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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 7.37


Nunc age, qui reges, Erato, quae tempora rerumThen, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw


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1. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100-104, 11-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.1, 2.494-2.759 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.1. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.495. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.496. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.497. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.498. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.499. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.500. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.501. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.502. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.503. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.504. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.505. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.506. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.507. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.508. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.509. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.510. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.511. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.512. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.513. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.514. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. And they that dwelt in Aspledon and Orchomenus of the Minyae were led by Ascalaphus and Ialmenus, sons of Ares, whom, in the palace of Actor, son of Azeus, Astyoche, the honoured maiden, conceived of mighty Ares, when she had entered into her upper chamber; 2.515. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.516. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.517. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.518. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.519. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.520. /and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.521. /and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.522. /and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.523. /and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.524. /and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.525. /And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen 2.526. /And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen 2.527. /And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen 2.528. /And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen 2.529. /And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen 2.530. /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.531. /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.532. /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.533. /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.534. /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.535. /the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.536. /the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.537. /the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.538. /the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.539. /the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.540. /all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.541. /all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.542. /all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.543. /all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.544. /all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.545. /And with him there followed forty black ships. 2.546. /And with him there followed forty black ships. 2.547. /And with him there followed forty black ships. 2.548. /And with him there followed forty black ships. 2.549. /And with him there followed forty black ships. And they that held Athens, the well-built citadel, the land of great-hearted Erechtheus, whom of old Athene, daughter of Zeus, fostered, when the earth, the giver of grain, had borne him; and she made him to dwell in Athens, in her own rich sanctuary 2.550. /and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.551. /and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.552. /and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.553. /and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.554. /and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.555. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 2.556. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 2.558. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 2.559. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 2.560. /and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.561. /and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.562. /and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.563. /and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.564. /and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.565. /And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel 2.566. /And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel 2.567. /And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel 2.568. /And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel 2.569. /And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel 2.570. /and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene 2.571. /and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene 2.572. /and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene 2.573. /and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene 2.574. /and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene 2.575. /and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors 2.576. /and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors 2.577. /and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors 2.578. /and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors 2.579. /and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors 2.580. /for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. 2.581. /for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. 2.582. /for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. 2.583. /for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. 2.584. /for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. And they that held the hollow land of Lacedaemon with its many ravines, and Pharis and Sparta and Messe, the haunt of doves, and that dwelt in Bryseiae and lovely Augeiae, and that held Amyclae and Helus, a citadel hard by the sea 2.585. /and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain 2.586. /and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain 2.587. /and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain 2.588. /and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain 2.589. /and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain 2.590. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.591. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.592. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.593. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.594. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.595. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.596. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.597. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.598. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.599. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.600. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.601. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.602. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.603. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.604. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.605. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.606. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.607. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.608. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.609. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.610. /with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.611. /with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.612. /with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.613. /with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.614. /with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.615. /And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.616. /And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.617. /And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.618. /And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.619. /And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.620. /of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. 2.621. /of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. 2.622. /of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. 2.623. /of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. 2.624. /of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. 2.625. /And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.626. /And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.627. /And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.628. /And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.629. /And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.630. /And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos 2.631. /And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos 2.632. /And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos 2.633. /And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos 2.634. /And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos 2.635. /and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. 2.636. /and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. 2.637. /and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. 2.638. /and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. 2.639. /and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. 2.645. /And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.646. /And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.647. /And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.648. /And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.649. /And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.650. /of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. 2.651. /of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. 2.652. /of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. 2.653. /of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. 2.654. /of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. And Tlepolemus, son of Heracles, a valiant man and tall, led from Rhodes nine ships of the lordly Rhodians 2.655. /that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs 2.656. /that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs 2.657. /that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs 2.658. /that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs 2.659. /that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs 2.660. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.661. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.662. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.663. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.664. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.665. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.666. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.667. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.668. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.669. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.670. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.671. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.672. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.673. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.674. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.675. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.676. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.677. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.678. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.679. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.680. /And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.681. /And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.682. /And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.683. /And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.684. /And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.685. /of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs 2.686. /of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs 2.687. /of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs 2.688. /of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs 2.689. /of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs 2.690. /whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. 2.691. /whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. 2.692. /whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. 2.693. /whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. 2.694. /whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. 2.695. /And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.696. /And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.697. /And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.698. /And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.699. /And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.700. /His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them 2.701. /His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them 2.702. /His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them 2.703. /His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them 2.704. /His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them 2.705. /he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.706. /he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.707. /he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.708. /he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.709. /he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.710. /And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus 2.711. /And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus 2.712. /And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus 2.713. /And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus 2.714. /And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus 2.715. /even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery 2.716. /even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery 2.717. /even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery 2.718. /even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery 2.719. /even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery 2.720. /and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.720. /yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags 2.721. /and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.721. /yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags 2.722. /and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.722. /yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags 2.723. /and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.723. /yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags 2.724. /and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.724. /yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags 2.730. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.731. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.732. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.733. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.734. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. And they that held Ormenius and the fountain Hypereia 2.735. /and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson 2.736. /and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson 2.737. /and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson 2.738. /and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson 2.739. /and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson 2.740. /these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.741. /these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.742. /these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.743. /these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.744. /these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.745. /Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight 2.746. /Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight 2.747. /Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight 2.748. /Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight 2.749. /Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight 2.750. /that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.751. /that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.752. /that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.753. /that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.754. /that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.755. /for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. 2.756. /for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. 2.757. /for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. 2.758. /for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. 2.759. /for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1, 1.10 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

259c. that they sang and sang, forgetting food and drink, until at last unconsciously they died. From them the locust tribe afterwards arose, and they have this gift from the Muses, that from the time of their birth they need no sustece, but sing continually, without food or drink, until they die, when they go to the Muses and report who honors each of them on earth. They tell Terpsichore of those who have honored her in dances, and make them dearer to her;
5. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.609-1.909, 2.835-2.954, 2.962-2.1008, 2.1010-2.1014, 2.1018-2.1029, 2.1047-2.1092, 2.1097-2.1099, 2.1147, 2.1155, 2.1169-2.1280, 3.1-3.5, 3.210-3.266, 3.270-3.438, 3.584-3.588 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.609. ἔνθʼ ἄμυδις πᾶς δῆμος ὑπερβασίῃσι γυναικῶν 1.610. νηλειῶς δέδμητο παροιχομένῳ λυκάβαντι. 1.611. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπηνήναντο γυναῖκας 1.612. ἀνέρες ἐχθήραντες, ἔχον δʼ ἐπὶ ληιάδεσσιν 1.613. τρηχὺν ἔρον, ἃς αὐτοὶ ἀγίνεον ἀντιπέρηθεν 1.614. Θρηικίην δῃοῦντες· ἐπεὶ χόλος αἰνὸς ὄπαζεν 1.615. Κύπιδος, οὕνεκά μιν γεράων ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἄτισσαν. 1.616. ὦ μέλεαι, ζήλοιό τʼ ἐπισμυγερῶς ἀκόρητοι. 1.617. οὐκ οἶον σὺν τῇσιν ἑοὺς ἔρραισαν ἀκοίτας 1.618. ἀμφʼ εὐνῇ, πᾶν δʼ ἄρσεν ὁμοῦ γένος, ὥς κεν ὀπίσσω 1.619. μήτινα λευγαλέοιο φόνου τίσειαν ἀμοιβήν. 1.620. οἴη δʼ ἐκ πασέων γεραροῦ περιφείσατο πατρὸς 1.621. Ὑψιπύλεια Θόαντος, ὃ δὴ κατὰ δῆμον ἄνασσεν· 1.622. λάρνακι δʼ ἐν κοίλῃ μιν ὕπερθʼ ἁλὸς ἧκε φέρεσθαι 1.623. αἴ κε φύγῃ. καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐς Οἰνοίην ἐρύσαντο 1.624. πρόσθεν, ἀτὰρ Σίκινόν γε μεθύστερον αὐδηθεῖσαν 1.625. νῆσον, ἐπακτῆρες, Σικίνου ἄπο, τόν ῥα Θόαντι 1.626. νηιὰς Οἰνοίη νύμφη τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα. 1.627. τῇσι δὲ βουκόλιαί τε βοῶν χάλκειά τε δύνειν 1.628. τεύχεα, πυροφόρους τε διατμήξασθαι ἀροὔρας 1.629. ῥηίτερον πάσῃσιν Ἀθηναίης πέλεν ἔργων 1.630. οἷς αἰεὶ τὸ πάροιθεν ὁμίλεον. ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔμπης 1.631. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ πάπταινον ἐπὶ πλατὺν ὄμμασι πόντον 1.632. δείματι λευγαλέῳ, ὁπότε Θρήικες ἴασιν. 1.633. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἐγγύθι νήσου ἐρεσσομένην ἴδον Ἀργώ 1.634. αὐτίκα πασσυδίῃ πυλέων ἔκτοσθε Μυρίνης 1.635. δήια τεύχεα δῦσαι ἐς αἰγιαλὸν προχέοντο 1.636. Θυιάσιν ὠμοβόροις ἴκελαι· φὰν γάρ που ἱκάνειν 1.637. Θρήικας· ἡ δʼ ἅμα τῇσι Θοαντιὰς Ὑψιπύλεια 1.638. δῦνʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσι πατρός. ἀμηχανίῃ δʼ ἐχέοντο 1.639. ἄφθογγοι· τοῖόν σφιν ἐπὶ δέος ᾐωρεῖτο. 1.640. τείως δʼ αὖτʼ ἐκ νηὸς ἀριστῆες προέηκαν 1.641. Αἰθαλίδην κήρυκα θοόν, τῷπέρ τε μέλεσθαι 1.642. ἀγγελίας καὶ σκῆπτρον ἐπέτρεπον Ἑρμείαο 1.643. σφωιτέροιο τοκῆος, ὅ οἱ μνῆστιν πόρε πάντων 1.644. ἄφθιτον· οὐδʼ ἔτι νῦν περ ἀποιχομένου Ἀχέροντος 1.645. δίνας ἀπροφάτους ψυχὴν ἐπιδέδρομε λήθη· 1.646. ἀλλʼ ἥγʼ ἔμπεδον αἰὲν ἀμειβομένη μεμόρηται 1.647. ἄλλοθʼ ὑποχθονίοις ἐναρίθμιος, ἄλλοτʼ ἐς αὐγὰς 1.648. ἠελίου ζωοῖσι μετʼ ἀνδράσιν. ἀλλὰ τί μύθους 1.649. Αἰθαλίδεω χρειώ με διηνεκέως ἀγορεύειν; 1.650. ὅς ῥα τόθʼ Ὑψιπύλην μειλίξατο δέχθαι ἰόντας 1.651. ἤματος ἀνομένοιο διὰ κνέφας· οὐδὲ μὲν ἠοῖ 1.652. πείσματα νηὸς ἔλυσαν ἐπὶ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.653. Λημνιάδες δὲ γυναῖκες ἀνὰ πτόλιν ἷζον ἰοῦσαι 1.654. εἰς ἀγορήν· αὐτὴ γὰρ ἐπέφραδεν Ὑψιπύλεια. 1.655. καί ῥʼ ὅτε δὴ μάλα πᾶσαι ὁμιλαδὸν ἠγερέθοντο 1.656. αὐτίκʼ ἄρʼ ἥγʼ ἐνὶ τῇσιν ἐποτρύνουσʼ ἀγόρευεν· 1.657. ‘Ὦφιλαι, εἰ δʼ ἄγε δὴ μενοεικέα δῶρα πόρωμεν 1.658. ἀνδράσιν, οἷά τʼ ἔοικεν ἄγειν ἐπὶ νηὸς ἔχοντας 1.659. ἤια, καὶ μέθυ λαρόν, ἵνʼ ἔμπεδον ἔκτοθι πύργων 1.660. μίμνοιεν, μηδʼ ἄμμε κατὰ χρειὼ μεθέποντες 1.661. ἀτρεκέως γνώωσι, κακὴ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλὸν ἵκηται 1.662. βάξις· ἐπεὶ μέγα ἔργον ἐρέξαμεν, οὐδέ τι πάμπαν 1.663. θυμηδὲς καὶ τοῖσι τόγʼ ἔσσεται, εἴ κε δαεῖεν. 1.664. ἡμετέρη μὲν νῦν τοίη παρενήνοθε μῆτις· 1.665. ὑμέων δʼ εἴ τις ἄρειον ἔπος μητίσεται ἄλλη 1.666. ἐγρέσθω· τοῦ γάρ τε καὶ εἵνεκα δεῦρʼ ἐκάλεσσα.’ 1.667. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη, καὶ θῶκον ἐφίζανε πατρὸς ἑοῖο 1.668. λάινον· αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα φίλη τροφὸς ὦρτο Πολυξώ 1.669. γήραϊ δὴ ῥικνοῖσιν ἐπισκάζουσα πόδεσσιν 1.670. βάκτρῳ ἐρειδομένη, περὶ δὲ μενέαινʼ ἀγορεῦσαι. 1.671. τῇ καὶ παρθενικαὶ πίσυρες σχεδὸν ἑδριόωντο 1.672. ἀδμῆτες λευκῇσιν ἐπιχνοαούσῃ ἐθείραις. 1.673. στῆ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐνὶ μέσσῃ ἀγορῇ, ἀνὰ δʼ ἔσχεθε δειρὴν 1.674. ἦκα μόλις κυφοῖο μεταφρένου, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.675. ‘δῶρα μέν, ὡς αὐτῇ περ ἐφανδάνει Ὑψιπυλείῃ 1.676. πέμπωμεν ξείνοισιν, ἐπεὶ καὶ ἄρειον ὀπάσσαι. 1.677. ὔμμι γε μὴν τίς μῆτις ἐπαύρεσθαι βιότοιο 1.678. αἴ κεν ἐπιβρίσῃ Θρήιξ στρατός, ἠέ τις ἄλλος 1.679. δυσμενέων, ἅ τε πολλὰ μετʼ ἀνθρώποισι πέλονται; 1.680. ὡς καὶ νῦν ὅδʼ ὅμιλος ἀνωίστως ἐφικάνει. 1.681. εἰ δὲ τὸ μὲν μακάρων τις ἀποτρέποι, ἄλλα δʼ ὀπίσσω 1.682. μυρία δηιοτῆτος ὑπέρτερα πήματα μίμνει 1.683. εὖτʼ ἂν δὴ γεραραὶ μὲν ἀποφθινύθωσι γυναῖκες 1.684. κουρότεραι δʼ ἄγονοι στυγερὸν ποτὶ γῆρας ἵκησθε. 1.685. πῶς τῆμος βώσεσθε δυσάμμοροι; ἦε βαθείαις 1.686. αὐτόματοι βόες ὔμμιν ἐνιζευχθέντες ἀρούραις 1.687. γειοτόμον νειοῖο διειρύσσουσιν ἄροτρον 1.688. καὶ πρόκα τελλομένου ἔτεος στάχυν ἀμήσονται; 1.689. ἦ μὲν ἐγών, εἰ καί με τὰ νῦν ἔτι πεφρίκασιν 1.690. κῆρες, ἐπερχόμενόν που ὀίομαι εἰς ἔτος ἤδη 1.691. γαῖαν ἐφέσσεσθαι, κτερέων ἀπὸ μοῖραν ἑλοῦσαν 1.692. αὔτως, ἣ θέμις ἐστί, πάρος κακότητα πελάσσαι. 1.693. ὁπλοτέρῃσι δὲ πάγχυ τάδε φράζεσθαι ἄνωγα. 1.694. νῦν γὰρ δὴ παρὰ ποσσὶν ἐπήβολός ἐστʼ ἀλεωρή 1.695. εἴ κεν ἐπιτρέψητε δόμους καὶ ληίδα πᾶσαν 1.696. ὑμετέρην ξείνοισι καὶ ἀγλαὸν ἄστυ μέλεσθαι.’ 1.697. ὧς ἔφατʼ· ἐν δʼ ἀγορὴ πλῆτο θρόου. εὔαδε γάρ σφιν 1.698. μῦθος. ἀτὰρ μετὰ τήνγε παρασχεδὸν αὖτις ἀνῶρτο 1.699. Ὑψιπύλη, καὶ τοῖον ὑποβλήδην ἔπος ηὔδα· 1.700. ‘εἰ μὲν δὴ πάσῃσιν ἐφανδάνει ἥδε μενοινή 1.701. ἤδη κεν μετὰ νῆα καὶ ἄγγελον ὀτρύναιμι.’ 1.702. ἦ ῥα, καὶ Ἰφινόην μετεφώνεεν ἆσσον ἐοῦσαν· 1.703. ‘ὄρσο μοι, Ἰφινόη, τοῦδʼ ἀνέρος ἀντιόωσα 1.704. ἡμέτερόνδε μολεῖν, ὅστις στόλου ἡγεμονεύει 1.705. ὄφρα τί οἱ δήμοιο ἔπος θυμῆρες ἐνίσπω· 1.706. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς γαίης τε καὶ ἄστεος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλωσιν 1.707. κέκλεο θαρσαλέως ἐπιβαινέμεν εὐμενέοντας.’ 1.708. ἦ, καὶ ἔλυσʼ ἀγορήν, μετὰ δʼ εἰς ἑὸν ὦρτο νέεσθαι. 1.709. ὧς δὲ καὶ Ἰφινόη Μινύας ἵκεθʼ· οἱ δʼ ἐρέεινον 1.710. χρεῖος ὅ τι φρονέουσα μετήλυθεν. ὦκα δὲ τούσγε 1.711. πασσυδίῃ μύθοισι προσέννεπεν ἐξερέοντας· 1.712. ‘κούρη τοί μʼ ἐφέηκε Θοαντιὰς ἐνθάδʼ ἰοῦσαν 1.713. Ὑψιπύλη, καλέειν νηὸς πρόμον, ὅστις ὄρωρεν 1.714. ὄφρα τί οἱ δήμοιο ἔπος θυμῆρες ἐνίσπῃ· 1.715. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς γαίης τε καὶ ἄστεος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλητε 1.716. κέκλεται αὐτίκα νῦν ἐπιβαινέμεν εὐμενέοντας.’ 1.717. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πάντεσσι δʼ ἐναίσιμος ἥνδανε μῦθος. 1.718. Υψιπύλην δʼ εἴσαντο καταφθιμένοιο Θόαντος 1.719. τηλυγέτην γεγαυῖαν ἀνασσέμεν· ὦκα δὲ τόνγε 1.720. πέμπον ἴμεν, καὶ δʼ αὐτοὶ ἐπεντύνοντο νέεσθαι. 1.721. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ἀμφʼ ὤμοισι θεᾶς Τριτωνίδος ἔργον 1.722. δίπλακα πορφυρέην περονήσατο, τήν οἱ ὄπασσεν 1.723. Παλλάς, ὅτε πρῶτον δρυόχους ἐπεβάλλετο νηὸς 1.724. Ἀργοῦς, καὶ κανόνεσσι δάε ζυγὰ μετρήσασθαι. 1.725. τῆς μὲν ῥηίτερόν κεν ἐς ἠέλιον ἀνιόντα 1.726. ὄσσε βάλοις, ἢ κεῖνο μεταβλέψειας ἔρευθος. 1.727. δὴ γάρ τοι μέσση μὲν ἐρευθήεσσʼ ἐτέτυκτο 1.728. ἄκρα δὲ πορφυρέη πάντῃ πέλεν· ἐν δʼ ἄρʼ ἑκάστῳ 1.729. τέρματι δαίδαλα πολλὰ διακριδὸν εὖ ἐπέπαστο. 1.730. ἐν μὲν ἔσαν Κύκλωπες ἐπʼ ἀφθίτῳ ἥμενοι ἔργῳ 1.731. Ζηνὶ κεραυνὸν ἄνακτι πονεύμενοι· ὃς τόσον ἤδη 1.732. παμφαίνων ἐτέτυκτο, μιῆς δʼ ἔτι δεύετο μοῦνον 1.733. ἀκτῖνος, τὴν οἵδε σιδηρείῃς ἐλάασκον 1.734. σφύρῃσιν, μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ζείουσαν ἀυτμήν. 1.735. ἐν δʼ ἔσαν Ἀντιόπης Ἀσωπίδος υἱέε δοιώ 1.736. Ἀμφίων καὶ Ζῆθος· ἀπύργωτος δʼ ἔτι Θήβη 1.737. κεῖτο πέλας, τῆς οἵγε νέον βάλλοντο δομαίους 1.738. ἱέμενοι. Ζῆθος μὲν ἐπωμαδὸν ἠέρταζεν 1.739. οὔρεος ἠλιβάτοιο κάρη, μογέοντι ἐοικώς· 1.740. Ἀμφίων δʼ ἐπί οἱ χρυσέῃ φόρμιγγι λιγαίνων 1.741. ἤιε, δὶς τόσση δὲ μετʼ ἴχνια νίσσετο πέτρη 1.742. ἑξείης δʼ ἤσκητο βαθυπλόκαμος Κυθέρεια 1.743. Ἄρεος ὀχμάζουσα θοὸν σάκος· ἐκ δέ οἱ ὤμου 1.744. πῆχυν ἔπι σκαιὸν ξυνοχὴ κεχάλαστο χιτῶνος 1.745. νέρθεν ὑπὲκ μαζοῖο· τὸ δʼ ἀντίον ἀτρεκὲς αὔτως 1.746. χαλκείῃ δείκηλον ἐν ἀσπίδι φαίνετʼ ἰδέσθαι. 1.747. ἐν δὲ βοῶν ἔσκεν λάσιος νομός· ἀμφὶ δὲ βουσὶν 1.748. Τηλεβόαι μάρναντο καὶ υἱέες Ἠλεκτρύωνος· 1.749. οἱ μὲν ἀμυνόμενοι, ἀτὰρ οἵγʼ ἐθέλοντες ἀμέρσαι 1.750. ληισταὶ Τάφιοι· τῶν δʼ αἵματι δεύετο λειμὼν 1.751. ἑρσήεις, πολέες δʼ ὀλίγους βιόωντο νομῆας. 1.752. ἐν δὲ δύω δίφροι πεπονήατο δηριόωντες. 1.753. καὶ τὸν μὲν προπάροιθε Πέλοψ ἴθυνε, τινάσσων 1.754. ἡνία, σὺν δέ οἱ ἔσκε παραιβάτις Ἱπποδάμεια· 1.755. τὸν δὲ μεταδρομάδην ἐπὶ Μυρτίλος ἤλασεν ἵππους 1.756. σὺν τῷ δʼ Οἰνόμαος προτενὲς δόρυ χειρὶ μεμαρπὼς 1.757. ἄξονος ἐν πλήμνῃσι παρακλιδὸν ἀγνυμένοιο 1.758. πῖπτεν, ἐπεσσύμενος Πελοπήια νῶτα δαΐξαι. 1.759. ἐν καὶ Ἀπόλλων Φοῖβος ὀιστεύων ἐτέτυκτο 1.760. βούπαις οὔπω πολλός, ἑὴν ἐρύοντα καλύπτρης 1.761. μητέρα θαρσαλέως Τιτυὸν μέγαν, ὅν ῥʼ ἔτεκέν γε 1.762. δῖʼ Ἐλάρη, θρέψεν δὲ καὶ ἂψ ἐλοχεύσατο Γαῖα. 1.763. ἐν καὶ Φρίξος ἔην Μινυήιος ὡς ἐτεόν περ 1.764. εἰσαΐων κριοῦ, ὁ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐξενέποντι ἐοικώς. 1.765. κείνους κʼ εἰσορόων ἀκέοις, ψεύδοιό τε θυμόν 1.766. ἐλπόμενος πυκινήν τινʼ ἀπὸ σφείων ἐσακοῦσαι 1.767. βάξιν, ὃ καὶ δηρόν περ ἐπʼ ἐλπίδι θηήσαιο. 1.768. τοῖʼ ἄρα δῶρα θεᾶς Τριτωνίδος ἦεν Ἀθήνης. 1.769. δεξιτερῇ δʼ ἕλεν ἔγχος ἑκηβόλον, ὅ ῥʼ Ἀταλάντη 1.770. Μαινάλῳ ἔν ποτέ οἱ ξεινήιον ἐγγυάλιξεν 1.771. πρόφρων ἀντομένη· περὶ γὰρ μενέαινεν ἕπεσθαι 1.772. τὴν ὁδόν· ἀλλὰ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἀπερήτυε κούρην 1.773. δεῖσεν δʼ ἀργαλέας ἔριδας φιλότητος ἕκητι. 1.774. βῆ δʼ ἴμεναι προτὶ ἄστυ, φαεινῷ ἀστέρι ἶσος 1.775. ὅν ῥά τε νηγατέῃσιν ἐεργόμεναι καλύβῃσιν 1.776. νύμφαι θηήσαντο δόμων ὕπερ ἀντέλλοντα 1.777. καί σφισι κυανέοιο διʼ ἠέρος ὄμματα θέλγει 1.778. καλὸν ἐρευθόμενος, γάνυται δέ τε ἠιθέοιο 1.779. παρθένος ἱμείρουσα μετʼ ἀλλοδαποῖσιν ἐόντος 1.780. ἀνδράσιν, ᾧ καί μιν μνηστὴν κομέουσι τοκῆες· 1.781. τῷ ἴκελος πρὸ πόληος ἀνὰ στίβον ἤιεν ἥρως. 1.782. καί ῥʼ ὅτε δὴ πυλέων τε καὶ ἄστεος ἐντὸς ἔβησαν 1.783. δημότεραι μὲν ὄπισθεν ἐπεκλονέοντο γυναῖκες 1.784. γηθόσυναι ξείνῳ· ὁ δʼ ἐπὶ χθονὸς ὄμματʼ ἐρείσας 1.785. νίσσετʼ ἀπηλεγέως, ὄφρʼ ἀγλαὰ δώμαθʼ ἵκανεν 1.786. Ὑψιπύλης· ἄνεσαν δὲ πύλας προφανέντι θεράπναι 1.787. δικλίδας, εὐτύκτοισιν ἀρηρεμένας σανίδεσσιν. 1.788. ἔνθα μιν Ἰφινόη κλισμῷ ἔνι παμφανόωντι 1.789. ἐσσυμένως καλῆς διὰ παστάδος εἷσεν ἄγουσα 1.790. ἀντία δεσποίνης· ἡ δʼ ἐγκλιδὸν ὄσσε βαλοῦσα 1.791. παρθενικὰς ἐρύθηνε παρηίδας· ἔμπα δὲ τόνγε 1.792. αἰδομένη μύθοισι προσέννεπεν αἱμυλίοισιν· 1.793. ‘ξεῖνε, τίη μίμνοντες ἐπὶ χρόνον ἔκτοθι πύργων 1.794. ἧσθʼ αὔτως; ἐπεὶ οὐ μὲν ὑπʼ ἀνδράσι ναίεται ἄστυ 1.795. ἀλλὰ Θρηικίης ἐπινάστιοι ἠπείροιο 1.796. πυροφόρους ἀρόωσι γύας. κακότητα δὲ πᾶσαν 1.797. ἐξερέω νημερτές, ἵνʼ εὖ γνοίητε καὶ αὐτοί. 1.798. εὖτε Θόας ἀστοῖσι πατὴρ ἐμὸς ἐμβασίλευεν 1.799. τηνίκα Θρηικίην, οἵ τʼ ἀντία ναιετάουσιν 1.800. δήμου ἀπορνύμενοι λαοὶ πέρθεσκον ἐπαύλους 1.801. ἐκ νηῶν, αὐτῇσι δʼ ἀπείρονα ληίδα κούραις 1.802. δεῦρʼ ἄγον· οὐλομένης δὲ θεᾶς πορσύνετο μῆτις 1.803. Κύπριδος, ἥ τέ σφιν θυμοφθόρον ἔμβαλεν ἄτην. 1.804. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπέστυγον, ἐκ δὲ μελάθρων 1.805. ᾗ ματίῃ εἴξαντες, ἀπεσσεύοντο γυναῖκας· 1.806. αὐτὰρ ληιάδεσσι δορικτήταις παρίαυον 1.807. σχέτλιοι. ἦ μὲν δηρὸν ἐτέτλαμεν, εἴ κέ ποτʼ αὖτις 1.808. ὀψὲ μεταστρέψωσι νόον· τὸ δὲ διπλόον αἰεὶ 1.809. πῆμα κακὸν προύβαινεν. ἀτιμάζοντο δὲ τέκνα 1.810. γνήσιʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροις, σκοτίη δʼ ἀνέτελλε γενέθλη. 1.811. αὔτως δʼ ἀδμῆτές τε κόραι, χῆραί τʼ ἐπὶ τῇσιν 1.812. μητέρες ἂμ πτολίεθρον ἀτημελέες ἀλάληντο. 1.813. οὐδὲ πατὴρ ὀλίγον περ ἑῆς ἀλέγιζε θυγατρός 1.814. εἰ καὶ ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖσι δαϊζομένην ὁρόῳτο 1.815. μητρυιῆς ὑπὸ χερσὶν ἀτασθάλου· οὐδʼ ἀπὸ μητρὸς 1.816. λώβην, ὡς τὸ πάροιθεν, ἀεικέα παῖδες ἄμυνον· 1.817. οὐδὲ κασιγνήτοισι κασιγνήτη μελε θυμῷ. 1.818. ἀλλʼ οἶαι κοῦραι ληίτιδες ἔν τε δόμοισιν 1.819. ἔν τε χοροῖς ἀγορῇ τε καὶ εἰλαπίνῃσι μέλοντο· 1.820. εἰσόκε τις θεὸς ἄμμιν ὑπέρβιον ἔμβαλε θάρσος 1.821. ἂψ ἀναερχομένους Θρῃκῶν ἄπο μηκέτι πύργοις 1.822. δέχθαι, ἵνʼ ἢ φρονέοιεν ἅπερ θέμις, ἠέ πῃ ἄλλῃ 1.823. αὐταῖς ληιάδεσσιν ἀφορμηθέντες ἵκοιντο. 1.824. οἱ δʼ ἄρα θεσσάμενοι παίδων γένος, ὅσσον ἔλειπτο 1.825. ἄρσεν ἀνὰ πτολίεθρον, ἔβαν πάλιν, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 1.826. Θρηικίης ἄροσιν χιονώδεα ναιετάουσιν. 1.827. τῶ ὑμεῖς στρωφᾶσθʼ ἐπιδήμιοι· εἰ δέ κεν αὖθι 1.828. ναιετάειν ἐθέλοις, καί τοι ἅδοι, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔπειτα 1.829. πατρὸς ἐμεῖο Θόαντος ἔχοις γέρας· οὐδέ τί σʼ οἴω 1.830. γαῖαν ὀνόσσεσθαι· περὶ γὰρ βαθυλήιος ἄλλων 1.831. νήσων, Αἰγαίῃ ὅσαι εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν. 1.832. ἀλλʼ ἄγε νῦν ἐπὶ νῆα κιὼν ἑτάροισιν ἐνίσπες 1.833. μύθους ἡμετέρους, μηδʼ ἔκτοθι μίμνε πόληος.’ 1.834. Ἴσκεν, ἀμαλδύνουσα φόνου τέλος, οἷον ἐτύχθη 1.835. ἀνδράσιν· αὐτὰρ ὁ τήνγε παραβλήδην προσέειπεν 1.836. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, μάλα κεν θυμηδέος ἀντιάσαιμεν 1.837. χρησμοσύνης, ἣν ἄμμι σέθεν χατέουσιν ὀπάζεις. 1.838. εἶμι δʼ ὑπότροπος αὖτις ἀνὰ πτόλιν, εὖτʼ ἂν ἕκαστα 1.839. ἐξείπω κατὰ κόσμον. ἀνακτορίη δὲ μελέσθω 1.840. σοίγʼ αὐτῇ καὶ νῆσος· ἔγωγε μὲν οὐκ ἀθερίζων 1.841. χάζομαι, ἀλλά με λυγροὶ ἐπισπέρχουσιν ἄεθλοι.’ 1.842. ἦ, καὶ δεξιτερῆς χειρὸς θίγεν· αἶψα δʼ ὀπίσσω 1.843. βῆ ῥʼ ἴμεν, ἀμφὶ δὲ τόνγε νεήνιδες ἄλλοθεν ἄλλαι 1.844. μυρίαι εἱλίσσοντο κεχαρμέναι, ὄφρα πυλάων 1.845. ἐξέμολεν. μετέπειτα δʼ ἐυτροχάλοισιν ἀμάξαις 1.846. ἀκτὴν εἰσαπέβαν, ξεινήια πολλὰ φέρουσαι 1.847. μῦθον ὅτʼ ἤδη πάντα διηνεκέως ἀγόρευσεν 1.848. τόν ῥα καλεσσαμένη διεπέφραδεν Ὑψιπύλεια· 1.849. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς ξεινοῦσθαι ἐπὶ σφέα δώματʼ ἄγεσκον 1.850. ῥηιδίως. Κύπρις γὰρ ἐπὶ γλυκὺν ἵμερον ὦρσεν 1.851. Ἡφαίστοιο χάριν πολυμήτιος, ὄφρα κεν αὖτις 1.852. ναίηται μετόπισθεν ἀκήρατος ἀνδράσι Λῆμνος. 1.853. ἔνθʼ ὁ μὲν Ὑψιπύλης βασιλήιον ἐς δόμον ὦρτο 1.854. Αἰσονίδης· οἱ δʼ ἄλλοι ὅπῃ καὶ ἔκυρσαν ἕκαστος 1.855. Ἡρακλῆος ἄνευθεν, ὁ γὰρ παρὰ νηὶ λέλειπτο 1.856. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν παῦροί τε διακρινθέντες ἑταῖροι. 1.857. αὐτίκα δʼ ἄστυ χοροῖσι καὶ εἰλαπίνῃσι γεγήθει 1.858. καπνῷ κνισήεντι περίπλεον· ἔξοχα δʼ ἄλλων 1.859. ἀθανάτων Ἥρης υἷα κλυτὸν ἠδὲ καὶ αὐτὴν 1.860. Κύπριν ἀοιδῇσιν θυέεσσί τε μειλίσσοντο. 1.861. ἀμβολίη δʼ εἰς ἦμαρ ἀεὶ ἐξ ἤματος ἦεν 1.862. ναυτιλίης· δηρὸν δʼ ἂν ἐλίνυον αὖθι μένοντες 1.863. εἰ μὴ ἀολλίσσας ἑτάρους ἀπάνευθε γυναικῶν 1.864. Ἡρακλέης τοίοισιν ἐνιπτάζων μετέειπεν· 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.867. κεῖθεν, ὀνοσσάμενοι πολιήτιδας; αὖθι δʼ ἕαδεν 1.868. ναίοντας λιπαρὴν ἄροσιν Λήμνοιο ταμέσθαι; 1.869. οὐ μὰν εὐκλειεῖς γε σὺν ὀθνείῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.870. ἐσσόμεθʼ ὧδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἐελμένοι· οὐδέ τι κῶας 1.871. αὐτόματον δώσει τις ἑλὼν θεὸς εὐξαμένοισιν. 1.872. ἴομεν αὖτις ἕκαστοι ἐπὶ σφέα· τὸν δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 1.873. Ὑψιπύλης εἰᾶτε πανήμερον, εἰσόκε Λῆμνον 1.874. παισὶν ἐσανδρώσῃ, μεγάλη τέ ἑ βάξις ἵκηται.’ 1.875. ὧς νείκεσσεν ὅμιλον· ἐναντία δʼ οὔ νύ τις ἔτλη 1.876. ὄμματʼ ἀνασχεθέειν, οὐδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι· 1.877. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀγορῆθεν ἐπαρτίζοντο νέεσθαι 1.878. σπερχόμενοι. ταὶ δέ σφιν ἐπέδραμον, εὖτʼ ἐδάησαν. 1.879. ὡς δʼ ὅτε λείρια καλὰ περιβρομέουσι μέλισσαι 1.880. πέτρης ἐκχύμεναι σιμβληίδος, ἀμφὶ δὲ λειμὼν 1.881. ἑρσήεις γάνυται, ταὶ δὲ γλυκὺν ἄλλοτε ἄλλον 1.882. καρπὸν ἀμέργουσιν πεποτημέναι· ὧς ἄρα ταίγε 1.883. ἐνδυκὲς ἀνέρας ἀμφὶ κινυρόμεναι προχέοντο 1.884. χερσί τε καὶ μύθοισιν ἐδεικανόωντο ἕκαστον 1.885. εὐχόμεναι μακάρεσσιν ἀπήμονα νόστον ὀπάσσαι. 1.886. ὧς δὲ καὶ Ὑψιπύλη ἠρήσατο χεῖρας ἑλοῦσα 1.887. Αἰσονίδεω, τὰ δέ οἱ ῥέε δάκρυα χήτει ἰόντος· 1.888. ‘Νίσσεο, καὶ σὲ θεοὶ σὺν ἀπηρέσιν αὖτις ἑταίροις 1.889. χρύσειον βασιλῆι δέρος κομίσειαν ἄγοντα 1.890. αὔτως, ὡς ἐθέλεις καί τοι φίλον. ἥδε δὲ νῆσος 1.891. σκῆπτρά τε πατρὸς ἐμεῖο παρέσσεται, ἢν καὶ ὀπίσσω 1.892. δή ποτε νοστήσας ἐθέλῃς ἄψορρον ἱκέσθαι. 1.893. ῥηιδίως δʼ ἂν ἑοῖ καὶ ἀπείρονα λαὸν ἀγείραις 1.894. ἄλλων ἐκ πολίων· ἀλλʼ οὐ σύγε τήνδε μενοινὴν 1.895. σχήσεις, οὔτʼ αὐτὴ προτιόσσομαι ὧδε τελεῖσθαι. 1.896. μνώεο μὴν ἀπεών περ ὁμῶς καὶ νόστιμος ἤδη 1.897. Ὑψιπύλης· λίπε δʼ ἧμιν ἔπος, τό κεν ἐξανύσαιμι 1.898. πρόφρων, ἢν ἄρα δή με θεοὶ δώωσι τεκέσθαι.’ 1.899. τὴν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀγαιόμενος προσέειπεν· 1.900. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, τὰ μὲν οὕτω ἐναίσιμα πάντα γένοιτο 1.901. ἐκ μακάρων· τύνη δʼ ἐμέθεν πέρι θυμὸν ἀρείω 1.902. ἴσχανʼ, ἐπεὶ πάτρην μοι ἅλις Πελίαο ἕκητι 1.903. ναιετάειν· μοῦνόν με θεοὶ λύσειαν ἀέθλων. 1.904. εἰ δʼ οὔ μοι πέπρωται ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 1.905. τηλοῦ ἀναπλώοντι, σὺ δʼ ἄρσενα παῖδα τέκηαι 1.906. πέμπε μιν ἡβήσαντα Πελασγίδος ἔνδον Ἰωλκοῦ 1.907. πατρί τʼ ἐμῷ καὶ μητρὶ δύης ἄκος, ἢν ἄρα τούσγε 1.908. τέτμῃ ἔτι ζώοντας, ἵνʼ ἄνδιχα τοῖο ἄνακτος 1.909. σφοῖσιν πορσύνωνται ἐφέστιοι ἐν μεγάροισιν.’ 2.835. ἔνθα δὲ ναυτιλίης μὲν ἐρητύοντο μέλεσθαι 2.836. ἀμφὶ δὲ κηδείῃ νέκυος μένον ἀσχαλόωντες. 2.837. ἤματα δὲ τρία πάντα γόων· ἑτέρῳ δέ μιν ἤδη 2.838. τάρχυον μεγαλωστί· συνεκτερέιζε δὲ λαὸς 2.839. αὐτῷ ὁμοῦ βασιλῆι Λύκῳ· παρὰ δʼ ἄσπετα μῆλα 2.840. ἣ θέμις οἰχομένοισι, ταφήια λαιμοτόμησαν. 2.841. καὶ δή τοι κέχυται τοῦδʼ ἀνέρος ἐν χθονὶ κείνῃ 2.842. τύμβος· σῆμα δʼ ἔπεστι καὶ ὀψιγόνοισιν ἰδέσθαι 2.843. νηίου ἐκ κοτίνοιο φάλαγξ· θαλέθει δέ τε φύλλοις 2.844. ἄκρης τυτθὸν ἔνερθʼ Ἀχερουσίδος. εἰ δέ με καὶ τὸ 2.845. χρειὼ ἀπηλεγέως Μουσέων ὕπο γηρύσασθαι 2.846. τόνδε πολισσοῦχον διεπέφραδε Βοιωτοῖσιν 2.847. Νισαίοισί τε Φοῖβος ἐπιρρήδην ἱλάεσθαι 2.848. ἀμφὶ δὲ τήνγε φάλαγγα παλαιγενέος κοτίνοιο 2.849. ἄστυ βαλεῖν· οἱ δʼ ἀντὶ θεουδέος Αἰολίδαο 2.850. Ἴδμονος εἰσέτι νῦν Ἀγαμήστορα κυδαίνουσιν. 2.851. τίς γὰρ δὴ θάνεν ἄλλος; ἐπεὶ καὶ ἔτʼ αὖτις ἔχευαν 2.852. ἥρωες τότε τύμβον ἀποφθιμένου ἑτάροιο. 2.853. δοιὰ γὰρ οὖν κείνων ἔτι σήματα φαίνεται ἀνδρῶν. 2.854. Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θανέειν φάτις· οὐδέ οἱ ἦεν 2.855. μοῖρʼ ἔτι ναυτίλλεσθαι ἑκαστέρω. ἀλλά νυ καὶ τὸν 2.856. αὖθι μινυνθαδίη πάτρης ἑκὰς εὔνασε νοῦσος 2.857. εἰσότʼ Ἀβαντιάδαο νέκυν κτερέιξεν ὅμιλος. 2.858. ἄτλητον δʼ ὀλοῷ ἐπὶ πήματι κῆδος ἕλοντο. 2.859. δὴ γὰρ ἐπεὶ καὶ τόνδε παρασχεδὸν ἐκτερέιξαν 2.860. αὐτοῦ, ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἁλὸς προπάροιθε πεσόντες 2.861. ἐντυπὰς εὐκήλως εἰλυμένοι οὔτε τι σίτου 2.862. μνώοντʼ οὔτε ποτοῖο· κατήμυσαν δʼ ἀχέεσσιν 2.863. θυμόν, ἐπεὶ μάλα πολλὸν ἀπʼ ἐλπίδος ἔπλετο νόστος. 2.864. καί νύ κʼ ἔτι προτέρω τετιημένοι ἰσχανόωντο 2.865. εἰ μὴ ἄρʼ Ἀγκαίῳ περιώσιον ἔμβαλεν Ἥρη 2.866. θάρσος, ὃν Ἰμβρασίοισι παρʼ ὕδασιν Ἀστυπάλαια 2.867. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι· περιπρὸ γὰρ εὖ ἐκέκαστο 2.868. ἰθύνειν, Πηλῆα δʼ ἐπεσσύμενος προσέειπεν· 2.869. ‘Αἰακίδη, πῶς καλὸν ἀφειδήσαντας ἀέθλων 2.870. γαίῃ ἐν ἀλλοδαπῇ δὴν ἔμμεναι; οὐ μὲν ἄρηος 2.871. ἴδριν ἐόντά με τόσσον ἄγει μετὰ κῶας Ἰήσων 2.872. παρθενίης ἀπάνευθεν, ὅσον τʼ ἐπιίστορα νηῶν. 2.873. τῶ μή μοι τυτθόν γε δέος περὶ νηὶ πελέσθω. 2.874. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι δεῦρο δαήμονες ἄνδρες ἔασιν 2.875. τῶν ὅτινα πρύμνης ἐπιβήσομεν, οὔτις ἰάψει 2.876. ναυτιλίην. ἀλλʼ ὦκα, παραιφάμενος τάδε πάντα 2.877. θαρσαλέως ὀρόθυνον ἐπιμνήσασθαι ἀέθλου.’ 2.878. ὧς φάτο· τοῖο δὲ θυμὸς ὀρέξατο γηθοσύνῃσιν. 2.879. αὐτίκα δʼ οὐ μετὰ δηρὸν ἐνὶ μέσσοις ἀγόρευσεν· 2.880. ‘δαιμόνιοι, τί νυ πένθος ἐτώσιον ἴσχομεν αὔτως; 2.881. οἱ μὲν γάρ ποθι τοῦτον, ὃν ἔλλαχον, οἶτον ὄλοντο· 2.882. ἡμῖν δʼ ἐν γὰρ ἔασι κυβερνητῆρες ὁμίλῳ 2.883. καὶ πολέες. τῶ μή τι διατριβώμεθα πείρης· 2.884. ἀλλʼ ἔγρεσθʼ εἰς ἔργον, ἀπορρίψαντες ἀνίας.’ 2.885. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀμηχανέων προσέειπεν· 2.886. ‘Αἰακίδη, πῇ δʼ οἵδε κυβερνητῆρες ἔασιν; 2.887. οὓς μὲν γὰρ τὸ πάροιθε δαήμονας εὐχόμεθʼ εἶναι 2.888. οἱ δὲ κατηφήσαντες ἐμεῦ πλέον ἀσχαλόωσιν. 2.889. τῶ καὶ ὁμοῦ φθιμένοισι κακὴν προτιόσσομαι ἄτην 2.890. εἰ δὴ μήτʼ ὀλοοῖο μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 2.891. ἔσσεται, ἠὲ καὶ αὖτις ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 2.892. πετράων ἔκτοσθε, κατʼ αὐτόθι δʼ ἄμμε καλύψει 2.893. ἀκλειῶς κακὸς οἶτος, ἐτώσια γηράσκοντας.’ 2.894. ὧς ἔφατʼ· Ἀγκαῖος δὲ μάλʼ ἐσσυμένως ὑπέδεκτο 2.895. νῆα θοὴν ἄξειν· δὴ γὰρ θεοῦ ἐτράπεθʼ ὁρμῇ. 2.896. τὸν δὲ μετʼ Ἐργῖνος καὶ Ναύπλιος Εὔφημός τε 2.897. ὤρνυντʼ, ἰθύνειν λελιημένοι. ἀλλʼ ἄρα τούσγε 2.898. ἔσχεθον· Ἀγκαίῳ δὲ πολεῖς ᾔνησαν ἑταίρων. 2.899. Ἠῷοι δἤπειτα δυωδεκάτῳ ἐπέβαινον 2.900. ἤματι· δὴ γάρ σφιν ζεφύρου μέγας οὖρος ἄητο. 2.901. καρπαλίμως δʼ Ἀχέροντα διεξεπέρησαν ἐρετμοῖς 2.902. ἐκ δʼ ἔχεαν πίσυνοι ἀνέμῳ λίνα, πουλὺ δʼ ἐπιπρὸ 2.903. λαιφέων πεπταμένων τέμνον πλόον εὐδιόωντες. 2.904. ὦκα δὲ Καλλιχόροιο παρὰ προχοὰς ποταμοῖο 2.905. ἤλυθον, ἔνθʼ ἐνέπουσι Διὸς Νυσήιον υἷα 2.906. Ἰνδῶν ἡνίκα φῦλα λιπὼν κατενάσσατο Θήβας 2.907. ὀργιάσαι, στῆσαί τε χοροὺς ἄντροιο πάροιθεν 2.908. ᾧ ἐν ἀμειδήτους ἁγίας ηὐλίζετο νύκτας 2.909. ἐξ οὗ Καλλίχορον ποταμὸν περιναιετάοντες 2.910. ἠδὲ καὶ Αὐλίον ἄντρον ἐπωνυμίην καλέουσιν. 2.911. ἔνθεν δὲ Σθενέλου τάφον ἔδρακον Ἀκτορίδαο 2.912. ὅς ῥά τʼ Ἀμαζονίδων πολυθαρσέος ἐκ πολέμοιο 2.913. ἂψ ἀνιὼν--δὴ γὰρ συνανήλυθεν Ἡρακλῆι-- 2.914. βλήμενος ἰῷ κεῖθεν ἐπʼ ἀγχιάλου θάνεν ἀκτῆς. 2.915. οὐ μέν θην προτέρω ἔτʼ ἐμέτρεον. ἧκε γὰρ αὐτὴ 2.916. Φερσεφόνη ψυχὴν πολυδάκρυον Ἀκτορίδαο 2.917. λισσομένην τυτθόν περ ὁμήθεας ἄνδρας ἰδέσθαι. 2.918. τύμβου δὲ στεφάνης ἐπιβὰς σκοπιάζετο νῆα 2.919. τοῖος ἐών, οἷος πόλεμόνδʼ ἴεν· ἀμφὶ δὲ καλὴ 2.920. τετράφαλος φοίνικι λόφῳ ἐπελάμπετο πήληξ. 2.921. καί ῥʼ ὁ μὲν αὖτις ἔδυνε μέγαν ζόφον· οἱ δʼ ἐσιδόντες 2.922. θάμβησαν· τοὺς δʼ ὦρσε θεοπροπέων ἐπικέλσαι 2.923. Ἀμπυκίδης Μόψος λοιβῇσί τε μειλίξασθαι. 2.924. οἱ δʼ ἀνὰ μὲν κραιπνῶς λαῖφος σπάσαν, ἐκ δὲ βαλόντες 2.925. πείσματʼ ἐν αἰγιαλῷ Σθενέλου τάφον ἀμφεπένοντο 2.926. χύτλα τέ οἱ χεύοντο, καὶ ἥγνισαν ἔντομα μήλων. 2.927. ἄνδιχα δʼ αὖ χύτλων νηοσσόῳ Ἀπόλλωνι 2.928. βωμὸν δειμάμενοι μῆρʼ ἔφλεγον ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 2.929. θῆκε λύρην· ἐκ τοῦ δὲ Λύρη πέλει οὔνομα χώρῳ. 2.942. Κρωβίαλον, Κρώμναν τε καὶ ὑλήεντα Κύτωρον. 2.975. πεμπάζοι· μία δʼ οἴη ἐτήτυμος ἔπλετο πηγή. 2.996. οὐ γὰρ ὁμηγερέες μίαν ἂμ πόλιν, ἀλλʼ ἀνὰ γαῖαν 2.997. κεκριμέναι κατὰ φῦλα διάτριχα ναιετάασκον· 2.1002. τοῖσι μὲν οὔτε βοῶν ἄροτος μέλει, οὔτε τις ἄλλη 2.1003. φυταλιὴ καρποῖο μελίφρονος· οὐδὲ μὲν οἵγε 2.1004. ποίμνας ἑρσήεντι νομῷ ἔνι ποιμαίνουσιν. 2.1005. ἀλλὰ σιδηροφόρον στυφελὴν χθόνα γατομέοντες 2.1006. ὦνον ἀμείβονται βιοτήσιον, οὐδέ ποτέ σφιν 2.1007. ἠὼς ἀντέλλει καμάτων ἄτερ, ἀλλὰ κελαινῇ 2.1008. λιγνύι καὶ καπνῷ κάματον βαρὺν ὀτλεύουσιν. 2.1010. γνάμψαντες σώοντο παρὲκ Τιβαρηνίδα γαῖαν. 2.1011. ἔνθʼ ἐπεὶ ἄρ κε τέκωνται ὑπʼ ἀνδράσι τέκνα γυναῖκες 2.1012. αὐτοὶ μὲν στενάχουσιν ἐνὶ λεχέεσσι πεσόντες 2.1013. κράατα δησάμενοι· ταὶ δʼ εὖ κομέουσιν ἐδωδῇ 2.1014. ἀνέρας, ἠδὲ λοετρὰ λεχώια τοῖσι πένονται. 2.1018. ἀλλοίη δὲ δίκη καὶ θέσμια τοῖσι τέτυκται. 2.1019. ὅσσα μὲν ἀμφαδίην ῥέζειν θέμις, ἢ ἐνὶ δήμῳ 2.1020. ἢ ἀγορῇ, τάδε πάντα δόμοις ἔνι μηχανόωνται· 2.1021. ὅσσα δʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροις πεπονήμεθα, κεῖνα θύραζε 2.1022. ἀψεγέως μέσσῃσιν ἐνὶ ῥέζουσιν ἀγυιαῖς. 2.1023. οὐδʼ εὐνῆς αἰδὼς ἐπιδήμιος, ἀλλά, σύες ὣς 2.1024. φορβάδες, οὐδʼ ἠβαιὸν ἀτυζόμενοι παρεόντας 2.1025. μίσγονται χαμάδις ξυνῇ φιλότητι γυναικῶν. 2.1026. αὐτὰρ ἐν ὑψίστῳ βασιλεὺς μόσσυνι θαάσσων 2.1027. ἰθείας πολέεσσι δίκας λαοῖσι δικάζει 2.1028. σχέτλιος. ἢν γάρ πού τί θεμιστεύων ἀλίτηται 2.1029. λιμῷ μιν κεῖνʼ ἦμαρ ἐνικλείσαντες ἔχουσιν. 2.1047. ‘νῆσος μὲν πέλας ἧμιν Ἀρητιάς· ἴστε καὶ αὐτοὶ 2.1048. τούσδʼ ὄρνιθας ἰδόντες. ἐγὼ δʼ οὐκ ἔλπομαι ἰοὺς 2.1049. τόσσον ἐπαρκέσσειν εἰς ἔκβασιν. ἀλλά τινʼ ἄλλην 2.1050. μῆτιν πορσύνωμεν ἐπίρροθον, εἴ γʼ ἐπικέλσαι 2.1051. μέλλετε, Φινῆος μεμνημένοι, ὡς ἐπέτελλεν. 2.1052. οὐδὲ γὰρ Ἡρακλέης, ὁπότʼ ἤλυθεν Ἀρκαδίηνδε 2.1053. πλωίδας ὄρνιθας Στυμφαλίδας ἔσθενε λίμνης 2.1054. ὤσασθαι τόξοισι, τὸ μέν τʼ ἐγὼ αὐτὸς ὄπωπα. 2.1055. ἀλλʼ ὅγε χαλκείην πλατάγην ἐνὶ χερσὶ τινάσσων 2.1056. δούπει ἐπὶ σκοπιῆς περιμήκεος· αἱ δʼ ἐφέβοντο 2.1057. τηλοῦ, ἀτυζηλῷ ὑπὸ δείματι κεκληγυῖαι. 2.1058. τῶ καὶ νῦν τοίην τινʼ ἐπιφραζώμεθα μῆτιν· 2.1059. αὐτὸς δʼ ἂν τὸ πάροιθεν ἐπιφρασθεὶς ἐνέποιμι. 2.1060. ἀνθέμενοι κεφαλῇσιν ἀερσιλόφους τρυφαλείας 2.1061. ἡμίσεες μὲν ἐρέσσετʼ ἀμοιβαδίς, ἡμίσεες δὲ 2.1062. δούρασί τε ξυστοῖσι καὶ ἀσπίσιν ἄρσετε νῆα. 2.1063. αὐτὰρ πασσυδίῃ περιώσιον ὄρνυτʼ ἀυτὴν 2.1064. ἀθρόοι, ὄφρα κολῳὸν ἀηθείῃ φοβέωνται 2.1065. νεύοντάς τε λόφους καὶ ἐπήορα δούραθʼ ὕπερθεν. 2.1066. εἰ δέ κεν αὐτὴν νῆσον ἱκώμεθα, δὴ τότʼ ἔπειτα 2.1067. σὺν κελάδῳ σακέεσσι πελώριον ὄρσετε δοῦπον.’ 2.1068. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πάντεσσι δʼ ἐπίρροθος ἥνδανε μῆτις. 2.1069. ἀμφὶ δὲ χαλκείας κόρυθας κεφαλῇσιν ἔθεντο 2.1070. δεινὸν λαμπομένας, ἐπὶ δὲ λόφοι ἐσσείοντο 2.1071. φοινίκεοι. καὶ τοὶ μὲν ἀμοιβήδην ἐλάασκον· 2.1072. τοὶ δʼ αὖτʼ ἐγχείῃσι καὶ ἀσπίσι νῆʼ ἐκάλυψαν. 2.1073. ὡς δʼ ὅτε τις κεράμῳ κατερέψεται ἑρκίον ἀνήρ 2.1074. δώματος ἀγλαΐην τε καὶ ὑετοῦ ἔμμεναι ἄλκαρ 2.1075. ἄλλῳ δʼ ἔμπεδον ἄλλος ὁμῶς ἐπαμοιβὸς ἄρηρεν· 2.1076. ὧς οἵγʼ ἀσπίσι νῆα συναρτύναντες ἔρεψαν. 2.1077. οἵη δὲ κλαγγὴ δῄου πέλει ἐξ ὁμάδοιο 2.1078. ἀνδρῶν κινυμένων, ὁπότε ξυνίωσι φάλαγγες 2.1079. τοίη ἄρʼ ὑψόθι νηὸς ἐς ἠέρα κίδνατʼ ἀυτή. 2.1080. οὐδέ τινʼ οἰωνῶν ἔτʼ ἐσέδρακον, ἀλλʼ ὅτε νήσῳ 2.1081. χρίμψαντες σακέεσσιν ἐπέκτυπον, αὐτίκʼ ἄρʼ οἵγε 2.1082. μυρίοι ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα πεφυζότες ἠερέθοντο. 2.1083. ὡς δʼ ὁπότε Κρονίδης πυκινὴν ἐφέηκε χάλαζαν 2.1084. ἐκ νεφέων ἀνά τʼ ἄστυ καὶ οἰκία, τοὶ δʼ ὑπὸ τοῖσιν 2.1085. ἐνναέται κόναβον τεγέων ὕπερ εἰσαΐοντες 2.1086. ἧνται ἀκήν, ἐπεὶ οὔ σφε κατέλλαβε χείματος ὥρη 2.1087. ἀπροφάτως, ἀλλὰ πρὶν ἐκαρτύναντο μέλαθρον· 2.1088. ὧς πυκινὰ πτερὰ τοῖσιν ἐφίεσαν ἀίσσοντες 2.1089. ὕψι μάλʼ ἂμ πέλαγος περάτης εἰς οὔρεα γαίης. 2.1090. τίς γὰρ δὴ Φινῆος ἔην νόος, ἐνθάδε κέλσαι 2.1091. ἀνδρῶν ἡρώων θεῖον στόλον; ἢ καὶ ἔπειτα 2.1092. ποῖον ὄνειαρ ἔμελλεν ἐελδομένοισιν ἱκέσθαι; 2.1097. καὶ δὴ ἔσαν νήσοιο μάλα σχεδὸν ἤματι κείνῳ. 2.1098. Ζεὺς δʼ ἀνέμου βορέαο μένος κίνησεν ἀῆναι 2.1099. ὕδατι σημαίνων διερὴν ὁδὸν Ἀρκτούροιο· 2.1147. Φυξίῳ ἐκ πάντων Κρονίδῃ Διί. καί μιν ἔδεκτο 2.1155. τῷδε Κυτίσσωρος πέλει οὔνομα, τῷ δέ τε Φρόντις 2.1169. πασσυδίῃ δἤπειτα κίον μετὰ νηὸν Ἄρηος 2.1170. μῆλʼ ἱερευσόμενοι· περὶ δʼ ἐσχάρῃ ἐστήσαντο 2.1171. ἐσσυμένως, ἥ τʼ ἐκτὸς ἀνηρεφέος πέλε νηοῦ 2.1172. στιάων· εἴσω δὲ μέλας λίθος ἠρήρειστο 2.1173. ἱερός, ᾧ ποτε πᾶσαι Ἀμαζόνες εὐχετόωντο. 2.1174. οὐδέ σφιν θέμις ἦεν, ὅτʼ ἀντιπέρηθεν ἵκοιντο 2.1175. μήλων τʼ ἠδὲ βοῶν τῇδʼ ἐσχάρῃ ἱερὰ καίειν· 2.1176. ἀλλʼ ἵππους δαίτρευον, ἐπηετανὸν κομέουσαι. 2.1177. αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ ῥέξαντες ἐπαρτέα δαῖτʼ ἐπάσαντο 2.1178. δὴ τότ ἄρʼ Αἰσονίδης μετεφώνεεν, ἦρχέ τε μύθων· 2.1179. ‘Ζεὺς ἐτεῇ τὰ ἕκαστʼ ἐπιδέρκεται· οὐδέ μιν ἄνδρες 2.1180. λήθομεν ἔμπεδον, οἵ τε θεουδέες οὐδὲ δίκαιοι. 2.1181. ὡς μὲν γὰρ πατέρʼ ὑμὸν ὑπεξείρυτο φόνοιο 2.1182. μητρυιῆς, καὶ νόσφιν ἀπειρέσιον πόρεν ὄλβον· 2.1183. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὑμέας αὖτις ἀπήμονας ἐξεσάωσεν 2.1184. χείματος οὐλομένοιο. πάρεστι δὲ τῆσδʼ ἐπὶ νηὸς 2.1185. ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα νέεσθαι, ὅπῃ φίλον, εἴτε μετʼ Αἶαν 2.1186. εἶτε μετʼ ἀφνειὴν θείου πόλιν Ὀρχομενοῖο. 2.1187. τὴν γὰρ Ἀθηναίη τεχνήσατο, καὶ τάμε χαλκῷ 2.1188. δούρατα Πηλιάδος κορυφῆς πέρι· σὺν δέ οἱ Ἄργος 2.1189. τεῦξεν. ἀτὰρ κείνην γε κακὸν διὰ κῦμʼ ἐκέδασσεν 2.1190. πρὶν καὶ πετράων σχεδὸν ἐλθεῖν, αἵ τʼ ἐνὶ πόντῳ 2.1191. στεινωπῷ συνίασι πανήμεροι ἀλλήλῃσιν. 2.1192. ἀλλʼ ἄγεθʼ ὧδε καὶ αὐτοὶ ἐς Ἑλλάδα μαιομένοισιν 2.1193. κῶας ἄγειν χρύσειον ἐπίρροθοι ἄμμι πέλεσθε 2.1194. καὶ πλόου ἡγεμονῆες, ἐπεὶ Φρίξοιο θυηλὰς 2.1195. στέλλομαι ἀμπλήσων, Ζηνὸς χόλον Αἰολίδῃσιν.’ 2.1196. ἴσκε παρηγορέων· οἱ δʼ ἔστυγον εἰσαΐοντες. 2.1197. οὐ γὰρ ἔφαν τεύξεσθαι ἐνηέος Αἰήταο 2.1198. κῶας ἄγειν κριοῖο μεμαότας, ὧδε δʼ ἔειπεν 2.1199. Ἄργος, ἀτεμβόμενος τοῖον στόλον ἀμφιπένεσθαι· 2.1200. ‘ὦ φίλοι, ἡμέτερον μὲν ὅσον σθένος, οὔποτʼ ἀρωγῆς 2.1201. σχήσεται, οὐδʼ ἠβαιόν, ὅτε χρειώ τις ἵκηται. 2.1202. ἀλλʼ αἰνῶς ὀλοῇσιν ἀπηνείῃσιν ἄρηρεν 2.1203. Αἰήτης· τῶ καὶ περιδείδια ναυτίλλεσθαι. 2.1204. στεῦται δʼ Ἠελίου γόνος ἔμμεναι· ἀμφὶ δὲ Κόλχων 2.1205. ἔθνεα ναιετάουσιν ἀπείρονα· καὶ δέ κεν Ἄρει 2.1206. σμερδαλέην ἐνοπὴν μέγα τε σθένος ἰσοφαρίζοι. 2.1207. οὐ μὰν οὐδʼ ἀπάνευθεν ἑλεῖν δέρος Αἰήταο 2.1208. ῥηίδιον, τοῖός μιν ὄφις περί τʼ ἀμφί τʼ ἔρυται 2.1209. ἀθάνατος καὶ ἄυπνος, ὃν αὐτὴ Γαῖʼ ἀνέφυσεν 2.1210. Καυκάσου ἐν κνημοῖσι, Τυφαονίη ὅθι πέτρη 2.1211. ἔνθα Τυφάονά φασι Διὸς Κρονίδαο κεραυνῷ 2.1212. βλήμενον, ὁππότε οἱ στιβαρὰς ἐπορέξατο χεῖρας 2.1213. θερμὸν ἀπὸ κρατὸς στάξαι φόνον· ἵκετο δʼ αὔτως 2.1214. οὔρεα καὶ πεδίον Νυσήιον, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 2.1215. κεῖται ὑποβρύχιος Σερβωνίδος ὕδασι λίμνης.’ 2.1216. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πολέεσσι δʼ ἐπὶ χλόος εἷλε παρειὰς 2.1217. αὐτίκα, τοῖον ἄεθλον ὅτʼ ἔκλυον. αἶψα δὲ Πηλεὺς 2.1218. θαρσαλέοις ἐπέεσσιν ἀμείψατο, φώνησέν τε· 2.1219. ‘μηδʼ οὕτως, ἠθεῖε, λίην δειδίσσεο θυμῷ. 2.1220. οὔτε γὰρ ὧδʼ ἀλκὴν ἐπιδευόμεθʼ, ὥστε χερείους 2.1221. ἔμμεναι Αἰήταο σὺν ἔντεσι πειρηθῆναι. 2.1222. ἀλλὰ καὶ ἡμέας οἴω ἐπισταμένους πολέμοιο 2.1223. κεῖσε μολεῖν, μακάρων σχεδὸν αἵματος ἐκγεγαῶτας. 2.1224. τῶ εἰ μὴ φιλότητι δέρος χρύσειον ὀπάσσει 2.1225. οὔ οἱ χραισμήσειν ἐπιέλπομαι ἔθνεα Κόλχων.’ 2.1226. ὧς οἵγʼ ἀλλήλοισιν ἀμοιβαδὸν ἠγορόωντο 2.1227. μέσφʼ αὖτις δόρποιο κορεσσάμενοι κατέδαρθεν. 2.1228. ἦρι δʼ ἀνεγρομένοισιν ἐυκραὴς ἄεν οὖρος· 2.1229. ἱστία δʼ ἤειραν, τὰ δʼ ὑπαὶ ῥιπῆς ἀνέμοιο 2.1230. τείνετο· ῥίμφα δὲ νῆσον ἀποπροέλειπον Ἄρηος. 2.1231. νυκτὶ δʼ ἐπιπλομένῃ Φιλυρηίδα νῆσον ἄμειβον· 2.1232. ἔνθα μὲν Οὐρανίδης Φιλύρῃ Κρόνος, εὖτʼ ἐν Ὀλύμπῳ 2.1233. Τιτήνων ἤνασσεν, ὁ δὲ Κρηταῖον ὑπʼ ἄντρον 2.1234. Ζεὺς ἔτι Κουρήτεσσι μετετρέφετʼ Ἰδαίοισιν 2.1235. Ῥείην ἐξαπαφών παρελέξατο· τοὺς δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 2.1236. τέτμε θεὰ μεσσηγύς· ὁ δʼ ἐξ εὐνῆς ἀνορούσας 2.1237. ἔσσυτο χαιτήεντι φυὴν ἐναλίγκιος ἵππῳ· 2.1238. ἡ δʼ αἰδοῖ χῶρόν τε καὶ ἤθεα κεῖνα λιποῦσα 2.1239. Ὠκεανὶς Φιλύρη εἰς οὔρεα μακρὰ Πελασγῶν 2.1240. ἦλθʼ, ἵνα δὴ Χείρωνα πελώριον, ἄλλα μὲν ἵππῳ 2.1241. ἄλλα θεῷ ἀτάλαντον, ἀμοιβαίῃ τέκεν εὐνῇ. 2.1242. κεῖθεν δʼ αὖ Μάκρωνας ἀπειρεσίην τε Βεχείρων 2.1243. γαῖαν ὑπερφιάλους τε παρεξενέοντο Σάπειρας 2.1244. Βύζηράς τʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν· ἐπιπρὸ γὰρ αἰὲν ἔτεμνον 2.1245. ἐσσυμένως, λιαροῖο φορεύμενοι ἐξ ἀνέμοιο. 2.1246. καὶ δὴ νισσομένοισι μυχὸς διεφαίνετο Πόντου. 2.1247. καὶ δὴ Καυκασίων ὀρέων ἀνέτελλον ἐρίπναι 2.1248. ἠλίβατοι, τόθι γυῖα περὶ στυφελοῖσι πάγοισιν 2.1249. ἰλλόμενος χαλκέῃσιν ἀλυκτοπέδῃσι Προμηθεὺς 2.1250. αἰετὸν ἥπατι φέρβε παλιμπετὲς ἀίσσοντα. 2.1251. τὸν μὲν ἐπʼ ἀκροτάτης ἴδον ἕσπερον ὀξέι ῥοίζῳ 2.1252. νηὸς ὑπερπτάμενον νεφέων σχεδόν· ἀλλὰ καὶ ἔμπης 2.1253. λαίφεα πάντʼ ἐτίναξε, παραιθύξας πτερύγεσσιν. 2.1254. οὐ γὰρʼ ὅγʼ αἰθερίοιο φυὴν ἔχεν οἰωνοῖο 2.1255. ἶσα δʼ ἐυξέστοις ὠκύπτερα πάλλεν ἐρετμοῖς 2.1256. δηρὸν δʼ. οὐ μετέπειτα πολύστονον ἄιον αὐδὴν 2.1257. ἧπαρ ἀνελκομένοιο Προμηθέος· ἔκτυπε δʼ αἰθὴρ 2.1258. οἰμωγῇ, μέσφʼ αὖτις ἀπʼ οὔρεος ἀίσσοντα 2.1259. αἰετὸν ὠμηστὴν αὐτὴν ὁδὸν εἰσενόησαν. 2.1260. ἐννύχιοι δʼ Ἄργοιο δαημοσύνῃσιν ἵκοντο 2.1261. Φᾶσίν τʼ εὐρὺ ῥέοντα, καὶ ἔσχατα πείρατα πόντοι 2.1262. αὐτίκα δʼ ἱστία μὲν καὶ ἐπίκριον ἔνδοθι κοίλης 2.1263. ἱστοδόκης στείλαντες ἐκόσμεον· ἐν δὲ καὶ αὐτὸν 2.1264. ἱστὸν ἄφαρ χαλάσαντο παρακλιδόν· ὦκα δʼ ἐρετμοῖς 2.1265. εἰσέλασαν ποταμοῖο μέγαν ῥόον· αὐτὰρ ὁ πάντῃ 2.1266. καχλάζων ὑπόεικεν. ἔχον δʼ ἐπʼ ἀριστερὰ χειρῶν 2.1267. Καύκασον αἰπήεντα Κυταιίδα τε πτόλιν Αἴης 2.1268. ἔνθεν δʼ αὖ πεδίον τὸ Ἀρήιον ἱερά τʼ ἄλση 2.1269. τοῖο θεοῦ, τόθι κῶας ὄφις εἴρυτο δοκεύων 2.1270. πεπτάμενον λασίοισιν ἐπὶ δρυὸς ἀκρεμόνεσσιν. 2.1271. αὐτὸς δʼ Αἰσονίδης χρυσέῳ ποταμόνδε κυπέλλῳ 2.1272. οἴνου ἀκηρασίοιο μελισταγέας χέε λοιβὰς 2.1273. γαίῃ τʼ ἐνναέταις τε θεοῖς ψυχαῖς τε καμόντων 2.1274. ἡρώων· γουνοῦτο δʼ ἀπήμονας εἶναι ἀρωγοὺς 2.1275. εὐμενέως, καὶ νηὸς ἐναίσιμα πείσματα δέχθαι. 2.1276. αὐτίκα δʼ Ἀγκαῖος τοῖον μετὰ μῦθον ἔειπεν· 2.1277. ‘Κολχίδα μὲν δὴ γαῖαν ἱκάνομεν ἠδὲ ῥέεθρα 2.1278. Φάσιδος· ὥρη δʼ ἧμιν ἐνὶ σφίσι μητιάασθαι 2.1279. εἴτʼ οὖν μειλιχίῃ πειρησόμεθʼ Αἰήταο 2.1280. εἴτε καὶ ἀλλοίη τις ἐπήβολος ἔσσεται ὁρμή.’ 3.1. εἰ δʼ ἄγε νῦν, Ἐρατώ, παρά θʼ ἵστασο, καί μοι ἔνισπε 3.210. τοῖσι δὲ νισσομένοις Ἥρη φίλα μητιόωσα 3.211. ἠέρα πουλὺν ἐφῆκε διʼ ἄστεος, ὄφρα λάθοιεν 3.212. Κόλχων μυρίον ἔθνος ἐς Αἰήταο κιόντες. 3.213. ὦκα δʼ ὅτʼ ἐκ πεδίοιο πόλιν καὶ δώμαθʼ ἵκοντο 3.214. Αἰήτεω, τότε δʼ αὖτις ἀπεσκέδασεν νέφος Ἥρη. 3.215. ἔσταν δʼ ἐν προμολῇσι τεθηπότες ἕρκεʼ ἄνακτος 3.216. εὐρείας τε πύλας καὶ κίονας, οἳ περὶ τοίχους 3.217. ἑξείης ἄνεχον· θριγκὸς δʼ ἐφύπερθε δόμοιο 3.218. λαΐνεος χαλκέῃσιν ἐπὶ γλυφίδεσσιν ἀρήρει. 3.219. εὔκηλοι δʼ ὑπὲρ οὐδὸν ἔπειτʼ ἔβαν. ἄγχι δὲ τοῖο 3.220. ἡμερίδες χλοεροῖσι καταστεφέες πετάλοισιν 3.221. ὑψοῦ ἀειρόμεναι μέγʼ ἐθήλεον. αἱ δʼ ὑπὸ τῇσιν 3.222. ἀέναοι κρῆναι πίσυρες ῥέον, ἃς ἐλάχηνεν 3.223. Ἥφαιστος. καί ῥʼ ἡ μέν ἀναβλύεσκε γάλακτι 3.224. ἡ δʼ οἴνῳ, τριτάτη δὲ θυώδεϊ νᾶεν ἀλοιφῇ· 3.225. ἡ δʼ ἄρʼ ὕδωρ προρέεσκε, τὸ μέν ποθι δυομένῃσιν 3.226. θέρμετο Πληιάδεσσιν, ἀμοιβηδὶς δʼ ἀνιούσαις 3.227. κρυστάλλῳ ἴκελον κοίλης ἀνεκήκιε πέτρης. 3.228. τοῖʼ ἄρʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροισι Κυταιέος Αἰήταο 3.229. τεχνήεις Ἥφαιστος ἐμήσατο θέσκελα ἔργα. 3.230. καί οἱ χαλκόποδας ταύρους κάμε, χάλκεα δέ σφεων 3.231. ἦν στόματʼ, ἐκ δὲ πυρὸς δεινὸν σέλας ἀμπνείεσκον· 3.232. πρὸς δὲ καὶ αὐτόγυον στιβαροῦ ἀδάμαντος ἄροτρον 3.233. ἤλασεν, Ἠελίῳ τίνων χάριν, ὅς ῥά μιν ἵπποις 3.234. δέξατο, Φλεγραίῃ κεκμηότα δηιοτῆτι. 3.235. ἔνθα δὲ καὶ μέσσαυλος ἐλήλατο· τῇ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλαὶ 3.236. δικλίδες εὐπηγεῖς θάλαμοί τʼ ἔσαν ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα· 3.237. δαιδαλέη δʼ αἴθουσα παρὲξ ἑκάτερθε τέτυκτο. 3.238. λέχρις δʼ αἰπύτεροι δόμοι ἕστασαν ἀμφοτέρωθεν. 3.239. τῶν ἤτοι ἄλλῳ μέν, ὅτις καὶ ὑπείροχος ἦεν 3.240. κρείων Αἰήτης σὺν ἑῇ ναίεσκε δάμαρτι· 3.241. ἄλλῳ δʼ Ἄψυρτος ναῖεν πάις Αἰήταο. 3.242. τὸν μὲν Καυκασίη νύμφη τέκεν Ἀστερόδεια 3.243. πρίν περ κουριδίην θέσθαι Εἰδυῖαν ἄκοιτιν 3.244. Τηθύος Ὠκεανοῦ τε πανοπλοτάτην γεγαυῖαν. 3.245. καί μιν Κόλχων υἷες ἐπωνυμίην Φαέθοντα 3.246. ἔκλεον, οὕνεκα πᾶσι μετέπρεπεν ἠιθέοισιν. 3.247. τοὺς δʼ ἔχον ἀμφίπολοί τε καὶ Αἰήταο θύγατρες 3.248. ἄμφω, Χαλκιόπη Μήδειά τε. τὴν μὲν ἄρʼ οἵγε 3.249. ἐκ θαλάμου θάλαμόνδε κασιγνήτην μετιοῦσαν-- 3.250. Ἥρη γάρ μιν ἔρυκε δόμῳ· πρὶν δʼ οὔτι θάμιζεν 3.251. ἐν μεγάροις, Ἑκάτης δὲ πανήμερος ἀμφεπονεῖτο 3.252. νηόν, ἐπεί ῥα θεᾶς αὐτὴ πέλεν ἀρήτειρα-- 3.253. καί σφεας ὡς ἴδεν ἆσσον, ἀνίαχεν· ὀξὺ δʼ ἄκουσεν 3.254. Χαλκιόπη· δμωαὶ δὲ ποδῶν προπάροιθε βαλοῦσαι 3.255. νήματα καὶ κλωστῆρας ἀολλέες ἔκτοθι πᾶσαι 3.256. ἔδραμον. ἡ δʼ ἅμα τοῖσιν ἑοὺς υἱῆας ἰδοῦσα 3.257. ὑψοῦ χάρματι χεῖρας ἀνέσχεθεν· ὧς δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ 3.258. μητέρα δεξιόωντο, καὶ ἀμφαγάπαζον ἰδόντες 3.259. γηθόσυνοι· τοῖον δὲ κινυρομένη φάτο μῦθον· 3.260. ‘ἔμπης οὐκ ἄρʼ ἐμέλλετʼ ἀκηδείῃ με λιπόντες 3.261. τηλόθι πλάγξασθαι· μετὰ δʼ ὑμέας ἔτραπεν αἶσα. 3.262. δειλὴ ἐγώ, οἷον πόθον Ἑλλάδος ἔκποθεν ἄτης 3.263. λευγαλέης Φρίξοιο ἐφημοσύνῃσιν ἕλεσθε 3.264. πατρός. ὁ μὲν θνῄσκων στυγερὰς ἐπετείλατʼ ἀνίας 3.265. ἡμετέρῃ κραδίῃ. τί δέ κεν πόλιν Ὀρχομενοῖο 3.266. ὅστις ὅδʼ Ὀρχομενός, κτεάνων Ἀθάμαντος ἕκητι 3.270. Χαλκιόπης ἀίουσα· τὸ δʼ αὐτίκα πᾶν ὁμάδοιο 3.271. ἕρκος ἐπεπλήθει. τοὶ μὲν μέγαν ἀμφιπένοντο 3.272. ταῦρον ἅλις δμῶες· τοὶ δὲ ξύλα κάγκανα χαλκῷ 3.273. κόπτον· τοὶ δὲ λοετρὰ πυρὶ ζέον· οὐδέ τις ἦεν 3.274. ὃς καμάτου μεθίεσκεν, ὑποδρήσσων βασιλῆι. 3.275. τόφρα δʼ Ἔρως πολιοῖο διʼ ἠέρος ἷξεν ἄφαντος 3.276. τετρηχώς, οἷόν τε νέαις ἐπὶ φορβάσιν οἶστρος 3.277. τέλλεται, ὅν τε μύωπα βοῶν κλείουσι νομῆες. 3.278. ὦκα δʼ ὑπὸ φλιὴν προδόμῳ ἔνι τόξα τανύσσας 3.279. ἰοδόκης ἀβλῆτα πολύστονον ἐξέλετʼ ἰόν. 3.280. ἐκ δʼ ὅγε καρπαλίμοισι λαθὼν ποσὶν οὐδὸν ἄμειψεν 3.281. ὀξέα δενδίλλων· αὐτῷ ὑπὸ βαιὸς ἐλυσθεὶς 3.282. Αἰσονίδῃ γλυφίδας μέσσῃ ἐνικάτθετο νευρῇ 3.283. ἰθὺς δʼ ἀμφοτέρῃσι διασχόμενος παλάμῃσιν 3.284. ἧκʼ ἐπὶ Μηδείῃ· τὴν δʼ ἀμφασίη λάβε θυμόν. 3.285. αὐτὸς δʼ ὑψορόφοιο παλιμπετὲς ἐκ μεγάροιο 3.286. καγχαλόων ἤιξε· βέλος δʼ ἐνεδαίετο κούρῃ 3.287. νέρθεν ὑπὸ κραδίῃ, φλογὶ εἴκελον· ἀντία δʼ αἰεὶ 3.288. βάλλεν ὑπʼ Αἰσονίδην ἀμαρύγματα, καί οἱ ἄηντο 3.289. στηθέων ἐκ πυκιναὶ καμάτῳ φρένες, οὐδέ τινʼ ἄλλην 3.290. μνῆστιν ἔχεν, γλυκερῇ δὲ κατείβετο θυμὸν ἀνίῃ. 3.291. ὡς δὲ γυνὴ μαλερῷ περὶ κάρφεα χεύατο δαλῷ 3.292. χερνῆτις, τῇπερ ταλασήια ἔργα μέμηλεν 3.293. ὥς κεν ὑπωρόφιον νύκτωρ σέλας ἐντύναιτο 3.294. ἄγχι μάλʼ ἐγρομένη· τὸ δʼ ἀθέσφατον ἐξ ὀλίγοιο 3.295. δαλοῦ ἀνεγρόμενον σὺν κάρφεα πάντʼ ἀμαθύνει· 3.296. τοῖος ὑπὸ κραδίῃ εἰλυμένος αἴθετο λάθρῃ 3.297. οὖλος Ἔρως· ἁπαλὰς δὲ μετετρωπᾶτο παρειὰς 3.298. ἐς χλόον, ἄλλοτʼ ἔρευθος, ἀκηδείῃσι νόοιο. 3.299. δμῶες δʼ ὁππότε δή σφιν ἐπαρτέα θῆκαν ἐδωδήν 3.300. αὐτοί τε λιαροῖσιν ἐφαιδρύναντο λοετροῖς 3.301. ἀσπασίως δόρπῳ τε ποτῆτί τε θυμὸν ἄρεσσαν. 3.302. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ Αἰήτης σφετέρης ἐρέεινε θυγατρὸς 3.303. υἱῆας τοίοισι παρηγορέων ἐπέεσσιν· 3.304. ‘παιδὸς ἐμῆς κοῦροι Φρίξοιό τε, τὸν περὶ πάντων 3.305. ξείνων ἡμετέροισιν ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἔτισα 3.306. πῶς Αἶάνδε νέεσθε παλίσσυτοι; ἦέ τις ἄτη 3.307. σωομένοις μεσσηγὺς ἐνέκλασεν; οὐ μὲν ἐμεῖο 3.308. πείθεσθε προφέροντος ἀπείρονα μέτρα κελεύθου. 3.309. ᾔδειν γάρ ποτε πατρὸς ἐν ἅρμασιν Ἠελίοιο 3.310. δινεύσας, ὅτʼ ἐμεῖο κασιγνήτην ἐκόμιζεν 3.311. Κίρκην ἑσπερίης εἴσω χθονός, ἐκ δʼ ἱκόμεσθα 3.312. ἀκτὴν ἠπείρου Τυρσηνίδος, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 3.313. ναιετάει, μάλα πολλὸν ἀπόπροθι Κολχίδος αἴης. 3.314. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἃ δʼ ἐν ποσὶν ὗμιν ὄρωρεν 3.315. εἴπατʼ ἀριφραδέως, ἠδʼ οἵτινες οἵδʼ ἐφέπονται 3.316. ἀνέρες, ὅππῃ τε γλαφυρῆς ἐκ νηὸς ἔβητε.’ 3.317. τοῖά μιν ἐξερέοντα κασιγνήτων προπάροιθεν 3.318. Ἄργος ὑποδδείσας ἀμφὶ στόλῳ Αἰσονίδαο 3.319. μειλιχίως προσέειπεν, ἐπεὶ προγενέστερος ἦεν· 3.320. ‘Αἰήτη, κείνην μὲν ἄφαρ διέχευαν ἄελλαι 3.321. ζαχρηεῖς· αὐτοὺς δʼ ἐπὶ δούρασι πεπτηῶτας 3.322. νήσου Ἐνυαλίοιο ποτὶ ξερὸν ἔκβαλε κῦμα 3.323. λυγαίῃ ὑπὸ νυκτί· θεὸς δέ τις ἄμμʼ ἐσάωσεν. 3.324. οὐδὲ γὰρ αἳ τὸ πάροιθεν ἐρημαίην κατὰ νῆσον 3.325. ηὐλίζοντʼ ὄρνιθες Ἀρήιαι, οὐδʼ ἔτι κείνας 3.326. εὕρομεν. ἀλλʼ οἵγʼ ἄνδρες ἀπήλασαν, ἐξαποβάντες 3.327. νηὸς ἑῆς προτέρῳ ἐνὶ ἤματι· καί σφʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.328. ἡμέας οἰκτείρων Ζηνὸς νόος, ἠέ τις αἶσα 3.329. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεὶ καὶ βρῶσιν ἅλις καὶ εἵματʼ ἔδωκαν 3.330. οὔνομά τε Φρίξοιο περικλεὲς εἰσαΐοντες 3.331. ἠδʼ αὐτοῖο σέθεν· μετὰ γὰρ τεὸν ἄστυ νέονται. 3.332. χρειὼ δʼ ἢν ἐθέλῃς ἐξίδμεναι, οὔ σʼ ἐπικεύσω. 3.333. τόνδε τις ἱέμενος πάτρης ἀπάνευθεν ἐλάσσαι 3.334. καὶ κτεάνων βασιλεὺς περιώσιον, οὕνεκεν ἀλκῇ 3.335. σφωιτέρῃ τάντεσσι μετέπρεπεν Αἰολίδῃσιν 3.336. πέμπει δεῦρο νέεσθαι ἀμήχανον· οὐδʼ ὑπαλύξειν 3.337. στεῦται ἀμειλίκτοιο Διὸς θυμαλγέα μῆνιν 3.338. καὶ χόλον, οὐδʼ ἄτλητον ἄγος Φρίξοιό τε ποινὰς 3.339. Αἰολιδέων γενεήν, πρὶν ἐς Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἱκέσθαι. 3.340. νῆα δʼ Ἀθηναίη Παλλὰς κάμεν, οὐ μάλα τοίην 3.341. οἷαί περ Κόλχοισι μετʼ ἀνδράσι νῆες ἔασιν 3.342. τάων αἰνοτάτης ἐπεκύρσαμεν. ἤλιθα γάρ μιν 3.343. λάβρον ὕδωρ πνοιή τε διέτμαγεν· ἡ δʼ ἐνὶ γόμφοις 3.344. ἴσχεται, ἢν καὶ πᾶσαι ἐπιβρίσωσιν ἄελλαι. 3.345. ἶσον δʼ ἐξ ἀνέμοιο θέει καὶ ὅτʼ ἀνέρες αὐτοὶ 3.346. νωλεμέως χείρεσσιν ἐπισπέρχωσιν ἐρετμοῖς. 3.347. τῇ δʼ ἐναγειράμενος Παναχαιίδος εἴ τι φέριστον 3.348. ἡρώων, τεὸν ἄστυ μετήλυθε, πόλλʼ ἐπαληθεὶς 3.349. ἄστεα καὶ πελάγη στυγερῆς ἁλός, εἴ οἱ ὀπάσσαις. 3.350. αὐτῷ δʼ ὥς κεν ἅδῃ, τὼς ἔσσεται· οὐ γὰρ ἱκάνει 3.351. χερσὶ βιησόμενος· μέμονεν δέ τοι ἄξια τίσειν 3.352. δωτίνης, ἀίων ἐμέθεν μέγα δυσμενέοντας 3.353. Σαυρομάτας, τοὺς σοῖσιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσει. 3.354. εἰ δὲ καὶ οὔνομα δῆθεν ἐπιθύεις γενεήν τε 3.355. ἴδμεναι, οἵτινές εἰσιν, ἕκαστά γε μυθησαίμην. 3.356. τόνδε μέν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος ὧλλοι ἄγερθεν 3.357. κλείουσʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸν Ἰήσονα Κρηθεΐδαο. 3.358. εἰ δʼ αὐτοῦ Κρηθῆος ἐτήτυμόν ἐστι γενέθλης 3.359. οὕτω κεν γνωτὸς πατρώιος ἄμμι πέλοιτο. 3.360. ἄμφω γὰρ Κρηθεὺς Ἀθάμας τʼ ἔσαν Αἰόλου υἷες· 3.361. Φρίξος δʼ αὖτʼ Ἀθάμαντος ἔην πάις Αἰολίδαο. 3.362. τόνδε δʼ ἄρʼ, Ἠελίου γόνον ἔμμεναι εἴ τινʼ ἀκούεις 3.363. δέρκεαι Αὐγείην· Τελαμὼν δʼ ὅγε, κυδίστοιο 3.364. Αἰακοῦ ἐκγεγαώς· Ζεὺς δʼ Αἰακὸν αὐτὸς ἔτικτεν. 3.365. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι πάντες, ὅσοι συνέπονται ἑταῖροι 3.366. ἀθανάτων υἷές τε καὶ υἱωνοὶ γεγάασιν.’ 3.367. τοῖα παρέννεπεν Ἄργος· ἄναξ δʼ ἐπεχώσατο μύθοις 3.368. εἰσαΐων· ὑψοῦ δὲ χόλῳ φρένες ἠερέθοντο. 3.369. φῆ δʼ ἐπαλαστήσας· μενέαινε δὲ παισὶ μάλιστα 3.370. Χαλκιόπης· τῶν γάρ σφε μετελθέμεν οὕνεκʼ ἐώλπει· 3.371. ἐκ δέ οἱ ὄμματʼ ἔλαμψεν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἱεμένοιο· 3.372. ‘οὐκ ἄφαρ ὀφθαλμῶν μοι ἀπόπροθι, λωβητῆρες 3.373. νεῖσθʼ αὐτοῖσι δόλοισι παλίσσυτοι ἔκτοθι γαίης 3.374. πρίν τινα λευγαλέον τε δέρος καὶ Φρίξον ἰδέσθαι; 3.375. αὐτίχʼ ὁμαρτήσαντες ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος, οὐκ ἐπὶ κῶας 3.376. σκῆπτρα δὲ καὶ τιμὴν βασιληίδα δεῦρο νέεσθε. 3.377. εἰ δέ κε μὴ προπάροιθεν ἐμῆς ἥψασθε τραπέζης 3.378. ἦ τʼ ἂν ἀπὸ γλώσσας τε ταμὼν καὶ χεῖρε κεάσσας 3.379. ἀμφοτέρας, οἴοισιν ἐπιπροέηκα πόδεσσιν 3.380. ὥς κεν ἐρητύοισθε καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι 3.381. οἷα δὲ καὶ μακάρεσσιν ἐπεψεύσασθε θεοῖσιν.’ 3.382. φῆ ῥα χαλεψάμενος· μέγα δὲ φρένες Αἰακίδαο 3.383. νειόθεν οἰδαίνεσκον· ἐέλδετο δʼ ἔνδοθι θυμὸς 3.384. ἀντιβίην ὀλοὸν φάσθαι ἔπος· ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.385. Αἰσονίδης· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἀμείψατο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.386. ‘Αἰήτη, σχέο μοι τῷδε στόλῳ. οὔτι γὰρ αὔτως 3.387. ἄστυ τεὸν καὶ δώμαθʼ ἱκάνομεν, ὥς που ἔολπας 3.388. οὐδὲ μὲν ἱέμενοι. τίς δʼ ἂν τόσον οἶδμα περῆσαι 3.389. τλαίη ἑκὼν ὀθνεῖον ἐπὶ κτέρας; ἀλλά με δαίμων 3.390. καὶ κρυερὴ βασιλῆος ἀτασθάλου ὦρσεν ἐφετμή. 3.391. δὸς χάριν ἀντομένοισι· σέθεν δʼ ἐγὼ Ἑλλάδι πάσῃ 3.392. θεσπεσιην οἴσω κληηδόνα· καὶ δέ τοι ἤδη 3.393. πρόφρονές εἰμεν ἄρηι θοὴν ἀποτῖσαι ἀμοιβήν 3.394. εἴτʼ οὖν Σαυρομάτας γε λιλαίεαι, εἴτε τινʼ ἄλλον 3.395. δῆμον σφωιτέροισιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσαι.’ 3.396. Ἴσκεν ὑποσσαίνων ἀγανῇ ὀπί· τοῖο δὲ θυμὸς 3.397. διχθαδίην πόρφυρεν ἐνὶ στήθεσσι μενοινήν 3.398. ἤ σφεας ὁρμηθεὶς αὐτοσχεδὸν ἐξεναρίζοι 3.399. ἦ ὅγε πειρήσαιτο βίης. τό οἱ εἴσατʼ ἄρειον 3.400. φραζομένῳ· καὶ δή μιν ὑποβλήδην προσέειπεν· 3.401. ‘ξεῖνε, τί κεν τὰ ἕκαστα διηνεκέως ἀγορεύοις; 3.402. εἰ γὰρ ἐτήτυμόν ἐστε θεῶν γένος, ἠὲ καὶ ἄλλως 3.403. οὐδὲν ἐμεῖο χέρηες ἐπʼ ὀθνείοισιν ἔβητε 3.404. δώσω τοι χρύσειον ἄγειν δέρος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλῃσθα 3.405. πειρηθείς. ἐσθλοῖς γὰρ ἐπʼ ἀνδράσιν οὔτι μεγαίρω 3.406. ὡς αὐτοὶ μυθεῖσθε τὸν Ἑλλάδι κοιρανέοντα. 3.407. πεῖρα δέ τοι μένεός τε καὶ ἀλκῆς ἔσσετʼ ἄεθλος 3.408. τόν ῥʼ αὐτὸς περίειμι χεροῖν ὀλοόν περ ἐόντα. 3.409. δοιώ μοι πεδίον τὸ Ἀρήιον ἀμφινέμονται 3.410. ταύρω χαλκόποδε, στόματι φλόγα φυσιόωντες· 3.411. τοὺς ἐλάω ζεύξας στυφελὴν κατὰ νειὸν Ἄρηος 3.412. τετράγυον, τὴν αἶψα ταμὼν ἐπὶ τέλσον ἀρότρῳ 3.413. οὐ σπόρον ὁλκοῖσιν Δηοῦς ἐνιβᾴλλομαι ἀκτήν 3.414. ἀλλʼ ὄφιος δεινοῖο μεταλδήσκοντας ὀδόντας 3.415. ἀνδράσι τευχηστῇσι δέμας. τοὺς δʼ αὖθι δαΐζων 3.416. κείρω ἐμῷ ὑπὸ δουρὶ περισταδὸν ἀντιόωντας. 3.417. ἠέριος ζεύγνυμι βόας, καὶ δείελον ὥρην 3.418. παύομαι ἀμήτοιο. σύ δʼ, εἰ τάδε τοῖα τελέσσεις 3.419. αὐτῆμαρ τόδε κῶας ἀποίσεαι εἰς βασιλῆος· 3.420. πρὶν δέ κεν οὐ δοίην, μηδʼ ἔλπεο. δὴ γὰρ ἀεικὲς 3.421. ἄνδρʼ ἀγαθὸν γεγαῶτα κακωτέρῳ ἀνέρι εἶξαι.’ 3.422. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· ὁ δὲ σῖγα ποδῶν πάρος ὄμματα πήξας 3.423. ἧστʼ αὔτως ἄφθογγος, ἀμηχανέων κακότητι. 3.424. βουλὴν δʼ ἀμφὶ πολὺν στρώφα χρόνον, οὐδέ πῃ εἶχεν 3.425. θαρσαλέως ὑποδέχθαι, ἐπεὶ μέγα φαίνετο ἔργον· 3.426. ὀψε δʼ ἀμειβόμενος προσελέξατο κερδαλέοισιν· 3.427. ‘Αἰήτη, μάλα τοί με δίκῃ περιπολλὸν ἐέργεις. 3.428. τῶ καὶ ἐγὼ τὸν ἄεθλον ὑπερφίαλόν περ ἐόντα 3.429. τλήσομαι, εἰ καί μοι θανέειν μόρος. οὐ γὰρ ἔτʼ ἄλλο 3.430. ῥίγιον ἀνθρώποισι κακῆς ἐπικείσετʼ ἀνάγκης 3.431. ἥ με καὶ ἐνθάδε νεῖσθαι ἐπέχραεν ἐκ βασιλῆος.’ 3.432. ὧς φάτʼ ἀμηχανίῃ βεβολημένος· αὐτὰρ ὁ τόνγε 3.433. σμερδαλέοις ἐπέεσσι προσέννεπεν ἀσχαλόωντα· 3.434. ‘ἔρχεο νῦν μεθʼ ὅμιλον, ἐπεὶ μέμονάς γε πόνοιο· 3.435. εἰ δὲ σύγε ζυγὰ βουσὶν ὑποδδείσαις ἐπαεῖραι 3.436. ἠὲ καὶ οὐλομένου μεταχάσσεαι ἀμήτοιο 3.437. αὐτῷ κεν τὰ ἕκαστα μέλοιτό μοι, ὄφρα καὶ ἄλλος 3.438. ἀνὴρ ἐρρίγῃσιν ἀρείονα φῶτα μετελθεῖν.’ 3.584. οὐδὲ γὰρ Αἰολίδην Φρίξον μάλα περ χατέοντα 3.585. δέχθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐφέστιον, ὃς περὶ πάντων 3.586. ξείνων μελιχίῃ τε θεουδείῃ τʼ ἐκέκαστο 3.587. εἰ μή οἱ Ζεὺς αὐτὸς ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἄγγελον ἧκεν 3.588. Ἑρμείαν, ὥς κεν προσκηδέος ἀντιάσειεν·
6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.1012 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Fasti, 4.195-4.196 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love):
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 7.203 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Propertius, Elegies, 3.5.19-3.5.20, 4.3.36, 4.6.72 (1st cent. BCE

11. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.2, 1.37-1.49, 1.258, 1.270, 1.297-1.304, 1.495-1.623, 1.701-1.708, 3.380, 3.433-3.440, 4.236, 4.347, 4.529, 4.564, 5.75, 5.553-5.554, 5.572, 5.592-5.593, 5.630, 6.84, 6.89, 6.264-6.269, 6.273-6.281, 6.283-6.289, 6.292-6.296, 6.309-6.310, 6.321, 6.333-6.552, 6.554-6.556, 6.566-6.569, 6.582-6.600, 6.625, 6.628, 6.637-6.683, 6.687-6.689, 6.692-6.693, 6.695-6.901, 7.1-7.36, 7.38-7.161, 7.170-7.191, 7.203-7.211, 7.219-7.221, 7.234-7.235, 7.237, 7.240-7.242, 7.249-7.258, 7.266-7.268, 7.270, 7.280-7.281, 7.286-7.414, 7.570, 7.641, 9.525-9.527, 10.2-10.3, 10.163, 11.234-11.235 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. predestined exile, from the Trojan shore 1.37. to meditate th' occasions of her rage 1.38. and cherish deep within her bosom proud 1.39. its griefs and wrongs: the choice by Paris made; 1.40. her scorned and slighted beauty; a whole race 1.41. rebellious to her godhead; and Jove's smile 1.42. that beamed on eagle-ravished Ganymede. 1.43. With all these thoughts infuriate, her power 1.44. pursued with tempests o'er the boundless main 1.45. the Trojans, though by Grecian victor spared 1.46. and fierce Achilles; so she thrust them far 1.47. from Latium ; and they drifted, Heaven-impelled 1.48. year after year, o'er many an unknown sea— 1.258. the victory of his bow, till on the ground 1.270. infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. 1.297. or mourns with grief untold the untimely doom 1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.300. from his ethereal sky surveying clear 1.301. the seas all winged with sails, lands widely spread 1.302. and nations populous from shore to shore 1.303. paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze 1.304. on Libya . But while he anxious mused 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where 1.496. his buried treasure lay, a weight unknown 1.497. of silver and of gold. Thus onward urged 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion 1.505. they took to sea. A woman wrought this deed. 1.506. Then came they to these lands where now thine eyes 1.507. behold yon walls and yonder citadel 1.508. of newly rising Carthage . For a price 1.509. they measured round so much of Afric soil 1.510. as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot 1.511. received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray 1.512. what men are ye? from what far land arrived 1.513. and whither going?” When she questioned thus 1.514. her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths 1.516. “Divine one, if I tell 1.517. my woes and burdens all, and thou could'st pause 1.518. to heed the tale, first would the vesper star 1.519. th' Olympian portals close, and bid the day 1.520. in slumber lie. of ancient Troy are we— 1.521. if aught of Troy thou knowest! As we roved 1.522. from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm 1.523. cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. 1.524. I am Aeneas, faithful evermore 1.525. to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear 1.526. my gods ancestral, which I snatched away 1.527. from peril of the foe. My fame is known 1.528. above the stars. I travel on in quest 1.529. of Italy, my true home-land, and I 1.530. from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. 1.531. With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main 1.532. I launched away. My mother from the skies 1.533. gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. 1.534. Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive 1.535. the shock of wind and wave; and I myself 1.536. friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down 1.537. this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here 1.538. from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.542. I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers 1.543. with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither 1.544. unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on 1.545. and to the royal threshold make thy way! 1.546. I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all 1.547. are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed 1.548. by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; 1.549. or else in vain my parents gave me skill 1.550. to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! 1.551. A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file 1.552. erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down 1.553. from his ethereal haunt, now form anew 1.554. their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place 1.555. or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground 1.556. or soaring high, with whir of happy wings 1.557. re-circle heaven in triumphant song: 1.558. likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners 1.559. are landed, or fly landward at full sail. 1.561. She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam 1.562. from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair 1.563. breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes 1.564. fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed 1.565. the veritable goddess. Now he knew 1.566. that vision was his mother, and his words 1.567. pursued the fading phantom as it fled: 1.568. “Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er 1.569. with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? 1.570. Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange 1.571. of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” 1.572. Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way 1.573. toward the city's rampart. Venus then 1.574. o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— 1.575. a liquid mantle of thick cloud divine,— 1.576. that viewless they might pass, nor would any 1.577. obstruct, delay, or question why they came. 1.578. To Paphos then she soared, her Ioved abode 1.579. where stands her temple, at whose hundred shrines 1.580. garlands of myrtle and fresh roses breathe 1.582. Meanwhile the wanderers swiftly journey on 1.583. along the clear-marked road, and soon they climb 1.584. the brow of a high hill, which close in view 1.585. o'er-towers the city's crown. The vast exploit 1.586. where lately rose but Afric cabins rude 1.587. Aeneas wondered at: the smooth, wide ways; 1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 1.590. a wall or citadel, from far below 1.591. lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care 1.592. choose where to build, and close the space around 1.593. with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place 1.594. the people for just governors, just laws 1.595. and for their reverend senate shout acclaim. 1.596. Some clear the harbor mouth; some deeply lay 1.597. the base of a great theatre, and carve out 1.598. proud columns from the mountain, to adorn 1.599. their rising stage with lofty ornament. 1.600. o busy bees above a field of flowers 1.601. in early summer amid sunbeams toil 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 1.603. or with the flowing honey storing close 1.604. the pliant cells, until they quite run o'er 1.605. with nectared sweet; while from the entering swarm 1.606. they take their little loads; or lined for war 1.607. rout the dull drones, and chase them from the hive; 1.608. brisk is the task, and all the honeyed air 1.609. breathes odors of wild thyme. “How blest of Heaven. 1.610. These men that see their promised ramparts rise!” 1.611. Aeneas sighed; and swift his glances moved 1.612. from tower to tower; then on his way he fared 1.613. veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614. of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— 1.616. Deep in the city's heart there was a grove 1.617. of beauteous shade, where once the Tyrians 1.618. cast here by stormful waves, delved out of earth 1.619. that portent which Queen Juno bade them find,— 1.620. the head of a proud horse,—that ages long 1.621. their boast might be wealth, luxury and war. 1.622. Upon this spot Sidonian Dido raised 1.623. a spacious fane to Juno, which became 1.701. emerging tallest of her beauteous train; 1.702. while joy unutterable thrills the breast 1.703. of fond Latona: Dido not less fair 1.704. amid her subjects passed, and not less bright 1.705. her glow of gracious joy, while she approved 1.706. her future kingdom's pomp and vast emprise. 1.707. Then at the sacred portal and beneath 1.708. the temple's vaulted dome she took her place 3.380. engirdled by the waves; Dulichium 3.433. at the portentous sight, she swooning fell 3.434. and lay cold, rigid, lifeless, till at last 3.435. carce finding voice, her lips addressed me thus : 3.436. “Have I true vision? Bringest thou the word 3.437. of truth, O goddess-born? Art still in flesh? 3.438. Or if sweet light be fled, my Hector, where?” 3.439. With flood of tears she spoke, and all the grove 3.440. reechoed to her cry. Scarce could I frame 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.529. His Lycian oracles! and sent by Jove 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 5.75. without divine intent and heavenly power 5.553. and towered gigantic in the midmost ring. 5.554. Anchises' son then gave two equal pairs 5.572. only by body-movement or quick eye 5.592. rushed fiercer to the fight, his strength now roused 5.593. by rage, while shame and courage confident 5.630. Forthwith Aeneas summons all who will 6.84. 0 gods and goddesses, beneath whose wrath 6.89. (Which asks no kingdom save what Fate decrees) 6.264. The lightly-feeding doves flit on and on 6.265. Ever in easy ken of following eyes 6.266. Till over foul Avernus' sulphurous throat 6.267. Swiftly they lift them through the liquid air 6.268. In silent flight, and find a wished-for rest 6.269. On a twy-natured tree, where through green boughs 6.273. Whose seed is never from the parent tree 6.274. O'er whose round limbs its tawny tendrils twine,— 6.275. So shone th' out-leafing gold within the shade 6.276. of dark holm-oak, and so its tinsel-bract 6.277. Rustled in each light breeze. Aeneas grasped 6.278. The lingering bough, broke it in eager haste 6.280. Meanwhile the Trojans on the doleful shore 6.281. Bewailed Misenus, and brought tribute there 6.283. First, of the full-sapped pine and well-hewn oak 6.284. A lofty pyre they build; then sombre boughs 6.285. Around it wreathe, and in fair order range 6.286. Funereal cypress; glittering arms are piled 6.287. High over all; on blazing coals they lift 6.288. Cauldrons of brass brimmed o'er with waters pure; 6.289. And that cold, lifeless clay lave and anoint 6.292. With purple vesture and familiar pall. 6.293. Then in sad ministry the chosen few 6.294. With eyes averted, as our sires did use 6.295. Hold the enkindling torch beneath the pyre : 6.296. They gather up and burn the gifts of myrrh 6.310. After these toils, they hasten to fulfil 6.321. The priestess sprinkled wine; 'twixt the two horns 6.333. An altar dark, and piled upon the flames 6.334. The ponderous entrails of the bulls, and poured 6.335. Free o'er the burning flesh the goodly oil. 6.336. Then lo! at dawn's dim, earliest beam began 6.337. Beneath their feet a groaning of the ground : 6.338. The wooded hill-tops shook, and, as it seemed 6.339. She-hounds of hell howled viewless through the shade 6.340. To hail their Queen. “Away, 0 souls profane! 6.341. Stand far away!” the priestess shrieked, “nor dare 6.342. Unto this grove come near! Aeneas, on! 6.343. Begin thy journey! Draw thy sheathed blade! 6.344. Now, all thy courage! now, th' unshaken soul!” 6.345. She spoke, and burst into the yawning cave 6.346. With frenzied step; he follows where she leads 6.348. Ye gods! who rule the spirits of the dead! 6.349. Ye voiceless shades and silent lands of night! 6.350. 0 Phlegethon! 0 Chaos! let my song 6.351. If it be lawful, in fit words declare 6.352. What I have heard; and by your help divine 6.353. Unfold what hidden things enshrouded lie 6.355. They walked exploring the unpeopled night 6.356. Through Pluto's vacuous realms, and regions void 6.357. As when one's path in dreary woodlands winds 6.358. Beneath a misty moon's deceiving ray 6.359. When Jove has mantled all his heaven in shade 6.360. And night seals up the beauty of the world. 6.361. In the first courts and entrances of Hell 6.362. Sorrows and vengeful Cares on couches lie : 6.363. There sad Old Age abides, Diseases pale 6.364. And Fear, and Hunger, temptress to all crime; 6.365. Want, base and vile, and, two dread shapes to see 6.366. Bondage and Death : then Sleep, Death's next of kin; 6.367. And dreams of guilty joy. Death-dealing War 6.368. Is ever at the doors, and hard thereby 6.369. The Furies' beds of steel, where wild-eyed Strife 6.371. There in the middle court a shadowy elm 6.372. Its ancient branches spreads, and in its leaves 6.373. Deluding visions ever haunt and cling. 6.374. Then come strange prodigies of bestial kind : 6.375. Centaurs are stabled there, and double shapes 6.376. Like Scylla, or the dragon Lerna bred 6.377. With hideous scream; Briareus clutching far 6.378. His hundred hands, Chimaera girt with flame 6.379. A crowd of Gorgons, Harpies of foul wing 6.380. And giant Geryon's triple-monstered shade. 6.381. Aeneas, shuddering with sudden fear 6.382. Drew sword and fronted them with naked steel; 6.383. And, save his sage conductress bade him know 6.384. These were but shapes and shadows sweeping by 6.386. Hence the way leads to that Tartarean stream 6.387. of Acheron, whose torrent fierce and foul 6.388. Disgorges in Cocytus all its sands. 6.389. A ferryman of gruesome guise keeps ward 6.390. Upon these waters,—Charon, foully garbed 6.391. With unkempt, thick gray beard upon his chin 6.392. And staring eyes of flame; a mantle coarse 6.393. All stained and knotted, from his shoulder falls 6.394. As with a pole he guides his craft, tends sail 6.395. And in the black boat ferries o'er his dead;— 6.396. Old, but a god's old age looks fresh and strong. 6.397. To those dim shores the multitude streams on— 6.398. Husbands and wives, and pale, unbreathing forms 6.399. of high-souled heroes, boys and virgins fair 6.400. And strong youth at whose graves fond parents mourned. 6.401. As numberless the throng as leaves that fall 6.402. When autumn's early frost is on the grove; 6.403. Or like vast flocks of birds by winter's chill 6.404. Sent flying o'er wide seas to lands of flowers. 6.405. All stood beseeching to begin their voyage 6.406. Across that river, and reached out pale hands 6.407. In passionate yearning for its distant shore. 6.408. But the grim boatman takes now these, now those 6.409. Or thrusts unpitying from the stream away. 6.410. Aeneas, moved to wonder and deep awe 6.411. Beheld the tumult; “Virgin seer!” he cried, . 6.412. “Why move the thronging ghosts toward yonder stream? 6.413. What seek they there? Or what election holds 6.414. That these unwilling linger, while their peers 6.415. Sweep forward yonder o'er the leaden waves?” 6.416. To him, in few, the aged Sibyl spoke : 6.417. “Son of Anchises, offspring of the gods 6.418. Yon are Cocytus and the Stygian stream 6.419. By whose dread power the gods themselves do fear 6.420. To take an oath in vain. Here far and wide 6.421. Thou seest the hapless throng that hath no grave. 6.422. That boatman Charon bears across the deep 6.423. Such as be sepulchred with holy care. 6.424. But over that loud flood and dreadful shore 6.425. No trav'ler may be borne, until in peace 6.426. His gathered ashes rest. A hundred years 6.427. Round this dark borderland some haunt and roam 6.428. Then win late passage o'er the longed-for wave.” 6.429. Aeneas lingered for a little space 6.430. Revolving in his soul with pitying prayer 6.431. Fate's partial way. But presently he sees 6.432. Leucaspis and the Lycian navy's lord 6.433. Orontes; both of melancholy brow 6.434. Both hapless and unhonored after death 6.435. Whom, while from Troy they crossed the wind-swept seas 6.437. There, too, the helmsman Palinurus strayed : 6.438. Who, as he whilom watched the Libyan stars 6.439. Had fallen, plunging from his lofty seat 6.440. Into the billowy deep. Aeneas now 6.441. Discerned his sad face through the blinding gloom 6.442. And hailed him thus : “0 Palinurus, tell 6.443. What god was he who ravished thee away 6.444. From me and mine, beneath the o'crwhelming wave? 6.445. Speak on! for he who ne'er had spoke untrue 6.446. Apollo's self, did mock my listening mind 6.447. And chanted me a faithful oracle 6.448. That thou shouldst ride the seas unharmed, and touch 6.449. Ausonian shores. Is this the pledge divine?” 6.450. Then he, “0 chieftain of Anchises' race 6.451. Apollo's tripod told thee not untrue. 6.452. No god did thrust me down beneath the wave 6.453. For that strong rudder unto which I clung 6.454. My charge and duty, and my ship's sole guide 6.455. Wrenched from its place, dropped with me as I fell. 6.456. Not for myself—by the rude seas I swear— 6.457. Did I have terror, but lest thy good ship 6.458. Stripped of her gear, and her poor pilot lost 6.459. Should fail and founder in that rising flood. 6.460. Three wintry nights across the boundless main 6.461. The south wind buffeted and bore me on; 6.462. At the fourth daybreak, lifted from the surge 6.463. I looked at last on Italy, and swam 6.464. With weary stroke on stroke unto the land. 6.465. Safe was I then. Alas! but as I climbed 6.466. With garments wet and heavy, my clenched hand 6.467. Grasping the steep rock, came a cruel horde 6.468. Upon me with drawn blades, accounting me— 6.469. So blind they were!—a wrecker's prize and spoil. 6.470. Now are the waves my tomb; and wandering winds 6.471. Toss me along the coast. 0, I implore 6.472. By heaven's sweet light, by yonder upper air 6.473. By thy lost father, by lulus dear 6.474. Thy rising hope and joy, that from these woes 6.475. Unconquered chieftain, thou wilt set me free! 6.476. Give me a grave where Velia 's haven lies 6.477. For thou hast power! Or if some path there be 6.478. If thy celestial mother guide thee here 6.479. (For not, I ween, without the grace of gods 6.480. Wilt cross yon rivers vast, you Stygian pool) 6.481. Reach me a hand! and bear with thee along! 6.482. Until (least gift!) death bring me peace and calm.” 6.483. Such words he spoke: the priestess thus replied: 6.484. “Why, Palinurus, these unblest desires? 6.485. Wouldst thou, unsepulchred, behold the wave 6.486. of Styx, stern river of th' Eumenides? 6.487. Wouldst thou, unbidden, tread its fearful strand? 6.488. Hope not by prayer to change the laws of Heaven! 6.489. But heed my words, and in thy memory 6.490. Cherish and keep, to cheer this evil time. 6.491. Lo, far and wide, led on by signs from Heaven 6.492. Thy countrymen from many a templed town 6.493. Shall consecrate thy dust, and build thy tomb 6.494. A tomb with annual feasts and votive flowers 6.495. To Palinurus a perpetual fame!” 6.496. Thus was his anguish stayed, from his sad heart 6.497. Grief ebbed awhile, and even to this day 6.499. The twain continue now their destined way 6.500. Unto the river's edge. The Ferryman 6.501. Who watched them through still groves approach his shore 6.502. Hailed them, at distance, from the Stygian wave 6.503. And with reproachful summons thus began: 6.504. “Whoe'er thou art that in this warrior guise 6.505. Unto my river comest,—quickly tell 6.506. Thine errand! Stay thee where thou standest now! 6.507. This is ghosts' land, for sleep and slumbrous dark. 6.508. That flesh and blood my Stygian ship should bear 6.509. Were lawless wrong. Unwillingly I took 6.510. Alcides, Theseus, and Pirithous 6.511. Though sons of gods, too mighty to be quelled. 6.512. One bound in chains yon warder of Hell's door 6.513. And dragged him trembling from our monarch's throne: 6.514. The others, impious, would steal away 6.515. Out of her bride-bed Pluto's ravished Queen.” 6.516. Briefly th' Amphrysian priestess made reply: 6.517. “Not ours, such guile: Fear not! This warrior's arms 6.518. Are innocent. Let Cerberus from his cave 6.519. Bay ceaselessly, the bloodless shades to scare; 6.520. Let Proserpine immaculately keep 6.521. The house and honor of her kinsman King. 6.522. Trojan Aeneas, famed for faithful prayer 6.523. And victory in arms, descends to seek 6.524. His father in this gloomy deep of death. 6.525. If loyal goodness move not such as thee 6.526. This branch at least” (she drew it from her breast) 6.527. “Thou knowest well.” 6.528. Then cooled his wrathful heart; 6.529. With silent lips he looked and wondering eyes 6.530. Upon that fateful, venerable wand 6.531. Seen only once an age. Shoreward he turned 6.532. And pushed their way his boat of leaden hue. 6.533. The rows of crouching ghosts along the thwarts 6.534. He scattered, cleared a passage, and gave room 6.535. To great Aeneas. The light shallop groaned 6.536. Beneath his weight, and, straining at each seam 6.537. Took in the foul flood with unstinted flow. 6.538. At last the hero and his priestess-guide 6.539. Came safe across the river, and were moored 6.541. Here Cerberus, with triple-throated roar 6.542. Made all the region ring, as there he lay 6.543. At vast length in his cave. The Sibyl then 6.544. Seeing the serpents writhe around his neck 6.545. Threw down a loaf with honeyed herbs imbued 6.546. And drowsy essences: he, ravenous 6.547. Gaped wide his three fierce mouths and snatched the bait 6.548. Crouched with his large backs loose upon the ground 6.549. And filled his cavern floor from end to end. 6.550. Aeneas through hell's portal moved, while sleep 6.551. Its warder buried; then he fled that shore 6.554. of souls of babes upon the threshold plaining; 6.555. Whom, ere they took their portion of sweet life 6.556. Dark Fate from nursing bosoms tore, and plunged 6.566. The vital essence. Willingly, alas! 6.567. They now would suffer need, or burdens bear 6.568. If only life were given! But Fate forbids. 6.569. Around them winds the sad, unlovely wave 6.582. And Caeneus, not a boy, but maiden now 6.583. By Fate remoulded to her native seeming. 6.584. Here Tyrian Dido, too, her wound unhealed 6.585. Roamed through a mighty wood. The Trojan's eyes 6.586. Beheld her near him through the murky gloom 6.587. As when, in her young month and crescent pale 6.588. One sees th' o'er-clouded moon, or thinks he sees. 6.589. Down dropped his tears, and thus he fondly spoke: 6.590. “0 suffering Dido! Were those tidings true 6.591. That thou didst fling thee on the fatal steel? 6.592. Thy death, ah me! I dealt it. But I swear 6.593. By stars above us, by the powers in Heaven 6.594. Or whatsoever oath ye dead believe 6.595. That not by choice I fled thy shores, 0 Queen! 6.596. Divine decrees compelled me, even as now 6.597. Among these ghosts I pass, and thread my way 6.598. Along this gulf of night and loathsome land. 6.599. How could I deem my cruel taking leave 6.600. Would bring thee at the last to all this woe? 6.625. Antenor's children three, and Ceres' priest 6.628. Around him left and right the crowding shades 6.637. A feeble shout, or vainly opened wide 6.639. Here Priam's son, with body rent and torn 6.640. Deiphobus Deïphobus is seen,—his mangled face 6.641. His face and bloody hands, his wounded head 6.642. of ears and nostrils infamously shorn. 6.643. Scarce could Aeneas know the shuddering shade 6.644. That strove to hide its face and shameful scar; 6.645. But, speaking first, he said, in their own tongue: 6.646. “Deiphobus, strong warrior, nobly born 6.647. of Teucer's royal stem, what ruthless foe 6.648. Could wish to wreak on thee this dire revenge? 6.649. Who ventured, unopposed, so vast a wrong? 6.650. The rumor reached me how, that deadly night 6.651. Wearied with slaying Greeks, thyself didst fall 6.652. Prone on a mingled heap of friends and foes. 6.653. Then my own hands did for thy honor build 6.654. An empty tomb upon the Trojan shore 6.655. And thrice with echoing voice I called thy shade. 6.656. Thy name and arms are there. But, 0 my friend 6.657. Thee could I nowhere find, but launched away 6.658. Nor o'er thy bones their native earth could fling.” 6.659. To him the son of Priam thus replied: 6.660. “Nay, friend, no hallowed rite was left undone 6.661. But every debt to death and pity due 6.662. The shades of thy Deiphobus received. 6.663. My fate it was, and Helen's murderous wrong 6.664. Wrought me this woe; of her these tokens tell. 6.665. For how that last night in false hope we passed 6.666. Thou knowest,—ah, too well we both recall! 6.667. When up the steep of Troy the fateful horse 6.668. Came climbing, pregt with fierce men-at-arms 6.669. 't was she, accurst, who led the Phrygian dames 6.670. In choric dance and false bacchantic song 6.671. And, waving from the midst a lofty brand 6.672. Signalled the Greeks from Ilium 's central tower 6.673. In that same hour on my sad couch I lay 6.674. Exhausted by long care and sunk in sleep 6.675. That sweet, deep sleep, so close to tranquil death. 6.676. But my illustrious bride from all the house 6.677. Had stolen all arms; from 'neath my pillowed head 6.678. She stealthily bore off my trusty sword; 6.679. Then loud on Menelaus did she call 6.680. And with her own false hand unbarred the door; 6.681. Such gift to her fond lord she fain would send 6.682. To blot the memory of his ancient wrong! 6.683. Why tell the tale, how on my couch they broke 6.687. If with clean lips upon your wrath I call! 6.688. But, friend, what fortunes have thy life befallen? 6.689. Tell point by point. Did waves of wandering seas 6.693. While thus they talked, the crimsoned car of Morn 6.695. On her ethereal road. The princely pair 6.696. Had wasted thus the whole brief gift of hours; 6.697. But Sibyl spoke the warning: “Night speeds by 6.698. And we, Aeneas, lose it in lamenting. 6.699. Here comes the place where cleaves our way in twain. 6.700. Thy road, the right, toward Pluto's dwelling goes 6.701. And leads us to Elysium. But the left 6.702. Speeds sinful souls to doom, and is their path 6.703. To Tartarus th' accurst.” Deiphobus Deïphobus 6.704. Cried out: “0 priestess, be not wroth with us! 6.705. Back to the ranks with yonder ghosts I go. 6.706. 0 glory of my race, pass on! Thy lot 6.708. Aeneas straightway by the leftward cliff 6.709. Beheld a spreading rampart, high begirt 6.710. With triple wall, and circling round it ran 6.711. A raging river of swift floods of flame 6.712. Infernal Phlegethon, which whirls along 6.713. Loud-thundering rocks. A mighty gate is there 6.714. Columned in adamant; no human power 6.715. Nor even the gods, against this gate prevail. 6.716. Tall tower of steel it has; and seated there 6.717. Tisiphone, in blood-flecked pall arrayed 6.718. Sleepless forever, guards the entering way. 6.719. Hence groans are heard, fierce cracks of lash and scourge 6.720. Loud-clanking iron links and trailing chains. 6.721. Aeneas motionless with horror stood 6.722. o'erwhelmed at such uproar. “0 virgin, say 6.723. What shapes of guilt are these? What penal woe 6.724. Harries them thus? What wailing smites the air?” 6.725. To whom the Sibyl, “Far-famed prince of Troy 6.726. The feet of innocence may never pass 6.727. Into this house of sin. But Hecate 6.728. When o'er th' Avernian groves she gave me power 6.729. Taught me what penalties the gods decree 6.730. And showed me all. There Cretan Rhadamanth 6.731. His kingdom keeps, and from unpitying throne 6.732. Chastises and lays bare the secret sins 6.733. of mortals who, exulting in vain guile 6.734. Elude till death, their expiation due. 6.735. There, armed forever with her vengeful scourge 6.736. Tisiphone, with menace and affront 6.737. The guilty swarm pursues; in her left hand 6.738. She lifts her angered serpents, while she calls 6.739. A troop of sister-furies fierce as she. 6.740. Then, grating loud on hinge of sickening sound 6.741. Hell's portals open wide. 0, dost thou see 6.742. What sentinel upon that threshold sits 6.744. Far, far within the dragon Hydra broods 6.745. With half a hundred mouths, gaping and black; 6.746. And Tartarus slopes downward to the dark 6.747. Twice the whole space that in the realms of light 6.748. Th' Olympian heaven above our earth aspires. — 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 6.750. Roll lightning-blasted in the gulf profound; 6.751. The twin Aloidae Aloïdae , colossal shades 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 6.893. Thy kindred accent mingling with my own? 6.894. I cherished long this hope. My prophet-soul 6.895. Numbered the lapse of days, nor did my thought 6.896. Deceive. 0, o'er what lands and seas wast driven 6.897. To this embrace! What perils manifold 6.898. Assailed thee, 0 my son, on every side! 6.899. How long I trembled, lest that Libyan throne 6.900. Should work thee woe!” 6.901. Aeneas thus replied: 7.1. One more immortal name thy death bequeathed 7.2. Nurse of Aeneas, to Italian shores 7.3. Caieta ; there thy honor hath a home; 7.4. Thy bones a name: and on Hesperia's breast 7.5. Their proper glory. When Aeneas now 7.6. The tribute of sepulchral vows had paid 7.7. Beside the funeral mound, and o'er the seas 7.8. Stillness had fallen, he flung forth his sails 7.9. And leaving port pursued his destined way. 7.10. Freshly the night-winds breathe; the cloudless moon 7.11. Outpours upon his path unstinted beam 7.12. And with far-trembling glory smites the sea. 7.13. Close to the lands of Circe soon they fare 7.14. Where the Sun's golden daughter in far groves 7.15. Sounds forth her ceaseless song; her lofty hall 7.16. Is fragrant every night with flaring brands 7.17. of cedar, giving light the while she weaves 7.18. With shrill-voiced shuttle at her linens fine. 7.19. From hence are heard the loud lament and wrath 7.20. of lions, rebels to their linked chains 7.21. And roaring all night long; great bristly boars 7.22. And herded bears, in pinfold closely kept 7.23. Rage horribly, and monster-wolves make moan; 7.24. Whom the dread goddess with foul juices strong 7.25. From forms of men drove forth, and bade to wear 7.26. the mouths and maws of beasts in Circe's thrall. 7.27. But lest the sacred Trojans should endure 7.28. uch prodigy of doom, or anchor there 7.29. on that destroying shore, kind Neptune filled 7.30. their sails with winds of power, and sped them on 7.32. Now morning flushed the wave, and saffron-garbed 7.33. Aurora from her rose-red chariot beamed 7.34. in highest heaven; the sea-winds ceased to stir; 7.35. a sudden calm possessed the air, and tides 7.36. of marble smoothness met the laboring oar. 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 7.46. Hail, Erato! while olden kings and thrones 7.47. and all their sequent story I unfold! 7.48. How Latium 's honor stood, when alien ships 7.49. brought war to Italy, and from what cause 7.50. the primal conflict sprang, O goddess, breathe 7.51. upon thy bard in song. Dread wars I tell 7.52. array of battle, and high-hearted kings 7.53. thrust forth to perish, when Etruria's host 7.54. and all Hesperia gathered to the fray. 7.55. Events of grander march impel my song 7.56. and loftier task I try. Latinus, then 7.57. an aged king, held long-accepted sway 7.58. o'er tranquil vales and towns. He was the son 7.59. of Faunus, so the legend tells, who wed 7.60. the nymph Marica of Laurentian stem. 7.61. Picus was Faunus' father, whence the line 7.62. to Saturn's Ioins ascends. O heavenly sire 7.63. from thee the stem began! But Fate had given 7.64. to King Latinus' body no heirs male: 7.65. for taken in the dawning of his day 7.66. his only son had been; and now his home 7.67. and spacious palace one sole daughter kept 7.68. who was grown ripe to wed and of full age 7.69. to take a husband. Many suitors tried 7.70. from all Ausonia and Latium 's bounds; 7.71. but comeliest in all their princely throng 7.72. came Turnus, of a line of mighty sires. 7.73. Him the queen mother chiefly loved, and yearned 7.74. to call him soon her son. But omens dire 7.75. and menaces from Heaven withstood her will. 7.76. A laurel-tree grew in the royal close 7.77. of sacred leaf and venerated age 7.78. which, when he builded there his wall and tower 7.79. Father Latinus found, and hallowed it 7.80. to Phoebus' grace and power, wherefrom the name 7.81. Laurentian, which his realm and people bear. 7.82. Unto this tree-top, wonderful to tell 7.83. came hosts of bees, with audible acclaim 7.84. voyaging the stream of air, and seized a place 7.85. on the proud, pointing crest, where the swift swarm 7.86. with interlacement of close-clinging feet 7.87. wung from the leafy bough. “Behold, there comes,” 7.88. the prophet cried, “a husband from afar! 7.89. To the same region by the self-same path 7.90. behold an arm'd host taking lordly sway 7.91. upon our city's crown!” Soon after this 7.92. when, coming to the shrine with torches pure 7.93. Lavinia kindled at her father's side 7.94. the sacrifice, swift seemed the flame to burn 7.95. along her flowing hair—O sight of woe! 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 7.102. bright honors on the virgin's head to fall 7.104. The King, sore troubled by these portents, sought 7.105. oracular wisdom of his sacred sire 7.106. Faunus, the fate-revealer, where the groves 7.107. tretch under high Albunea, and her stream 7.108. roars from its haunted well, exhaling through 7.109. vast, gloomful woods its pestilential air. 7.110. Here all Oenotria's tribes ask oracles 7.111. in dark and doubtful days: here, when the priest 7.112. has brought his gifts, and in the night so still 7.113. couched on spread fleeces of the offered flock 7.114. awaiting slumber lies, then wondrously 7.115. a host of flitting shapes he sees, and hears 7.116. voices that come and go: with gods he holds 7.117. high converse, or in deep Avernian gloom 7.118. parleys with Acheron. Thither drew near 7.119. Father Latinus, seeking truth divine. 7.120. Obedient to the olden rite, he slew 7.121. a hundred fleecy sheep, and pillowed lay 7.122. upon their outstretched skins. Straightway a voice 7.123. out of the lofty forest met his prayer. 7.124. “Seek not in wedlock with a Latin lord 7.125. to join thy daughter, O my son and seed! 7.126. Beware this purposed marriage! There shall come 7.127. ons from afar, whose blood shall bear our name 7.128. tarward; the children of their mighty loins 7.129. as far as eve and morn enfold the seas 7.130. hall see a subject world beneath their feet 7.131. ubmissive lie.” This admonition given 7.132. Latinus hid not. But on restless wing 7.133. rumor had spread it, when the men of Troy 7.134. along the river-bank of mounded green 7.135. their fleet made fast. Aeneas and his chiefs 7.136. with fair Iulus, under spreading boughs 7.137. of one great tree made resting-place, and set 7.138. the banquet on. Thin loaves of altar-bread 7.139. along the sward to bear their meats were laid 7.140. (such was the will of Jove), and wilding fruits 7.141. rose heaping high, with Ceres' gift below. 7.142. Soon, all things else devoured, their hunger turned 7.143. to taste the scanty bread, which they attacked 7.144. with tooth and nail audacious, and consumed 7.145. both round and square of that predestined leaven. 7.146. “Look, how we eat our tables even!” cried 7.147. Iulus, in a jest. Such was the word 7.148. which bade their burdens fall. From his boy's lip 7.149. the father caught this utterance of Fate 7.150. ilent with wonder at the ways of Heaven; 7.151. then swift he spoke: “Hail! O my destined shore 7.152. protecting deities of Ilium, hail! 7.153. Here is our home, our country here! This day 7.154. I publish the mysterious prophecy 7.155. by Sire Anchises given: ‘My son,’ said he 7.156. ‘When hunger in strange lands shall bid devour 7.157. the tables of thy banquet gone, then hope 7.158. for home, though weary, and take thought to build 7.159. a dwelling and a battlement.’ Behold! 7.160. This was our fated hunger! This last proof 7.161. will end our evil days. Up, then! For now 7.170. eldest of names divine; the Nymphs he called 7.171. and river-gods unknown; his voice invoked 7.172. the night, the omen-stars through night that roll. 7.173. Jove, Ida's child, and Phrygia 's fertile Queen: 7.174. he called his mother from Olympian skies 7.175. and sire from Erebus. Lo, o'er his head 7.176. three times unclouded Jove omnipotent 7.177. in thunder spoke, and, with effulgent ray 7.178. from his ethereal tract outreaching far 7.179. hook visibly the golden-gleaming air. 7.180. Swift, through the concourse of the Trojans, spread 7.181. news of the day at hand when they should build 7.182. their destined walls. So, with rejoicing heart 7.183. at such vast omen, they set forth a feast 7.184. with zealous emulation, ranging well 7.186. Soon as the morrow with the lamp of dawn 7.187. looked o'er the world, they took their separate ways 7.188. exploring shore and towns; here spread the pools 7.189. and fountain of Numicius; here they see 7.190. the river Tiber, where bold Latins dwell. 7.191. Anchises' son chose out from his brave band 7.204. fair youths and striplings in life's early bloom 7.205. course with swift steeds, or steer through dusty cloud 7.206. the whirling chariot, or stretch stout bows 7.207. or hurl the seasoned javelin, or strive 7.208. in boxing-bout and foot-race: one of these 7.209. made haste on horseback to the aged King 7.210. with tidings of a stranger company 7.211. in foreign garb approaching. The good King 7.219. Here kings took sceptre and the fasces proud 7.220. with omens fair; the selfsame sacred place 7.221. was senate-house and temple; here was found 7.234. along the columns: chariots of war 7.235. from foeman taken, axes of round blade 7.237. from city-gates, shields, spears, and beaks of bronze 7.240. girt in scant shift, and bearing on his left 7.241. the sacred oval shield, appeared enthroned 7.242. Picus, breaker of horses, whom his bride 7.249. with brow serene gave greeting as they came: 7.250. “O sons of Dardanus, think not unknown 7.251. your lineage and city! Rumored far 7.252. your venturous voyage has been. What seek ye here? 7.253. What cause, what quest, has brought your barks and you 7.254. o'er the blue waters to Ausonia's hills? 7.255. What way uncharted, or wild stress of storm 7.256. or what that sailors suffer in mid-sea 7.257. unto this river bank and haven bore? 7.258. Doubt not our welcome! We of Latin land 7.266. Once out of Tuscan Corythus he fared; 7.267. but now in golden house among the stars 7.268. he has a throne, and by his altars blest 7.280. boast Jove to be their sire, and our true King 7.281. is of Olympian seed. To thine abode 7.286. that lone wight hears whom earth's remotest isle 7.287. has banished to the Ocean's rim, or he 7.288. whose dwelling is the ample zone that burns 7.289. betwixt the changeful sun-god's milder realms 7.290. far severed from the world. We are the men 7.291. from war's destroying deluge safely borne 7.292. over the waters wide. We only ask 7.293. ome low-roofed dwelling for our fathers' gods 7.294. ome friendly shore, and, what to all is free 7.295. water and air. We bring no evil name 7.296. upon thy people; thy renown will be 7.297. but wider spread; nor of a deed so fair 7.298. can grateful memory die. Ye ne'er will rue 7.299. that to Ausonia's breast ye gathered Troy . 7.300. I swear thee by the favored destinies 7.301. of great Aeneas, by his strength of arm 7.302. in friendship or in war, that many a tribe 7.303. (O, scorn us not, that, bearing olive green 7.304. with suppliant words we come), that many a throne 7.305. has sued us to be friends. But Fate's decree 7.306. to this thy realm did guide. Here Dardanus 7.307. was born; and with reiterate command 7.308. this way Apollo pointed to the stream 7.309. of Tiber and Numicius' haunted spring. 7.310. Lo, these poor tributes from his greatness gone 7.311. Aeneas sends, these relics snatched away 7.312. from Ilium burning: with this golden bowl 7.313. Anchises poured libation when he prayed; 7.314. and these were Priam's splendor, when he gave 7.315. laws to his gathered states; this sceptre his 7.316. this diadem revered, and beauteous pall 7.317. handwork of Asia 's queens.” So ceased to speak 7.318. Ilioneus. But King Latinus gazed 7.319. uswering on the ground, all motionless 7.320. ave for his musing eyes. The broidered pall 7.321. of purple, and the sceptre Priam bore 7.322. moved little on his kingly heart, which now 7.323. pondered of giving to the bridal bed 7.324. his daughter dear. He argues in his mind 7.325. the oracle of Faunus:—might this be 7.326. that destined bridegroom from an alien land 7.327. to share his throne, to get a progeny 7.328. of glorious valor, which by mighty deeds 7.329. hould win the world for kingdom? So at last 7.330. with joyful brow he spoke: “Now let the gods 7.331. our purpose and their own fair promise bless! 7.332. Thou hast, O Trojan, thy desire. Thy gifts 7.333. I have not scorned; nor while Latinus reigns 7.334. hall ye lack riches in my plenteous land 7.335. not less than Trojan store. But where is he 7.336. Aeneas' self? If he our royal love 7.337. o much desire, and have such urgent mind 7.338. to be our guest and friend, let him draw near 7.339. nor turn him from well-wishing looks away! 7.340. My offering and pledge of peace shall be 7.341. to clasp your monarch's hand. Bear back, I pray 7.342. this answer to your King: my dwelling holds 7.343. a daughter, whom with husband of her blood 7.344. great signs in heaven and from my father's tomb 7.345. forbid to wed. A son from alien shores 7.346. they prophesy for Latium 's heir, whose seed 7.347. hall lift our glory to the stars divine. 7.348. I am persuaded this is none but he 7.349. that man of destiny; and if my heart 7.350. be no false prophet, I desire it so.” 7.351. Thus having said, the sire took chosen steeds 7.352. from his full herd, whereof, well-groomed and fair 7.353. three hundred stood within his ample pale. 7.354. of these to every Teucrian guest he gave 7.355. a courser swift and strong, in purple clad 7.356. and broidered housings gay; on every breast 7.357. hung chains of gold; in golden robes arrayed 7.358. they champed the red gold curb their teeth between. 7.359. For offering to Aeneas, he bade send 7.360. a chariot, with chargers twain of seed 7.361. ethereal, their nostrils breathing fire: 7.362. the famous kind which guileful Circe bred 7.363. cheating her sire, and mixed the sun-god's team 7.364. with brood-mares earthly born. The sons of Troy 7.365. uch gifts and greetings from Latinus bearing 7.367. But lo! from Argos on her voyage of air 7.368. rides the dread spouse of Jove. She, sky-enthroned 7.369. above the far Sicilian promontory 7.370. pachynus, sees Dardania's rescued fleet 7.371. and all Aeneas' joy. The prospect shows 7.372. houses a-building, lands of safe abode 7.373. and the abandoned ships. With bitter grief 7.374. he stands at gaze: then with storm-shaken brows 7.375. thus from her heart lets loose the wrathful word: 7.376. “O hated race! O Phrygian destinies — 7.377. to mine forevermore (unhappy me!) 7.378. a scandal and offense! Did no one die 7.379. on Troy 's embattled plain? Could captured slaves 7.380. not be enslaved again? Was Ilium's flame 7.381. no warrior's funeral pyre? Did they walk safe 7.382. through serried swords and congregated fires? 7.383. At last, methought, my godhead might repose 7.384. and my full-fed revenge in slumber lie. 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.388. hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.391. The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 7.401. outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak 7.402. my own prerogative of godhead be 7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! 7.404. If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. 7.405. To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds 7.406. my fated power. So be it! Fate has given 7.407. Lavinia for his bride. But long delays 7.408. I still can plot, and to the high event 7.409. deferment and obstruction. I can smite 7.410. the subjects of both kings. Let sire and son 7.411. buy with their people's blood this marriage-bond! 7.412. Let Teucrian and Rutulian slaughter be 7.413. thy virgin dower, and Bellona's blaze 7.414. light thee the bridal bed! Not only teemed 7.570. and burn their painted galleys! 't is the will 7.641. with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close 9.526. was all of tangled brush and blinding shade 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair 10.3. the Sire of gods and King of all mankind 10.163. the shadowy flood and black, abysmal shore. 11.234. can bid me live. Then let thy sword repay 11.235. its debt to sire and son by Turnus slain!
12. Vergil, Georgics, 4.467 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.467. of wonder gazing on his mother's hall
13. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.1-1.7, 6.648, 9.620-9.655 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Furens, 666 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Phaedra, 1201 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 782 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Statius, Siluae, 4.7.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.211-1.226, 2.216-2.310, 2.314, 2.353-2.356, 3.14-3.18, 3.81-3.82, 3.212-3.219, 3.350-3.353, 3.392-3.395, 5.1-5.224, 5.233-5.240, 5.289-5.290, 5.415-5.454, 6.14-6.30, 7.32-7.77, 7.348-7.349 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 2.557 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
achilles Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
aeetes Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 121
aeneas, iliadic orientation Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
aeneas, intertextual identities, odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
aeneas, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 243, 245
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 179, 242, 243, 245; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 126, 136; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
aeolus, king of the winds Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 245
aietes Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141; Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
allecto Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 245
allegory Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
amata Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 245
amor Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 130, 136
analogues Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
anchises Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 243, 245; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
aphrodite Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica, intertextual aspects, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica, structure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 242, 245
apollonius of rhodes, on medea Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 67, 88, 120, 121; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 135, 136
arete, queen of scheria Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 120
argus (argonaut) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 130
augustus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58
bellona Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
bribery Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
caieta Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 126, 130; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 291
calliope Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 135; Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 111
carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 179
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
catabasis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
centrality Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
choice Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
circe/kirke Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 291, 314
circe Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
civil wars Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 67, 120, 121
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
concord Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
consolation Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126
councils Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58
cupid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 67
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 243, 245
deidamia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
dido, intertexutal identities, circe Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
dreams Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
education, instruction Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243, 245
ekphrasis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
ekpyrosis, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
elpenor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
emotions, passions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243, 245
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 242, 245
epic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 179; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126, 127, 130, 135, 155
epic cycle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
epicureanism, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
epitaph Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 126, 130
epithalamium Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
erato Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 243, 245; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 121; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 126, 127, 130, 135, 136, 155; Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 111
erysichthon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
ethics, ethical heroism Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
etruscans Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
etymology, erato Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
etymology Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 135, 136
euripides, alcestis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
euryalus, mother of Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
euryalus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
failure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
fame Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
faunus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
fire narratives, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
funerals Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
funerary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
games Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58
genealogy Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 179, 242
golden fleece Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121
gorgons Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
hannibal Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
helenus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 242
hesiod Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 135
hesperia Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125
historiography Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
history Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
homecomings (nostoi) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
homer, iliad Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 130
homer Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
horace Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243, 245
humanism Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
hyperbole Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140
hypsipyle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
idmon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
inscriptions, epitaphic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126
intentions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 243
intertextual chronology, intrusion Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140
intertextuality, future reflexive mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
intertextuality, imitation Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
intertextuality, interruption Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
intertextuality, window reference (two-tier allusion) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141, 242, 245
italy Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 243
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
julian house Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
juno, iliadic orientation Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
juno, intertextual identities Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
juno, soliloquies, second Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 245
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 243, 245
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141, 242
lament Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 155
lapidge, michael Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
latinus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 243; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141, 179, 242, 243, 245; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
laurentum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
lavinia, characteristics, role in aeneid Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
lavinia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141, 242; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
lemnos Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
loss Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130
love Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
lucan, civil war Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
lucan Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
marica Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
marius, gaius ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
marriage, weddings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245
marriage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 242
mars Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
masks Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
medea Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
minerva (see also athena, pallas)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
mise en abyme' Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
misenus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
mopsus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 67
mors Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 126, 130, 136
muses, erato Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
muses, invocation of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 179, 242, 243, 245
muses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 243; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 125, 127, 130, 135, 136; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 291
myth Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
narrative, battle, in the aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
narrative structure of aeneid Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 58
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 242, 243, 245
narrators, argonautic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 243
nausicaa Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
nisus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 136
palinurus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
pallas (see also athena, minerva)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
patria Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
patrizi, francesco Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
perses Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121
phaeacians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
phineus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121
phrixus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 121
pio, giovan battista (johannes baptista pius)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
plato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 135
plots, argonautic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
plots, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
politics Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
pollius felix Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 111
pollius temple of Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 111
pompeius/pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
portents Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
priam Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
prologues Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 156
propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 136
queen (regina, potnia) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
rebirth and renewal narratives, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
revenge, vengeance Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
romans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
rome, troy reborn Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
roses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 136
samnite wars ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
scheria Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
sex Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243, 245
sinon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
social war ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
sol Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
stars, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
stoicism, cosmology of Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
stoicism, ekpyrosis and Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
stoicism, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 245
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 243
structure, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
structure, iterative Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
structure, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
structure, symmetical Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
structure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141
success Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 245
suitors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
surrentum Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 111
tener Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130, 136
theogony Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 314
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 179
thoas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
threnos (and threnody) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
tiber Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
tiber tiberis Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 291
time, heroic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
tiphys Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
tombs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 126
tragic, mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242
trojan war, division between mythical and historical periods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 242, 245; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
troy, reborn as rome Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179, 242, 245; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
underworld Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 155
valerius flaccus, and apollonius rhodius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
valerius flaccus, funerals in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 100
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 245; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 130
venus (see also aphrodite) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, argonautic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 141, 242, 243
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, historical Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 179
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, homeric Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 141
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 243
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 130, 135; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 172
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 67, 88, 120, 121
voyaging Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 140, 179, 242, 243, 245