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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 4.376-4.380


Heu furiis incensa feror! Nunc augur Apolloflowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair


nunc Lyciae sortes, nunc et Iove missus ab ipsoby opulent Dido with fine threads of gold


interpres divom fert horrida iussa per auras.her gift of love; straightway the god began:


Scilicet is Superis labor est, ea cura quietos“Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build


sollicitat. Neque te teneo, neque dicta refello.foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.677-24.694 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.677. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.678. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.679. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, overcome of soft sleep; but not upon the helper Hermes might sleep lay hold 24.680. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.681. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.682. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.683. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.684. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.685. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.686. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.687. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.688. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.689. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.690. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.691. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.692. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.693. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.694. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.84-1.87, 1.96-1.98, 5.29-5.49, 5.55-5.148, 10.277-10.308, 10.330-10.332 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 66 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

66. He took the hollow lyre which he placed
4. Euripides, Medea, 352-354, 446-583, 586-587, 591-592, 595-599, 610-613, 619-620, 625-626, 351 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.827-1.831, 1.865-1.866, 1.888-1.908, 4.361-4.363, 4.368-4.369 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.827. τῶ ὑμεῖς στρωφᾶσθʼ ἐπιδήμιοι· εἰ δέ κεν αὖθι 1.828. ναιετάειν ἐθέλοις, καί τοι ἅδοι, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔπειτα 1.829. πατρὸς ἐμεῖο Θόαντος ἔχοις γέρας· οὐδέ τί σʼ οἴω 1.830. γαῖαν ὀνόσσεσθαι· περὶ γὰρ βαθυλήιος ἄλλων 1.831. νήσων, Αἰγαίῃ ὅσαι εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν. 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.888. ‘Νίσσεο, καὶ σὲ θεοὶ σὺν ἀπηρέσιν αὖτις ἑταίροις 1.889. χρύσειον βασιλῆι δέρος κομίσειαν ἄγοντα 1.890. αὔτως, ὡς ἐθέλεις καί τοι φίλον. ἥδε δὲ νῆσος 1.891. σκῆπτρά τε πατρὸς ἐμεῖο παρέσσεται, ἢν καὶ ὀπίσσω 1.892. δή ποτε νοστήσας ἐθέλῃς ἄψορρον ἱκέσθαι. 1.893. ῥηιδίως δʼ ἂν ἑοῖ καὶ ἀπείρονα λαὸν ἀγείραις 1.894. ἄλλων ἐκ πολίων· ἀλλʼ οὐ σύγε τήνδε μενοινὴν 1.895. σχήσεις, οὔτʼ αὐτὴ προτιόσσομαι ὧδε τελεῖσθαι. 1.896. μνώεο μὴν ἀπεών περ ὁμῶς καὶ νόστιμος ἤδη 1.897. Ὑψιπύλης· λίπε δʼ ἧμιν ἔπος, τό κεν ἐξανύσαιμι 1.898. πρόφρων, ἢν ἄρα δή με θεοὶ δώωσι τεκέσθαι.’ 1.899. τὴν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀγαιόμενος προσέειπεν· 1.900. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, τὰ μὲν οὕτω ἐναίσιμα πάντα γένοιτο 1.901. ἐκ μακάρων· τύνη δʼ ἐμέθεν πέρι θυμὸν ἀρείω 1.902. ἴσχανʼ, ἐπεὶ πάτρην μοι ἅλις Πελίαο ἕκητι 1.903. ναιετάειν· μοῦνόν με θεοὶ λύσειαν ἀέθλων. 1.904. εἰ δʼ οὔ μοι πέπρωται ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 1.905. τηλοῦ ἀναπλώοντι, σὺ δʼ ἄρσενα παῖδα τέκηαι 1.906. πέμπε μιν ἡβήσαντα Πελασγίδος ἔνδον Ἰωλκοῦ 1.907. πατρί τʼ ἐμῷ καὶ μητρὶ δύης ἄκος, ἢν ἄρα τούσγε 1.908. τέτμῃ ἔτι ζώοντας, ἵνʼ ἄνδιχα τοῖο ἄνακτος 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι.
7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Propertius, Elegies, 1.1.3, 1.1.6, 1.1.11, 1.1.14, 1.1.27-1.1.28, 1.1.36 (1st cent. BCE

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.197-1.204, 1.235, 1.297-1.304, 1.335-1.371, 1.494-1.756, 2.337, 2.725, 3.78, 4.1-4.59, 4.65-4.128, 4.133, 4.138-4.139, 4.141-4.150, 4.155-4.298, 4.300-4.375, 4.377-4.400, 4.402-4.705, 5.628, 6.450-6.474, 7.355-7.356, 7.456-7.457, 7.550, 7.594, 7.623, 7.641-7.817, 8.18-8.21, 9.422-9.432, 10.442, 10.670 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.197. out-ebbing far, he calms the whole wide sea 1.198. and glides light-wheeled along the crested foam. 1.199. As when, with not unwonted tumult, roars 1.200. in some vast city a rebellious mob 1.201. and base-born passions in its bosom burn 1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.235. Then good Achates smote a flinty stone 1.297. or mourns with grief untold the untimely doom 1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.300. from his ethereal sky surveying clear 1.301. the seas all winged with sails, lands widely spread 1.302. and nations populous from shore to shore 1.303. paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze 1.304. on Libya . But while he anxious mused 1.335. to a new land and race; the Trojan arms 1.336. were hung on temple walls; and, to this day 1.337. lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. 1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 1.339. a station in the arch of heaven assign 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.341. a single god is angry; we endure 1.342. this treachery and violence, whereby 1.343. wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. 1.344. Is this what piety receives? Or thus 1.346. Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men 1.347. with such a look as clears the skies of storm 1.348. chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: 1.349. “Let Cytherea cast her fears away! 1.350. Irrevocably blest the fortunes be 1.351. of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see 1.352. that City, and the proud predestined wall 1.353. encompassing Lavinium . Thyself 1.354. hall starward to the heights of heaven bear 1.355. Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves 1.356. my will once uttered. Since such carking cares 1.357. consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth 1.358. and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. 1.359. Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war 1.360. and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall 1.361. and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond 1.362. about his gathered people. Summers three 1.363. hall Latium call him king; and three times pass 1.364. the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. 1.365. His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called 1.366. (Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood) 1.367. full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne 1.368. from the Lavinian citadel, and build 1.370. Here three full centuries shall Hector's race 1.371. have kingly power; till a priestess queen 1.494. to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where 1.496. his buried treasure lay, a weight unknown 1.497. of silver and of gold. Thus onward urged 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion 1.505. they took to sea. A woman wrought this deed. 1.506. Then came they to these lands where now thine eyes 1.507. behold yon walls and yonder citadel 1.508. of newly rising Carthage . For a price 1.509. they measured round so much of Afric soil 1.510. as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot 1.511. received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray 1.512. what men are ye? from what far land arrived 1.513. and whither going?” When she questioned thus 1.514. her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths 1.516. “Divine one, if I tell 1.517. my woes and burdens all, and thou could'st pause 1.518. to heed the tale, first would the vesper star 1.519. th' Olympian portals close, and bid the day 1.520. in slumber lie. of ancient Troy are we— 1.521. if aught of Troy thou knowest! As we roved 1.522. from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm 1.523. cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. 1.524. I am Aeneas, faithful evermore 1.525. to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear 1.526. my gods ancestral, which I snatched away 1.527. from peril of the foe. My fame is known 1.528. above the stars. I travel on in quest 1.529. of Italy, my true home-land, and I 1.530. from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. 1.531. With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main 1.532. I launched away. My mother from the skies 1.533. gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. 1.534. Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive 1.535. the shock of wind and wave; and I myself 1.536. friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down 1.537. this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here 1.538. from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.542. I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers 1.543. with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither 1.544. unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on 1.545. and to the royal threshold make thy way! 1.546. I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all 1.547. are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed 1.548. by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; 1.549. or else in vain my parents gave me skill 1.550. to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! 1.551. A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file 1.552. erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down 1.553. from his ethereal haunt, now form anew 1.554. their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place 1.555. or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground 1.556. or soaring high, with whir of happy wings 1.557. re-circle heaven in triumphant song: 1.558. likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners 1.559. are landed, or fly landward at full sail. 1.561. She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam 1.562. from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair 1.563. breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes 1.564. fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed 1.565. the veritable goddess. Now he knew 1.566. that vision was his mother, and his words 1.567. pursued the fading phantom as it fled: 1.568. “Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er 1.569. with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? 1.570. Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange 1.571. of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” 1.572. Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way 1.573. toward the city's rampart. Venus then 1.574. o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— 1.575. a liquid mantle of thick cloud divine,— 1.576. that viewless they might pass, nor would any 1.577. obstruct, delay, or question why they came. 1.578. To Paphos then she soared, her Ioved abode 1.579. where stands her temple, at whose hundred shrines 1.580. garlands of myrtle and fresh roses breathe 1.582. Meanwhile the wanderers swiftly journey on 1.583. along the clear-marked road, and soon they climb 1.584. the brow of a high hill, which close in view 1.585. o'er-towers the city's crown. The vast exploit 1.586. where lately rose but Afric cabins rude 1.587. Aeneas wondered at: the smooth, wide ways; 1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 1.590. a wall or citadel, from far below 1.591. lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care 1.592. choose where to build, and close the space around 1.593. with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place 1.594. the people for just governors, just laws 1.595. and for their reverend senate shout acclaim. 1.596. Some clear the harbor mouth; some deeply lay 1.597. the base of a great theatre, and carve out 1.598. proud columns from the mountain, to adorn 1.599. their rising stage with lofty ornament. 1.600. o busy bees above a field of flowers 1.601. in early summer amid sunbeams toil 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 1.603. or with the flowing honey storing close 1.604. the pliant cells, until they quite run o'er 1.605. with nectared sweet; while from the entering swarm 1.606. they take their little loads; or lined for war 1.607. rout the dull drones, and chase them from the hive; 1.608. brisk is the task, and all the honeyed air 1.609. breathes odors of wild thyme. “How blest of Heaven. 1.610. These men that see their promised ramparts rise!” 1.611. Aeneas sighed; and swift his glances moved 1.612. from tower to tower; then on his way he fared 1.613. veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614. of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— 1.616. Deep in the city's heart there was a grove 1.617. of beauteous shade, where once the Tyrians 1.618. cast here by stormful waves, delved out of earth 1.619. that portent which Queen Juno bade them find,— 1.620. the head of a proud horse,—that ages long 1.621. their boast might be wealth, luxury and war. 1.622. Upon this spot Sidonian Dido raised 1.623. a spacious fane to Juno, which became 1.624. plendid with gifts, and hallowed far and wide 1.625. for potency divine. Its beams were bronze 1.626. and on loud hinges swung the brazen doors. 1.627. A rare, new sight this sacred grove did show 1.628. which calmed Aeneas' fears, and made him bold 1.629. to hope for safety, and with lifted heart 1.630. from his low-fallen fortunes re-aspire. 1.631. For while he waits the advent of the Queen 1.632. he scans the mighty temple, and admires 1.633. the city's opulent pride, and all the skill 1.634. its rival craftsmen in their work approve. 1.635. Behold! he sees old Ilium 's well-fought fields 1.636. in sequent picture, and those famous wars 1.637. now told upon men's lips the whole world round. 1.638. There Atreus' sons, there kingly Priam moved 1.639. and fierce Pelides pitiless to both. 1.640. Aeneas paused, and, weeping, thus began: 1.641. “Alas, Achates, what far region now 1.642. what land in all the world knows not our pain? 1.648. So saying, he received into his heart 1.649. that visionary scene, profoundly sighed 1.650. and let his plenteous tears unheeded flow. 1.651. There he beheld the citadel of Troy 1.652. girt with embattled foes; here, Greeks in flight 1.653. ome Trojan onset 'scaped; there, Phrygian bands 1.654. before tall-plumed Achilles' chariot sped. 1.655. The snowy tents of Rhesus spread hard by 1.657. in night's first watch burst o'er them unawares 1.658. with bloody havoc and a host of deaths; 1.659. then drove his fiery coursers o'er the plain 1.660. before their thirst or hunger could be stayed 1.661. on Trojan corn or Xanthus ' cooling stream. 1.662. Here too was princely Troilus, despoiled 1.663. routed and weaponless, O wretched boy! 1.664. Ill-matched against Achilles! His wild steeds 1.665. bear him along, as from his chariot's rear 1.666. he falls far back, but clutches still the rein; 1.667. his hair and shoulders on the ground go trailing 1.668. and his down-pointing spear-head scrawls the dust. 1.669. Elsewhere, to Pallas' ever-hostile shrine 1.670. daughters of Ilium, with unsnooded hair 1.671. and lifting all in vain her hallowed pall 1.672. walked suppliant and sad, beating their breasts 1.673. with outspread palms. But her unswerving eyes 1.674. the goddess fixed on earth, and would not see. 1.675. Achilles round the Trojan rampart thrice 1.676. had dragged the fallen Hector, and for gold 1.677. was making traffic of the lifeless clay. 1.678. Aeneas groaned aloud, with bursting heart 1.679. to see the spoils, the car, the very corpse 1.680. of his lost friend,—while Priam for the dead 1.681. tretched forth in piteous prayer his helpless hands. 1.682. There too his own presentment he could see 1.683. urrounded by Greek kings; and there were shown 1.684. hordes from the East, and black-browed Memnon's arms; 1.685. her band of Amazons, with moon-shaped shields 1.686. Penthesilea led; her martial eye 1.687. flamed on from troop to troop; a belt of gold 1.688. beneath one bare, protruded breast she bound— 1.690. While on such spectacle Aeneas' eyes 1.691. looked wondering, while mute and motionless 1.692. he stood at gaze, Queen Dido to the shrine 1.693. in lovely majesty drew near; a throng 1.694. of youthful followers pressed round her way. 1.695. So by the margin of Eurotas wide 1.696. or o'er the Cynthian steep, Diana leads 1.697. her bright processional; hither and yon 1.698. are visionary legions numberless 1.699. of Oreads; the regt goddess bears 1.700. a quiver on her shoulders, and is seen 1.701. emerging tallest of her beauteous train; 1.702. while joy unutterable thrills the breast 1.703. of fond Latona: Dido not less fair 1.704. amid her subjects passed, and not less bright 1.705. her glow of gracious joy, while she approved 1.706. her future kingdom's pomp and vast emprise. 1.707. Then at the sacred portal and beneath 1.708. the temple's vaulted dome she took her place 1.709. encompassed by armed men, and lifted high 1.710. upon a throne; her statutes and decrees 1.711. the people heard, and took what lot or toil 1.712. her sentence, or impartial urn, assigned. 1.713. But, lo! Aeneas sees among the throng 1.714. Antheus, Sergestus, and Cloanthus bold 1.715. with other Teucrians, whom the black storm flung 1.716. far o'er the deep and drove on alien shores. 1.717. Struck dumb was he, and good Achates too 1.718. half gladness and half fear. Fain would they fly 1.719. to friendship's fond embrace; but knowing not 1.720. what might befall, their hearts felt doubt and care. 1.721. Therefore they kept the secret, and remained 1.722. forth-peering from the hollow veil of cloud 1.723. haply to learn what their friends' fate might be 1.724. or where the fleet was landed, or what aim 1.725. had brought them hither; for a chosen few 1.726. from every ship had come to sue for grace 1.729. and leave to speak, revered Ilioneus 1.730. with soul serene these lowly words essayed: 1.731. “O Queen, who hast authority of Jove 1.732. to found this rising city, and subdue 1.733. with righteous goverce its people proud 1.734. we wretched Trojans, blown from sea to sea 1.735. beseech thy mercy; keep the curse of fire 1.736. from our poor ships! We pray thee, do no wrong 1.737. unto a guiltless race. But heed our plea! 1.738. No Libyan hearth shall suffer by our sword 1.739. nor spoil and plunder to our ships be borne; 1.740. uch haughty violence fits not the souls 1.741. of vanquished men. We journey to a land 1.742. named, in Greek syllables, Hesperia : 1.743. a storied realm, made mighty by great wars 1.744. and wealth of fruitful land; in former days 1.745. Oenotrians had it, and their sons, 't is said 1.746. have called it Italy, a chieftain's name 1.747. to a whole region given. Thitherward 1.748. our ships did fare; but with swift-rising flood 1.749. the stormful season of Orion's star 1.750. drove us on viewless shoals; and angry gales 1.751. dispersed us, smitten by the tumbling surge 1.752. among innavigable rocks. Behold 1.753. we few swam hither, waifs upon your shore! 1.754. What race of mortals this? What barbarous land 1.755. that with inhospitable laws ye thrust 1.756. a stranger from your coasts, and fly to arms 2.337. and in the consecrated citadel 2.725. when Priam was his foe. With flush of shame 3.78. he scorned all honor and did murder foul 4.1. Now felt the Queen the sharp, slow-gathering pangs 4.2. of love; and out of every pulsing vein 4.5. keep calling to her soul; his words, his glance 4.6. cling to her heart like lingering, barbed steel 4.9. lit up all lands, and from the vaulted heaven 4.10. Aurora had dispelled the dark and dew; 4.12. of her dear sister spoke the stricken Queen: 4.13. “Anna, my sister, what disturbing dreams 4.14. perplex me and alarm? What guest is this 4.15. new-welcomed to our house? How proud his mien! 4.16. What dauntless courage and exploits of war! 4.20. has smitten him with storms! What dire extremes 4.21. of war and horror in his tale he told! 4.22. O, were it not immutably resolved 4.23. in my fixed heart, that to no shape of man 4.24. I would be wed again (since my first love 4.25. left me by death abandoned and betrayed); 4.26. loathed I not so the marriage torch and train 4.27. I could—who knows?—to this one weakness yield. 4.30. were by a brother's murder dabbled o'er 4.32. has shaken my weak will. I seem to feel 4.33. the motions of love's lost, familiar fire. 4.34. But may the earth gape open where I tread 4.35. and may almighty Jove with thunder-scourge 4.36. hurl me to Erebus' abysmal shade 4.37. to pallid ghosts and midnight fathomless 4.38. before, O Chastity! I shall offend 4.39. thy holy power, or cast thy bonds away! 4.40. He who first mingled his dear life with mine 4.41. took with him all my heart. 'T is his alone — 4.42. o, let it rest beside him in the grave!” 4.47. weet babes at thine own breast, nor gifts of love? 4.51. and long ago in Tyre . Iarbas knew 4.52. thy scorn, and many a prince and captain bred 4.54. a love that makes thee glad? Hast thou no care 4.66. and what imperial city shall be thine 4.67. if thus espoused! With Trojan arms allied 4.68. how far may not our Punic fame extend 4.69. in deeds of power? Call therefore on the gods 4.70. to favor thee; and, after omens fair 4.71. give queenly welcome, and contrive excuse 4.72. to make him tarry, while yon wintry seas 4.73. are loud beneath Orion's stormful star 4.75. So saying, she stirred a passion-burning breast 4.76. to Iove more madly still; her words infused 4.77. a doubting mind with hope, and bade the blush 4.78. of shame begone. First to the shrines they went 4.79. and sued for grace; performing sacrifice 4.83. but chiefly unto Juno, patroness 4.84. of nuptial vows. There Dido, beauteous Queen 4.86. and poured it full between the lifted horns 4.87. of the white heifer; or on temple floors 4.88. he strode among the richly laden shrines 4.89. the eyes of gods upon her, worshipping 4.90. with many a votive gift; or, peering deep 4.91. into the victims' cloven sides, she read 4.92. the fate-revealing tokens trembling there. 4.93. How blind the hearts of prophets be! Alas! 4.94. of what avail be temples and fond prayers 4.95. to change a frenzied mind? Devouring ever 4.96. love's fire burns inward to her bones; she feels 4.97. quick in her breast the viewless, voiceless wound. 4.98. Ill-fated Dido ranges up and down 4.99. the spaces of her city, desperate 4.100. her life one flame—like arrow-stricken doe 4.101. through Cretan forest rashly wandering 4.102. pierced by a far-off shepherd, who pursues 4.103. with shafts, and leaves behind his light-winged steed 4.104. not knowing; while she scours the dark ravines 4.105. of Dicte and its woodlands; at her heart 4.106. the mortal barb irrevocably clings. 4.107. around her city's battlements she guides 4.108. aeneas, to make show of Sidon 's gold 4.109. and what her realm can boast; full oft her voice 4.110. essays to speak and frembling dies away: 4.111. or, when the daylight fades, she spreads anew 4.112. a royal banquet, and once more will plead 4.113. mad that she is, to hear the Trojan sorrow; 4.114. and with oblivious ravishment once more 4.115. hangs on his lips who tells; or when her guests 4.116. are scattered, and the wan moon's fading horn 4.117. bedims its ray, while many a sinking star 4.118. invites to slumber, there she weeps alone 4.119. in the deserted hall, and casts her down 4.120. on the cold couch he pressed. Her love from far 4.121. beholds her vanished hero and receives 4.122. his voice upon her ears; or to her breast 4.123. moved by a father's image in his child 4.124. he clasps Ascanius, seeking to deceive 4.125. her unblest passion so. Her enterprise 4.126. of tower and rampart stops: her martial host 4.127. no Ionger she reviews, nor fashions now 4.128. defensive haven and defiant wall; 4.133. of honor to such frenzy spoke not, she 4.138. in lasting, vast renown—that by the snare 4.139. of two great gods in league one woman fell! 4.141. have ever been thy fear, and the proud halls 4.142. of Carthage thy vexation and annoy. 4.143. Why further go? Prithee, what useful end 4.144. has our long war? Why not from this day forth 4.145. perpetual peace and nuptial amity? 4.146. Hast thou not worked thy will? Behold and see 4.147. how Iove-sick Dido burns, and all her flesh 4.148. 'The madness feels! So let our common grace 4.149. mile on a mingled people! Let her serve 4.150. a Phrygian husband, while thy hands receive 4.155. “'T were mad to spurn such favor, or by choice 4.156. be numbered with thy foes. But can it be 4.157. that fortune on thy noble counsel smiles? 4.158. To me Fate shows but dimly whether Jove 4.159. unto the Trojan wanderers ordains 4.160. a common city with the sons of Tyre 4.161. with mingling blood and sworn, perpetual peace. 4.162. His wife thou art; it is thy rightful due 4.163. to plead to know his mind. Go, ask him, then! 4.164. For humbly I obey!” With instant word 4.165. Juno the Queen replied: “Leave that to me! 4.166. But in what wise our urgent task and grave 4.167. may soon be sped, I will in brief unfold 4.168. to thine attending ear. A royal hunt 4.169. in sylvan shades unhappy Dido gives 4.170. for her Aeneas, when to-morrow's dawn 4.171. uplifts its earliest ray and Titan's beam 4.172. hall first unveil the world. But I will pour 4.173. black storm-clouds with a burst of heavy hail 4.174. along their way; and as the huntsmen speed 4.175. to hem the wood with snares, I will arouse 4.176. all heaven with thunder. The attending train 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 4.178. while Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.179. to the same cavern fly. My auspices 4.180. I will declare—if thou alike wilt bless; 4.181. and yield her in true wedlock for his bride. 4.182. Such shall their spousal be!” To Juno's will 4.183. Cythera's Queen inclined assenting brow 4.184. and laughed such guile to see. Aurora rose 4.185. and left the ocean's rim. The city's gates 4.186. pour forth to greet the morn a gallant train 4.187. of huntsmen, bearing many a woven snare 4.188. and steel-tipped javelin; while to and fro 4.189. run the keen-scented dogs and Libyan squires. 4.190. The Queen still keeps her chamber; at her doors 4.191. the Punic lords await; her palfrey, brave 4.192. in gold and purple housing, paws the ground 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 4.194. At last, with numerous escort, forth she shines: 4.195. her Tyrian pall is bordered in bright hues 4.196. her quiver, gold; her tresses are confined 4.197. only with gold; her robes of purple rare 4.198. meet in a golden clasp. To greet her come 4.199. the noble Phrygian guests; among them smiles 4.200. the boy Iulus; and in fair array 4.201. Aeneas, goodliest of all his train. 4.202. In such a guise Apollo (when he leaves 4.203. cold Lycian hills and Xanthus ' frosty stream 4.204. to visit Delos to Latona dear) 4.205. ordains the song, while round his altars cry 4.206. the choirs of many islands, with the pied 4.207. fantastic Agathyrsi; soon the god 4.208. moves o'er the Cynthian steep; his flowing hair 4.209. he binds with laurel garland and bright gold; 4.210. upon his shining shoulder as he goes 4.211. the arrows ring:—not less uplifted mien 4.212. aeneas wore; from his illustrious brow 4.213. uch beauty shone. Soon to the mountains tall 4.214. the cavalcade comes nigh, to pathless haunts 4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 4.218. are routed deer, that scour the spreading plain 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 4.279. the filthy goddess spread; and soon she hied 4.280. to King Iarbas, where her hateful song 4.282. Him the god Ammon got by forced embrace 4.283. upon a Libyan nymph; his kingdoms wide 4.284. possessed a hundred ample shrines to Jove 4.285. a hundred altars whence ascended ever 4.286. the fires of sacrifice, perpetual seats 4.287. for a great god's abode, where flowing blood 4.288. enriched the ground, and on the portals hung 4.289. garlands of every flower. The angered King 4.290. half-maddened by maligt Rumor's voice 4.291. unto his favored altars came, and there 4.292. urrounded by the effluence divine 4.293. upraised in prayer to Jove his suppliant hands. 4.294. “Almighty Jupiter, to whom each day 4.295. at banquet on the painted couch reclined 4.296. Numidia pours libation! Do thine eyes 4.300. hoot forth blind fire to terrify the soul 4.301. with wild, unmeaning roar? O, Iook upon 4.302. that woman, who was homeless in our realm 4.303. and bargained where to build her paltry town 4.304. receiving fertile coastland for her farms 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy, a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.331. If such a glory and event supreme 4.332. enkindle not his bosom; if such task 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap 4.337. of enemies, considering no more 4.338. the land Lavinian and Ausonia's sons. 4.339. Let him to sea! Be this our final word: 4.341. He spoke. The god a prompt obedience gave 4.342. to his great sire's command. He fastened first 4.343. those sandals of bright gold, which carry him 4.344. aloft o'er land or sea, with airy wings 4.345. that race the fleeting wind; then lifted he 4.346. his wand, wherewith he summons from the grave 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.348. to doleful Tartarus; or by its power 4.349. gives slumber or dispels; or quite unseals 4.350. the eyelids of the dead: on this relying 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.356. is girdled evermore with misty gloom 4.357. and lashed of wind and rain; a cloak of snow 4.358. melts on his shoulder; from his aged chin 4.359. drop rivers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice 4.360. glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed 4.361. the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; 4.362. here making pause, from hence he headlong flung 4.363. his body to the sea; in motion like 4.364. ome sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus, I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.392. Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir 4.393. Ascanius. It is his rightful due 4.394. in Italy o'er Roman lands to reign.” 4.395. After such word Cyllene's winged god 4.396. vanished, and e'er his accents died away 4.398. Aeneas at the sight stood terror-dumb 4.399. with choking voice and horror-rising hair. 4.400. He fain would fly at once and get him gone 4.402. at Heaven's wrathful word. Alas! how stir? 4.403. What cunning argument can plead his cause 4.404. before th' infuriate Queen? How break such news? 4.405. Flashing this way and that, his startled mind 4.406. makes many a project and surveys them all. 4.407. But, pondering well, his final counsel stopped 4.408. at this resolve: he summoned to his side 4.409. Mnestheus, Sergestus, and Serestus bold 4.410. and bade them fit the fleet, all silently 4.411. gathering the sailors and collecting gear 4.412. but carefully dissembling what emprise 4.420. his stratagem, and all the coming change 4.421. perceived ere it began. Her jealous fear 4.422. counted no hour secure. That unclean tongue 4.423. of Rumor told her fevered heart the fleet 4.425. Distractedly she raved, and passion-tossed 4.426. roamed through her city, like a Maenad roused 4.430. Finding Aeneas, thus her plaint she poured: 4.433. out of my kingdom? Did our mutual joy 4.434. not move thee; nor thine own true promise given 4.438. o fast through stormy skies? O, cruelty! 4.439. If Troy still stood, and if thou wert not bound 4.445. by our poor marriage of imperfect vow 4.446. if aught to me thou owest, if aught in me 4.447. ever have pleased thee—O, be merciful 4.448. to my low-fallen fortunes! I implore 4.449. if place be left for prayer, thy purpose change! 4.450. Because of thee yon Libyan savages 4.451. and nomad chiefs are grown implacable 4.452. and my own Tyrians hate me. Yes, for thee 4.453. my chastity was slain and honor fair 4.454. by which alone to glory I aspired 4.455. in former days. To whom dost thou in death 4.456. abandon me? my guest!—since but this name 4.457. is left me of a husband! Shall I wait 4.458. till fell Pygmalion, my brother, raze 4.459. my city walls? Or the Gaetulian king 4.460. Iarbas, chain me captive to his car? . 4.461. O, if, ere thou hadst fled, I might but bear 4.462. ome pledge of love to thee, and in these halls 4.463. watch some sweet babe Aeneas at his play 4.464. whose face should be the memory of thine own — 4.466. She said. But he, obeying Jove's decree 4.467. gazed steadfastly away; and in his heart 4.468. with strong repression crushed his cruel pain; 4.469. then thus the silence broke: “O Queen, not one 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged 4.471. would I gainsay. Elissa's memory 4.472. will be my treasure Iong as memory holds 4.473. or breath of life is mine. Hear my brief plea! 4.474. 'T was not my hope to hide this flight I take 4.475. as thou hast dreamed. Nay, I did never light 4.476. a bridegroom's torch, nor gave I thee the vow 4.477. of marriage. Had my destiny decreed 4.478. that I should shape life to my heart's desire 4.479. and at my own will put away the weight 4.480. of foil and pain, my place would now be found 4.481. in Troy, among the cherished sepulchres 4.482. of my own kin, and Priam's mansion proud 4.483. were standing still; or these my loyal hands 4.484. had rebuilt Ilium for her vanquished sons. 4.485. But now to Italy Apollo's power 4.486. commands me forth; his Lycian oracles 4.487. are loud for Italy. My heart is there 4.488. and there my fatherland. If now the towers 4.489. of Carthage and thy Libyan colony 4.490. delight thy Tyrian eyes; wilt thou refuse 4.491. to Trojan exiles their Ausonian shore? 4.492. I too by Fate was driven, not less than thou 4.493. to wander far a foreign throne to find. 4.494. oft when in dewy dark night hides the world 4.495. and flaming stars arise, Anchises' shade 4.496. looks on me in my dreams with angered brow. 4.497. I think of my Ascanius, and the wrong 4.498. to that dear heart, from whom I steal away 4.499. Hesperia, his destined home and throne. 4.500. But now the winged messenger of Heaven 4.501. ent down by Jove (I swear by thee and me!) 4.502. has brought on winged winds his sire's command. 4.503. My own eyes with unclouded vision saw 4.504. the god within these walls; I have received 4.505. with my own ears his word. No more inflame 4.506. with lamentation fond thy heart and mine. 4.508. She with averted eyes and glance that rolled 4.509. peechless this way and that, had listened long 4.510. to his reply, till thus her rage broke forth: 4.511. “No goddess gave thee birth. No Dardanus 4.512. begot thy sires. But on its breast of stone 4.513. Caucasus bore thee, and the tigresses 4.514. of fell Hyrcania to thy baby lip 4.515. their udders gave. Why should I longer show 4.516. a lying smile? What worse can I endure? 4.517. Did my tears draw one sigh? Did he once drop 4.518. his stony stare? or did he yield a tear 4.519. to my lament, or pity this fond heart? 4.520. Why set my wrongs in order? Juno, now 4.521. and Jove, the son of Saturn, heed no more 4.522. where justice lies. No trusting heart is safe 4.523. in all this world. That waif and castaway 4.524. I found in beggary and gave him share— 4.525. fool that I was!—in my own royal glory. 4.526. His Iost fleet and his sorry crews I steered 4.527. from death away. O, how my fevered soul 4.528. unceasing raves! Forsooth Apollo speaks! 4.529. His Lycian oracles! and sent by Jove 4.530. the messenger of Heaven on fleeting air 4.531. the ruthless bidding brings! Proud business 4.532. for gods, I trow, that such a task disturbs 4.533. their still abodes! I hold thee back no more 4.534. nor to thy cunning speeches give the lie. 4.535. Begone! Sail on to Italy, thy throne 4.536. through wind and wave! I pray that, if there be 4.537. any just gods of power, thou mayest drink down 4.538. death on the mid-sea rocks, and often call 4.539. with dying gasps on Dido's name—while I 4.540. pursue with vengeful fire. When cold death rends 4.541. the body from the breath, my ghost shall sit 4.542. forever in thy path. Full penalties 4.543. thy stubborn heart shall pay. They'll bring me never 4.544. in yon deep gulf of death of all thy woe.” 4.545. Abrupt her utterance ceased; and sick at heart 4.546. he fled the light of day, as if to shrink 4.547. from human eyes, and left Aeneas there 4.548. irresolute with horror, while his soul 4.549. framed many a vain reply. Her swooning shape 4.550. her maidens to a marble chamber bore 4.552. Aeneas, faithful to a task divine 4.553. though yearning sore to remedy and soothe 4.554. uch misery, and with the timely word 4.555. her grief assuage, and though his burdened heart 4.556. was weak because of love, while many a groan 4.557. rose from his bosom, yet no whit did fail 4.558. to do the will of Heaven, but of his fleet 4.559. resumed command. The Trojans on the shore 4.560. ply well their task and push into the sea 4.561. the lofty ships. Now floats the shining keel 4.562. and oars they bring all leafy from the grove 4.563. with oak half-hewn, so hurried was the flight. 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 4.565. forth-streaming!—just as when a heap of corn 4.566. is thronged with ants, who, knowing winter nigh 4.567. refill their granaries; the long black line 4.568. runs o'er the levels, and conveys the spoil 4.569. in narrow pathway through the grass; a part 4.570. with straining and assiduous shoulder push 4.571. the kernels huge; a part array the file 4.572. and whip the laggards on; their busy track 4.573. warms quick and eager with unceasing toil. 4.574. O Dido, how thy suffering heart was wrung 4.575. that spectacle to see! What sore lament 4.576. was thine, when from the towering citadel 4.577. the whole shore seemed alive, the sea itself 4.578. in turmoil with loud cries! Relentless Love 4.579. to what mad courses may not mortal hearts 4.580. by thee be driven? Again her sorrow flies 4.581. to doleful plaint and supplication vain; 4.582. again her pride to tyrant Love bows down 4.583. lest, though resolved to die, she fail to prove 4.584. each hope of living: “O Anna, dost thou see 4.585. yon busy shore? From every side they come. 4.586. their canvas wooes the winds, and o'er each prow 4.587. the merry seamen hang their votive flowers. 4.588. Dear sister, since I did forebode this grief 4.589. I shall be strong to bear it. One sole boon 4.590. my sorrow asks thee, Anna! Since of thee 4.591. thee only, did that traitor make a friend 4.592. and trusted thee with what he hid so deep — 4.593. the feelings of his heart; since thou alone 4.594. hast known what way, what hour the man would yield 4.595. to soft persuasion—therefore, sister, haste 4.596. and humbly thus implore our haughty foe: 4.597. ‘I was not with the Greeks what time they swore 4.598. at Aulis to cut off the seed of Troy ; 4.599. I sent no ships to Ilium . Pray, have I 4.600. profaned Anchises' tomb, or vexed his shade?’ 4.601. Why should his ear be deaf and obdurate 4.602. to all I say? What haste? May he not make 4.603. one last poor offering to her whose love 4.604. is only pain? O, bid him but delay 4.605. till flight be easy and the winds blow fair. 4.606. I plead no more that bygone marriage-vow 4.607. by him forsworn, nor ask that he should lose 4.608. his beauteous Latium and his realm to be. 4.609. Nothing but time I crave! to give repose 4.610. and more room to this fever, till my fate 4.611. teach a crushed heart to sorrow. I implore 4.612. this last grace. (To thy sister's grief be kind!) 4.614. Such plaints, such prayers, again and yet again 4.615. betwixt the twain the sorrowing sister bore. 4.616. But no words move, no lamentations bring 4.617. persuasion to his soul; decrees of Fate 4.618. oppose, and some wise god obstructs the way 4.619. that finds the hero's ear. oft-times around 4.620. the aged strength of some stupendous oak 4.621. the rival blasts of wintry Alpine winds 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 4.630. has many a pang, while his serene intent 4.632. Then wretched Dido, by her doom appalled 4.633. asks only death. It wearies her to see 4.634. the sun in heaven. Yet that she might hold fast 4.635. her dread resolve to quit the light of day 4.636. behold, when on an incense-breathing shrine 4.637. her offering was laid—O fearful tale!— 4.638. the pure libation blackened, and the wine 4.639. flowed like polluting gore. She told the sight 4.640. to none, not even to her sister's ear. 4.641. A second sign was given: for in her house 4.642. a marble altar to her husband's shade 4.643. with garlands bright and snowy fleeces dressed 4.644. had fervent worship; here strange cries were heard 4.645. as if her dead spouse called while midnight reigned 4.646. and round her towers its inhuman song 4.647. the lone owl sang, complaining o'er and o'er 4.648. with lamentation and long shriek of woe. 4.649. Forgotten oracles by wizards told 4.650. whisper old omens dire. In dreams she feels 4.651. cruel Aeneas goad her madness on 4.652. and ever seems she, friendless and alone 4.653. ome lengthening path to travel, or to seek 4.654. her Tyrians through wide wastes of barren lands. 4.655. Thus frantic Pentheus flees the stern array 4.656. of the Eumenides, and thinks to see 4.657. two noonday lights blaze oer his doubled Thebes ; 4.658. or murdered Agamemnon's haunted son 4.659. Orestes, flees his mother's phantom scourge 4.660. of flames and serpents foul, while at his door 4.661. avenging horrors wait. Now sorrow-crazed 4.662. and by her grief undone, resolved on death 4.663. the manner and the time her secret soul 4.664. prepares, and, speaking to her sister sad 4.665. he masks in cheerful calm her fatal will: 4.666. “I know a way—O, wish thy sister joy!— 4.667. to bring him back to Iove, or set me free. 4.668. On Ocean's bound and next the setting sun 4.669. lies the last Aethiop land, where Atlas tall 4.670. lifts on his shoulder the wide wheel of heaven 4.671. tudded with burning stars. From thence is come 4.672. a witch, a priestess, a Numidian crone 4.673. who guards the shrine of the Hesperides 4.674. and feeds the dragon; she protects the fruit 4.675. of that enchanting tree, and scatters there 4.676. her slumb'rous poppies mixed with honey-dew. 4.677. Her spells and magic promise to set free 4.678. what hearts she will, or visit cruel woes 4.679. on men afar. She stops the downward flow 4.680. of rivers, and turns back the rolling stars; 4.681. on midnight ghosts she calls: her vot'ries hear 4.682. earth bellowing loud below, while from the hills 4.683. the ash-trees travel down. But, sister mine 4.684. thou knowest, and the gods their witness give 4.685. how little mind have I to don the garb 4.686. of sorcery. Depart in secret, thou 4.687. and bid them build a lofty funeral pyre 4.688. inside our palalce-wall, and heap thereon 4.689. the hero's arms, which that blasphemer hung 4.690. within my chamber; every relic bring 4.691. and chiefly that ill-omened nuptial bed 4.692. my death and ruin! For I must blot out 4.693. all sight and token of this husband vile. 4.694. 'T is what the witch commands.” She spoke no more 4.695. and pallid was her brow. Yet Anna's mind 4.696. knew not what web of death her sister wove 4.697. by these strange rites, nor what such frenzy dares; 4.698. nor feared she worse than when Sichaeus died 4.700. Soon as the funeral pyre was builded high 4.701. in a sequestered garden, Iooming huge 4.702. with boughs of pine and faggots of cleft oak 4.703. the queen herself enwreathed it with sad flowers 4.704. and boughs of mournful shade; and crowning all 4.705. he laid on nuptial bed the robes and sword 5.628. For this last victory and joyful day 6.450. Then he, “0 chieftain of Anchises' race 6.451. Apollo's tripod told thee not untrue. 6.452. No god did thrust me down beneath the wave 6.453. For that strong rudder unto which I clung 6.454. My charge and duty, and my ship's sole guide 6.455. Wrenched from its place, dropped with me as I fell. 6.456. Not for myself—by the rude seas I swear— 6.457. Did I have terror, but lest thy good ship 6.458. Stripped of her gear, and her poor pilot lost 6.459. Should fail and founder in that rising flood. 6.460. Three wintry nights across the boundless main 6.461. The south wind buffeted and bore me on; 6.462. At the fourth daybreak, lifted from the surge 6.463. I looked at last on Italy, and swam 6.464. With weary stroke on stroke unto the land. 6.465. Safe was I then. Alas! but as I climbed 6.466. With garments wet and heavy, my clenched hand 6.467. Grasping the steep rock, came a cruel horde 6.468. Upon me with drawn blades, accounting me— 6.469. So blind they were!—a wrecker's prize and spoil. 6.470. Now are the waves my tomb; and wandering winds 6.471. Toss me along the coast. 0, I implore 6.472. By heaven's sweet light, by yonder upper air 6.473. By thy lost father, by lulus dear 6.474. Thy rising hope and joy, that from these woes 7.355. a courser swift and strong, in purple clad 7.356. and broidered housings gay; on every breast 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.550. in sacred fillet bound, and garlanded 7.594. while he but faltered speechless. She upraised 7.641. with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close 7.642. and combed the creature, or would bring to bathe 7.643. at a clear, crystal spring. It knew the hands 7.644. of all its gentle masters, and would feed 7.645. from their own dish; or wandering through the wood 7.646. come back unguided to their friendly door 7.647. though deep the evening shade. Iulus' dogs 7.648. now roused this wanderer in their ravening chase 7.649. as, drifted down-stream far from home it lay 7.650. on a green bank a-cooling. From bent bow 7.651. Ascanius, eager for a hunter's praise 7.652. let go his shaft; nor did Alecto fail 7.653. his aim to guide: but, whistling through the air 7.654. the light-winged reed pierced deep in flank and side. 7.655. Swift to its cover fled the wounded thing 7.656. and crept loud-moaning to its wonted stall 7.657. where, like a blood-stained suppliant, it seemed 7.658. to fill that shepherd's house with plaintive prayer. 7.659. Then Silvia the sister, smiting oft 7.660. on breast and arm, made cry for help, and called 7.661. the sturdy rustics forth in gathering throng. 7.662. These now (for in the silent forest couched 7.663. the cruel Fury) swift to battle flew. 7.664. One brandished a charred stake, another swung 7.665. a knotted cudgel, as rude anger shapes 7.666. its weapon of whate'er the searching eye 7.667. first haps to fall on. Tyrrhus roused his clans 7.668. just when by chance he split with blows of wedge 7.669. an oak in four; and, panting giant breath 7.670. houldered his woodman's axe. Alecto then 7.671. prompt to the stroke of mischief, soared aloft 7.672. from where she spying sate, to the steep roof 7.673. of a tall byre, and from its peak of straw 7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far 7.676. that all the forest shuddered, and the grove 7.677. throbbed to its deepest glen. Cold Trivia's lake 7.678. from end to end gave ear, and every wave 7.679. of the white stream of Nar, the lonely pools 7.680. of still Velinus heard: while at the sound 7.681. pale mothers to their breasts their children drew. 7.682. Swift to the signal of the dreadful horn 7.683. natching their weapons rude, the freeborn swains 7.684. assembled for the fray; the Trojan bands 7.685. poured from their bivouac with instant aid 7.686. for young Ascanius. In array of war 7.687. both stand confronting. Not mere rustic brawl 7.688. with charred oak-staff and cudgel is the fight 7.689. but with the two-edged steel; the naked swords 7.690. wave like dark-bladed harvest-field, while far 7.691. the brazen arms flash in the smiting sun 7.692. and skyward fling their beam: so some wide sea 7.693. at first but whitened in the rising wind 7.694. wells its slow-rolling mass and ever higher 7.695. its billows rears, until the utmost deep 7.696. lifts in one surge to heaven. The first to fall 7.697. was Almo, eldest-born of Tyrrhus' sons 7.698. whom, striding in the van, a loud-winged shaft 7.699. laid low in death; deep in his throat it clung 7.700. and silenced with his blood the dying cry 7.701. of his frail life. Around him fell the forms 7.702. of many a brave and strong; among them died 7.703. gray-haired Galaesus pleading for a truce: 7.704. righteous he was, and of Ausonian fields 7.705. a prosperous master; five full flocks had he 7.706. of bleating sheep, and from his pastures came 7.707. five herds of cattle home; his busy churls 7.709. While o'er the battle-field thus doubtful swung 7.710. the scales of war, the Fury (to her task 7.711. now equal proven) having dyed the day 7.712. a deep-ensanguined hue, and opened fight 7.713. with death and slaughter, made no tarrying 7.714. within Hesperia, but skyward soared 7.715. and, Ioud in triumph, insolently thus 7.716. to Juno called: “See, at thy will, their strife 7.717. full-blown to war and woe! Could even thyself 7.718. command them now to truce and amity? 7.719. But I, that with Ausonia's blood befoul 7.720. their Trojan hands, yet more can do, if thou 7.721. hift not thy purpose. For with dire alarms 7.722. I will awake the bordering states to war 7.723. enkindling in their souls the frenzied lust 7.724. the war-god breathes; till from th' horizon round 7.725. the reinforcement pours—I scattering seeds 7.726. of carnage through the land.” In answer spoke 7.727. juno: “Enough of artifice and fear! 7.728. Thy provocation works. Now have they joined 7.729. in close and deadly combat, and warm blood 7.730. those sudden-leaping swords incarnadines 7.731. which chance put in their hands. Such nuptial joys 7.732. uch feast of wedlock, let the famous son 7.733. of Venus with the King Latinus share! 7.734. But yon Olympian Sire and King no more 7.735. permits thee freely in our skies to roam. 7.736. Go, quit the field! Myself will take control 7.737. of hazards and of labors yet to be.” 7.738. Thus Saturn's daughter spoke. Alecto then 7.739. unfolding far her hissing, viperous wings 7.740. turned toward her Stygian home, and took farewell 7.741. of upper air. Deep in Italia lies 7.742. a region mountain-girded, widely famed 7.743. and known in olden songs from land to land: 7.744. the valley of Amsanctus; deep, dark shades 7.745. enclose it between forest-walls, whereby 7.746. through thunderous stony channel serpentines 7.747. a roaring fall. Here in a monstrous cave 7.748. are breathing-holes of hell, a vast abyss 7.749. where Acheron opes wide its noisome jaws: 7.750. in this Alecto plunged, concealing so 7.751. her execrable godhead, while the air 7.753. Forthwith the sovereign hands of Juno haste 7.754. to consummate the war. The shepherds bear 7.755. back from the field of battle to the town 7.756. the bodies of the slain: young Almo's corse 7.757. and gray Galaesus' bleeding head. They call 7.758. just gods in heaven to Iook upon their wrong 7.759. and bid Latinus see it. Turnus comes 7.760. and, while the angry mob surveys the slain 7.761. adds fury to the hour. “Shall the land 7.762. have Trojan lords? Shall Phrygian marriages 7.763. debase our ancient, royal blood—and I 7.764. be spurned upon the threshold?” Then drew near 7.765. the men whose frenzied women-folk had held 7.766. bacchantic orgies in the pathless grove 7.767. awed by Amata's name: these, gathering 7.768. ued loud for war. Yea, all defied the signs 7.769. and venerable omens; all withstood 7.770. divine decrees, and clamored for revenge 7.771. prompted by evil powers. They besieged 7.772. the house of King Latinus, shouting-loud 7.773. with emulous rage. But like a sea-girt rock 7.774. unmoved he stood; like sea-girt rock when surge 7.775. of waters o'er it sweeps, or howling waves 7.776. urround; it keeps a ponderous front of power 7.777. though foaming cliffs around it vainly roar; 7.778. from its firm base the broken sea-weeds fall. 7.779. But when authority no whit could change 7.780. their counsels blind, and each event fulfilled 7.781. dread Juno's will, then with complaining prayer 7.782. the aged sire cried loud upon his gods 7.783. and on th' unheeding air: “Alas,” said he 7.784. “My doom is shipwreck, and the tempest bears 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood 7.786. hall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. 7.787. O Turnus! O abominable deed! 7.788. Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods 7.789. thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. 7.790. Now was my time to rest. But as I come 7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me 7.792. of comfort in my death.” With this the King 7.794. A sacred custom the Hesperian land 7.795. of Latium knew, by all the Alban hills 7.796. honored unbroken, which wide-ruling Rome 7.797. keeps to this day, when to new stroke she stirs 7.798. the might of Mars; if on the Danube 's wave 7.799. resolved to fling the mournful doom of war 7.800. or on the Caspian folk or Arabs wild; 7.801. or chase the morning far as India 's verge 7.802. ind from the Parthian despot wrest away 7.803. our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be 7.804. of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: 7.805. a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength 7.806. of uncorrupting steel; in sleepless watch 7.807. Janus the threshold keeps. 'T is here, what time 7.808. the senate's voice is war, the consul grave 7.809. in Gabine cincture and Quirinal shift 7.810. himself the griding hinges backward moves 7.811. and bids the Romans arm; obedient then 7.812. the legionary host makes Ioud acclaim 7.813. and hoarse consent the brazen trumpets blow. 7.814. Thus King Latinus on the sons of Troy 7.815. was urged to open war, and backward roll 7.816. those gates of sorrow: but the aged king 7.817. recoiled, refused the loathsome task, and fled 8.18. through Latium waxes large. But what the foe 8.19. by such attempt intends, what victory 8.20. is his presumptuous hope, if Fortune smile 8.21. Aetolia 's lord will not less wisely fear 9.422. and sheathed in ivory. On Nisus then 9.423. Mnestheus bestowed a shaggy mantle torn 9.424. from a slain lion; good Aletes gave 9.425. exchange of crested helms. In such array 9.426. they hastened forth; and all the princely throng 9.427. young men and old, ran with them to the gates 9.428. praying all gods to bless. Iulus then 9.429. a fair youth, but of grave, heroic soul 9.430. beyond his years, gave them in solemn charge 9.431. full many a message for his sire, but these 9.432. the hazard of wild winds soon scattered far 10.442. while following in ill-omened haste the steps 10.670. of youthful company by treason slain
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.511, 2.514-2.526, 3.215-3.216, 3.242-3.283, 3.475, 3.478-3.566, 4.287-4.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 3.215. But corn-ears with thy hand pluck from the crops. 3.216. Nor shall the brood-kine, as of yore, for thee 3.242. The north wind stoops, and scatters from his path 3.243. Dry clouds and storms of placeName key= 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.245. A sound is heard among the forest-tops; 3.246. Long waves come racing shoreward: fast he flies 3.247. With instant pinion sweeping earth and main. 3.248. A steed like this or on the mighty course 3.249. of placeName key= 3.250. Red foam-flakes from his mouth, or, kindlier task 3.251. With patient neck support the Belgian car. 3.252. Then, broken at last, let swell their burly frame 3.253. With fattening corn-mash, for, unbroke, they will 3.254. With pride wax wanton, and, when caught, refuse 3.255. Tough lash to brook or jagged curb obey. 3.256. But no device so fortifies their power 3.257. As love's blind stings of passion to forefend 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.264. His strength with smouldering fire, till he forget 3.265. Both grass and woodland. She indeed full oft 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.269. While each on each the furious rivals run; 3.270. Wound follows wound; the black blood laves their limbs; 3.271. Horns push and strive against opposing horns 3.272. With mighty groaning; all the forest-side 3.273. And far placeName key= 3.274. Nor wont the champions in one stall to couch; 3.275. But he that's worsted hies him to strange clime 3.276. Far off, an exile, moaning much the shame 3.277. The blows of that proud conqueror, then love's lo 3.278. Avenged not; with one glance toward the byre 3.279. His ancient royalties behind him lie. 3.280. So with all heed his strength he practiseth 3.281. And nightlong makes the hard bare stones his bed 3.282. And feeds on prickly leaf and pointed rush 3.283. And proves himself, and butting at a tree 3.475. With salt herbs to the cote, whence more they love 3.478. Many there be who from their mothers keep 3.479. The new-born kids, and straightway bind their mouth 3.480. With iron-tipped muzzles. What they milk at dawn 3.481. Or in the daylight hours, at night they press; 3.482. What darkling or at sunset, this ere morn 3.483. They bear away in baskets—for to town 3.484. The shepherd hies him—or with dash of salt 3.485. Just sprinkle, and lay by for winter use. 3.486. Nor be thy dogs last cared for; but alike 3.487. Swift Spartan hounds and fierce Molossian feed 3.488. On fattening whey. Never, with these to watch 3.489. Dread nightly thief afold and ravening wolves 3.490. Or Spanish desperadoes in the rear. 3.491. And oft the shy wild asses thou wilt chase 3.492. With hounds, too, hunt the hare, with hounds the doe; 3.493. oft from his woodland wallowing-den uprouse 3.494. The boar, and scare him with their baying, and drive 3.495. And o'er the mountains urge into the toil 3.496. Some antlered monster to their chiming cry. 3.497. Learn also scented cedar-wood to burn 3.498. Within the stalls, and snakes of noxious smell 3.499. With fumes of galbanum to drive away. 3.500. oft under long-neglected cribs, or lurk 3.501. A viper ill to handle, that hath fled 3.502. The light in terror, or some snake, that wont 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 3.504. Its bane among the cattle, hugs the ground 3.505. Fell scourge of kine. Shepherd, seize stakes, seize stones! 3.506. And as he rears defiance, and puffs out 3.507. A hissing throat, down with him! see how low 3.508. That cowering crest is vailed in flight, the while 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep 3.531. When chilly showers have probed them to the quick 3.532. And winter stark with hoar-frost, or when sweat 3.533. Unpurged cleaves to them after shearing done 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 3.536. While, plunged beneath the flood, with drenched fell 3.537. The ram, launched free, goes drifting down the tide. 3.538. Else, having shorn, they smear their bodies o'er 3.539. With acrid oil-lees, and mix silver-scum 3.540. And native sulphur and Idaean pitch 3.541. Wax mollified with ointment, and therewith 3.542. Sea-leek, strong hellebores, bitumen black. 3.543. Yet ne'er doth kindlier fortune crown his toil 3.544. Than if with blade of iron a man dare lance 3.545. The ulcer's mouth ope: for the taint is fed 3.546. And quickened by confinement; while the swain 3.547. His hand of healing from the wound withholds 3.548. Or sits for happier signs imploring heaven. 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.551. By thirsty fever are consumed, 'tis good 3.552. To draw the enkindled heat therefrom, and pierce 3.553. Within the hoof-clefts a blood-bounding vein. 3.554. of tribes Bisaltic such the wonted use 3.555. And keen Gelonian, when to 3.556. He flies, or Getic desert, and quaffs milk 3.557. With horse-blood curdled. Seest one far afield 3.558. oft to the shade's mild covert win, or pull 3.559. The grass tops listlessly, or hindmost lag 3.560. Or, browsing, cast her down amid the plain 3.561. At night retire belated and alone; 3.562. With quick knife check the mischief, ere it creep 3.563. With dire contagion through the unwary herd. 3.564. Less thick and fast the whirlwind scours the main 3.565. With tempest in its wake, than swarm the plague 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone 4.287. of the Divine Intelligence, and to drink 4.288. Pure draughts of ether; for God permeates all— 4.289. Earth, and wide ocean, and the vault of heaven— 4.290. From whom flocks, herds, men, beasts of every kind 4.291. Draw each at birth the fine essential flame; 4.292. Yea, and that all things hence to Him return 4.293. Brought back by dissolution, nor can death 4.294. Find place: but, each into his starry rank


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
aeneas, as teucer Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 138
aeneas, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 52
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555, 565
ajax telamonius Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 138
allecto Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
amata Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
amor, as destructive force Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
anchises Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
anna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
apollonius Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
bacchant Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
bougonia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
calypso Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187
carthage, mirror of rome Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 138
carthage Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187
carthaginians, as trojans/romans Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 138
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 138
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555
circe Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
conflation (of episodes or characters) Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 147
cupid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
death, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
dementia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
dido, as lover Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 52, 146, 147
dido, kingship of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42, 52
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555, 565
elegy, topics Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 147
elegy Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 146, 147
emotion, description of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555, 565
emotions, frustration de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 565
emotions, grief de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 565
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
eros, personification of Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
euripides Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
fame Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
finales, book 3 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
finales, book 4 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
focalizer de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555
furor Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 52; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
gallus (cornelius) Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 146
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
herdsman, in homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
hermes, dolios/patron of tricks Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
hermes, erotic, see also erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
homer, iliad Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
homer, odyssey Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
hunt(ing) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
ilioneus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
intertextuality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555
iris Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italians, as iliadic greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italy Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 52; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
jupiter Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 42; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 565
kings, kingship theory Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latinus, good king Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latinus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
lavinia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
love affair, of aeneas and dido Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 52
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
madness, of love Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
maenads Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
magic Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 146
mars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
medea Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
mercurius de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555, 565
mercury/hermes, in vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187
mirabilia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
moly' Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 565
narrator-focalizer de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
odysseus, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
ogygia Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
pallanteum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
priam Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
propemptikon Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 146, 147
propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
puella(e) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
simile de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 565
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
tisiphone Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 115; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 129, 187
virgil de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 555, 565
wandering, odyssean theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 48
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248