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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 12.943


Pallantis pueri, victum quem volnere Turnusunlingering tried, all lesser task laid by


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5 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 4.450, 8.64, 15.191, 16.857, 22.363, 24.5, 24.49, 24.51-24.55, 24.486-24.551 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.450. /Then were heard alike the sound of groaning and the cry of triumph of the slayers and the slain, and the earth flowed with blood. As when winter torrents, flowing down the mountains from their great springs to a place where two valleys meet, join their mighty floods in a deep gorge 8.64. /But when they were met together and come into one place, then clashed they their shields and spears, and the fury of bronze-mailed warriors; and the bossed shields closed each with each, and a great din arose. Then were heard alike the sound of groaning and the cry of triumph 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 16.857. /Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him; and his soul fleeting from his limbs was gone to Hades, bewailing her fate, leaving manliness and youth. And to him even in his death spake glorious Hector:Patroclus, wherefore dost thou prophesy for me sheer destruction? 22.363. /valorous though thou art, at the Scaean gate. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him and his soul fleeting from his limbs was gone to Hades, bewailing her fate, leaving manliness and youth. And to him even in his death spake goodly Achilles: 24.5. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.5. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.49. /the which harmeth men greatly and profiteth them withal. Lo, it may be that a man hath lost one dearer even than was this—a brother, that the selfsame mother bare, or haply a son; yet verily when he hath wept and wailed for him he maketh an end; for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men. 24.51. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.52. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.53. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.54. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.55. /Then stirred to anger spake to him white-armed Hera:Even this might be as thou sayest, Lord of the silver bow, if indeed ye gods will vouchsafe like honour to Achilles and to Hector. Hector is but mortal and was suckled at a woman's breast, but Achilles is the child of a goddess that I mine own self 24.486. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.487. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.488. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.489. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.490. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.491. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.492. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.493. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.494. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.495. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.496. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.497. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.498. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.499. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.500. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.501. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.502. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.503. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.504. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.505. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.506. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.507. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.508. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.509. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. So spake he, and in Achilles he roused desire to weep for his father; and he took the old man by the hand, and gently put him from him. So the twain bethought them of their dead, and wept; the one for man-slaying Hector wept sore 24.510. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.511. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.512. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.513. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.514. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.515. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.516. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.517. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.518. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.519. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.520. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.521. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.522. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.523. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.524. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.525. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.526. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.527. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.528. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.529. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.530. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.531. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.532. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.533. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.534. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.535. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.536. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.537. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.538. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.539. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.540. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.541. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.542. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.543. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.544. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.545. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.546. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.547. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.548. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.549. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.550. /neither wilt thou bring him back to life; ere that shalt thou suffer some other ill. 24.551. /neither wilt thou bring him back to life; ere that shalt thou suffer some other ill.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 6.34-6.35, 11.609-11.612, 20.353-20.356, 22.45-22.59, 22.61-22.64, 22.70-22.78, 22.310-22.329, 24.5-24.8, 24.514-24.515, 24.521-24.525 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 3.523-3.696 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.523. Not far from your banks, Tiber, far flowing river. 3.524. The people come and drink there, scattered on the grass 3.525. And every man reclines there with his girl. 3.526. Some tolerate the open sky, a few pitch tents 3.527. And some make leafy huts out of branches 3.528. While others set reeds up, to form rigid pillars 3.529. And hang their outspread robes from the reeds. 3.530. But they’re warmed by sun and wine, and pray 3.531. For as many years as cups, as many as they drink. 3.532. There you’ll find a man who quaffs Nestor’s years 3.533. A woman who’d age as the Sibyl, in her cups. 3.534. There they sing whatever they’ve learnt in the theatres 3.535. Beating time to the words with ready hands 3.536. And setting the bowl down, dance coarsely 3.537. The trim girl leaping about with streaming hair. 3.538. Homecoming they stagger, a sight for vulgar eyes 3.539. And the crowd meeting them call them ‘blessed’. 3.540. I fell in with the procession lately (it seems to me worth 3.541. Saying): a tipsy old woman dragging a tipsy old man. 3.542. But since errors abound as to who this goddess is 3.543. I’m determined not to cloak her story. 3.544. Wretched Dido burned with love for Aeneas 3.545. She burned on the pyre built for her funeral: 3.546. Her ashes were gathered, and this brief couplet 3.547. Which she left, in dying, adorned her tomb: 3.548. AENEAS THE REASON, HIS THE BLADE EMPLOYED. 3.549. DIDO BY HER OWN HAND WAS DESTROYED. 3.550. The Numidians immediately invaded the defencele 3.551. Realm, and Iarbas the Moor captured and held the palace. 3.552. Remembering her scorn, he said: ‘See, I, whom she 3.553. So many times rejected, now enjoy Elissa’s marriage bed.’ 3.554. The Tyrians scattered, as each chanced to stray, as bee 3.555. often wander confusedly, having lost their Queen. 3.556. Anna, was driven from her home, weeping on leaving 3.557. Her sister’s city, after first paying honour to that sister. 3.558. The loose ashes drank perfume mixed with tears 3.559. And received an offering of her shorn hair: 3.560. Three times she said: ‘Farewell!’ three times lifted 3.561. And pressed the ashes to her lips, seeing her sister there. 3.562. Finding a ship, and companions for her flight, she glided 3.563. Away, looking back at the city, her sister’s sweet work. 3.564. There’s a fertile island, Melite, near barren Cosyra 3.565. Lashed by the waves of the Libyan sea. Trusting in 3.566. The king’s former hospitality, she headed there 3.567. Battus was king there, and was a wealthy host. 3.568. When he had learned the fates of the two sisters 3.569. He said: ‘This land, however small, is yours.’ 3.570. He would have been hospitable to the end 3.571. Except that he feared Pygmalion’s great power. 3.572. The corn had been taken to be threshed a third time 3.573. And a third time the new wine poured into empty vats. 3.574. The sun had twice circled the zodiac, and a third year 3.575. Was passing, when Anna had to find a fresh place of exile. 3.576. Her brother came seeking war. The king hated weapons 3.577. And said: ‘We are peaceable, flee for your own safety!’ 3.578. She fled at his command, gave her ship to the wind and waves: 3.579. Her brother was crueller than any ocean. 3.580. There’s a little field by the fish-filled stream 3.581. of stony Crathis: the local people call it Camere. 3.582. There she sailed, and when she was no further away 3.583. Than the distance reached by nine slingshots 3.584. The sails first fell and then flapped in the light breeze. 3.585. ‘Attack the water with oars!’ cried the captain. 3.586. And while they made ready to reef the sails 3.587. The swift South Wind struck the curved stern 3.588. And despite the captain’s efforts swept them 3.589. Into the open sea: the land was lost to sight. 3.590. The waves attacked them, and the ocean heaved 3.591. From the depths, and the hull gulped the foaming waters. 3.592. Skill is defeated by the wind, the steersman no longer 3.593. Guides the helm, but he too turns to prayer for aid. 3.594. The Phoenician exile is thrown high on swollen waves 3.595. And hides her weeping eyes in her robe: 3.596. Then for a first time she called her sister Dido happy 3.597. And whoever, anywhere, might be treading dry land. 3.598. A great gust drove the ship to the Laurentine shore 3.599. And, foundering, it perished, when all had landed. 3.600. Meanwhile pious Aeneas had gained Latinus’ realm 3.601. And his daughter too, and had merged both peoples. 3.602. While he was walking barefoot along the shore 3.603. That had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates 3.604. He saw Anna wandering, not believing it was her: 3.605. ‘Why should she be here in the fields of Latium?’ 3.606. Aeneas said to himself: ‘It’s Anna!’ shouted Achates: 3.607. At the sound of her name she raised her face. 3.608. Alas, what should she do? Flee? Wish for the ground 3.609. To swallow her? Her wretched sister’s fate was before her eyes. 3.610. The Cytherean hero felt her fear, and spoke to her 3.611. (He still wept, moved by your memory, Elissa): 3.612. ‘Anna, I swear, by this land that you once knew 3.613. A happier fate had granted me, and by the god 3.614. My companions, who have lately found a home here 3.615. That all of them often rebuked me for my delay. 3.616. Yet I did not fear her dying, that fear was absent. 3.617. Ah me! Her courage was beyond belief. 3.618. Don’t re-tell it: I saw shameful wounds on her body 3.619. When I dared to visit the houses of Tartarus. 3.620. But you shall enjoy the comforts of my kingdom 3.621. Whether your will or a god brings you to our shores. 3.622. I owe you much, and owe Elissa not a little: 3.623. You are welcome for your own and your sister’s sake.’ 3.624. She accepted his words (no other hope was left) 3.625. And told him of her own wanderings. 3.626. When she entered the palace, dressed in Tyrian style 3.627. Aeneas spoke (the rest of the throng were silent): 3.628. ‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting 3.629. This lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense. 3.630. She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore: 3.631. I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’ 3.632. Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong 3.633. Within her silent heart, and concealed her fears: 3.634. And though she saw many gifts given away openly 3.635. She suspected many more were sent secretly. 3.636. She hadn’t yet decided what to do: she hated 3.637. With fury, prepared a plan, and wished to die avenged. 3.638. It was night: it seemed her sister Dido stood 3.639. Before her bed, her straggling hair stained with her blood 3.640. Crying: ‘Flee, don’t hesitate, flee this gloomy house!’ 3.641. At the words a gust slammed the creaking door. 3.642. Anna leapt up, then jumped from a low window 3.643. To the ground: fear itself had made her daring. 3.644. With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest 3.645. She runs like a frightened doe that hears the wolves. 3.646. It’s thought that horned Numicius swept her away 3.647. In his swollen flood, and hid her among his pools. 3.648. Meanwhile, shouting, they searched for the Sidonian lady 3.649. Through the fields: traces and tracks were visible: 3.650. Reaching the banks, they found her footprints there. 3.651. The knowing river stemmed his silent waters. 3.652. She herself appeared, saying: ‘I’m a nymph of the calm 3.653. Numicius: hid in perennial waters, Anna Perenna’s my name.’ 3.654. Quickly they set out a feast in the fields they’d roamed 3.655. And celebrated their deeds and the day, with copious wine. 3.656. Some think she’s the Moon, because she measures out 3.657. The year (annus): others, Themis, or the Inachian heifer. 3.658. Anna, you’ll find some to say you’re a nymph, daughter 3.659. of Azan, and gave Jupiter his first nourishment. 3.660. I’ll relate another tale that’s come to my ears 3.661. And it’s not so far away from the truth. 3.662. The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes 3.663. Fled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount: 3.664. The food supplies they’d brought with them failed 3.665. Also the stores of bread fit for human consumption. 3.666. There was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae 3.667. A poor woman, old, but very industrious. 3.668. With her grey hair bound up in a light cap 3.669. She used to make coarse cakes with a trembling hand 3.670. And distribute them, still warm, among the people 3.671. Each morning: this supply of hers pleased them all. 3.672. When peace was made at home, they set up a statue 3.673. To Perenna, because she’d helped supply their needs. 3.674. Now it’s left for me to tell why the girls sing coarse songs: 3.675. Since they gather together to sing certain infamous things. 3.676. Anna had lately been made a goddess: Gradivus came to her 3.677. And taking her aside, spoke these words: 3.678. You honour my month: I’ve joined my season to yours: 3.679. I’ve great hopes you can do me a service. 3.680. Armed, I’m captivated by armed Minerva 3.681. I burn, and have nursed the wound for many a day. 3.682. Help us, alike in our pursuits, to become one: 3.683. The part suits you well, courteous old lady.’ 3.684. He spoke. She tricked the god with empty promises. 3.685. And led him on, in foolish hope, with false delays. 3.686. often, when he pressed her, she said: ‘I’ve done as you asked 3.687. She’s won, she’s yielded at last to your prayers.’ 3.688. The lover believed her and prepared the marriage-chamber. 3.689. They led Anna there, a new bride, her face veiled. 3.690. About to kiss her, Mars suddenly saw it was Anna: 3.691. Shame and anger alternating stirred the hoodwinked god. 3.692. The new goddess laughed at her dear Minerva’s lover. 3.693. Nothing indeed has ever pleased Venus more. 3.694. So now they tell old jokes, and coarse songs are sung 3.695. And they delight in how the great god was cheated. 3.696. I was about to neglect those daggers that pierced
4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.264-1.266, 1.290, 1.450-1.493, 3.588-3.654, 5.237, 5.362-5.484, 6.14-6.41, 6.791-6.792, 6.853, 6.863-6.886, 6.889-6.890, 7.54, 8.184-8.279, 8.608-8.731, 10.495-10.506, 10.825, 11.831, 12.8, 12.82, 12.95, 12.189-12.194, 12.313-12.314, 12.697-12.703, 12.715-12.724, 12.731, 12.742, 12.749-12.757, 12.766-12.771, 12.776-12.886, 12.894-12.895, 12.898, 12.906, 12.908-12.914, 12.919-12.942, 12.944-12.952 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 3.588. the monster waves, and ever and anon 3.589. flings them at heaven, to lash the tranquil stars. 3.590. But Scylla, prisoned in her eyeless cave 3.591. thrusts forth her face, and pulls upon the rocks 3.592. hip after ship; the parts that first be seen 3.593. are human; a fair-breasted virgin she 3.594. down to the womb; but all that lurks below 3.595. is a huge-membered fish, where strangely join 3.596. the flukes of dolphins and the paunch of wolves. 3.597. Better by far to round the distant goal 3.598. of the Trinacrian headlands, veering wide 3.599. from thy true course, than ever thou shouldst see 3.600. that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave 3.601. where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar. 3.602. Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed 3.603. on Helenus, if trusted prophet he 3.604. and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given 3.605. o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all 3.606. I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. 3.607. To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; 3.608. to Juno chant a fervent votive song 3.609. and with obedient offering persuade 3.610. that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing 3.611. to Italy be sped, and leave behind 3.612. Trinacria . When wafted to that shore 3.613. repair to Cumae 's hill, and to the Lake 3.614. Avernus with its whispering grove divine. 3.615. There shalt thou see a frenzied prophetess 3.616. who from beneath the hollow scarped crag 3.617. ings oracles, or characters on leaves 3.618. mysterious names. Whate'er the virgin writes 3.619. on leaves inscribing the portentous song 3.620. he sets in order, and conceals them well 3.621. in her deep cave, where they abide unchanged 3.622. in due array. Yet not a care has she 3.623. if with some swinging hinge a breeze sweeps in 3.624. to catch them as they whirl: if open door 3.625. disperse them flutterlig through the hollow rock 3.626. he will not link their shifted sense anew 3.627. nor re-invent her fragmentary song. 3.628. oft her uswered votaries depart 3.629. corning the Sibyl's shrine. But deem not thou 3.630. thy tarrying too Iong, whate'er thy stay. 3.631. Though thy companions chide, though winds of power 3.632. invite thy ship to sea, and well would speed 3.633. the swelling sail, yet to that Sibyl go. 3.634. Pray that her own lips may sing forth for thee 3.635. the oracles, uplifting her dread voice 3.636. in willing prophecy. Her rede shall tell 3.637. of Italy, its wars and tribes to be 3.638. and of what way each burden and each woe 3.639. may be escaped, or borne. Her favoring aid 3.640. will grant swift, happy voyages to thy prayer. 3.641. Such counsels Heaven to my lips allows. 3.642. arise, begone! and by thy glorious deeds 3.644. So spake the prophet with benigt voice. 3.645. Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold 3.646. and graven ivory, which to our ships 3.647. he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full 3.648. with messy silver and Dodona 's pride 3.649. of brazen cauldrons; a cuirass he gave 3.650. of linked gold enwrought and triple chain; 3.651. a noble helmet, too, with flaming crest 3.652. and lofty cone, th' accoutrement erewhile 3.653. of Neoptolemus. My father too 3.654. had fit gifts from the King; whose bounty then 5.237. he hurled poor, slack Menoetes from the poop 5.362. bound with a purple fillet. But behold! 5.363. Sergestus, from the grim rock just dragged off 5.364. by cunning toil, one halting rank of oars 5.365. left of his many lost, comes crawling in 5.366. with vanquished ship, a mockery to all. 5.367. As when a serpent, on the highway caught 5.368. ome brazen wheel has crushed, or traveller 5.369. with heavy-smiting blow left half alive 5.370. and mangled by a stone; in vain he moves 5.371. in writhing flight; a part is lifted high 5.372. with hissing throat and angry, glittering eyes; 5.373. but by the wounded part a captive still 5.374. he knots him fold on fold: with such a track 5.375. the maimed ship labored slow; but by her sails 5.376. he still made way, and with full canvas on 5.377. arrived at land. Aeneas then bestowed 5.378. a boon upon Sergestus, as was meet 5.379. for reward of the ship in safety brought 5.380. with all its men; a fair slave was the prize 5.381. the Cretan Pholoe, well taught to weave 5.383. Then good Aeneas, the ship-contest o'er 5.384. turned to a wide green valley, circled round 5.385. with clasp of wood-clad hills, wherein was made 5.386. an amphitheatre; entering with a throng 5.387. of followers, the hero took his seat 5.388. in mid-arena on a lofty mound. 5.389. For the fleet foot-race, now, his summons flies, — 5.390. he offers gifts, and shows the rewards due. 5.391. The mingling youth of Troy and Sicily 5.392. hastened from far. Among the foremost came 5.393. the comrades Nisus and Euryalus 5.394. Euryalus for beauty's bloom renowned 5.395. Nisus for loyal love; close-following these 5.396. Diores strode, a prince of Priam's line; 5.397. then Salius and Patron, who were bred 5.398. in Acaria and Arcady; 5.399. then two Sicilian warriors, Helymus 5.400. and Panopes, both sylvan bred and born 5.401. comrades of King Acestes; after these 5.402. the multitude whom Fame forgets to tell. 5.403. Aeneas, so surrounded, thus spake forth: 5.404. “Hear what I purpose, and with joy receive! 5.405. of all your company, not one departs 5.406. with empty hand. The Cretan javelins 5.407. bright-tipped with burnished steel, and battle-axe 5.408. adorned with graven silver, these shall be 5.409. the meed of all. The three first at the goal 5.410. hall bind their foreheads with fair olive green 5.411. and win the rewards due. The first shall lead 5.412. victorious, yon rich-bridled steed away; 5.413. this Amazonian quiver, the next prize 5.414. well-stocked with Thracian arrows; round it goes 5.415. a baldrick broad and golden,—in its clasp 5.416. a lustrous gem. The third man goes away 5.418. They heard, and took their places. The loud horn 5.419. gave signal, and impetuous from the line 5.420. wift as a bursting storm they sped away 5.421. eyes fixed upon the goal. Far in advance 5.422. Nisus shot forward, swifter than the winds 5.423. or winged thunderbolt; the next in course 5.424. next, but out-rivalled far, was Salius 5.425. and after him a space, Euryalus 5.426. came third; him Helymus was hard upon; 5.427. and, look! Diores follows, heel on heel 5.428. close at his shoulder—if the race be long 5.429. he sure must win, or claim a doubtful prize. 5.430. Now at the last stretch, spent and panting, all 5.431. pressed to the goal, when in a slime of blood 5.432. Nisus, hard fate! slipped down, where late the death 5.433. of victims slain had drenched the turf below. 5.434. Here the young victor, with his triumph flushed 5.435. lost foothold on the yielding ground, and plunged 5.436. face forward in the pool of filth and gore; 5.437. but not of dear Euryalus was he 5.438. forgetful then, nor heedless of his friend; 5.439. but rising from the mire he hurled himself 5.440. in Salius' way; so he in equal plight 5.441. rolled in the filthy slough. Euryalus 5.442. leaped forth, the winner of the race by gift 5.443. of his true friend, and flying to the goal 5.444. tood first, by many a favoring shout acclaimed. 5.445. Next Helymus ran in; and, for the third, last prize 5.446. Diores. But the multitude now heard 5.447. the hollowed hill-side ringing with wild wrath 5.448. from Salius, clamoring where the chieftains sate 5.449. for restitution of his stolen prize 5.450. lost by a cheat. But general favor smiles 5.451. upon Euryalus, whose beauteous tears 5.452. commend him much, and nobler seems the worth 5.453. of valor clothed in youthful shape so fair. 5.454. Diores, too, assists the victor's claim 5.455. with loud appeal—he too has won a prize 5.456. and vainly holds his last place, if the first 5.457. to Salius fall. Aeneas then replied: 5.458. “Your gifts, my gallant youths, remain secure. 5.459. None can re-judge the prize. But to console 5.460. the misadventure of a blameless friend 5.461. is in my power.” Therewith to Salius 5.462. an Afric lion's monstrous pelt he gave 5.463. with ponderous mane, the claws o'erlaid with gold. 5.464. But Nisus cried: “If such a gift be found 5.465. for less than victory, and men who fall 5.466. are worthy so much sorrow, pray, what prize 5.467. hall Nisus have? For surely I had won 5.468. the proudest of the garlands, if one stroke 5.469. of inauspicious fortune had not fallen 5.470. on Salius and me.” So saying, he showed 5.471. his smeared face and his sorry limbs befouled 5.472. with mire and slime. Then laughed the gracious sire 5.473. and bade a shield be brought, the cunning work 5.474. of Didymaon, which the Greeks tore down 5.475. from Neptune's temple; with this noble gift 5.477. The foot-race over and the gifts disbursed 5.478. “Come forth!” he cries, “if any in his heart 5.479. have strength and valor, let him now pull on 5.480. the gauntlets and uplift his thong-bound arms 5.481. in challenge.” For the reward of this fight 5.482. a two-fold gift he showed: the victor's meed 5.483. a bullock decked and gilded; but a sword 5.484. and glittering helmet to console the fallen. 6.14. The templed hill where lofty Phoebus reigns 6.15. And that far-off, inviolable shrine 6.16. of dread Sibylla, in stupendous cave 6.17. O'er whose deep soul the god of Delos breathes 6.18. Prophetic gifts, unfolding things to come. 6.20. Here Daedalus, the ancient story tells 6.21. Escaping Minos' power, and having made 6.22. Hazard of heaven on far-mounting wings 6.23. Floated to northward, a cold, trackless way 6.24. And lightly poised, at last, o'er Cumae 's towers. 6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee 6.26. His gear of wings, Apollo! and ordained 6.27. Vast temples to thy name and altars fair. 6.28. On huge bronze doors Androgeos' death was done; 6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe 6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!— 6.31. The youths and maidens wait the annual doom 6.32. Drawn out by lot from yonder marble urn. 6.33. Beyond, above a sea, lay carven Crete :— 6.34. The bull was there; the passion, the strange guile; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son 6.36. The Minotaur—of monstrous loves the sign. 6.37. Here was the toilsome, labyrinthine maze 6.38. Where, pitying love-lorn Ariadne's tears 6.39. The crafty Daedalus himself betrayed 6.40. The secret of his work; and gave the clue 6.41. To guide the path of Theseus through the gloom. 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 7.54. and all Hesperia gathered to the fray. 8.184. The sire and builder of the Trojan town 8.185. was Dardanus; but he, Electra's child 8.186. came over sea to Teucria; the sire 8.187. of fair Electra was great Atlas, he 8.188. whose shoulder carries the vast orb of heaven. 8.189. But thy progenitor was Mercury 8.190. and him conceiving, Maia, that white maid 8.191. on hoar Cyllene's frosty summit bore. 8.192. But Maia's sire, if aught of truth be told 8.193. was Atlas also, Atlas who sustains 8.194. the weight of starry skies. Thus both our tribes 8.195. are one divided stem. Secure in this 8.196. no envoys have I sent, nor tried thy mind 8.197. with artful first approaches, but myself 8.198. risking my person and my life, have come 8.199. a suppliant here. For both on me and thee 8.200. the house of Daunus hurls insulting war. 8.201. If us they quell, they doubt not to obtain 8.202. lordship of all Hesperia, and subdue 8.203. alike the northern and the southern sea. 8.204. Accept good faith, and give! Behold, our hearts 8.205. quail not in battle; souls of fire are we 8.207. Aeneas ceased. The other long had scanned 8.208. the hero's face, his eyes, and wondering viewed 8.209. his form and mien divine; in answer now 8.210. he briefly spoke: “With hospitable heart 8.211. O bravest warrior of all Trojan-born 8.212. I know and welcome thee. I well recall 8.213. thy sire Anchises, how he looked and spake. 8.214. For I remember Priam, when he came 8.215. to greet his sister, Queen Hesione 8.216. in Salamis, and thence pursued his way 8.217. to our cool uplands of Arcadia . 8.218. The bloom of tender boyhood then was mine 8.219. and with a wide-eyed wonder I did view 8.220. those Teucrian lords, Laomedon's great heir 8.221. and, towering highest in their goodly throng 8.222. Anchises, whom my warm young heart desired 8.223. to speak with and to clasp his hand in mine. 8.224. So I approached, and joyful led him home 8.225. to Pheneus' olden wall. He gave me gifts 8.226. the day he bade adieu; a quiver rare 8.227. filled with good Lycian arrows, a rich cloak 8.228. inwove with thread of gold, and bridle reins 8.229. all golden, now to youthful Pallas given. 8.230. Therefore thy plea is granted, and my hand 8.231. here clasps in loyal amity with thine. 8.232. To-morrow at the sunrise thou shalt have 8.233. my tribute for the war, and go thy way 8.234. my glad ally. But now this festival 8.235. whose solemn rite 't were impious to delay 8.236. I pray thee celebrate, and bring with thee 8.237. well-omened looks and words. Allies we are! 8.239. So saying, he bade his followers renew 8.240. th' abandoned feast and wine; and placed each guest 8.241. on turf-built couch of green, most honoring 8.242. Aeneas by a throne of maple fair 8.243. decked with a lion's pelt and flowing mane. 8.244. Then high-born pages, with the altar's priest 8.245. bring on the roasted beeves and load the board 8.246. with baskets of fine bread; and wine they bring — 8.247. of Ceres and of Bacchus gift and toil. 8.248. While good Aeneas and his Trojans share 8.250. When hunger and its eager edge were gone 8.251. Evander spoke: “This votive holiday 8.252. yon tables spread and altar so divine 8.253. are not some superstition dark and vain 8.254. that knows not the old gods, O Trojan King! 8.255. But as men saved from danger and great fear 8.256. this thankful sacrifice we pay. Behold 8.257. yon huge rock, beetling from the mountain wall 8.258. hung from the cliff above. How lone and bare 8.259. the hollowed mountain looks! How crag on crag 8.260. tumbled and tossed in huge confusion lie! 8.261. A cavern once it was, which ran deep down 8.262. into the darkness. There th' half-human shape 8.263. of Cacus made its hideous den, concealed 8.264. from sunlight and the day. The ground was wet 8.265. at all times with fresh gore; the portal grim 8.266. was hung about with heads of slaughtered men 8.267. bloody and pale—a fearsome sight to see. 8.268. Vulcan begat this monster, which spewed forth 8.269. dark-fuming flames from his infernal throat 8.270. and vast his stature seemed. But time and tide 8.271. brought to our prayers the advent of a god 8.272. to help us at our need. For Hercules 8.273. divine avenger, came from laying low 8.274. three-bodied Geryon, whose spoils he wore 8.275. exultant, and with hands victorious drove 8.276. the herd of monster bulls, which pastured free 8.277. along our river-valley. Cacus gazed 8.278. in a brute frenzy, and left not untried 8.279. aught of bold crime or stratagem, but stole 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 10.495. who also for the roughness of the ground 10.496. were all unmounted: he (the last resource 10.497. of men in straits) to wild entreaty turned 10.498. and taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew: 10.499. “Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds 10.500. O, by our lord Evander's happy wars 10.501. the proud hopes I had to make my name 10.502. a rival glory,—think not ye can fly! 10.503. Your swords alone can carve ye the safe way 10.504. traight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng 10.505. is fiercest, thickest, there and only there 10.506. your Country's honor calls for men like you 10.825. thy stern command? If I could claim to-day 11.831. took flight and hurried far with loose-flung rein. 12.8. unto his last grim fight, and gloriously 12.82. from these new terms of duel, wept aloud 12.95. with slave's eyes on Aeneas as my son.” 12.189. But Juno, peering from that summit proud 12.190. which is to-day the Alban (though that time 12.191. nor name nor fame the hallowed mountain knew) 12.192. urveyed the plain below and fair array 12.193. of Trojan and Laurentine, by the walls 12.194. of King Latinus. Whereupon straightway 12.313. dejectedly drew near the place of prayer 12.314. worn, pale, and wasted in his youthful bloom. 12.716. Behold Murranus, boasting his high birth 12.717. from far-descended sires of storied name 12.718. the line of Latium 's kings! Aeneas now 12.719. with mountain-boulder lays him low in dust 12.720. mitten with whirlwind of the monster stone; 12.721. and o'er him fallen under yoke and rein 12.722. roll his own chariot wheels, while with swift tread 12.723. the mad hoofs of his horses stamp him down 12.724. not knowing him their lord. But Turnus found 12.731. against Aeneas, but his breast he gave 12.777. Bring flames; avenge the broken oath with fire!” 12.778. Scarce had he said, when with consenting souls 12.779. they speed them to the walls in dense array 12.786. Aeneas, calling on the gods to hear 12.791. dissension 'twixt the frighted citizens: 12.792. ome would give o'er the city and fling wide 12.793. its portals to the Trojan, or drag forth 12.794. the King himself to parley; others fly 12.795. to arms, and at the rampart make a stand. 12.796. 'T is thus some shepherd from a caverned crag 12.797. tirs up the nested bees with plenteous fume 12.798. of bitter smoke; they, posting to and fro 12.799. fly desperate round the waxen citadel 12.800. and whet their buzzing fury; through their halls 12.801. the stench and blackness rolls; within the caves 12.802. noise and confusion ring; the fatal cloud 12.804. But now a new adversity befell 12.805. the weary Latins, which with common woe 12.806. hook the whole city to its heart. The Queen 12.807. when at her hearth she saw the close assault 12.808. of enemies, the walls beset, and fire 12.809. preading from roof to roof, but no defence 12.810. from the Rutulian arms, nor front of war 12.811. with Turnus leading,—she, poor soul, believed 12.812. her youthful champion in the conflict slain; 12.813. and, mad with sudden sorrow, shrieked aloud 12.814. against herself, the guilty chief and cause 12.815. of all this ill; and, babbling her wild woe 12.816. in endless words, she rent her purple pall 12.817. and with her own hand from the rafter swung 12.818. a noose for her foul death. The tidings dire 12.819. among the moaning wives of Latium spread 12.820. and young Lavinia's frantic fingers tore 12.821. her rose-red cheek and hyacinthine hair. 12.822. Then all her company of women shrieked 12.823. in anguish, and the wailing echoed far 12.824. along the royal seat; from whence the tale 12.825. of sorrow through the peopled city flew; 12.826. hearts sank; Latinus rent his robes, appalled 12.827. to see his consort's doom, his falling throne; 12.829. Meanwhile the warrior Turnus far afield 12.830. pursued a scattered few; but less his speed 12.831. for less and less his worn steeds worked his will; 12.832. and now wind-wafted to his straining ear 12.833. a nameless horror came, a dull, wild roar 12.834. the city's tumult and distressful cry. 12.835. “Alack,” he cried, “what stirs in yonder walls 12.836. uch anguish? Or why rings from side to side 12.837. uch wailing through the city?” Asking so 12.838. he tightened frantic grasp upon the rein. 12.839. To him his sister, counterfeiting still 12.840. the charioteer Metiscus, while she swayed 12.841. rein, steeds, and chariot, this answer made: 12.842. “Hither, my Turnus, let our arms pursue 12.843. the sons of Troy . Here lies the nearest way 12.844. to speedy triumph. There be other swords 12.845. to keep yon city safe. Aeneas now 12.846. torms against Italy in active war; 12.847. we also on this Trojan host may hurl 12.848. grim havoc. Nor shalt thou the strife give o'er 12.849. in glory second, nor in tale of slain.” 12.850. Turnus replied, “O sister, Iong ago 12.851. I knew thee what thou wert, when guilefully 12.852. thou didst confound their treaty, and enlist 12.853. thy whole heart in this war. No Ionger now 12.854. thy craft divine deceives me. But what god 12.855. compelled thee, from Olympus fallen so far 12.856. to bear these cruel burdens? Wouldst thou see 12.857. thy wretched brother slaughtered? For what else 12.858. is in my power? What flattering hazard still 12.859. holds forth deliverance? My own eyes have seen 12.860. Murranus (more than any now on earth 12.861. my chosen friend) who, calling on my name 12.862. died like a hero by a hero's sword. 12.863. Ill-fated Ufens fell, enduring not 12.864. to Iook upon my shame; the Teucrians 12.865. divide his arms for spoil and keep his bones. 12.866. Shall I stand tamely, till my hearth and home 12.867. are levelled with the ground? For this would be 12.868. the only blow not fallen. Shall my sword 12.869. not give the lie to Drances' insolence? 12.870. Shall I take flight and let my country see 12.871. her Turnus renegade? Is death a thing 12.872. o much to weep for? O propitious dead 12.873. O spirits of the dark, receive and bless 12.874. me whom yon gods of light have cast away! 12.875. Sacred and guiltless shall my soul descend 12.876. to join your company; I have not been 12.878. Scarce had he said, when through the foeman's line 12.879. Saces dashed forth upon a foaming steed 12.880. his face gashed by an arrow. He cried loud 12.881. on Turnus' name: “O Turnus, but in thee 12.882. our last hope lies. Have pity on the woe 12.883. of all thy friends and kin! Aeneas hurls 12.884. his thunderbolt of war, and menaces 12.885. to crush the strongholds of all Italy 12.886. and lay them low; already where we dwell 12.894. Messapus only and Atinas bear 12.895. the brunt of battle; round us closely draw 12.898. peed in thy chariot o'er this empty plain?” 12.906. he strained his flaming eyeballs to behold 12.908. in wonder at the lordly citadel. 12.909. For, lo, a pointed peak of flame uprolled 12.910. from tier to tier, and surging skyward seized 12.911. a tower—the very tower his own proud hands 12.912. had built of firm-set beams and wheeled in place 12.913. and slung its Iofty bridges high in air. 12.914. “Fate is too strong, my sister! Seek no more 12.919. O sister, thou shalt look upon my shame 12.920. no longer. But first grant a madman's will!” 12.921. He spoke; and leaping from his chariot, sped 12.922. through foes and foemen's spears, not seeing now 12.923. his sister's sorrow, as in swift career 12.924. he burst from line to line. Thus headlong falls 12.925. a mountain-boulder by a whirlwind flung 12.926. from lofty peak, or loosened by much rain 12.927. or by insidious lapse of seasons gone; 12.928. the huge, resistless crag goes plunging down 12.929. by leaps and bounds, o'erwhelming as it flies 12.930. tall forests, Bocks and herds, and mortal men: 12.931. o through the scattered legions Turnus ran 12.932. traight to the city walls, where all the ground 12.933. was drenched with blood, and every passing air 12.934. hrieked with the noise of spears. His lifted hand 12.935. made sign of silence as he loudly called: 12.936. “Refrain, Rutulians! O ye Latins all 12.937. your spears withhold! The issue of the fray 12.938. is all my own. I only can repair 12.939. our broken truce by judgment of the sword.” 12.941. But Sire Aeneas, hearing Turnus' name 12.942. down the steep rampart from the citadel 12.944. with joy exultant and dread-thundering arms. 12.945. Like Athos ' crest he loomed, or soaring top 12.946. of Eryx, when the nodding oaks resound 12.947. or sovereign Apennine that lifts in air 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy, Rutulia, and Italy 12.950. were fixed his way; and all who kept a guard 12.951. on lofty rampart, or in siege below 12.952. were battering the foundations, now laid by
5. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 7.81-7.86, 7.92-7.95 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
achilles, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
achilles Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
actium, battle of ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeetes Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
aeneas, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
aeneas, experience Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, intertextual identities, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113, 114
aeneid, virgils Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
ajax Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
anger, epicurean view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
anger, stoic view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
anger Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 132, 133
anger of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
apsyrtus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
argo Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
aristotle, definition of anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226
athena Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 169
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
augustus Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 281; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 26
aurelius, marcus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
body Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
bovillae, perenna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
cacus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
caesar, julius\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
camilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
clemency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
clupeus virtutis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
concord Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 213
conflation (of episodes or characters) Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 213
copying, of behaviors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
daedalus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
danaids Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
destruction of\n, troy Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 277
divination/oracles Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 181
dymas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
ecphrasis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
egypt, egyptians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 132
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113, 169
epic poetry, roman Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
epictetus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
epicurean philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
ethical qualities, consistency Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
etymology Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 213
expectations, readers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
failed Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 132
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 181
fear Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
frustration Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226
funeral Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
gill, christopher Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
golden age Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 277, 281
hatred Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 132
hector, achilles anger at Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
hector Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
hellenistic philosophy, ideas about anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
homer, iliad Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
homer, odyssey Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
horizon of expectations Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
hunter, r.l. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
indeterminacy, hypermnestra Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
indeterminacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
intertextuality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 169
italy/italian Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
jason Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
juno, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
juno, temple at carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
lausus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
lavinia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
looking through, aeneid through odyssey to iliad Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 213
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
marriage, weddings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
medea, euripides Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
medea Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
menoetius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
mise en abyme Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
mori, a. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
myth Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
nausicaa Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
north africa Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25
nostalgia Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 281
objective attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
oileus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
pallas, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
pallas, son of evander, baldric Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
pallas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
pathos Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
patroclus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
peleus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
pelias Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
peripatetic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
persuasion Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 132
philadelphus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 26
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
pity, of aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
political readings, of the argonautica Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25, 26
post-mortem reward or punishment Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 277
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 169
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
priam, embassy to achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
progress, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 281
ptolemies, ptolemaic kingdom Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25, 26
rage Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
rationality, reactive attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
rationality Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226
reading, active Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
retaliation, and aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226
revenge, and aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
rhetoric, practices and training Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
rhetoric/rhetorical Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
sibyl Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
sight Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
speeches Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113, 114
stoic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
suffering Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 281
suitors Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
telamon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
temple, of apollo at cumae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113, 114, 169
thetis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
thomas, richard Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 25, 26
transcripts, hidden and public Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
troy/trojans, victims of junos anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
turnus, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227; Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 213
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
umbra Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
underworld Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
venus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113, 114
virgil, and hellenistic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 226, 227
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 65
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 169
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
voice' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 169
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
ēthos Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 133