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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 2.752-2.757


Principio muros obscuraque limina portaeand dazed me utterly. A vision rose


qua gressum extuleram, repeto, et vestigia retroof my own cherished father, as I saw


observata sequor per noctem et lumine lustro.the King, his aged peer, sore wounded Iying


Horror ubique animo, simul ipsa silentia terrent.in mortal agony; a vision too


Inde domum, si forte pedem, si forte tulissetof lost Creusa at my ravaged hearth


me refero: inruerant Danai, et tectum omne tenebant.and young Iulus' peril. Then my eyes


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 11.24-11.43 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Republic, 6.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.13. Sed quo sis, Africane, alacrior ad tutandam rem publicam, sic habeto: omnibus, qui patriam conservaverint, adiuverint, auxerint, certum esse in caelo definitum locum, ubi beati aevo sempiterno fruantur; nihil est enim illi principi deo, qui omnem mundum regit, quod quidem in terris fiat, acceptius quam concilia coetusque hominum iure sociati, quae civitates appellantur; harum rectores et conservatores hinc profecti huc revertuntur.
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.307-2.308, 2.314-2.317, 2.431-2.434, 2.469-2.563, 2.725, 2.736-2.740, 2.745, 2.753-2.757, 2.768-2.771, 6.126, 6.128-6.129, 6.268, 6.384, 6.477, 6.539, 6.642-6.644, 6.673, 6.676, 6.688, 6.703, 8.307 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.314. eized now on every heart. “ of his vast guilt 2.315. Laocoon,” they say, “receives reward; 2.316. for he with most abominable spear 2.317. did strike and violate that blessed wood. 2.469. I thus addressed them: “Warriors, vainly brave 2.470. if ye indeed desire to follow one 2.471. who dares the uttermost brave men may do 2.472. our evil plight ye see: the gods are fled 2.473. from every altar and protecting fire 2.474. which were the kingdom's stay. Ye offer aid 2.475. unto your country's ashes. Let us fight 2.476. unto the death! To arms, my men, to arms! 2.477. The single hope and stay of desperate men 2.478. is their despair.” Thus did I rouse their souls. 2.479. Then like the ravening wolves, some night of cloud 2.480. when cruel hunger in an empty maw 2.481. drives them forth furious, and their whelps behind 2.482. wait famine-throated; so through foemen's steel 2.483. we flew to surest death, and kept our way 2.484. traight through the midmost town . The wings of night 2.485. brooded above us in vast vault of shade. 2.486. But who the bloodshed of that night can tell? 2.487. What tongue its deaths shall number, or what eyes 2.488. find meed of tears to equal all its woe? 2.489. The ancient City fell, whose throne had stood 2.490. age after age. Along her streets were strewn 2.491. the unresisting dead; at household shrines 2.492. and by the temples of the gods they lay. 2.493. Yet not alone was Teucrian blood required: 2.494. oft out of vanquished hearts fresh valor flamed 2.495. and the Greek victor fell. Anguish and woe 2.496. were everywhere; pale terrors ranged abroad 2.498. Androgeos, followed by a thronging band 2.499. of Greeks, first met us on our desperate way; 2.500. but heedless, and confounding friend with foe 2.501. thus, all unchallenged, hailed us as his own : 2.502. “Haste, heroes! Are ye laggards at this hour? 2.503. Others bear off the captives and the spoil 2.504. of burning Troy . Just from the galleys ye?” 2.505. He spoke; but straightway, when no safe reply 2.506. returned, he knew himself entrapped, and fallen 2.507. into a foeman's snare; struck dumb was he 2.508. and stopped both word and motion; as one steps 2.509. when blindly treading a thick path of thorns 2.510. upon a snake, and sick with fear would flee 2.511. that lifted wrath and swollen gorge of green: 2.512. o trembling did Androgeos backward fall. 2.513. At them we flew and closed them round with war; 2.514. and since they could not know the ground, and fear 2.515. had whelmed them quite, we swiftly laid them low. 2.516. Thus Fortune on our first achievement smiled; 2.517. and, flushed with victory, Cormbus cried: 2.518. “Come, friends, and follow Fortune's finger, where 2.519. he beckons us what path deliverance lies. 2.520. Change we our shields, and these Greek emblems wear. 2.521. 'Twixt guile and valor who will nicely weigh 2.522. When foes are met? These dead shall find us arms.” 2.523. With this, he dons Androgeos' crested helm 2.524. and beauteous, blazoned shield; and to his side 2.525. girds on a Grecian blade. Young Rhipeus next 2.526. with Dymas and the other soldiery 2.527. repeat the deed, exulting, and array 2.528. their valor in fresh trophies from the slain. 2.529. Now intermingled with our foes we moved 2.530. and alien emblems wore; the long, black night 2.531. brought many a grapple, and a host of Greeks 2.532. down to the dark we hurled. Some fled away 2.533. eeking their safe ships and the friendly shore. 2.534. Some cowards foul went clambering back again 2.536. But woe is me! If gods their help withhold 2.537. 't is impious to be brave. That very hour 2.538. the fair Cassandra passed us, bound in chains 2.539. King Priam's virgin daughter, from the shrine 2.540. and altars of Minerva; her loose hair 2.541. had lost its fillet; her impassioned eyes 2.542. were lifted in vain prayer,—her eyes alone! 2.543. For chains of steel her frail, soft hands confined. 2.544. Coroebus' eyes this horror not endured 2.545. and, sorrow-crazed, he plunged him headlong in 2.546. the midmost fray, self-offered to be slain 2.547. while in close mass our troop behind him poured. 2.548. But, at this point, the overwhelming spears 2.549. of our own kinsmen rained resistless down 2.550. from a high temple-tower; and carnage wild 2.551. ensued, because of the Greek arms we bore 2.552. and our false crests. The howling Grecian band 2.553. crazed by Cassandra's rescue, charged at us 2.554. from every side; Ajax of savage soul 2.555. the sons of Atreus, and that whole wild horde 2.556. Achilles from Dolopian deserts drew. 2.557. 'T was like the bursting storm, when gales contend 2.558. west wind and South, and jocund wind of morn 2.559. upon his orient steeds—while forests roar 2.725. when Priam was his foe. With flush of shame 2.736. tell him my naughty deeds! Be sure and say 2.737. how Neoptolemus hath shamed his sires. 2.738. Now die!” With this, he trailed before the shrines 2.739. the trembling King, whose feet slipped in the stream 2.740. of his son's blood. Then Pyrrhus' left hand clutched 2.745. fell on him, while his dying eyes surveyed 2.753. of my own cherished father, as I saw 2.754. the King, his aged peer, sore wounded Iying 2.755. in mortal agony; a vision too 2.756. of lost Creusa at my ravaged hearth 2.757. and young Iulus' peril. Then my eyes 2.768. for Troy o'erthrown, and of some Greek revenge 2.769. or her wronged husband's Iong indigt ire. 2.770. So hid she at that shrine her hateful brow 2.771. being of Greece and Troy, full well she knew 6.126. Through Italy ; the cause of so much ill 6.128. A marriage-chamber for an alien bride. 6.129. Oh! yield not to thy woe, but front it ever 6.268. In silent flight, and find a wished-for rest 6.384. These were but shapes and shadows sweeping by 6.477. For thou hast power! Or if some path there be 6.539. Came safe across the river, and were moored 6.642. of ears and nostrils infamously shorn. 6.643. Scarce could Aeneas know the shuddering shade 6.644. That strove to hide its face and shameful scar; 6.673. In that same hour on my sad couch I lay 6.676. But my illustrious bride from all the house 6.688. But, friend, what fortunes have thy life befallen? 6.703. To Tartarus th' accurst.” Deiphobus Deïphobus 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas, founder of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
aeneas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
anchises de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
campus martius, for leisure Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
cicero, marcus tullius, on walking Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
cumae, sibyl of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
emptiness Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
evanders rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
hector de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
leisure, campus martius for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
messenger-speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
movement in the city, walking and running Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
pompey, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
portico of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
porticos, for strolling Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
priam de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
sibyl of cumae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
thebes Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149
troy, fall of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
troy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
venus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
virgil de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 546
walking in the city' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 149