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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 6.36-6.155


obscuris vera involvens: ea frena furentiA company of chosen priests shall serve.


concutit, et stimulos sub pectore vertit Apollo.O, not on leaves, light leaves, inscribe thy songs!


Ut primum cessit furor et rabida ora quieruntLest, playthings of each breeze, they fly afar


incipit Aeneas heros: Non ulla laborumIn swift confusion! Sing thyself, I pray.”


O virgo, nova mi facies inopinave surgit;So ceased his voice; the virgin through the cave


omnia praecepi atque animo mecum ante peregi.Scarce bridled yet by Phoebus' hand divine


Unum oro: quando hic inferni ianua regisEcstatic swept along, and vainly stove


dicitur, et tenebrosa palus Acheronte refusoTo fing its potent master from her breast;


ire ad conspectum cari genitoris et oraBut he more strongly plied his rein and curb


contingat; doceas iter et sacra ostia pandas.Upon her frenzied lips, and soon subdued


Illum ego per flammas et mille sequentia telaHer spirit fierce, and swayed her at his will.


eripui his umeris, medioque ex hoste recepi;Free and self-moved the cavern's hundred adoors


ille meum comitatus iter, maria omnia mecumSwung open wide, and uttered to the air


atque omnes pelagique minas caelique ferebatThe oracles the virgin-priestess sung :


invalidus, vires ultra sortemque senectae.“Thy long sea-perils thou hast safely passed;


Quin, ut te supplex peterem et tua limina adiremBut heavier woes await thee on the land.


idem orans mandata dabat. Gnatique patrisqueTruly thy Trojans to Lavinian shore


alma, precor, miserere;—potes namque omnia, nec teShall come—vex not thyself thereon—but, oh!


nequiquam lucis Hecate praefecit Avernis;—Shall rue their coming thither! war, red war!


si potuit Manes arcessere coniugis OrpheusAnd Tiber stained with bloody foam I see.


Threïcia fretus cithara fidibusque canorisSimois, Xanthus, and the Dorian horde


si fratrem Pollux alterna morte redemitThou shalt behold; a new Achilles now


itque reditque viam totiens. Quid Thesea, magnumIn Latium breathes,—he, too, of goddess born;


quid memorem Alciden? Et mi genus ab Iove summo.And Juno, burden of the sons of Troy


Talibus orabat dictis, arasque tenebatWill vex them ever; while thyself shalt sue


cum sic orsa loqui vates: Sate sanguine divomIn dire distress to many a town and tribe


Tros Anchisiade, facilis descensus Averno;Through Italy ; the cause of so much ill


noctes atque dies patet atri ianua Ditis;Again shall be a hostess-queen, again


sed revocare gradum superasque evadere ad aurasA marriage-chamber for an alien bride.


hoc opus, hic labor est. Pauci, quos aequus amavitOh! yield not to thy woe, but front it ever


Iuppiter, aut ardens evexit ad aethera virtusAnd follow boldly whither Fortune calls.


dis geniti potuere. Tenent media omnia silvaeThy way of safety, as thou least couldst dream
NaN


Quod si tantus amor menti, si tanta cupido estThus from her shrine Cumaea's prophetess


bis Stygios innare lacus, bis nigra videreChanted the dark decrees; the dreadful sound


Tartara, et insano iuvat indulgere laboriReverberated through the bellowing cave


accipe, quae peragenda prius. Latet arbore opacaCommingling truth with ecstasies obscure.


aureus et foliis et lento vimine ramusApollo, as she raged, flung loosened rein


Iunoni infernae dictus sacer; hunc tegit omnisAnd thrust beneath her heart a quickening spur.


lucus, et obscuris claudunt convallibus umbrae.When first her madness ceased, and her wild lips


Sed non ante datur telluris operta subireWere still at last, the hero thus began :


auricomos quam quis decerpserit arbore fetus.“No tribulations new, 0 Sibyl blest


Hoc sibi pulchra suum ferri Proserpina munusCan now confront me; every future pain


instituit. Primo avulso non deficit alterI have foretasted; my prophetic soul


aureus, et simili frondescit virga metallo.Endured each stroke of fate before it fell.


Ergo alte vestiga oculis, et rite repertumOne boon I ask. If of th' infernal King


carpe manu; namque ipse volens facilisque sequeturThis be the portal where the murky wave


si te fata vocant; aliter non viribus ullisOf swollen Acheron o'erflows its bound


vincere, nec duro poteris convellere ferro.Here let me enter and behold the face


Praeterea iacet exanimum tibi corpus amici—Of my loved sire. Thy hand may point the way;


heu nescis—totamque incestat funere classemThy word will open wide yon holy doors.


dum consulta petis nostroque in limine pendes.My father through the flames and falling spears


Sedibus hunc refer ante suis et conde sepulchro.Straight through the centre of our foes, I bore


Duc nigras pecudes; ea prima piacula sunto:Upon these shoulders. My long flight he shared


sic demum lucos Stygis et regna invia vivisFrom sea to sea, and suffered at my side


aspicies. Dixit, pressoque obmutuit ore.The anger of rude waters and dark skies,—


Deiphobe Glauci, fatur quae talia regi:The Minotaur—of monstrous loves the sign.


Non hoc ista sibi tempus spectacula poscit;Here was the toilsome, labyrinthine maze


nunc grege de intacto septem mactare iuvencosWhere, pitying love-lorn Ariadne's tears


nanThe crafty Daedalus himself betrayed


Talibus adfata Aenean (nec sacra moranturThe secret of his work; and gave the clue


iussa viri), Teucros vocat alta in templa sacerdos.To guide the path of Theseus through the gloom.


Excisum Euboicae latus ingens rupis in antrum0 Icarus, in such well-graven scene


quo lati ducunt aditus centum, ostia centum;How proud thy place should be! but grief forbade:


unde ruunt totidem voces, responsa Sibyllae.Twice in pure gold a father's fingers strove


Ventum erat ad limen, cum virgo. Poscere fataTo shape thy fall, and twice they strove in vain.


tempus ait; deus, ecce, deus! Cui talia fantiAeneas long the various work would scan;


ante fores subito non voltus, non color unusBut now Achates comes, and by his side


non comptae mansere comae; sed pectus anhelumDeiphobe, the Sibyl, Glaucus' child.


et rabie fera corda tument; maiorque videriThus to the prince she spoke :


nec mortale sonans, adflata est numine quando“Is this thine hour


iam propiore dei. Cessas in vota precesqueTo stand and wonder? Rather go obtain


Tros ait Aenea? Cessas? Neque enim ante dehiscentFrom young unbroken herd the bullocks seven


attonitae magna ora domus. Et talia fataAnd seven yearling ewes, our wonted way.”


conticuit. Gelidus Teucris per dura cucurritThus to Aeneas; his attendants haste


ossa tremor, funditque preces rex pectore ab imo:To work her will; the priestess, calling loud
NaN


Dardana qui Paridis direxti tela manusqueDeep in the face of that Euboean crag


corpus in Aeacidae, magnas obeuntia terrasA cavern vast is hollowed out amain


tot maria intravi duce te, penitusque repostasWith hundred openings, a hundred mouths


Massylum gentes praetentaque Syrtibus arvaWhence voices flow, the Sibyl's answering songs.


iam tandem Italiae fugientis prendimus oras;While at the door they paused, the virgin cried :


hac Troiana tenus fuerit Fortuna secuta.“Ask now thy doom!—the god! the god is nigh!”


Vos quoque Pergameae iam fas est parcere gentiSo saying, from her face its color flew


dique deaeque omnes quibus obstitit Ilium et ingensHer twisted locks flowed free, the heaving breast


gloria Dardaniae. Tuque, O sanctissima vatesSwelled with her heart's wild blood; her stature seemed


praescia venturi, da, non indebita poscoVaster, her accent more than mortal man


regna meis fatis, Latio considere TeucrosAs all th' oncoming god around her breathed :


errantisque deos agitataque numina Troiae.“On with thy vows and prayers, 0 Trojan, on!


Tum Phoebo et Triviae solido de marmore templumFor only unto prayer this haunted cave


instituam, festosque dies de nomine Phoebi.May its vast lips unclose.” She spake no more.


Te quoque magna manent regnis penetralia nostris:An icy shudder through the marrow ran


hic ego namque tuas sortes arcanaque fataOf the bold Trojans; while their sacred King


dicta meae genti, ponam, lectosque sacraboPoured from his inmost soul this plaint and prayer :


alma, viros. Foliis tantum ne carmina manda“Phoebus, who ever for the woes of Troy


ne turbata volent rapidis ludibria ventis;Hadst pitying eyes! who gavest deadly aim


ipsa canas oro. Finem dedit ore loquendi.To Paris when his Dardan shaft he hurled


At, Phoebi nondum patiens, immanis in antroOn great Achilles! Thou hast guided me


bacchatur vates, magnum si pectore possitThrough many an unknown water, where the seas


excussisse deum; tanto magis ille fatigatBreak upon kingdoms vast, and to the tribes


os rabidum, fera corda domans, fingitque premendo.Of the remote Massyli, whose wild land


Ostia iamque domus patuere ingentia centumTo Syrtes spreads. But now; because at last


sponte sua, vatisque ferunt responsa per auras:I touch Hesperia's ever-fleeting bound


O tandem magnis pelagi defuncte periclis!May Troy 's ill fate forsake me from this day!


Sed terrae graviora manent. In regna Lavini0 gods and goddesses, beneath whose wrath


Dardanidae venient; mitte hanc de pectore curam;Dardania's glory and great Ilium stood


sed non et venisse volent. Bella, horrida bellaSpare, for ye may, the remnant of my race!


et Thybrim multo spumantem sanguine cerno.And thou, most holy prophetess, whose soul


Non Simois tibi, nec Xanthus, nec Dorica castraForeknows events to come, grant to my prayer


defuerint; alius Latio iam partus Achilles(Which asks no kingdom save what Fate decrees)


natus et ipse dea; nec Teucris addita IunoThat I may stablish in the Latin land


usquam aberit; cum tu supplex in rebus egenisMy Trojans, my far-wandering household-gods


quas gentes Italum aut quas non oraveris urbes!And storm-tossed deities of fallen Troy .


Causa mali tanti coniunx iterum hospita TeucrisThen unto Phoebus and his sister pale


externique iterum thalami.A temple all of marble shall be given


Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior itoAnd festal days to Phoebus evermore.


qua tua te Fortuna sinet. Via prima salutisThee also in my realms a spacious shrine


quod minime reris, Graia pandetur ab urbe.Shall honor; thy dark books and holy songs


Talibus ex adyto dictis Cumaea SibyllaI there will keep, to be my people's law;


horrendas canit ambages antroque remugitAnd thee, benignant Sibyl for all time


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

26 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1113, 1141-1142, 1112 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1112. οὔπω ξυνῆκα· νῦν γὰρ ἐξ αἰνιγμάτων 1112. Nor yet I’ve gone with thee! for — after riddles —
2. Aristophanes, Birds, 958-991, 955 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

955. τὰ κρυερὰ τονδὶ τὸν χιτωνίσκον λαβών.
3. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1089, 110-149, 167, 177, 181, 185-186, 193-222, 960-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
4. Aristophanes, Peace, 1071-1110, 1070 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1070. εἰ γὰρ μὴ νύμφαι γε θεαὶ Βάκιν ἐξαπάτασκον
5. Herodotus, Histories, 1.53, 8.77, 8.96, 9.43 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.53. The Lydians who were to bring these gifts to the temples were instructed by Croesus to inquire of the oracles whether he was to send an army against the Persians and whether he was to add an army of allies. ,When the Lydians came to the places where they were sent, they presented the offerings, and inquired of the oracles, in these words: “Croesus, king of Lydia and other nations, believing that here are the only true places of divination among men, endows you with such gifts as your wisdom deserves. And now he asks you whether he is to send an army against the Persians, and whether he is to add an army of allies.” ,Such was their inquiry; and the judgment given to Croesus by each of the two oracles was the same: namely, that if he should send an army against the Persians he would destroy a great empire. And they advised him to discover the mightiest of the Greeks and make them his friends. 8.77. I cannot say against oracles that they are not true, and I do not wish to try to discredit them when they speak plainly. Look at the following matter: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"When the sacred headland of golden-sworded Artemis and Cynosura by the sea they bridge with ships, /l lAfter sacking shiny Athens in mad hope, /l lDivine Justice will extinguish mighty Greed the son of Insolence /l lLusting terribly, thinking to devour all. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Bronze will come together with bronze, and Ares /l lWill redden the sea with blood. To Hellas the day of freedom /l lFar-seeing Zeus and august Victory will bring. /l /quote Considering this, I dare to say nothing against Bacis concerning oracles when he speaks so plainly, nor will I consent to it by others. 8.96. When the battle was broken off, the Hellenes towed to Salamis as many of the wrecks as were still there and kept ready for another battle, supposing that the king could still make use of his surviving ships. ,A west wind had caught many of the wrecks and carried them to the shore in Attica called Colias. Thus not only was all the rest of the oracle fulfilled which Bacis and Musaeus had spoken about this battle, but also what had been said many years before this in an oracle by Lysistratus, an Athenian soothsayer, concerning the wrecks carried to shore there. Its meaning had eluded all the Hellenes: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"The Colian women will cook with oars. /l lBut this was to happen after the king had marched away. /l /quote 9.43. Now for this prophecy, which Mardonius said was spoken of the Persians, I know it to have been made concerning not them but the Illyrians and the army of the Enchelees. There is, however, a prophecy made by Bacis concerning this battle: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"By Thermodon's stream and the grass-grown banks of Asopus, /l lWill be a gathering of Greeks for fight and the ring of the barbarian's war-cry; /l lMany a Median archer, by death untimely overtaken will fall /l lThere in the battle when the day of his doom is upon him. /l /quote I know that these verses and others very similar to them from Musaeus referred to the Persians. As for the river Thermodon, it flows between Tanagra and Glisas.
6. Cicero, On Divination, 2.76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.76. Sed de hoc loco plura in aliis, nunc hactenus. Externa enim auguria, quae sunt non tam artificiosa quam superstitiosa, videamus. Omnibus fere avibus utuntur, nos admodum paucis; alia illis sinistra sunt, alia nostris. Solebat ex me Deiotarus percontari nostri augurii disciplinam, ego ex illo sui. Di immortales! quantum differebat! ut quaedam essent etiam contraria. Atque ille iis semper utebatur, nos, nisi dum a populo auspicia accepta habemus, quam multum iis utimur? Bellicam rem administrari maiores nostri nisi auspicato noluerunt; quam multi anni sunt, cum bella a proconsulibus et a propraetoribus administrantur 2.76. But we shall discuss the latter point at greater length in other discourses; let us dismiss it for the present.Now let us examine augury as practised among foreign nations, whose methods are not so artificial as they are superstitious. They employ almost all kinds of birds, we only a few; they regard some signs as favourable, we, others. Deiotarus used to question me a great deal about our system of augury, and I him about that of his country. Ye gods! how much they differed! So much that in some cases they were directly the reverse of each other. He employed auspices constantly, we never do except when the duty of doing so is imposed by a vote of the people. Our ancestors would not undertake any military enterprise without consulting the auspices; but now, for many years, our wars have been conducted by pro-consuls and pro-praetors, who do not have the right to take auspices.
7. Cicero, On Laws, 2.3-2.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods.
9. Cicero, On Duties, 3.102, 3.104 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.102. Quid est igitur, dixerit quis, in iure iurando? num iratum timemus lovem? At hoc quidem commune est omnium philosophorum, non eorum modo, qui deum nihil habere ipsum negotii dicunt, nihil exhibere alteri, sed eorum etiam, qui deum semper agere aliquid et moliri volunt, numquam nec irasci deum nec nocere. Quid autem iratus Iuppiter plus nocere potuisset, quam nocuit sibi ipse Regulus Nulla igitur vis fuit religionis, quae tantam utilitatem perverteret. An ne turpiter faceret? Primum minima de malis. Num igitur tantum mali turpitude ista habebat, quantum ille cruciatus? Deinde illud etiam apud Accium: Fregistín fidem? Néque dedi neque do ínfideli cuíquam quamquam ab impio rege dicitur, luculente tamen dicitur. 3.104. Non fuit Iuppiter metuendus ne iratus noceret, qui neque irasci solet nec nocere. Haec quidem ratio non magis contra Reguli quam contra omne ius iurandum valet. Sed in iure iurando non qui metus, sed quae vis sit, debet intellegi; est enim ius iurandum affirmatio religiosa; quod autem affirmate quasi deo teste promiseris, id tenendum est. Iam enim non ad iram deorum, quae nulla est, sed ad iustitiam et ad fidem pertinet. Nam praeclare Ennius: Ó Fides alma ápta pinnis ét ius iurandúm Iovis! Qui ius igitur iurandum violat, is Fidem violat, quam in Capitolio vicinam Iovis optimi maximi, ut in Catonis oratione est, maiores nostri esse voluerunt. 3.102.  "What significance, then," someone will say, "do we attach to an oath? It is not that we fear the wrath of Jove, is it? Not at all; it is the universally accepted view of all philosophers that God is never angry, never hurtful. This is the doctrine not only of those who teach that God is Himself free from troubling cares and that He imposes no trouble upon others, but also of those who believe that God is ever working and ever directing His world. Furthermore, suppose Jupiter had been wroth, what greater injury could He have inflicted upon Regulus than Regulus brought upon himself? Religious scruple, therefore, had no such preponderance as to outweigh so great expediency." "Or was he afraid that his act would be morally wrong? As to that, first of all, the proverb says, 'of evils choose the least.' Did that moral wrong, then, really involve as great an evil as did that awful torture? And secondly, there are the lines of Accius: Thyestes. Hast thou broke thy faith? Atreus. None have I given; none give I ever to the faithless. Although this sentiment is put into the mouth of a wicked king, still it is illuminating in its correctness. 3.104.  "He need not have been afraid that Jupiter in anger would inflict injury upon him; he is not wont to be angry or hurtful." This argument, at all events, has no more weight against Regulus's conduct than it has against the keeping of any other oath. But in taking an oath it is our duty to consider not what one may have to fear in case of violation but wherein its obligation lies: an oath is an assurance backed by religious sanctity; and a solemn promise given, as before God as one's witness, is to be sacredly kept. For the question no longer concerns the wrath of the gods (for there is no such thing) but the obligations of justice and good faith. For, as Ennius says so admirably: "Gracious Good Faith, on wings upborne; thou oath in Jupiter's great name!" Whoever, therefore, violates his oath violates Good Faith; and, as we find it stated in Cato's speech, our forefathers chose that she should dwell upon the Capitol "neighbour to Jupiter Supreme and Best.
10. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 5.16.3, 6.13.1-6.13.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.16.3.  For the Romans attribute panics to this divinity; and whatever apparitions come to men's sight, now in one shape and now in another, inspiring terror, or whatever supernatural voices come to their ears to disturb them are the work, they say, of this god. The voice of the divinity exhorted the Romans to be of good courage, as having gained the victory, and declared that the enemy's dead exceeded theirs by one man. They say that Valerius, encouraged by this voice, pushed on to the Tyrrhenians' entrenchments while it was still the dead of night, and having slain many of them and driven the rest out of the camp, made himself master of it. 6.13.1.  It is said that in this battle two men on horseback, far excelling in both beauty and stature those our human stock produces, and just growing their first beard, appeared to Postumius, the dictator, and to those arrayed about him, and charged at the head of the Roman horse, striking with their spears all the Latins they encountered and driving them headlong before them. And after the flight of the Latins and the capture of their camp, the battle having come to an end in the late afternoon, two youths are said to have appeared in the same manner in the Roman Forum attired in military garb, very tall and beautiful and of the same age, themselves retaining on their counteces as having come from a battle, the look of combatants, and the horses they led being all in a sweat. 6.13.2.  And when they had each of them watered their horses and washed them at the fountain which rises near the temple of Vesta and forms a small but deep pool, and many people stood about them and inquired if they brought any news from the camp, they related how the battle had gone and that the Romans were the victors. And it is said that after they left the Forum they were not seen again by anyone, though great search was made for them by the man who had been left in command of the city.
11. Livy, History, 1.19.4, 7.6, 29.18.4-29.18.5, 29.18.18, 42.28.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.102-1.103, 1.108-1.109 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Ovid, Fasti, 4.649-4.672, 6.473-6.572, 6.582, 6.589-6.596, 6.601-6.648 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.649. There was an ancient wood, long untouched by the axe 4.650. Still sacred to Pan, the god of Maenalus: 4.651. He gave answers, to calm minds, in night silence. 4.652. Here Numa sacrificed twin ewes. 4.653. The first fell to Faunus, the second to gentle Sleep: 4.654. Both the fleeces were spread on the hard soil. 4.655. Twice the king’s unshorn head was sprinkled with spring water 4.656. Twice he pressed the beech leaves to his forehead. 4.657. He abstained from sex: no meat might be served 4.658. At table, nor could he wear a ring on any finger. 4.659. Dressed in rough clothes he lay down on fresh fleeces 4.660. Having worshipped the god with appropriate words. 4.661. Meanwhile Night arrived, her calm brow wreathed 4.662. With poppies: bringing with her shadowy dreams. 4.663. Faunus appeared, and pressing the fleece with a hard hoof 4.664. From the right side of the bed, he uttered these words: 4.665. ‘King, you must appease Earth, with the death of two cows: 4.666. Let one heifer give two lives, in sacrifice.’ 4.667. Fear banished sleep: Numa pondered the vision 4.668. And considered the ambiguous and dark command. 4.669. His wife, Egeria, most dear to the grove, eased his doubt 4.670. Saying: ‘What’s needed are the innards of a pregt cow,’ 4.671. The innards of a pregt cow were offered: the year proved 4.672. More fruitful, and earth and cattle bore their increase. 6.473. Now you complain, Phrygian Tithonus, abandoned by your bride 6.474. And the vigilant Morning Star leaves the Eastern waters. 6.475. Good mothers (since the Matralia is your festival) 6.476. Go, offer the Theban goddess the golden cakes she’s owed. 6.477. Near the bridges and mighty Circus is a famous square 6.478. One that takes its name from the statue of an ox: 6.479. There, on this day, they say, Servius with his own 6.480. Royal hands, consecrated a temple to Mother Matruta. 6.481. Bacchus, whose hair is twined with clustered grapes 6.482. If the goddess’ house is also yours, guide the poet’s work 6.483. Regarding who the goddess is, and why she exclude 6.484. (Since she does) female servants from the threshold 6.485. of her temple, and why she calls for toasted cakes. 6.486. Semele was burnt by Jove’s compliance: Ino 6.487. Received you as a baby, and nursed you with utmost care. 6.488. Juno swelled with rage, that Ino should raise a child 6.489. Snatched from Jove’s lover: but it was her sister’s son. 6.490. So Athamas was haunted by the Furies, and false visions 6.491. And little Learchus died by his father’s hand. 6.492. His grieving mother committed his shade to the tomb. 6.493. And paid the honours due to the sad pyre. 6.494. Then tearing her hair in sorrow, she leapt up 6.495. And snatched you from your cradle, Melicertes. 6.496. There’s a narrow headland between two seas 6.497. A single space attacked by twofold waves: 6.498. There Ino came, clutching her son in her frenzied grasp 6.499. And threw herself, with him, from a high cliff into the sea. 6.500. Panope and her hundred sisters received them unharmed 6.501. And gliding smoothly carried them through their realm. 6.502. They reached the mouth of densely eddying Tiber 6.503. Before they became Leucothea and Palaemon. 6.504. There was a grove: known either as Semele’s or Stimula’s: 6.505. Inhabited, they say, by Italian Maenads. 6.506. Ino, asking them their nation, learned they were Arcadians 6.507. And that Evander was the king of the place. 6.508. Hiding her divinity, Saturn’s daughter cleverly 6.509. Incited the Latian Bacchae with deceiving words: 6.510. ‘O too-easy-natured ones, caught by every feeling! 6.511. This stranger comes, but not as a friend, to our gathering. 6.512. She’s treacherous, and would learn our sacred rites: 6.513. But she has a child on whom we can wreak punishment.’ 6.514. She’d scarcely ended when the Thyiads, hair streaming 6.515. Over their necks, filled the air with their howling 6.516. Laid hands on Ino, and tried to snatch the boy. 6.517. She invoked gods with names as yet unknown to her: 6.518. ‘Gods, and men, of this land, help a wretched mother!’ 6.519. Her cry carried to the neighbouring Aventine. 6.520. Oetaean Hercules having driven the Iberian cattle 6.521. To the riverbank, heard and hurried towards the voice. 6.522. As he arrived, the women who’d been ready for violence 6.523. Shamefully turned their backs in cowardly flight. 6.524. ‘What are you doing here,’ said Hercules (recognising her) 6.525. ‘Sister of Bacchus’ mother? Does Juno persecute you too?’ 6.526. She told him part of her tale, suppressing the rest because of her son: 6.527. Ashamed to have been goaded to crime by the Furies. 6.528. Rumour, so swift, flew on beating wings 6.529. And your name was on many a lip, Ino. 6.530. It’s said you entered loyal Carmentis’ home 6.531. As a guest, and assuaged your great hunger: 6.532. They say the Tegean priestess quickly made cake 6.533. With her own hands, and baked them on the hearth. 6.534. Now cakes delight the goddess at the Matralia: 6.535. Country ways pleased her more than art’s attentions. 6.536. ‘Now, O prophetess,’ she said, ‘reveal my future fate 6.537. As far as is right. Add this, I beg, to your hospitality.’ 6.538. A pause ensued. Then the prophetess assumed divine powers 6.539. And her whole breast filled with the presence of the god: 6.540. You’d hardly have known her then, so much taller 6.541. And holier she’d become than a moment before. 6.542. ‘I sing good news, Ino,’ she said, ‘your trials are over 6.543. Be a blessing to your people for evermore. 6.544. You’ll be a sea goddess, and your son will inhabit ocean. 6.545. Take different names now, among your own waves: 6.546. Greeks will call you Leucothea, our people Matuta: 6.547. Your son will have complete command of harbours 6.548. We’ll call him Portunus, Palaemon in his own tongue. 6.549. Go, and both be friends, I beg you, of our country!’ 6.550. Ino nodded, and gave her promise. Their trials were over 6.551. They changed their names: he’s a god and she’s a goddess. 6.552. You ask why she forbids the approach of female servants? 6.553. She hates them: by her leave I’ll sing the reason for her hate. 6.554. Daughter of Cadmus, one of your maid 6.555. Was often embraced by your husband. 6.556. Faithless Athamas secretly enjoyed her: he learned 6.557. From her that you gave the farmers parched seed. 6.558. You yourself denied it, but rumour confirmed it. 6.559. That’s why you hate the service of a maid. 6.560. But let no loving mother pray to her, for her child: 6.561. She herself proved an unfortunate parent. 6.562. Better command her to help another’s child: 6.563. She was more use to Bacchus than her own. 6.564. They say she asked you, Rutilius, ‘Where are you rushing? 6.565. As consul you’ll fall to the Marsian enemy on my day.’ 6.566. Her words were fulfilled, the Tolenu 6.567. Flowed purple, its waters mixed with blood. 6.568. The following year, Didius, killed on the same 6.569. Day, doubled the enemy’s strength. 6.570. Fortuna, the same day is yours, your temple 6.571. Founded by the same king, in the same place. 6.572. And whose is that statue hidden under draped robes? 6.582. Under cloth: the king’s face being covered by a robe. 6.589. Having secured her marriage by crime, Tullia 6.590. Used to incite her husband with words like these: 6.591. ‘What use if we’re equally matched, you by my sister’ 6.592. Murder, I by your brother’s, in leading a virtuous life? 6.593. Better that my husband and your wife had lived 6.594. Than that we shrink from greater achievement. 6.595. I offer my father’s life and realm as my dower: 6.596. If you’re a man, go take the dower I speak of. 6.601. With blood and slaughter the weak old man was defeated: 6.602. Tarquin the Proud snatched his father-in-law’s sceptre. 6.603. Servius himself fell bleeding to the hard earth 6.604. At the foot of the Esquiline, site of his palace. 6.605. His daughter, driving to her father’s home 6.606. Rode through the streets, erect and haughty. 6.607. When her driver saw the king’s body, he halted 6.608. In tears. She reproved him in these terms: 6.609. ‘Go on, or do you seek the bitter fruits of virtue? 6.610. Drive the unwilling wheels, I say, over his face.’ 6.611. A certain proof of this is Evil Street, named 6.612. After her, while eternal infamy marks the deed. 6.613. Yet she still dared to visit her father’s temple 6.614. His monument: what I tell is strange but true. 6.615. There was a statue enthroned, an image of Servius: 6.616. They say it put a hand to its eyes 6.617. And a voice was heard: ‘Hide my face 6.618. Lest it view my own wicked daughter.’ 6.619. It was veiled by cloth, Fortune refused to let the robe 6.620. Be removed, and she herself spoke from her temple: 6.621. ‘The day when Servius’ face is next revealed 6.622. Will be a day when shame is cast aside.’ 6.623. Women, beware of touching the forbidden cloth 6.624. (It’s sufficient to utter prayers in solemn tones) 6.625. And let him who was the City’s seventh king 6.626. Keep his head covered, forever, by this veil. 6.627. The temple once burned: but the fire spared 6.628. The statue: Mulciber himself preserved his son. 6.629. For Servius’ father was Vulcan, and the lovely 6.630. Ocresia of Corniculum his mother. 6.631. Once, performing sacred rites with her in the due manner 6.632. Tanaquil ordered her to pour wine on the garlanded hearth: 6.633. There was, or seemed to be, the form of a male organ 6.634. In the ashes: the shape was really there in fact. 6.635. The captive girl sat on the hearth, as commanded: 6.636. She conceived Servius, born of divine seed. 6.637. His father showed his paternity by touching the child’ 6.638. Head with fire, and a cap of flames glowed on his hair. 6.639. And Livia, this day dedicated a magnificent shrine to you 6.640. Concordia, that she offered to her dear husband. 6.641. Learn this, you age to come: where Livia’s Colonnade 6.642. Now stands, there was once a vast palace. 6.643. A site that was like a city: it occupied a space 6.644. Larger than that of many a walled town. 6.645. It was levelled to the soil, not because of its owner’s treason 6.646. But because its excess was considered harmful. 6.647. Caesar counteced the demolition of such a mass 6.648. Destroying its great wealth to which he was heir.
14. Propertius, Elegies, 4.9.37-4.9.50 (1st cent. BCE

15. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.501, 6.1-6.2, 6.9-6.12, 6.14-6.99, 6.101-6.155, 6.258-6.259, 6.262-6.264, 7.85-7.101, 7.563-7.571, 8.203-8.204, 8.349-8.354, 11.429 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 6.1. After such words and tears, he flung free rein 6.2. To the swift fleet, which sped along the wave 6.9. To find the seed-spark hidden in its veins; 6.10. One breaks the thick-branched trees, and steals away 6.11. The shelter where the woodland creatures bide; 6.12. One leads his mates where living waters flow. 6.14. The templed hill where lofty Phoebus reigns 6.15. And that far-off, inviolable shrine 6.16. of dread Sibylla, in stupendous cave 6.17. O'er whose deep soul the god of Delos breathes 6.18. Prophetic gifts, unfolding things to come. 6.20. Here Daedalus, the ancient story tells 6.21. Escaping Minos' power, and having made 6.22. Hazard of heaven on far-mounting wings 6.23. Floated to northward, a cold, trackless way 6.24. And lightly poised, at last, o'er Cumae 's towers. 6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee 6.26. His gear of wings, Apollo! and ordained 6.27. Vast temples to thy name and altars fair. 6.28. On huge bronze doors Androgeos' death was done; 6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe 6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!— 6.31. The youths and maidens wait the annual doom 6.32. Drawn out by lot from yonder marble urn. 6.33. Beyond, above a sea, lay carven Crete :— 6.34. The bull was there; the passion, the strange guile; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son 6.36. The Minotaur—of monstrous loves the sign. 6.37. Here was the toilsome, labyrinthine maze 6.38. Where, pitying love-lorn Ariadne's tears 6.39. The crafty Daedalus himself betrayed 6.40. The secret of his work; and gave the clue 6.41. To guide the path of Theseus through the gloom. 6.42. 0 Icarus, in such well-graven scene 6.43. How proud thy place should be! but grief forbade: 6.44. Twice in pure gold a father's fingers strove 6.45. To shape thy fall, and twice they strove in vain. 6.46. Aeneas long the various work would scan; 6.47. But now Achates comes, and by his side 6.48. Deiphobe, the Sibyl, Glaucus' child. 6.49. Thus to the prince she spoke : 6.50. “Is this thine hour 6.51. To stand and wonder? Rather go obtain 6.52. From young unbroken herd the bullocks seven 6.53. And seven yearling ewes, our wonted way.” 6.54. Thus to Aeneas; his attendants haste 6.55. To work her will; the priestess, calling loud 6.57. Deep in the face of that Euboean crag 6.58. A cavern vast is hollowed out amain 6.59. With hundred openings, a hundred mouths 6.60. Whence voices flow, the Sibyl's answering songs. 6.61. While at the door they paused, the virgin cried : 6.62. “Ask now thy doom!—the god! the god is nigh!” 6.63. So saying, from her face its color flew 6.64. Her twisted locks flowed free, the heaving breast 6.65. Swelled with her heart's wild blood; her stature seemed 6.66. Vaster, her accent more than mortal man 6.67. As all th' oncoming god around her breathed : 6.68. “On with thy vows and prayers, 0 Trojan, on! 6.69. For only unto prayer this haunted cave 6.70. May its vast lips unclose.” She spake no more. 6.71. An icy shudder through the marrow ran 6.72. of the bold Trojans; while their sacred King 6.73. Poured from his inmost soul this plaint and prayer : 6.74. “Phoebus, who ever for the woes of Troy 6.75. Hadst pitying eyes! who gavest deadly aim 6.76. To Paris when his Dardan shaft he hurled 6.77. On great Achilles! Thou hast guided me 6.78. Through many an unknown water, where the seas 6.79. Break upon kingdoms vast, and to the tribes 6.80. of the remote Massyli, whose wild land 6.81. To Syrtes spreads. But now; because at last 6.82. I touch Hesperia's ever-fleeting bound 6.83. May Troy 's ill fate forsake me from this day! 6.84. 0 gods and goddesses, beneath whose wrath 6.85. Dardania's glory and great Ilium stood 6.86. Spare, for ye may, the remt of my race! 6.87. And thou, most holy prophetess, whose soul 6.88. Foreknows events to come, grant to my prayer 6.89. (Which asks no kingdom save what Fate decrees) 6.90. That I may stablish in the Latin land 6.91. My Trojans, my far-wandering household-gods 6.92. And storm-tossed deities of fallen Troy . 6.93. Then unto Phoebus and his sister pale 6.94. A temple all of marble shall be given 6.95. And festal days to Phoebus evermore. 6.96. Thee also in my realms a spacious shrine 6.97. Shall honor; thy dark books and holy songs 6.98. I there will keep, to be my people's law; 6.99. And thee, benigt Sibyl for all time 6.101. O, not on leaves, light leaves, inscribe thy songs! 6.102. Lest, playthings of each breeze, they fly afar 6.103. In swift confusion! Sing thyself, I pray.” 6.104. So ceased his voice; the virgin through the cave 6.105. Scarce bridled yet by Phoebus' hand divine 6.106. Ecstatic swept along, and vainly stove 6.107. To fing its potent master from her breast; 6.108. But he more strongly plied his rein and curb 6.109. Upon her frenzied lips, and soon subdued 6.110. Her spirit fierce, and swayed her at his will. 6.111. Free and self-moved the cavern's hundred adoors 6.112. Swung open wide, and uttered to the air 6.113. The oracles the virgin-priestess sung : 6.114. “Thy long sea-perils thou hast safely passed; 6.115. But heavier woes await thee on the land. 6.116. Truly thy Trojans to Lavinian shore 6.117. Shall come—vex not thyself thereon—but, oh! 6.118. Shall rue their coming thither! war, red war! 6.119. And Tiber stained with bloody foam I see. 6.120. Simois, Xanthus, and the Dorian horde 6.121. Thou shalt behold; a new Achilles now 6.122. In Latium breathes,—he, too, of goddess born; 6.123. And Juno, burden of the sons of Troy 6.124. Will vex them ever; while thyself shalt sue 6.125. In dire distress to many a town and tribe 6.126. Through Italy ; the cause of so much ill 6.127. Again shall be a hostess-queen, again 6.128. A marriage-chamber for an alien bride. 6.129. Oh! yield not to thy woe, but front it ever 6.130. And follow boldly whither Fortune calls. 6.131. Thy way of safety, as thou least couldst dream 6.133. Thus from her shrine Cumaea's prophetess 6.134. Chanted the dark decrees; the dreadful sound 6.135. Reverberated through the bellowing cave 6.136. Commingling truth with ecstasies obscure. 6.137. Apollo, as she raged, flung loosened rein 6.138. And thrust beneath her heart a quickening spur. 6.139. When first her madness ceased, and her wild lips 6.140. Were still at last, the hero thus began : 6.141. “No tribulations new, 0 Sibyl blest 6.142. Can now confront me; every future pain 6.143. I have foretasted; my prophetic soul 6.144. Endured each stroke of fate before it fell. 6.145. One boon I ask. If of th' infernal King 6.146. This be the portal where the murky wave 6.147. of swollen Acheron o'erflows its bound 6.148. Here let me enter and behold the face 6.149. of my loved sire. Thy hand may point the way; 6.150. Thy word will open wide yon holy doors. 6.151. My father through the flames and falling spears 6.152. Straight through the centre of our foes, I bore 6.153. Upon these shoulders. My long flight he shared 6.154. From sea to sea, and suffered at my side 6.155. The anger of rude waters and dark skies,— 6.258. “0, guide me on, whatever path there be! 6.259. In airy travel through the woodland fly 6.262. 0 heavenly mother!” So saying, his steps lie stayed 6.263. Close watching whither they should signal give; 6.264. The lightly-feeding doves flit on and on 7.85. on the proud, pointing crest, where the swift swarm 7.86. with interlacement of close-clinging feet 7.87. wung from the leafy bough. “Behold, there comes,” 7.88. the prophet cried, “a husband from afar! 7.89. To the same region by the self-same path 7.90. behold an arm'd host taking lordly sway 7.91. upon our city's crown!” Soon after this 7.92. when, coming to the shrine with torches pure 7.93. Lavinia kindled at her father's side 7.94. the sacrifice, swift seemed the flame to burn 7.95. along her flowing hair—O sight of woe! 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 7.563. which, while in night and slumber thou wert laid 7.564. Saturnia 's godhead, visibly revealed 7.565. bade me declare. Up, therefore, and array 7.566. thy warriors in arms! Swift sallying forth 7.567. from thy strong city-gates, on to the fray 7.568. exultant go! Assail the Phrygian chiefs 7.569. who tent them by thy beauteous river's marge 7.570. and burn their painted galleys! 't is the will 7.571. of gods above that speaks. Yea, even the King 8.203. alike the northern and the southern sea. 8.204. Accept good faith, and give! Behold, our hearts 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 11.429. for other land or people yearn, and fate
16. Vergil, Georgics, 2.173-2.174, 2.473-2.474 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags
17. Lucan, Pharsalia, 3.399, 5.116-5.227 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

45. I do not know, said Demetrius, the state of affairs there at present; for as you all know, I have been out of the country for a long time now. But, when I was there, both the oracle of Mopsus and that of Amphilochus were still flourishing. I have a most amazing thing to tell as the result of my visit to the oracle of Mopsus. The ruler of Cilicia was himself still of two minds towards religious matters. This, I think, was because his scepticism lacked conviction, for in all else he was an arrogant and contemptible man. Since he kept about him certain Epicureans, who, because of their admirable naturestudies, forsooth, have an arrogant contempt, as they themselves aver, Frag. 395 Usener; Diogenes Laertius, x. 135. for all such things as oracles, he sent in a freedman, like a spy into the enemy’s territory, arranging that he should have a sealed tablet, on the inside of which was written the inquiry without anyone’s knowing what it was. The man accordingly, as is the custom, passed the night in the sacred precinct and went to sleep, and in the morning reported a dream in this fashion: it seemed to him that a handsome man stood beside him who uttered just one word Black and nothing more, and was gone immediately. The thing seemed passing strange to us, and raised much inquiry, but the ruler was astounded and fell down and worshipped; then opening the tablet he showed written there the question: Shall I sacrifice to you a white bull or a black? The result was that the Epicureans were put to confusion, and the ruler himself not only duly performed the sacrifice, but ever after revered Mopsus. 45. I do not know," said Demetrius, "the state of affairs there at present; for as you all know, I have been out of the country for a long time now. But, when I was there, both the oracle of Mopsus and that of Amphilochus were still flourishing. I have a most amazing thing to tell as the result of my visit to the oracle of Mopsus. The ruler of Cilicia was himself still of two minds towards religious matters. This, I think, was because his skepticism lacked conviction, for in all else he was an arrogant and contemptible man. Since he kept about him certain Epicureans, who, because of their admirable nature-studies, forsooth, have an arrogant contempt, as they themselves aver, for all such things as oracles, he sent in a freedman, like a spy into the enemy's territory, arranging that he should have a sealed tablet, on the inside of which was written the inquiry without anyone's knowing what it was. The man accordingly, as is the custom, passed the night in the sacred precinct and went to sleep, and in the morning reported a dream in this fashion: it seemed to him that a handsome man stood beside him who uttered just one word 'Black' and nothing more, and was gone immediately. The thing seemed passing strange to us, and raised much inquiry, but the ruler was astounded and fell down and worshipped; then opening the tablet he shoed written there the question: 'Shall I sacrifice to you a white bull or a black?' The result was that the Epicureans were put to confusion, and the ruler himself not only duly performed the sacrifice, but ever after revered Mopsus.
19. Plutarch, Coriolanus, 3.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4. In the battle of which I was speaking, it is said that Castor and Pollux appeared, and that immediately after the battle they were seen, their horses all a-drip with sweat, in the forum, announcing the victory, by the fountain where their temple now stands. Therefore the day on which this victory was won, the Ides of July, was consecrated to the Dioscuri.
20. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 2.13.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.13.13.  Timanthes, who was, I think, a native of Cythnus, provides an example of this in the painting with which he won the victory over Colotes of Teos. It represented the sacrifice of Iphigenia, and the artist had depicted an expression of grief on the face of Calchas and of still greater grief on that of Ulysses, while he had given Menelaus an agony of sorrow beyond which his art could not go. Having exhausted his powers of emotional expression he was at a loss to portray the father's face as it deserved, and solved the problem by veiling his head and leaving his sorrow to the imagination of the spectator.
21. Seneca The Younger, Agamemnon, 587-588, 713, 769-775, 586 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 651-682, 650 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Statius, Thebais, 4.419-4.442 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 50.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 22, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. This difference of opinion did not last long, and Alexander prevailed. Discovering, however, that a use might, after all, be made of Chalcedon, they went there first, and in the temple of Apollo, the oldest in the place, they buried some brazen tablets, on which was the statement that very shortly Asclepius, with his father Apollo[1], would pay a visit to Pontus, and take up his abode at Abonoteichos[2]. The discovery of the tablets took place as arranged, and the news flew through Bithynia and Pontus[3], first of all, naturally, to Abonoteichos. The people of that place at once resolved to raise a temple and lost no time in digging the foundations. Cocconas was now left at Chalcedon, engaged in composing certain ambiguous crabbed oracles. He shortly afterward died, I believe, of a viper’s bite. [1] Asclepius and Apollo | Asclepius is a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. He is the son of Apollo. [2] Abonoteichos | A coin that was struck during the reign of Antoninus Pius for the Abonoteichiteans has the figure of the Emperor on one side and on the reverse two serpents, the one seeming to whisper something in the ear of the other. It is a possibility that this coin was struck to perpetuate the arrival of these two divinities at Abonoteichos. To indicate by the symbol on the coin, that the new Aesculapius had received his prophetic gift immediately from his father Apollo.25) [3] Bithynia and Pontus | Bithynia, Paphlagonia, and Pontus were the three northern provinces of Lesser Asia, or those bordering on Euxine Sea. Sometimes the two latter together are called Pontus. In Lucian's time, they were all three under one sole governor general or proconsul. [4] Map of Bithynia and Pontus |
26. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.5. My opinion is that Amphiaraus devoted him self most to the exposition of dreams. It is manifest that, when his divinity was established, it was a dream oracle that he set up. One who has come to consult Amphiaraus is wont first to purify himself. The mode of purification is to sacrifice to the god, and they sacrifice not only to him but also to all those whose names are on the altar. And when all these things have been first done, they sacrifice a ram, and, spreading the skin under them, go to sleep and await enlightenment in a dream.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas, and the sibyl Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229, 231
aeneas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
aeneas at cumae, echoes in senecas agamemnon Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
aeneas at cumae, prophecy of the sibyl Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 184, 185
aeschylus, role doubling in Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
aesculapius, as semitic eshmoun, a demon Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 48
agency (of prophets) Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
ampsanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233, 254
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
animal imagery Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 185
apollo Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
athens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
augury, virgil on Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
augury Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
bacchic rites, matralia and cult of mater matuta in ovids fasti Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
body of the prophet, as sexual object Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
body of the prophet, size Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233, 254
caesar Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125
cassandra Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
cassandra (ondiviela), cassandra (stallings) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 231
castor and pollux Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
ceres Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
chthonic deities Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
cicero, marcus tullius, on religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
cumae, sibyl of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
cumae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
cumaean sibyl, and song Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 231
cumaean sibyl, prophecies to aeneas Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 184, 185
cumaean sibyl, reflected in senecan cassandra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
curtius, lacus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
curtius, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
daedalus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
deiphobe Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233; Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175
demons, xii; obey christians Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 48
demons, xii; origin, nature and activity of Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 48
diana Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
dido Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
divination, incubation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
divination Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 337
divine speech, enigmatic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
dreams and visions, incubation, oracular Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
dreams and visions, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
ecstasy/frenzy (prophetic) Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125
ekphrasis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
electra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
enigmatic speech, graeco-roman oracular and prophetic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
enigmatic speech, in dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
enigmatic speech, modes Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
evidence; of demons Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 48
ezekiel Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
fabius pictor Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
faunus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 148
foreignness Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 184
forum boarium, rome Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
furies Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 337
gaul Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
gods, chthonic deities Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
gods, presence in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
greek cultural influences Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
greek literature and practice, juno, victims of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
greek religion and mythology Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
helenus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
hercules Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
inconsistency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 148
inspiration Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 205
jeremiah Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
juno/hera Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
juno Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
jupiter, capitolinus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
jupiter, in the aeneid Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229, 231
katz, joshua Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 185
lacus curtius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
lake regillus, battle of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
libera (proserpina) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
locri Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
lycophron Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
magna graecia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
masculinity Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
matralia and cult of mater matuta, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
matralia and cult of mater matuta, hercules protection of ino in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
matralia and cult of mater matuta, vergils aeneid, as alternative foundation narrative to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
matralia and cult of mater matuta Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
modern reception Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 231
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
nero Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125
numa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
numinousness, in foreign lands Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
numinousness, of divine imagery Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
numinousness, of nature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
old testament Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
oracles, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
oracles; pagan Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 48
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
prodigy, in virgil Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
prophecy, enigmatic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
prophecy, prophetic dreams and visions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
prophecy, sibylline Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
prophecy, unsolicited oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
proserpina (libera) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
pyrrhus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
pythia Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
pythia (see priestesses) Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175
quinctius cincinnatus, l., (quin)decemuiri s.f. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
quintilian Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
rhetoric, practices and training Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 148
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
rutulians Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 221
sibyl, cumaean Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229, 231
sibyl Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
sibyl of cumae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 233; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
sibyls, cumaean sibyl Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175
sibyls, jewish/christian sibyls Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
signs, augural Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
signs Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
stallings, a. e., cassandra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 231
temple, as metaliterary devices Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
temple, of apollo at cumae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
temple of proserpina at locri Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
tiberinus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 231
tolumnius Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
translation, of aeneids sibyl Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 184
trojans Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229, 231
uates Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229
underworld Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
uoluo Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 185
vatinius, publius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 254
vergil, aeneid, matralia as alternative foundation narrative to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 196
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147, 148
violence) Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175
violence, divine violence Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
violence Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 175
virgil Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 125, 175; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 229, 231
world' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 147
written vs. oral prophecy, scroll-reading imagery Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 185