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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 10.890-10.894


multa movens animo iam tandem erumpit et interAeneas to the battle vainly called


bellatoris equi cava tempora conicit hastam.the vanished foe, and round his hard-fought path


Tollit se arrectum quadrupes et calcibus aurastretched many a hero dead. No longer now


verberat effusumque equitem super ipse secutusthe mocking shadow sought to hide, but soared


implicat eiectoque incumbit cernuus armo.visibly upward and was Iost in cloud


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 21.122-21.204 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

21.122. /Him then Achilles seized by the foot and flung into the river to go his way, and vaunting over him he spake winged words:Lie there now among the fishes that shall lick the blood from thy wound, nor reck aught of thee, neither shall thy mother lay thee on a bier and make lament; 21.123. /Him then Achilles seized by the foot and flung into the river to go his way, and vaunting over him he spake winged words:Lie there now among the fishes that shall lick the blood from thy wound, nor reck aught of thee, neither shall thy mother lay thee on a bier and make lament; 21.124. /Him then Achilles seized by the foot and flung into the river to go his way, and vaunting over him he spake winged words:Lie there now among the fishes that shall lick the blood from thy wound, nor reck aught of thee, neither shall thy mother lay thee on a bier and make lament; 21.125. /nay, eddying Scamander shall bear thee into the broad gulf of the sea. Many a fish as he leapeth amid the waves, shall dart up beneath the black ripple to eat the white fat of Lycaon. So perish ye, till we be come to the city of sacred Ilios, ye in flight, and I making havoc in your rear. 21.126. /nay, eddying Scamander shall bear thee into the broad gulf of the sea. Many a fish as he leapeth amid the waves, shall dart up beneath the black ripple to eat the white fat of Lycaon. So perish ye, till we be come to the city of sacred Ilios, ye in flight, and I making havoc in your rear. 21.127. /nay, eddying Scamander shall bear thee into the broad gulf of the sea. Many a fish as he leapeth amid the waves, shall dart up beneath the black ripple to eat the white fat of Lycaon. So perish ye, till we be come to the city of sacred Ilios, ye in flight, and I making havoc in your rear. 21.128. /nay, eddying Scamander shall bear thee into the broad gulf of the sea. Many a fish as he leapeth amid the waves, shall dart up beneath the black ripple to eat the white fat of Lycaon. So perish ye, till we be come to the city of sacred Ilios, ye in flight, and I making havoc in your rear. 21.129. /nay, eddying Scamander shall bear thee into the broad gulf of the sea. Many a fish as he leapeth amid the waves, shall dart up beneath the black ripple to eat the white fat of Lycaon. So perish ye, till we be come to the city of sacred Ilios, ye in flight, and I making havoc in your rear. 21.130. /Not even the fair-flowing river with his silver eddies shall aught avail you, albeit to him, I ween, ye have long time been wont to sacrifice bulls full many, and to cast single-hooved horses while yet they lived. into his eddies. Howbeit even so shall ye perish by an evil fate till ye have all paid the price for the slaying of Patroclus and for the woe of the Achaeans 21.131. /Not even the fair-flowing river with his silver eddies shall aught avail you, albeit to him, I ween, ye have long time been wont to sacrifice bulls full many, and to cast single-hooved horses while yet they lived. into his eddies. Howbeit even so shall ye perish by an evil fate till ye have all paid the price for the slaying of Patroclus and for the woe of the Achaeans 21.132. /Not even the fair-flowing river with his silver eddies shall aught avail you, albeit to him, I ween, ye have long time been wont to sacrifice bulls full many, and to cast single-hooved horses while yet they lived. into his eddies. Howbeit even so shall ye perish by an evil fate till ye have all paid the price for the slaying of Patroclus and for the woe of the Achaeans 21.133. /Not even the fair-flowing river with his silver eddies shall aught avail you, albeit to him, I ween, ye have long time been wont to sacrifice bulls full many, and to cast single-hooved horses while yet they lived. into his eddies. Howbeit even so shall ye perish by an evil fate till ye have all paid the price for the slaying of Patroclus and for the woe of the Achaeans 21.134. /Not even the fair-flowing river with his silver eddies shall aught avail you, albeit to him, I ween, ye have long time been wont to sacrifice bulls full many, and to cast single-hooved horses while yet they lived. into his eddies. Howbeit even so shall ye perish by an evil fate till ye have all paid the price for the slaying of Patroclus and for the woe of the Achaeans 21.135. /whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. 21.136. /whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. 21.137. /whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. 21.138. /whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. 21.139. /whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. So spake he, and the river waxed the more wroth at heart, and pondered in mind how he should stay goodly Achilles from his labour and ward off ruin from the Trojans. Meanwhile the son of Peleus bearing his far-shadowing spear leapt, eager to slay him 21.140. /upon Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, that was begotten of wide-flowing Axius and Periboea, eldest of the daughters of Acessamenus; for with her lay the deep-eddying River. Upon him rushed Achilles, and Asteropaeus 21.141. /upon Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, that was begotten of wide-flowing Axius and Periboea, eldest of the daughters of Acessamenus; for with her lay the deep-eddying River. Upon him rushed Achilles, and Asteropaeus 21.142. /upon Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, that was begotten of wide-flowing Axius and Periboea, eldest of the daughters of Acessamenus; for with her lay the deep-eddying River. Upon him rushed Achilles, and Asteropaeus 21.143. /upon Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, that was begotten of wide-flowing Axius and Periboea, eldest of the daughters of Acessamenus; for with her lay the deep-eddying River. Upon him rushed Achilles, and Asteropaeus 21.144. /upon Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, that was begotten of wide-flowing Axius and Periboea, eldest of the daughters of Acessamenus; for with her lay the deep-eddying River. Upon him rushed Achilles, and Asteropaeus 21.145. /stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.146. /stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.147. /stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.148. /stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.149. /stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.150. / Who among men art thou, and from whence, that thou darest come forth against me? Unhappy are they whose children face my might. Then spake unto him the glorious son of Pelegon:Great-souled son of Peleus, wherefore enquirest thou of my lineage? I come from deep-soiled Paeonia, a land afar 21.151. / Who among men art thou, and from whence, that thou darest come forth against me? Unhappy are they whose children face my might. Then spake unto him the glorious son of Pelegon:Great-souled son of Peleus, wherefore enquirest thou of my lineage? I come from deep-soiled Paeonia, a land afar 21.152. / Who among men art thou, and from whence, that thou darest come forth against me? Unhappy are they whose children face my might. Then spake unto him the glorious son of Pelegon:Great-souled son of Peleus, wherefore enquirest thou of my lineage? I come from deep-soiled Paeonia, a land afar 21.153. / Who among men art thou, and from whence, that thou darest come forth against me? Unhappy are they whose children face my might. Then spake unto him the glorious son of Pelegon:Great-souled son of Peleus, wherefore enquirest thou of my lineage? I come from deep-soiled Paeonia, a land afar 21.154. / Who among men art thou, and from whence, that thou darest come forth against me? Unhappy are they whose children face my might. Then spake unto him the glorious son of Pelegon:Great-souled son of Peleus, wherefore enquirest thou of my lineage? I come from deep-soiled Paeonia, a land afar 21.155. /leading the Paeonians with their long spears, and this is now my eleventh morn, since I came to Ilios. But my lineage is from wide-flowing Axius—Axius, the water whereof flows the fairest over the face of the earth—who begat Pelegon famed for his spear, and he, men say 21.156. /leading the Paeonians with their long spears, and this is now my eleventh morn, since I came to Ilios. But my lineage is from wide-flowing Axius—Axius, the water whereof flows the fairest over the face of the earth—who begat Pelegon famed for his spear, and he, men say 21.157. /leading the Paeonians with their long spears, and this is now my eleventh morn, since I came to Ilios. But my lineage is from wide-flowing Axius—Axius, the water whereof flows the fairest over the face of the earth—who begat Pelegon famed for his spear, and he, men say 21.158. /leading the Paeonians with their long spears, and this is now my eleventh morn, since I came to Ilios. But my lineage is from wide-flowing Axius—Axius, the water whereof flows the fairest over the face of the earth—who begat Pelegon famed for his spear, and he, men say 21.159. /leading the Paeonians with their long spears, and this is now my eleventh morn, since I came to Ilios. But my lineage is from wide-flowing Axius—Axius, the water whereof flows the fairest over the face of the earth—who begat Pelegon famed for his spear, and he, men say 21.160. /was my father. Now let us do battle, glorious Achilles. 21.161. /was my father. Now let us do battle, glorious Achilles. 21.162. /was my father. Now let us do battle, glorious Achilles. 21.163. /was my father. Now let us do battle, glorious Achilles. 21.164. /was my father. Now let us do battle, glorious Achilles. So spake he threatening, but goodly Achilles raised on high the spear of Pelian ash; howbeit the warrior Asteropaeus hurled with both spears at once, for he was one that could use both hands alike. With the one spear he smote the shield 21.165. /but it brake not through, for the gold stayed it, the gift of the god and with the other he smote the right forearm of Achilles a grazing blow, and the black blood gushed forth; but the spear-point passed above him and fixed itself in the earth, fain to glut itself with flesh. Then Achilles in his turn hurled 21.166. /but it brake not through, for the gold stayed it, the gift of the god and with the other he smote the right forearm of Achilles a grazing blow, and the black blood gushed forth; but the spear-point passed above him and fixed itself in the earth, fain to glut itself with flesh. Then Achilles in his turn hurled 21.167. /but it brake not through, for the gold stayed it, the gift of the god and with the other he smote the right forearm of Achilles a grazing blow, and the black blood gushed forth; but the spear-point passed above him and fixed itself in the earth, fain to glut itself with flesh. Then Achilles in his turn hurled 21.168. /but it brake not through, for the gold stayed it, the gift of the god and with the other he smote the right forearm of Achilles a grazing blow, and the black blood gushed forth; but the spear-point passed above him and fixed itself in the earth, fain to glut itself with flesh. Then Achilles in his turn hurled 21.169. /but it brake not through, for the gold stayed it, the gift of the god and with the other he smote the right forearm of Achilles a grazing blow, and the black blood gushed forth; but the spear-point passed above him and fixed itself in the earth, fain to glut itself with flesh. Then Achilles in his turn hurled 21.170. /at Asteropaeus his straight-flying spear of ash, eager to slay him but missed the man and struck the high bank and up to half its length he fixed in the bank the spear of ash. But the son of Peleus, drawing his sharp sword from beside his thigh, leapt upon him furiously 21.171. /at Asteropaeus his straight-flying spear of ash, eager to slay him but missed the man and struck the high bank and up to half its length he fixed in the bank the spear of ash. But the son of Peleus, drawing his sharp sword from beside his thigh, leapt upon him furiously 21.172. /at Asteropaeus his straight-flying spear of ash, eager to slay him but missed the man and struck the high bank and up to half its length he fixed in the bank the spear of ash. But the son of Peleus, drawing his sharp sword from beside his thigh, leapt upon him furiously 21.173. /at Asteropaeus his straight-flying spear of ash, eager to slay him but missed the man and struck the high bank and up to half its length he fixed in the bank the spear of ash. But the son of Peleus, drawing his sharp sword from beside his thigh, leapt upon him furiously 21.174. /at Asteropaeus his straight-flying spear of ash, eager to slay him but missed the man and struck the high bank and up to half its length he fixed in the bank the spear of ash. But the son of Peleus, drawing his sharp sword from beside his thigh, leapt upon him furiously 21.175. /and the other availed not to draw in his stout hand the ashen spear of Achilles forth from out the bank. Thrice he made it quiver in his eagerness to draw it, and thrice he gave up his effort; but the fourth time his heart was fain to bend and break the ashen spear of the son of Aeacus; howbeit ere that might be Achilles drew nigh and robbed him of life with his sword. 21.176. /and the other availed not to draw in his stout hand the ashen spear of Achilles forth from out the bank. Thrice he made it quiver in his eagerness to draw it, and thrice he gave up his effort; but the fourth time his heart was fain to bend and break the ashen spear of the son of Aeacus; howbeit ere that might be Achilles drew nigh and robbed him of life with his sword. 21.177. /and the other availed not to draw in his stout hand the ashen spear of Achilles forth from out the bank. Thrice he made it quiver in his eagerness to draw it, and thrice he gave up his effort; but the fourth time his heart was fain to bend and break the ashen spear of the son of Aeacus; howbeit ere that might be Achilles drew nigh and robbed him of life with his sword. 21.178. /and the other availed not to draw in his stout hand the ashen spear of Achilles forth from out the bank. Thrice he made it quiver in his eagerness to draw it, and thrice he gave up his effort; but the fourth time his heart was fain to bend and break the ashen spear of the son of Aeacus; howbeit ere that might be Achilles drew nigh and robbed him of life with his sword. 21.179. /and the other availed not to draw in his stout hand the ashen spear of Achilles forth from out the bank. Thrice he made it quiver in his eagerness to draw it, and thrice he gave up his effort; but the fourth time his heart was fain to bend and break the ashen spear of the son of Aeacus; howbeit ere that might be Achilles drew nigh and robbed him of life with his sword. 21.180. /In the belly he smote him beside the navel, and forth upon the ground gushed all his bowels, and darkness enfolded his eyes as he lay gasping. And Achilles leapt upon his breast and despoiled him of his arms, and exulted saying:Lie as thou art! Hard is it 21.181. /In the belly he smote him beside the navel, and forth upon the ground gushed all his bowels, and darkness enfolded his eyes as he lay gasping. And Achilles leapt upon his breast and despoiled him of his arms, and exulted saying:Lie as thou art! Hard is it 21.182. /In the belly he smote him beside the navel, and forth upon the ground gushed all his bowels, and darkness enfolded his eyes as he lay gasping. And Achilles leapt upon his breast and despoiled him of his arms, and exulted saying:Lie as thou art! Hard is it 21.183. /In the belly he smote him beside the navel, and forth upon the ground gushed all his bowels, and darkness enfolded his eyes as he lay gasping. And Achilles leapt upon his breast and despoiled him of his arms, and exulted saying:Lie as thou art! Hard is it 21.184. /In the belly he smote him beside the navel, and forth upon the ground gushed all his bowels, and darkness enfolded his eyes as he lay gasping. And Achilles leapt upon his breast and despoiled him of his arms, and exulted saying:Lie as thou art! Hard is it 21.185. /to strive with the children of the mighty son of Cronos, albeit for one begotten of a River. Thou verily declarest that thy birth is from the wide-flowing River, whereas I avow me to be of the lineage of great Zeus. The father that begat me is one that is lord among the many Myrmidons, even Peleus, son of Aeacus; and Aeacus was begotten of Zeus. 21.186. /to strive with the children of the mighty son of Cronos, albeit for one begotten of a River. Thou verily declarest that thy birth is from the wide-flowing River, whereas I avow me to be of the lineage of great Zeus. The father that begat me is one that is lord among the many Myrmidons, even Peleus, son of Aeacus; and Aeacus was begotten of Zeus. 21.187. /to strive with the children of the mighty son of Cronos, albeit for one begotten of a River. Thou verily declarest that thy birth is from the wide-flowing River, whereas I avow me to be of the lineage of great Zeus. The father that begat me is one that is lord among the many Myrmidons, even Peleus, son of Aeacus; and Aeacus was begotten of Zeus. 21.188. /to strive with the children of the mighty son of Cronos, albeit for one begotten of a River. Thou verily declarest that thy birth is from the wide-flowing River, whereas I avow me to be of the lineage of great Zeus. The father that begat me is one that is lord among the many Myrmidons, even Peleus, son of Aeacus; and Aeacus was begotten of Zeus. 21.189. /to strive with the children of the mighty son of Cronos, albeit for one begotten of a River. Thou verily declarest that thy birth is from the wide-flowing River, whereas I avow me to be of the lineage of great Zeus. The father that begat me is one that is lord among the many Myrmidons, even Peleus, son of Aeacus; and Aeacus was begotten of Zeus. 21.190. /Wherefore as Zeus is mightier than rivers that murmur seaward, so mightier too is the seed of Zeus than the seed of a river. For lo, hard beside thee is a great River, if so be he can avail thee aught; but it may not be that one should fight with Zeus the son of Cronos. With him doth not even king Achelous vie 21.191. /Wherefore as Zeus is mightier than rivers that murmur seaward, so mightier too is the seed of Zeus than the seed of a river. For lo, hard beside thee is a great River, if so be he can avail thee aught; but it may not be that one should fight with Zeus the son of Cronos. With him doth not even king Achelous vie 21.192. /Wherefore as Zeus is mightier than rivers that murmur seaward, so mightier too is the seed of Zeus than the seed of a river. For lo, hard beside thee is a great River, if so be he can avail thee aught; but it may not be that one should fight with Zeus the son of Cronos. With him doth not even king Achelous vie 21.193. /Wherefore as Zeus is mightier than rivers that murmur seaward, so mightier too is the seed of Zeus than the seed of a river. For lo, hard beside thee is a great River, if so be he can avail thee aught; but it may not be that one should fight with Zeus the son of Cronos. With him doth not even king Achelous vie 21.194. /Wherefore as Zeus is mightier than rivers that murmur seaward, so mightier too is the seed of Zeus than the seed of a river. For lo, hard beside thee is a great River, if so be he can avail thee aught; but it may not be that one should fight with Zeus the son of Cronos. With him doth not even king Achelous vie 21.195. /nor the great might of deep-flowing Ocean, from whom all rivers flow and every sea, and all the springs and deep wells; howbeit even he hath fear of the lightning of great Zeus, and his dread thunder, whenso it crasheth from heaven. 21.196. /nor the great might of deep-flowing Ocean, from whom all rivers flow and every sea, and all the springs and deep wells; howbeit even he hath fear of the lightning of great Zeus, and his dread thunder, whenso it crasheth from heaven. 21.197. /nor the great might of deep-flowing Ocean, from whom all rivers flow and every sea, and all the springs and deep wells; howbeit even he hath fear of the lightning of great Zeus, and his dread thunder, whenso it crasheth from heaven. 21.198. /nor the great might of deep-flowing Ocean, from whom all rivers flow and every sea, and all the springs and deep wells; howbeit even he hath fear of the lightning of great Zeus, and his dread thunder, whenso it crasheth from heaven. 21.199. /nor the great might of deep-flowing Ocean, from whom all rivers flow and every sea, and all the springs and deep wells; howbeit even he hath fear of the lightning of great Zeus, and his dread thunder, whenso it crasheth from heaven. 21.200. /He spake, and drew forth from the bank his spear of bronze, and left Asteropaeus where he was, when he had robbed him of his life, lying in the sands; and the dark water wetted him. With him then the eels and fishes dealt, plucking and tearing the fat about his kidneys; 21.201. /He spake, and drew forth from the bank his spear of bronze, and left Asteropaeus where he was, when he had robbed him of his life, lying in the sands; and the dark water wetted him. With him then the eels and fishes dealt, plucking and tearing the fat about his kidneys; 21.202. /He spake, and drew forth from the bank his spear of bronze, and left Asteropaeus where he was, when he had robbed him of his life, lying in the sands; and the dark water wetted him. With him then the eels and fishes dealt, plucking and tearing the fat about his kidneys; 21.203. /He spake, and drew forth from the bank his spear of bronze, and left Asteropaeus where he was, when he had robbed him of his life, lying in the sands; and the dark water wetted him. With him then the eels and fishes dealt, plucking and tearing the fat about his kidneys; 21.204. /He spake, and drew forth from the bank his spear of bronze, and left Asteropaeus where he was, when he had robbed him of his life, lying in the sands; and the dark water wetted him. With him then the eels and fishes dealt, plucking and tearing the fat about his kidneys;
2. Vergil, Aeneis, 10.554-10.560, 10.843-10.859, 10.870-10.871, 10.891-10.894, 11.741-11.744 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.554. ees, glad at heart, his own victorious fires: 10.555. o now fierce valor spreads, uniting all 10.556. in one confederate rage, 'neath Pallas' eyes. 10.557. But the fierce warrior Halaesus next 10.558. led on the charge, behind his skilful shield 10.559. close-crouching. Ladon and Demodocus 10.560. and Pheres he struck down; his glittering blade 10.843. ome larger grace, and fain would touch or change 10.844. the issue of the war, then art thou fed 10.845. on expectation vain.” With weeping eyes 10.846. Juno made answer: “Can it be thy mind 10.847. gives what thy words refuse, and Turnus' life 10.848. if rescued, may endure? Yet afterward 10.849. ome cruel close his guiltless day shall see— 10.850. or far from truth I stray! O, that I were 10.851. the dupe of empty fears! and O, that thou 10.852. wouldst but refashion to some happier end 10.854. She ceased; and swiftly from the peak of heaven 10.855. moved earthward, trailing cloud-wrack through the air 10.856. and girdled with the storm. She took her way 10.857. to where Troy 's warriors faced Laurentum's line. 10.858. There of a hollow cloud the goddess framed 10.859. a shape of airy, unsubstantial shade 10.870. and hurled a hissing spear with distant aim; 10.871. the thing wheeled round and fled. The foe forthwith 10.891. the vanished foe, and round his hard-fought path 10.892. tretched many a hero dead. No longer now 10.893. the mocking shadow sought to hide, but soared 10.894. visibly upward and was Iost in cloud 11.741. ‘Latona's daughter, whose benigt grace 11.742. protects this grove, behold, her father now 11.743. gives thee this babe for handmaid! Lo, thy spear 11.744. her infant fingers hold, as from her foes
3. Lucan, Pharsalia, 4.749 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 6.256-6.259 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
aeneas, boasting of Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
aeneas, mezentius' corpse treatment" Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
aeneas Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
animal, empathy Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
animal, sympathy Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
anthropomorphism Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
aristeia Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 109
asteropaeus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
bird Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 109
boasting' Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
castor Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109
cyzicus Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
horse Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109
intertext(uality) Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 109
lucan Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
lycaon Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
mezentius, and hector Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
mezentius Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
nisus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
oncheus Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109
ovid Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107
rhaebus Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109
simile Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 109
tarquitus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 51
trans-species, relationship Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109
virgil, aeneid Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 107, 109