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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 3.658


monstrum horrendum, informe, ingens, cui lumen ademptum.Anchises bade us speedily set sail


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 5.313-5.463, 12.447 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Horace, Odes, 1.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.37. and so many of the people followed him, that he was encouraged to come down from the mountains, and to give battle to Antiochus’s generals, when he beat them, and drove them out of Judea. So he came to the government by this his success, and became the prince of his own people by their own free consent, and then died, leaving the government to Judas, his eldest son. 1.37. But as he was avenging himself on his enemies, there fell upon him another providential calamity; for in the seventh year of his reign, when the war about Actium was at the height, at the beginning of the spring, the earth was shaken, and destroyed an immense number of cattle, with thirty thousand men; but the army received no harm, because it lay in the open air.
3. Horace, Letters, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. For some of them apply themselves to this part of learning to show their skill in composition, and that they may therein acquire a reputation for speaking finely. Others of them there are who write histories in order to gratify those that happen to be concerned in them, and on that account have spared no pains, but rather gone beyond their own abilities in the performance. 1.2. neither could the legislator himself have a right mind without such a contemplation; nor would any thing he should write tend to the promotion of virtue in his readers; I mean, unless they be taught first of all, that God is the Father and Lord of all things, and sees all things, and that thence he bestows a happy life upon those that follow him; but plunges such as do not walk in the paths of virtue into inevitable miseries. 1.2. And when God had replied that there was no good man among the Sodomites; for if there were but ten such man among them, he would not punish any of them for their sins, Abraham held his peace. And the angels came to the city of the Sodomites, and Lot entreated them to accept of a lodging with him; for he was a very generous and hospitable man, and one that had learned to imitate the goodness of Abraham. Now when the Sodomites saw the young men to be of beautiful counteces, and this to an extraordinary degree, and that they took up their lodgings with Lot, they resolved themselves to enjoy these beautiful boys by force and violence;
4. Ovid, Fasti, 5.35 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5.35. Earth bore the Giants, a fierce brood of savage monsters
5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.148-1.154, 1.613-1.615, 2.192-2.194, 3.582, 3.588-3.657, 3.659-3.691, 4.622-4.629, 6.355-6.356, 6.836-6.840, 8.113, 8.143, 8.151, 11.225-11.295 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.148. an east wind, blowing landward from the deep 1.149. drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— 1.150. and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. 1.151. That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore 1.152. the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave 1.153. truck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. 1.154. Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side 1.613. veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614. of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— 2.192. are forfeit, when my foemen take revenge 2.193. for my escape, and slay those helpless ones 2.194. in expiation of my guilty deed. 3.582. Hesperia's bosom from fair Sicily 3.588. the monster waves, and ever and anon 3.589. flings them at heaven, to lash the tranquil stars. 3.590. But Scylla, prisoned in her eyeless cave 3.591. thrusts forth her face, and pulls upon the rocks 3.592. hip after ship; the parts that first be seen 3.593. are human; a fair-breasted virgin she 3.594. down to the womb; but all that lurks below 3.595. is a huge-membered fish, where strangely join 3.596. the flukes of dolphins and the paunch of wolves. 3.597. Better by far to round the distant goal 3.598. of the Trinacrian headlands, veering wide 3.599. from thy true course, than ever thou shouldst see 3.600. that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave 3.601. where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar. 3.602. Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed 3.603. on Helenus, if trusted prophet he 3.604. and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given 3.605. o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all 3.606. I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. 3.607. To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; 3.608. to Juno chant a fervent votive song 3.609. and with obedient offering persuade 3.610. that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing 3.611. to Italy be sped, and leave behind 3.612. Trinacria . When wafted to that shore 3.613. repair to Cumae 's hill, and to the Lake 3.614. Avernus with its whispering grove divine. 3.615. There shalt thou see a frenzied prophetess 3.616. who from beneath the hollow scarped crag 3.617. ings oracles, or characters on leaves 3.618. mysterious names. Whate'er the virgin writes 3.619. on leaves inscribing the portentous song 3.620. he sets in order, and conceals them well 3.621. in her deep cave, where they abide unchanged 3.622. in due array. Yet not a care has she 3.623. if with some swinging hinge a breeze sweeps in 3.624. to catch them as they whirl: if open door 3.625. disperse them flutterlig through the hollow rock 3.626. he will not link their shifted sense anew 3.627. nor re-invent her fragmentary song. 3.628. oft her uswered votaries depart 3.629. corning the Sibyl's shrine. But deem not thou 3.630. thy tarrying too Iong, whate'er thy stay. 3.631. Though thy companions chide, though winds of power 3.632. invite thy ship to sea, and well would speed 3.633. the swelling sail, yet to that Sibyl go. 3.634. Pray that her own lips may sing forth for thee 3.635. the oracles, uplifting her dread voice 3.636. in willing prophecy. Her rede shall tell 3.637. of Italy, its wars and tribes to be 3.638. and of what way each burden and each woe 3.639. may be escaped, or borne. Her favoring aid 3.640. will grant swift, happy voyages to thy prayer. 3.641. Such counsels Heaven to my lips allows. 3.642. arise, begone! and by thy glorious deeds 3.644. So spake the prophet with benigt voice. 3.645. Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold 3.646. and graven ivory, which to our ships 3.647. he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full 3.648. with messy silver and Dodona 's pride 3.649. of brazen cauldrons; a cuirass he gave 3.650. of linked gold enwrought and triple chain; 3.651. a noble helmet, too, with flaming crest 3.652. and lofty cone, th' accoutrement erewhile 3.653. of Neoptolemus. My father too 3.654. had fit gifts from the King; whose bounty then 3.655. gave steeds and riders; and new gear was sent 3.656. to every sea-worn ship, while he supplied 3.659. nor lose a wind so fair; and answering him 3.660. Apollo's priest made reverent adieu: 3.661. “Anchises, honored by the love sublime 3.662. of Venus, self and twice in safety borne 3.663. from falling Troy, chief care of kindly Heaven 3.664. th' Ausonian shore is thine. Sail thitherward! 3.665. For thou art pre-ordained to travel far 3.666. o'er yonder seas; far in the distance lies 3.667. that region of Ausonia, Phoebus' voice 3.668. to thee made promise of. Onward, I say 3.669. o blest in the exceeding loyal love 3.670. of thy dear son! Why keep thee longer now? 3.671. Why should my words yon gathering winds detain?” 3.672. Likewise Andromache in mournful guise 3.673. took last farewell, bringing embroidered robes 3.674. of golden woof; a princely Phrygian cloak 3.675. he gave Ascanius, vying with the King 3.676. in gifts of honor; and threw o'er the boy 3.677. the labors of her loom, with words like these: 3.678. “Accept these gifts, sweet youth, memorials 3.679. of me and my poor handicraft, to prove 3.680. th' undying friendship of Andromache 3.681. once Hector's wife. Take these last offerings 3.682. of those who are thy kin—O thou that art 3.683. of my Astyanax in all this world 3.684. the only image! His thy lovely eyes! 3.685. Thy hands, thy lips, are even what he bore 3.686. and like thy own his youthful bloom would be.” 3.687. Thus I made answer, turning to depart 3.688. with rising tears: “Live on, and be ye blessed 3.689. whose greatness is accomplished! As for me 3.690. from change to change Fate summons, and I go; 3.691. but ye have won repose. No leagues of sea 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 6.355. They walked exploring the unpeopled night 6.356. Through Pluto's vacuous realms, and regions void 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 8.113. white gleaming through the grove, with all her brood 8.143. and to the powers divine pay worship due 8.151. prang to its feet and left the feast divine. 11.225. yon glittering spoils of victims of thy sword! 11.226. Thou, Turnus, too, wert now an effigy 11.227. in giant armor clad, if but his years 11.228. and strength full ripe had been fair match for thine! 11.229. But now my woes detain the Trojan host 11.230. from battle. I beseech ye haste away 11.231. and bear this faithful message to your King: 11.232. ince I but linger out a life I loathe 11.233. without my Pallas, nothing but thy sword 11.234. can bid me live. Then let thy sword repay 11.235. its debt to sire and son by Turnus slain! 11.236. Such deed alone may with thy honor fit 11.237. and happier fortunes. But my life to me 11.238. has no joy left to pray for, save to bring 11.240. Meanwhile o'er sorrowing mortals the bright morn 11.241. had lifted her mild beam, renewing so 11.242. the burden of man's toil. Aeneas now 11.243. built funeral pyres along the winding shore 11.244. King Tarchon at his side. Each thither brought 11.245. the bodies of his kin, observing well 11.246. all ancient ritual. The fuming fires 11.247. burned from beneath, till highest heaven was hid 11.248. in blackest, overmantling cloud. Three times 11.249. the warriors, sheathed in proud, resplendent steel 11.250. paced round the kindling pyres; and three times 11.251. fair companies of horsemen circled slow 11.252. with loud lamenting, round the doleful flame. 11.253. The wail of warriors and the trumpets' blare 11.254. the very welkin rend. Cast on the flames 11.255. are spoils of slaughtered Latins,—helms and blades 11.256. bridles and chariot-wheels. Yet others bring 11.257. gifts to the dead familiar, their own shields 11.258. and unavailing spears. Around them slain 11.259. great herds of kine give tribute unto death: 11.260. wine, bristly-backed, from many a field are borne 11.261. and slaughtered sheep bleed o'er the sacred fire. 11.262. So on the shore the wailing multitude 11.263. behold their comrades burning, and keep guard 11.264. o'er the consuming pyres, nor turn away 11.265. till cooling night re-shifts the globe of heaven 11.267. Likewise the mournful Latins far away 11.268. have built their myriad pyres. Yet of the slain 11.269. not few in graves are laid, and borne with tears 11.270. to neighboring country-side or native town; 11.271. the rest—promiscuous mass of dead unknown— 11.272. to nameless and unhonored ashes burn; 11.273. with multitude of fires the far-spread fields 11.274. blaze forth unweariedly. But when from heaven 11.275. the third morn had dispelled the dark and cold 11.276. the mournful bands raked forth the mingled bones 11.277. and plenteous ashes from the smouldering pyres 11.278. then heaped with earth the one sepulchral mound. 11.279. Now from the hearth-stones of the opulent town 11.280. of old Latinus a vast wail burst forth 11.281. for there was found the chief and bitterest share 11.282. of all the woe. For mothers in their tears 11.283. lone brides, and stricken souls of sisters fond 11.284. and boys left fatherless, fling curses Ioud 11.285. on Turnus' troth-plight and the direful war: 11.286. “Let him, let Turnus, with his single sword 11.287. decide the strife,”—they cry,—“and who shall claim 11.288. Lordship of Italy and power supreme.” 11.289. Fierce Drances whets their fury, urging all 11.290. that Turnus singly must the challenge hear 11.291. and singly wage the war; but others plead 11.292. in Turnus' favor; the Queen's noble name 11.293. protects him, and his high renown in arms 11.295. Amid these tumults of the wrathful throng
6. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 5.12.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.12.19.  But I take Nature for my guide and regard any man whatsoever as fairer to view than a eunuch, nor can I believe that Providence is ever so indifferent to what itself has created as to allow weakness to be an excellence, nor again can I think that the knife can render beautiful that which, if produced in the natural course of birth, would be regarded as a monster. A false resemblance to the female sex may in itself delight lust, if it will, but depravity of morals will never acquire such ascendancy as to succeed in giving real value to that to which it has succeeded in giving a high price.
7. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 5.12.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.12.19.  But I take Nature for my guide and regard any man whatsoever as fairer to view than a eunuch, nor can I believe that Providence is ever so indifferent to what itself has created as to allow weakness to be an excellence, nor again can I think that the knife can render beautiful that which, if produced in the natural course of birth, would be regarded as a monster. A false resemblance to the female sex may in itself delight lust, if it will, but depravity of morals will never acquire such ascendancy as to succeed in giving real value to that to which it has succeeded in giving a high price.
8. Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 5.1-5.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 50.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Suetonius, Caligula, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenides Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 93; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
achilles, responsible for the fall of troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
aeneas, humanity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
aeneas, intertextual identities, odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
antisthenes Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
birth Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
civil war Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 93
claudius Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
concord Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 93
contradiction Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
correction Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
cyclops Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
cynic, philosophy, view of odysseus Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
cynic, philosophy Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214
deformity Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
diomedes Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 122
ethical qualities, candor, frankness Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
ethical qualities, falsehood, lies Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
ethical qualities, lying Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
ethical qualities, restraint, self-control, self-restraint Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214
ethical qualities, treachery Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
evander Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 122
exempla, positive Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214
failure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
homer Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
homeric epics, ancient comparisons, between Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
homeric epics, ancient comparisons, moralising views of Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
horace Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
livius andronicus, odyssey Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
monster Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
morio Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
narratives Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
narrators, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
polyphemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
similes, in aeneid Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 122
sinon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
slave Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
stoic philosophy Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 182
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 215
turnus, 'alienisation'" '681.0_122.0@turnus, italian roots Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 122
ulysses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214, 215
veteran Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
war' Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
words Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 214