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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 2.682-2.686


ecce levis summo de vertice visus Iulith' exulting foe, the aged King did bind


fundere lumen apex, tactuque innoxia mollishis rusted armor to his trembling thews,—


lambere flamma comas et circum tempora pasci.all vainly,— and a useless blade of steel


Nos pavidi trepidare metu, crinemque flagrantemhe girded on; then charged, resolved to die


excutere et sanctos restinguere fontibus ignis.encircled by the foe. Within his walls


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 7.311-7.314, 11.318-11.320 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 6.633-6.648 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.633. There was, or seemed to be, the form of a male organ 6.634. In the ashes: the shape was really there in fact. 6.635. The captive girl sat on the hearth, as commanded: 6.636. She conceived Servius, born of divine seed. 6.637. His father showed his paternity by touching the child’ 6.638. Head with fire, and a cap of flames glowed on his hair. 6.639. And Livia, this day dedicated a magnificent shrine to you 6.640. Concordia, that she offered to her dear husband. 6.641. Learn this, you age to come: where Livia’s Colonnade 6.642. Now stands, there was once a vast palace. 6.643. A site that was like a city: it occupied a space 6.644. Larger than that of many a walled town. 6.645. It was levelled to the soil, not because of its owner’s treason 6.646. But because its excess was considered harmful. 6.647. Caesar counteced the demolition of such a mass 6.648. Destroying its great wealth to which he was heir.
3. Propertius, Elegies, 3.18 (1st cent. BCE

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.28, 1.148-1.156, 1.195-1.209, 1.509-1.515, 2.268-2.297, 2.307-2.308, 2.314-2.318, 2.320-2.321, 2.324-2.325, 2.337, 2.343, 2.351-2.358, 2.361-2.363, 2.368-2.434, 2.438-2.566, 2.594-2.620, 2.673-2.681, 2.683-2.704, 3.163-3.171, 3.245-3.258, 3.334-3.336, 3.349-3.351, 3.388-3.395, 4.166, 5.5, 5.7, 6.777-6.780, 7.71-7.80, 7.96-7.101, 7.107-7.129, 7.267-7.268, 7.270, 7.314, 7.318-7.319, 7.359-7.372, 7.385-7.405, 7.421-7.434, 7.555-7.556, 8.41-8.48, 8.671, 8.678-8.728, 9.595-9.658, 10.270-10.275 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.28. that of the Trojan blood there was a breed 1.148. an east wind, blowing landward from the deep 1.149. drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— 1.150. and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. 1.151. That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore 1.152. the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave 1.153. truck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. 1.154. Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side 1.155. fell headlong, while three times the circling flood 1.156. pun the light bark through swift engulfing seas. 1.195. while, with the trident, the great god's own hand 1.196. assists the task; then, from the sand-strewn shore 1.197. out-ebbing far, he calms the whole wide sea 1.198. and glides light-wheeled along the crested foam. 1.199. As when, with not unwonted tumult, roars 1.200. in some vast city a rebellious mob 1.201. and base-born passions in its bosom burn 1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 1.207. with clear and soothing speech the people's will. 1.208. So ceased the sea's uproar, when its grave Sire 1.209. looked o'er th' expanse, and, riding on in light 1.509. they measured round so much of Afric soil 1.510. as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot 1.511. received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray 1.512. what men are ye? from what far land arrived 1.513. and whither going?” When she questioned thus 1.514. her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths 2.272. our doubt dispelled. His stratagems and tears 2.273. wrought victory where neither Tydeus' son 2.274. nor mountain-bred Achilles could prevail 2.275. nor ten years' war, nor fleets a thousand strong. 2.276. But now a vaster spectacle of fear 2.277. burst over us, to vex our startled souls. 2.279. priest unto Neptune, was in act to slay 2.281. Lo! o'er the tranquil deep from Tenedos 2.289. their monstrous backs wound forward fold on fold. 2.290. Soon they made land; the furious bright eyes 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.293. All terror-pale we fled. Unswerving then 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.296. each dragon coiled, and on the shrinking flesh 2.314. eized now on every heart. “ of his vast guilt 2.315. Laocoon,” they say, “receives reward; 2.316. for he with most abominable spear 2.317. did strike and violate that blessed wood. 2.320. in general acclaim. Ourselves did make 2.324. were 'neath its feet; great ropes stretched round its neck 2.325. till o'er our walls the fatal engine climbed 2.337. and in the consecrated citadel 2.343. The skies rolled on; and o'er the ocean fell 2.351. on to the well-known strand. The King displayed 2.352. torch from his own ship, and Sinon then 2.353. whom wrathful Heaven defended in that hour 2.354. let the imprisoned band of Greeks go free 2.361. the son of Peleus, came, and Acamas 2.362. King Menelaus, Thoas and Machaon 2.363. and last, Epeus, who the fabric wrought. 2.369. That hour it was when heaven's first gift of sleep 2.370. on weary hearts of men most sweetly steals. 2.371. O, then my slumbering senses seemed to see 2.372. Hector, with woeful face and streaming eyes; 2.373. I seemed to see him from the chariot trailing 2.374. foul with dark dust and gore, his swollen feet 2.375. pierced with a cruel thong. Ah me! what change 2.376. from glorious Hector when he homeward bore 2.377. the spoils of fierce Achilles; or hurled far 2.378. that shower of torches on the ships of Greece ! 2.379. Unkempt his beard, his tresses thick with blood 2.380. and all those wounds in sight which he did take 2.381. defending Troy . Then, weeping as I spoke 2.382. I seemed on that heroic shape to call 2.383. with mournful utterance: “O star of Troy ! 2.384. O surest hope and stay of all her sons! 2.385. Why tarriest thou so Iong? What region sends 2.386. the long-expected Hector home once more? 2.387. These weary eyes that look on thee have seen 2.388. hosts of thy kindred die, and fateful change 2.389. upon thy people and thy city fall. 2.390. O, say what dire occasion has defiled 2.391. thy tranquil brows? What mean those bleeding wounds?” 2.392. Silent he stood, nor anywise would stay 2.393. my vain lament; but groaned, and answered thus: 2.394. “Haste, goddess-born, and out of yonder flames 2.395. achieve thy flight. Our foes have scaled the wall; 2.396. exalted Troy is falling. Fatherland 2.397. and Priam ask no more. If human arm 2.398. could profit Troy, my own had kept her free. 2.399. Her Lares and her people to thy hands 2.400. Troy here commends. Companions let them be 2.401. of all thy fortunes. Let them share thy quest 2.402. of that wide realm, which, after wandering far 2.403. thou shalt achieve, at last, beyond the sea.” 2.404. He spoke: and from our holy hearth brought forth 2.405. the solemn fillet, the ancestral shrines 2.407. Now shrieks and loud confusion swept the town; 2.408. and though my father's dwelling stood apart 2.409. embowered deep in trees, th' increasing din 2.410. drew nearer, and the battle-thunder swelled. 2.411. I woke on sudden, and up-starting scaled 2.412. the roof, the tower, then stood with listening ear: 2.413. 't was like an harvest burning, when wild winds 2.414. uprouse the flames; 't was like a mountain stream 2.415. that bursts in flood and ruinously whelms 2.416. weet fields and farms and all the ploughman's toil 2.417. whirling whole groves along; while dumb with fear 2.418. from some far cliff the shepherd hears the sound. 2.419. Now their Greek plot was plain, the stratagem 2.420. at last laid bare. Deiphobus' great house 2.421. ank vanquished in the fire. Ucalegon's 2.422. hard by was blazing, while the waters wide 2.423. around Sigeum gave an answering glow. 2.424. Shrill trumpets rang; Ioud shouting voices roared; 2.425. wildly I armed me (when the battle calls 2.426. how dimly reason shines!); I burned to join 2.427. the rally of my peers, and to the heights 2.428. defensive gather. Frenzy and vast rage 2.429. eized on my soul. I only sought what way 2.438. is still our own?” But scarcely could I ask 2.439. when thus, with many a groan, he made reply:— 2.440. “Dardania's death and doom are come to-day 2.441. implacable. There is no Ilium now; 2.442. our Trojan name is gone, the Teucrian throne 2.443. Quite fallen. For the wrathful power of Jove 2.444. has given to Argos all our boast and pride. 2.453. is flashing naked, making haste for blood. 2.454. Our sentries helpless meet the invading shock 2.455. and give back blind and unavailing war.” 2.456. By Panthus' word and by some god impelled 2.457. I flew to battle, where the flames leaped high 2.458. where grim Bellona called, and all the air 2.459. resounded high as heaven with shouts of war. 2.460. Rhipeus and Epytus of doughty arm 2.461. were at my side, Dymas and Hypanis 2.462. een by a pale moon, join our little band; 2.463. and young Coroebus, Mygdon's princely son 2.464. who was in Troy that hour because he loved 2.465. Cassandra madly, and had made a league 2.466. as Priam's kinsman with our Phrygian arms: 2.468. When these I saw close-gathered for the fight 2.469. I thus addressed them: “Warriors, vainly brave 2.470. if ye indeed desire to follow one 2.471. who dares the uttermost brave men may do 2.472. our evil plight ye see: the gods are fled 2.473. from every altar and protecting fire 2.474. which were the kingdom's stay. Ye offer aid 2.475. unto your country's ashes. Let us fight 2.476. unto the death! To arms, my men, to arms! 2.477. The single hope and stay of desperate men 2.478. is their despair.” Thus did I rouse their souls. 2.479. Then like the ravening wolves, some night of cloud 2.480. when cruel hunger in an empty maw 2.481. drives them forth furious, and their whelps behind 2.482. wait famine-throated; so through foemen's steel 2.483. we flew to surest death, and kept our way 2.484. traight through the midmost town . The wings of night 2.485. brooded above us in vast vault of shade. 2.486. But who the bloodshed of that night can tell? 2.487. What tongue its deaths shall number, or what eyes 2.488. find meed of tears to equal all its woe? 2.489. The ancient City fell, whose throne had stood 2.490. age after age. Along her streets were strewn 2.491. the unresisting dead; at household shrines 2.492. and by the temples of the gods they lay. 2.493. Yet not alone was Teucrian blood required: 2.494. oft out of vanquished hearts fresh valor flamed 2.495. and the Greek victor fell. Anguish and woe 2.496. were everywhere; pale terrors ranged abroad 2.498. Androgeos, followed by a thronging band 2.499. of Greeks, first met us on our desperate way; 2.500. but heedless, and confounding friend with foe 2.501. thus, all unchallenged, hailed us as his own : 2.502. “Haste, heroes! Are ye laggards at this hour? 2.503. Others bear off the captives and the spoil 2.504. of burning Troy . Just from the galleys ye?” 2.505. He spoke; but straightway, when no safe reply 2.506. returned, he knew himself entrapped, and fallen 2.507. into a foeman's snare; struck dumb was he 2.508. and stopped both word and motion; as one steps 2.509. when blindly treading a thick path of thorns 2.510. upon a snake, and sick with fear would flee 2.511. that lifted wrath and swollen gorge of green: 2.512. o trembling did Androgeos backward fall. 2.513. At them we flew and closed them round with war; 2.514. and since they could not know the ground, and fear 2.515. had whelmed them quite, we swiftly laid them low. 2.516. Thus Fortune on our first achievement smiled; 2.517. and, flushed with victory, Cormbus cried: 2.518. “Come, friends, and follow Fortune's finger, where 2.519. he beckons us what path deliverance lies. 2.520. Change we our shields, and these Greek emblems wear. 2.521. 'Twixt guile and valor who will nicely weigh 2.522. When foes are met? These dead shall find us arms.” 2.523. With this, he dons Androgeos' crested helm 2.524. and beauteous, blazoned shield; and to his side 2.525. girds on a Grecian blade. Young Rhipeus next 2.526. with Dymas and the other soldiery 2.527. repeat the deed, exulting, and array 2.528. their valor in fresh trophies from the slain. 2.529. Now intermingled with our foes we moved 2.530. and alien emblems wore; the long, black night 2.531. brought many a grapple, and a host of Greeks 2.532. down to the dark we hurled. Some fled away 2.533. eeking their safe ships and the friendly shore. 2.534. Some cowards foul went clambering back again 2.536. But woe is me! If gods their help withhold 2.537. 't is impious to be brave. That very hour 2.538. the fair Cassandra passed us, bound in chains 2.539. King Priam's virgin daughter, from the shrine 2.540. and altars of Minerva; her loose hair 2.541. had lost its fillet; her impassioned eyes 2.542. were lifted in vain prayer,—her eyes alone! 2.543. For chains of steel her frail, soft hands confined. 2.544. Coroebus' eyes this horror not endured 2.545. and, sorrow-crazed, he plunged him headlong in 2.546. the midmost fray, self-offered to be slain 2.547. while in close mass our troop behind him poured. 2.548. But, at this point, the overwhelming spears 2.549. of our own kinsmen rained resistless down 2.550. from a high temple-tower; and carnage wild 2.551. ensued, because of the Greek arms we bore 2.552. and our false crests. The howling Grecian band 2.553. crazed by Cassandra's rescue, charged at us 2.554. from every side; Ajax of savage soul 2.555. the sons of Atreus, and that whole wild horde 2.556. Achilles from Dolopian deserts drew. 2.557. 'T was like the bursting storm, when gales contend 2.558. west wind and South, and jocund wind of morn 2.559. upon his orient steeds—while forests roar 2.594. the shielded left-hand thwarts the falling spears 2.595. the right to every vantage closely clings. 2.596. The Trojans hurl whole towers and roof-tops down 2.597. upon the mounting foe; for well they see 2.598. that the last hour is come, and with what arms 2.599. the dying must resist. Rich gilded beams 2.600. with many a beauteous blazon of old time 2.601. go crashing down. Men armed with naked swords 2.603. Thus were our hearts inflamed to stand and strike 2.604. for the king's house, and to his body-guard 2.605. bring succor, and renew their vanquished powers. 2.606. A certain gate I knew, a secret way 2.607. which gave free passage between Priam's halls 2.608. and exit rearward; hither, in the days 2.609. before our fall, the lone Andromache 2.610. was wont with young Astyanax to pass 2.611. in quest of Priam and her husband's kin. 2.612. This way to climb the palace roof I flew 2.613. where, desperate, the Trojans with vain skill 2.614. hurled forth repellent arms. A tower was there 2.615. reared skyward from the roof-top, giving view 2.616. of Troy 's wide walls and full reconnaissance 2.617. of all Achaea 's fleets and tented field; 2.618. this, with strong steel, our gathered strength assailed 2.619. and as the loosened courses offered us 2.620. great threatening fissures, we uprooted it 2.673. there fifty nuptial beds gave promise proud 2.674. of princely heirs; but all their brightness now 2.675. of broidered cunning and barbaric gold 2.676. lay strewn and trampled on. The Danaan foe 2.678. But would ye haply know what stroke of doom 2.679. on Priam fell? Now when his anguish saw 2.680. his kingdom lost and fallen, his abode 2.681. hattered, and in his very hearth and home 2.683. his rusted armor to his trembling thews,— 2.684. all vainly,— and a useless blade of steel 2.685. he girded on; then charged, resolved to die 2.686. encircled by the foe. Within his walls 2.687. there stood, beneath the wide and open sky 2.688. a lofty altar; an old laurel-tree 2.689. leaned o'er it, and enclasped in holy shade 2.690. the statues of the tutelary powers. 2.691. Here Hecuba and all the princesses 2.692. took refuge vain within the place of prayer. 2.693. Like panic-stricken doves in some dark storm 2.694. close-gathering they sate, and in despair 2.695. embraced their graven gods. But when the Queen 2.696. aw Priam with his youthful harness on 2.697. “What frenzy, O my wretched lord,” she cried 2.698. “Arrayed thee in such arms? O, whither now? 2.699. Not such defences, nor such arm as thine 2.700. the time requires, though thy companion were 2.701. our Hector's self. O, yield thee, I implore! 2.702. This altar now shall save us one and all 2.703. or we must die together.” With these words 2.704. he drew him to her side, and near the shrine 3.163. nor towered Pergama; in lowly vales 3.164. their dwelling; hence the ancient worship given 3.165. to the Protectress of Mount Cybele 3.166. mother of Gods, what time in Ida's grove 3.167. the brazen Corybantic cymbals clang 3.168. or sacred silence guards her mystery 3.169. and lions yoked her royal chariot draw. 3.170. Up, then, and follow the behests divine! 3.171. Pour offering to the winds, and point your keels 3.245. our true abode can be; for Dardanus 3.246. was cradled there, and old Iasius 3.247. their blood the oldest of our ancient line. 3.248. Arise! go forth and cheer thy father gray 3.249. with the glad tidings! Bid him doubt no more! 3.250. Ausonia seek and Corythus; for Jove 3.251. denies this Cretan realm to thine and thee.” 3.252. I marvelled at the heavenly presences 3.253. o vocal and so bright, for 't was not sleep; 3.254. but face to face I deemed I could discern 3.255. each countece august and holy brow 3.256. each mantled head; and from my body ran 3.257. cold sweat of awe. From my low couch I sprang 3.258. lifting to heaven my suppliant hands and prayer 3.334. and, hiding in deep grass their swords and shields 3.335. in ambush lay. But presently the foe 3.336. wept o'er the winding shore with loud alarm : 3.349. ons of Laomedon, have ye made war? 3.350. And will ye from their rightful kingdom drive 3.351. the guiltless Harpies? Hear, O, hear my word 3.388. the little port and town. Our weary fleet 3.390. So, safe at land, our hopeless peril past 3.391. we offered thanks to Jove, and kindled high 3.392. his altars with our feast and sacrifice; 3.393. then, gathering on Actium 's holy shore 3.394. made fair solemnities of pomp and game. 3.395. My youth, anointing their smooth, naked limbs 4.166. But in what wise our urgent task and grave 5.5. looked back on Carthage, they beheld the glare 5.7. what kindled the wild flames; but that the pang 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 7.71. but comeliest in all their princely throng 7.72. came Turnus, of a line of mighty sires. 7.73. Him the queen mother chiefly loved, and yearned 7.74. to call him soon her son. But omens dire 7.75. and menaces from Heaven withstood her will. 7.76. A laurel-tree grew in the royal close 7.77. of sacred leaf and venerated age 7.78. which, when he builded there his wall and tower 7.79. Father Latinus found, and hallowed it 7.80. to Phoebus' grace and power, wherefrom the name 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 7.107. tretch under high Albunea, and her stream 7.108. roars from its haunted well, exhaling through 7.109. vast, gloomful woods its pestilential air. 7.110. Here all Oenotria's tribes ask oracles 7.111. in dark and doubtful days: here, when the priest 7.112. has brought his gifts, and in the night so still 7.113. couched on spread fleeces of the offered flock 7.114. awaiting slumber lies, then wondrously 7.115. a host of flitting shapes he sees, and hears 7.116. voices that come and go: with gods he holds 7.117. high converse, or in deep Avernian gloom 7.118. parleys with Acheron. Thither drew near 7.119. Father Latinus, seeking truth divine. 7.120. Obedient to the olden rite, he slew 7.121. a hundred fleecy sheep, and pillowed lay 7.122. upon their outstretched skins. Straightway a voice 7.123. out of the lofty forest met his prayer. 7.124. “Seek not in wedlock with a Latin lord 7.125. to join thy daughter, O my son and seed! 7.126. Beware this purposed marriage! There shall come 7.127. ons from afar, whose blood shall bear our name 7.128. tarward; the children of their mighty loins 7.129. as far as eve and morn enfold the seas 7.267. but now in golden house among the stars 7.268. he has a throne, and by his altars blest 7.314. and these were Priam's splendor, when he gave 7.318. Ilioneus. But King Latinus gazed 7.319. uswering on the ground, all motionless 7.359. For offering to Aeneas, he bade send 7.360. a chariot, with chargers twain of seed 7.361. ethereal, their nostrils breathing fire: 7.362. the famous kind which guileful Circe bred 7.363. cheating her sire, and mixed the sun-god's team 7.364. with brood-mares earthly born. The sons of Troy 7.365. uch gifts and greetings from Latinus bearing 7.367. But lo! from Argos on her voyage of air 7.368. rides the dread spouse of Jove. She, sky-enthroned 7.369. above the far Sicilian promontory 7.370. pachynus, sees Dardania's rescued fleet 7.371. and all Aeneas' joy. The prospect shows 7.372. houses a-building, lands of safe abode 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.388. hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.391. The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 7.401. outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak 7.402. my own prerogative of godhead be 7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! 7.404. If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. 7.405. To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.555. lavished in vain? and thy true throne consigned 7.556. to Trojan wanderers? The King repels 8.41. his body to its Iong-delayed repose. 8.42. There, 'twixt the poplars by the gentle stream 8.43. the River-Father, genius of that place 8.44. old Tiberinus visibly uprose; 8.45. a cloak of gray-green lawn he wore, his hair 8.46. o'erhung with wreath of reeds. In soothing words 8.48. “Seed of the gods! who bringest to my shore 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 9.595. he did but love his hapless friend too well.” 9.596. But while he spoke, the furious-thrusting sword 9.597. had pierced the tender body, and run through 9.598. the bosom white as snow. Euryalus 9.599. ank prone in death; upon his goodly limbs 9.600. the life-blood ran unstopped, and low inclined 9.601. the drooping head; as when some purpled flower 9.602. cut by the ploughshare, dies, or poppies proud 9.603. with stem forlorn their ruined beauty bow 9.604. before the pelting storm. Then Nisus flew 9.605. traight at his foes; but in their throng would find 9.606. Volscens alone, for none but Volscens stayed: 9.607. they gathered thickly round and grappled him 9.608. in shock of steel with steel. But on he plunged 9.609. winging in ceaseless circles round his head 9.610. his lightning-sword, and thrust it through the face 9.611. of shrieking Volscens, with his own last breath 9.612. triking his foeman down; then cast himself 9.613. upon his fallen comrade's breast; and there 9.615. Heroic pair and blest! If aught I sing 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age 9.617. hall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: 9.618. not while the altars of Aeneas' line 9.619. hall crown the Capitol's unshaken hill 9.620. nor while the Roman Father's hand sustains 9.622. The Rutules seized the spoils of victory 9.623. and slowly to their camp, with wail and cry 9.624. bore Volscens' corse; and in the eamp they made 9.625. like wailing over Rhamnes lifeless found 9.626. o'er Numa and Serranus, and a throng 9.627. of princes dead. The gazing people pressed 9.628. around the slain, the dying, where the earth 9.629. ran red with slaughter and full many a stream 9.630. of trickling gore; nor did they fail to know 9.631. Messapus' glittering helm, his baldric fair 9.633. Now, from Tithonus' saffron couch set free 9.634. Aurora over many a land outpoured 9.635. the rising morn; the sun's advancing beam 9.636. unveiled the world; and Turnus to his host 9.637. gave signal to stand forth, while he arrayed 9.638. himself in glorious arms. Then every chief 9.639. awoke his mail-clad company, and stirred 9.640. their slumbering wrath with tidings from the foe. 9.641. Tumultuously shouting, they impaled 9.642. on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! — 9.643. the heads of Nisus and Euryalus. 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 10.270. oft snow-white plumes, and spurning earth he soared 10.271. on high, and sped in music through the stars. 10.272. His son with bands of youthful peers urged on 10.273. a galley with a Centaur for its prow 10.274. which loomed high o'er the waves, and seemed to hurl 10.275. a huge stone at the water, as the keel
5. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.561-1.573 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas, shield of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 174
aeneas Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232; Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
aeneas at cumae, fire imagery Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
aeneas at cumae, prophecy of helenus Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
aeneid (virgil) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
amata Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255
ambiguity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
anchises Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232; Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255
apollo (see also phoebus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
apollodorus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
ascanius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265; Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255
audience de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
bacchus (see also dionysus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
buthrotum Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
caesar, julius\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
castor Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
catasterism Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
celaeno Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
christ, body O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 372
concordia in porticus liviae Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
creusa Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232; Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255
crib, star O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 372
dido de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
epiphany, gifts of magi O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 372
epiphany O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 372
fire imagery, aeneid Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
gens iulia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 174
gigantomachy Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 174
hector de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545
helenus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
irony, dramatic de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
julian house Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 157
juno Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 157
jupiter, in the aeneid Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
lament, and women Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 255
lavinia, characteristics, role in aeneid Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 157
lavinia Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
liviae Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
matralia and concordia in porticus liviae Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
messenger-speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
monstrum Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
pollio razed for construction of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
pollux Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
portents Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 157
prodigy, in virgil Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
semele Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265
servius tullius, as model for augustus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
servius tullius, as veiled adfectator regni Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
servius tullius, parentage of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 272
shield of aeneas Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 174
sidus iulium (julian star) Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 174
sidus julium Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
signs Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
simile de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 551
syme, ronald Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
tiberinus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
trojans Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
troy, fall of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
troy, western resurgence Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 158
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
uates Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232
venus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
virgil, aeneid O'Daly, Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012) 372
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 232; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 545, 551
women' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 58
zeus (see also jupiter) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 265