell many a son of Heaven. Yea, there was slain 10.637. Sarpedon, my own offspring. Turnus too 10.638. is summoned to his doom, and nears the bounds 10.639. of his appointed span.” So speaking, Jove 10.640. turned from Rutulia's war his eyes away. 10.641. But Pallas hurled his lance with might and main 10.642. and from its hollow scabbard flashed his sword. 10.643. The flying shaft touched where the plated steel 10.644. over the shoulders rose, and worked its way 10.645. through the shield's rim—then falling, glanced aside 10.646. from Turnus' giant body. Turnus then 10.647. poised, without haste, his iron-pointed spear 10.648. and, launching it on Pallas, cried, “Look now 10.649. will not this shaft a good bit deeper drive?” 10.650. He said: and through the mid-boss of the shield 10.651. teel scales and brass with bull's-hide folded round 10.652. the quivering spear-point crashed resistlessly 10.653. and through the corselet's broken barrier 10.654. pierced Pallas' heart. The youth plucked out in vain 10.655. the hot shaft from the wound; his life and blood 10.656. together ebbed away, as sinking prone 10.657. on his rent side he fell; above him rang 10.658. his armor; and from lips with blood defiled 10.659. he breathed his last upon his foeman's ground. 10.660. Over him Turnus stood: “Arcadians all,” 10.661. He cried, “take tidings of this feat of arms 10.662. to King Evander. With a warrior's wage 10.663. his Pallas I restore, and freely grant 10.664. what glory in a hero's tomb may lie 10.665. or comfort in a grave. They dearly pay 10.666. who bid Aeneas welcome at their board.” 10.667. So saying, with his left foot he held down 10.668. the lifeless form, and raised the heavy weight 10.669. of graven belt, which pictured forth that crime 10.670. of youthful company by treason slain 10.671. all on their wedding night, in bridal bowers 10.672. to horrid murder given,—which Clonus, son 10.673. of Eurytus, had wrought in lavish gold; 10.674. this Turnus in his triumph bore away 10.675. exulting in the spoil. O heart of man 10.676. not knowing doom, nor of events to be! 10.677. Nor, being lifted up, to keep thy bounds 10.678. in prosperous days! To Turnus comes the hour 10.679. when he would fain a prince's ransom give 10.680. had Pallas passed unscathed, and will bewail 10.681. cuch spoil of victory. With weeping now 10.682. and lamentations Ioud his comrades lay 10.683. young Pallas on his shield, and thronging close 10.684. carry him homeward with a mournful song: 10.685. alas! the sorrow and the glorious gain 10.686. thy sire shall have in thee. For one brief day 10.687. bore thee to battle and now bears away; 12.946. of Eryx, when the nodding oaks resound 12.947. or sovereign Apennine that lifts in air
27. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Juvenal, Satires, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. New Testament, Acts, 9.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.7. The men who traveled with him stood speechless, hearing the voice, but seeing no one.
30. New Testament, Luke, 24.13-24.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24.13. Behold, two of them were going that very day to a village named Emmaus, which was sixty stadia from Jerusalem. 24.14. They talked with each other about all of these things which had happened. 24.15. It happened, while they talked and questioned together, that Jesus himself came near, and went with them. 24.16. But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. 24.17. He said to them, "What are you talking about as you walk, and are sad? 24.18. One of them, named Cleopas, answered him, "Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who doesn't know the things which have happened there in these days? 24.19. He said to them, "What things?"They said to him, "The things concerning Jesus, the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people; 24.20. and how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him up to be condemned to death, and crucified him. 24.21. But we were hoping that it was he who would redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things happened. 24.22. Also, certain women of our company amazed us, having arrived early at the tomb; 24.23. and when they didn't find his body, they came saying that they had also seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. 24.24. Some of us went to the tomb, and found it just like the women had said, but they didn't see him. 24.25. He said to them, "Foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! 24.26. Didn't the Christ have to suffer these things and to enter into his glory? 24.27. Beginning from Moses and from all the prophets, he explained to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. 24.28. They drew near to the village, where they were going, and he acted like he would go further. 24.29. They urged him, saying, "Stay with us, for it is almost evening, and the day is almost over."He went in to stay with them. 24.30. It happened, that when he had sat down at the table with them, he took the bread and gave thanks. Breaking it, he gave to them. 24.31. Their eyes were opened, and they recognized him, and he vanished out of their sight. 24.32. They said one to another, "Weren't our hearts burning within us, while he spoke to us along the way, and while he opened the Scriptures to us? 24.33. Rising rose up that very hour, they returned to Jerusalem, and found the eleven gathered together, and those who were with them 24.34. saying, "The Lord is risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon! 24.35. They related the things that happened along the way, and how he was recognized by them in the breaking of the bread.
31. New Testament, Matthew, 27.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.19. While he was sitting on the judgment seat, his wife sent to him, saying, "Have nothing to do with that righteous man, for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.
32. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 32.9, 63.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33. Plutarch, Marius, 45.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

34. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 9.2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.2.8.  How much greater is the fire of his words as they stand than if he had said, "You have abused our patience a long time," and "Your plots are all laid bare." We may also ask what cannot be denied, as "Was Gaius Ficiulanius Falcula, I ask you, brought to justice?" Or we may put a question to which it is difficult to reply, as in the common forms, "How is it possible?" "How can that be?
35. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 3.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

36. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 2.243 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

37. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.6.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

38. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.7, 48.32 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

39. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.25-2.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

40. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 3.7.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

41. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.18-1.19, 2.16 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acheron Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
aeneas and odysseus, turnus and hector Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 72
agave Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
allecto Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
amata Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
analogues Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 72
anger, as “firstâ€\x9d emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
anger, symptoms of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
anxiety dreams and nightmares, demonic assaults Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
anxiety dreams and nightmares, haunting by victims Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
anxiety dreams and nightmares, in dream theory and literature Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
anxiety dreams and nightmares, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431, 433
anxiety dreams and nightmares, voices Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147, 174, 175, 185
apparitions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 444
ascanius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
bacchic rites, in vergils aeneid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
biography, hellenistic and roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
callimachus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
catabasis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
cicero Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
cynthia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
decision Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
dido, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67
dido Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
divination, incubation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147, 431
divination Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 429
divine councils Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 429
divine visits, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
double dreams and visions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147
dream figures, appearance Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dream figures, gods, in disguise Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dream imagery, monsters, witches, demons Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
dreams Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
dreams and visions, deixis, anxious state Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185, 431, 433
dreams and visions, disturbing Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175, 185
dreams and visions, dream/reality confusion Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147, 431, 444
dreams and visions, dream figures, loved ones Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
dreams and visions, dream figures, phantoms Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, examples, apocrypha and non-apocalyptic pseudepigrapha Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 444
dreams and visions, examples, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 429, 431, 433
dreams and visions, form criticism/classification, message dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147, 185
dreams and visions, incubation, oracular Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147, 431
dreams and visions, wish fulfilment Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
emotion, infection with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
ennius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
epic, anger in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
etymology' "681.0_72.0@piety {pietas), turnus' lack of" Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67
euripides, alcestis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
eurydice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
evander Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
fama/rumor Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
fiction, hellenistic and roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 175, 185
fire imagery Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
genre Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
ghosts Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
hecuba Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
heracles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
hercules Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
hesiod Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
homer Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
hypsipyle, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
intertextuality, of philomela and procne in ovids metamorphoses' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
intertextuality, window reference (two-tier allusion) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
italy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
lavinia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
lucilius, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
madness, furial Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
madness, infernal Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
madness, madness (personified) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
maecenas Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
mezentius Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 72
natural dreaming, in literary settings Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 175
natural dreaming, prescience and cognition Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
natural dreaming, uncertainty re revelation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
natural dreaming Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 175
patroclus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
philomela and procne, bacchic ritual context of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
philomela and procne, euripidean tragedy invoked by Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
plots, comic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
plots, tragic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
portents Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 72; Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 429
propertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
prophecy, prophetic dreams and visions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
prophecy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 429
rebuke, by human dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 185
rebuke, divine Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147
rebuke, in dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147
reincarnation/transmigration Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
revelation and guidance, progressive Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 147
revelation and guidance Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
rex (regere etc.) Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67
rumor/fama Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
satyr drama Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
seneca Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tereus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tragedy, and comedy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tragedy, as a theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tragedy, greek Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tragedy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tragic, mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
turnus, as foil to aeneas Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67, 72
turnus, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67, 72
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
tyrant Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 67
uncertainty, about actions, decisions, destiny etc. Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 175
underworld Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
vergil, aeneid, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
vergil, aeneid, final battle between aeneas and turnus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
vergil, aeneid, hypsipyle story, valerius and statius versions of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 248
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, heraclean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, tragic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 177