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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 10.670


Quo feror? Unde abii? Quae me fuga quemve reducit?of youthful company by treason slain


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3 results
1. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.314-1.417, 2.270-2.297, 2.337, 2.559-2.587, 2.725, 2.771-2.795, 3.78, 4.110, 4.219-4.278, 4.376, 4.465-4.473, 4.557-4.572, 5.628, 5.841-5.861, 7.415-7.466, 7.594, 7.641-7.817, 8.18-8.21, 8.32-8.34, 8.608-8.625, 9.644-9.658, 10.82, 10.442, 10.606-10.669, 10.671-10.688, 10.691-10.692, 10.707-10.718, 10.720-10.730, 10.743, 10.758-10.759, 10.767 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.314. Hast thou not given us thy covet 1.315. that hence the Romans when the rolling years 1.316. have come full cycle, shall arise to power 1.317. from Troy 's regenerate seed, and rule supreme 1.318. the unresisted lords of land and sea? 1.319. O Sire, what swerves thy will? How oft have I 1.320. in Troy 's most lamentable wreck and woe 1.321. consoled my heart with this, and balanced oft 1.322. our destined good against our destined ill! 1.323. But the same stormful fortune still pursues 1.324. my band of heroes on their perilous way. 1.325. When shall these labors cease, O glorious King? 1.326. Antenor, though th' Achaeans pressed him sore 1.327. found his way forth, and entered unassailed 1.328. Illyria 's haven, and the guarded land 1.329. of the Liburni. Straight up stream he sailed 1.330. where like a swollen sea Timavus pours 1.331. a nine-fold flood from roaring mountain gorge 1.332. and whelms with voiceful wave the fields below. 1.333. He built Patavium there, and fixed abodes 1.334. for Troy 's far-exiled sons; he gave a name 1.335. to a new land and race; the Trojan arms 1.336. were hung on temple walls; and, to this day 1.337. lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. 1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 1.339. a station in the arch of heaven assign 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.341. a single god is angry; we endure 1.342. this treachery and violence, whereby 1.343. wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. 1.344. Is this what piety receives? Or thus 1.346. Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men 1.347. with such a look as clears the skies of storm 1.348. chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: 1.349. “Let Cytherea cast her fears away! 1.350. Irrevocably blest the fortunes be 1.351. of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see 1.352. that City, and the proud predestined wall 1.353. encompassing Lavinium . Thyself 1.354. hall starward to the heights of heaven bear 1.355. Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves 1.356. my will once uttered. Since such carking cares 1.357. consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth 1.358. and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. 1.359. Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war 1.360. and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall 1.361. and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond 1.362. about his gathered people. Summers three 1.363. hall Latium call him king; and three times pass 1.364. the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. 1.365. His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called 1.366. (Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood) 1.367. full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne 1.368. from the Lavinian citadel, and build 1.370. Here three full centuries shall Hector's race 1.371. have kingly power; till a priestess queen 1.372. by Mars conceiving, her twin offspring bear; 1.373. then Romulus, wolf-nursed and proudly clad 1.374. in tawny wolf-skin mantle, shall receive 1.375. the sceptre of his race. He shall uprear 1.376. and on his Romans his own name bestow. 1.377. To these I give no bounded times or power 1.378. but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen 1.379. Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea 1.380. with her dread frown, will find a wiser way 1.381. and at my sovereign side protect and bless 1.382. the Romans, masters of the whole round world 1.383. who, clad in peaceful toga, judge mankind. 1.384. Such my decree! In lapse of seasons due 1.385. the heirs of Ilium 's kings shall bind in chains 1.386. Mycenae 's glory and Achilles' towers 1.387. and over prostrate Argos sit supreme. 1.388. of Trojan stock illustriously sprung 1.389. lo, Caesar comes! whose power the ocean bounds 1.390. whose fame, the skies. He shall receive the name 1.391. Iulus nobly bore, great Julius, he. 1.392. Him to the skies, in Orient trophies dress 1.393. thou shalt with smiles receive; and he, like us 1.394. hall hear at his own shrines the suppliant vow. 1.395. Then will the world grow mild; the battle-sound 1.396. will be forgot; for olden Honor then 1.397. with spotless Vesta, and the brothers twain 1.398. Remus and Romulus, at strife no more 1.399. will publish sacred laws. The dreadful gates 1.400. whence issueth war, shall with close-jointed steel 1.401. be barred impregnably; and prisoned there 1.402. the heaven-offending Fury, throned on swords 1.403. and fettered by a hundred brazen chains 1.405. These words he gave, and summoned Maia's son 1.406. the herald Mercury, who earthward flying 1.407. hould bid the Tyrian realms and new-built towers 1.408. welcome the Trojan waifs; lest Dido, blind 1.409. to Fate's decree, should thrust them from the land. 1.410. He takes his flight, with rhythmic stroke of wing 1.411. across th' abyss of air, and soon draws near 1.412. unto the Libyan mainland. He fulfils 1.413. his heavenly task; the Punic hearts of stone 1.414. grow soft beneath the effluence divine; 1.415. and, most of all, the Queen, with heart at ease 1.417. But good Aeneas, pondering all night long 2.272. our doubt dispelled. His stratagems and tears 2.273. wrought victory where neither Tydeus' son 2.274. nor mountain-bred Achilles could prevail 2.275. nor ten years' war, nor fleets a thousand strong. 2.276. But now a vaster spectacle of fear 2.277. burst over us, to vex our startled souls. 2.279. priest unto Neptune, was in act to slay 2.281. Lo! o'er the tranquil deep from Tenedos 2.289. their monstrous backs wound forward fold on fold. 2.290. Soon they made land; the furious bright eyes 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.293. All terror-pale we fled. Unswerving then 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.296. each dragon coiled, and on the shrinking flesh 2.337. and in the consecrated citadel 2.559. upon his orient steeds—while forests roar 2.567. o'erwhelms us utterly. Coroebus first 2.568. at mailed Minerva's altar prostrate lay 2.569. pierced by Peneleus, blade; then Rhipeus fell; 2.570. we deemed him of all Trojans the most just 2.571. most scrupulously righteous; but the gods 2.572. gave judgment otherwise. There Dymas died 2.573. and Hypanis, by their compatriots slain; 2.574. nor thee, O Panthus, in that mortal hour 2.575. could thy clean hands or Phoebus, priesthood save. 2.576. O ashes of my country! funeral pyre 2.577. of all my kin! bear witness that my breast 2.578. hrank not from any sword the Grecian drew 2.579. and that my deeds the night my country died 2.580. deserved a warrior's death, had Fate ordained. 2.581. But soon our ranks were broken; at my side 2.582. tayed Iphitus and Pelias; one with age 2.583. was Iong since wearied, and the other bore 2.584. the burden of Ulysses' crippling wound. 2.585. Straightway the roar and tumult summoned us 2.586. to Priam's palace, where a battle raged 2.587. as if save this no conflict else were known 2.725. when Priam was his foe. With flush of shame 2.771. being of Greece and Troy, full well she knew 2.774. my dying country, and with horrid deed 2.781. my native Troy ? and cloth our Dardan strand 3.78. he scorned all honor and did murder foul 4.110. essays to speak and frembling dies away: 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.466. She said. But he, obeying Jove's decree 4.467. gazed steadfastly away; and in his heart 4.468. with strong repression crushed his cruel pain; 4.469. then thus the silence broke: “O Queen, not one 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged 4.471. would I gainsay. Elissa's memory 4.472. will be my treasure Iong as memory holds 4.473. or breath of life is mine. Hear my brief plea! 4.557. rose from his bosom, yet no whit did fail 4.558. to do the will of Heaven, but of his fleet 4.559. resumed command. The Trojans on the shore 4.560. ply well their task and push into the sea 4.561. the lofty ships. Now floats the shining keel 4.562. and oars they bring all leafy from the grove 4.563. with oak half-hewn, so hurried was the flight. 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 4.565. forth-streaming!—just as when a heap of corn 4.566. is thronged with ants, who, knowing winter nigh 4.567. refill their granaries; the long black line 4.568. runs o'er the levels, and conveys the spoil 4.569. in narrow pathway through the grass; a part 4.570. with straining and assiduous shoulder push 4.571. the kernels huge; a part array the file 4.572. and whip the laggards on; their busy track 5.628. For this last victory and joyful day 5.841. from Beroe sick, and left her grieving sore 5.842. that she, she only, had no gift to bring 5.843. of mournful honor to Anchises' shade.” 5.844. She spoke. The women with ill-boding eyes 5.845. looked on the ships. Their doubting hearts were torn 5.846. 'twixt tearful passion for the beauteous isle 5.847. their feet then trod, and that prophetic call 5.848. of Fate to lands unknown. Then on wide wings 5.849. oared Iris into heaven, and through the clouds 5.850. clove a vast arch of light. With wonder dazed 5.851. the women in a shrieking frenzy rose 5.852. took embers from the hearth-stones, stole the fires 5.853. upon the altars—faggots, branches, brands — 5.854. and rained them on the ships. The god of fire 5.855. through thwarts and oars and bows of painted fir 5.856. ran in unbridled flame. Swift to the tomb 5.857. of Sire Anchises, to the circus-seats 5.858. the messenger Eumelus flew, to bring 5.859. news of the ships on fire; soon every eye 5.860. the clouds of smoke and hovering flame could see. 5.861. Ascanius, who had led with smiling brow 7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea 7.594. while he but faltered speechless. She upraised 7.641. with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close 7.642. and combed the creature, or would bring to bathe 7.643. at a clear, crystal spring. It knew the hands 7.644. of all its gentle masters, and would feed 7.645. from their own dish; or wandering through the wood 7.646. come back unguided to their friendly door 7.647. though deep the evening shade. Iulus' dogs 7.648. now roused this wanderer in their ravening chase 7.649. as, drifted down-stream far from home it lay 7.650. on a green bank a-cooling. From bent bow 7.651. Ascanius, eager for a hunter's praise 7.652. let go his shaft; nor did Alecto fail 7.653. his aim to guide: but, whistling through the air 7.654. the light-winged reed pierced deep in flank and side. 7.655. Swift to its cover fled the wounded thing 7.656. and crept loud-moaning to its wonted stall 7.657. where, like a blood-stained suppliant, it seemed 7.658. to fill that shepherd's house with plaintive prayer. 7.659. Then Silvia the sister, smiting oft 7.660. on breast and arm, made cry for help, and called 7.661. the sturdy rustics forth in gathering throng. 7.662. These now (for in the silent forest couched 7.663. the cruel Fury) swift to battle flew. 7.664. One brandished a charred stake, another swung 7.665. a knotted cudgel, as rude anger shapes 7.666. its weapon of whate'er the searching eye 7.667. first haps to fall on. Tyrrhus roused his clans 7.668. just when by chance he split with blows of wedge 7.669. an oak in four; and, panting giant breath 7.670. houldered his woodman's axe. Alecto then 7.671. prompt to the stroke of mischief, soared aloft 7.672. from where she spying sate, to the steep roof 7.673. of a tall byre, and from its peak of straw 7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far 7.676. that all the forest shuddered, and the grove 7.677. throbbed to its deepest glen. Cold Trivia's lake 7.678. from end to end gave ear, and every wave 7.679. of the white stream of Nar, the lonely pools 7.680. of still Velinus heard: while at the sound 7.681. pale mothers to their breasts their children drew. 7.682. Swift to the signal of the dreadful horn 7.683. natching their weapons rude, the freeborn swains 7.684. assembled for the fray; the Trojan bands 7.685. poured from their bivouac with instant aid 7.686. for young Ascanius. In array of war 7.687. both stand confronting. Not mere rustic brawl 7.688. with charred oak-staff and cudgel is the fight 7.689. but with the two-edged steel; the naked swords 7.690. wave like dark-bladed harvest-field, while far 7.691. the brazen arms flash in the smiting sun 7.692. and skyward fling their beam: so some wide sea 7.693. at first but whitened in the rising wind 7.694. wells its slow-rolling mass and ever higher 7.695. its billows rears, until the utmost deep 7.696. lifts in one surge to heaven. The first to fall 7.697. was Almo, eldest-born of Tyrrhus' sons 7.698. whom, striding in the van, a loud-winged shaft 7.699. laid low in death; deep in his throat it clung 7.700. and silenced with his blood the dying cry 7.701. of his frail life. Around him fell the forms 7.702. of many a brave and strong; among them died 7.703. gray-haired Galaesus pleading for a truce: 7.704. righteous he was, and of Ausonian fields 7.705. a prosperous master; five full flocks had he 7.706. of bleating sheep, and from his pastures came 7.707. five herds of cattle home; his busy churls 7.709. While o'er the battle-field thus doubtful swung 7.710. the scales of war, the Fury (to her task 7.711. now equal proven) having dyed the day 7.712. a deep-ensanguined hue, and opened fight 7.713. with death and slaughter, made no tarrying 7.714. within Hesperia, but skyward soared 7.715. and, Ioud in triumph, insolently thus 7.716. to Juno called: “See, at thy will, their strife 7.717. full-blown to war and woe! Could even thyself 7.718. command them now to truce and amity? 7.719. But I, that with Ausonia's blood befoul 7.720. their Trojan hands, yet more can do, if thou 7.721. hift not thy purpose. For with dire alarms 7.722. I will awake the bordering states to war 7.723. enkindling in their souls the frenzied lust 7.724. the war-god breathes; till from th' horizon round 7.725. the reinforcement pours—I scattering seeds 7.726. of carnage through the land.” In answer spoke 7.727. juno: “Enough of artifice and fear! 7.728. Thy provocation works. Now have they joined 7.729. in close and deadly combat, and warm blood 7.730. those sudden-leaping swords incarnadines 7.731. which chance put in their hands. Such nuptial joys 7.732. uch feast of wedlock, let the famous son 7.733. of Venus with the King Latinus share! 7.734. But yon Olympian Sire and King no more 7.735. permits thee freely in our skies to roam. 7.736. Go, quit the field! Myself will take control 7.737. of hazards and of labors yet to be.” 7.738. Thus Saturn's daughter spoke. Alecto then 7.739. unfolding far her hissing, viperous wings 7.740. turned toward her Stygian home, and took farewell 7.741. of upper air. Deep in Italia lies 7.742. a region mountain-girded, widely famed 7.743. and known in olden songs from land to land: 7.744. the valley of Amsanctus; deep, dark shades 7.745. enclose it between forest-walls, whereby 7.746. through thunderous stony channel serpentines 7.747. a roaring fall. Here in a monstrous cave 7.748. are breathing-holes of hell, a vast abyss 7.749. where Acheron opes wide its noisome jaws: 7.750. in this Alecto plunged, concealing so 7.751. her execrable godhead, while the air 7.753. Forthwith the sovereign hands of Juno haste 7.754. to consummate the war. The shepherds bear 7.755. back from the field of battle to the town 7.756. the bodies of the slain: young Almo's corse 7.757. and gray Galaesus' bleeding head. They call 7.758. just gods in heaven to Iook upon their wrong 7.759. and bid Latinus see it. Turnus comes 7.760. and, while the angry mob surveys the slain 7.761. adds fury to the hour. “Shall the land 7.762. have Trojan lords? Shall Phrygian marriages 7.763. debase our ancient, royal blood—and I 7.764. be spurned upon the threshold?” Then drew near 7.765. the men whose frenzied women-folk had held 7.766. bacchantic orgies in the pathless grove 7.767. awed by Amata's name: these, gathering 7.768. ued loud for war. Yea, all defied the signs 7.769. and venerable omens; all withstood 7.770. divine decrees, and clamored for revenge 7.771. prompted by evil powers. They besieged 7.772. the house of King Latinus, shouting-loud 7.773. with emulous rage. But like a sea-girt rock 7.774. unmoved he stood; like sea-girt rock when surge 7.775. of waters o'er it sweeps, or howling waves 7.776. urround; it keeps a ponderous front of power 7.777. though foaming cliffs around it vainly roar; 7.778. from its firm base the broken sea-weeds fall. 7.779. But when authority no whit could change 7.780. their counsels blind, and each event fulfilled 7.781. dread Juno's will, then with complaining prayer 7.782. the aged sire cried loud upon his gods 7.783. and on th' unheeding air: “Alas,” said he 7.784. “My doom is shipwreck, and the tempest bears 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood 7.786. hall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. 7.787. O Turnus! O abominable deed! 7.788. Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods 7.789. thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. 7.790. Now was my time to rest. But as I come 7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me 7.792. of comfort in my death.” With this the King 7.794. A sacred custom the Hesperian land 7.795. of Latium knew, by all the Alban hills 7.796. honored unbroken, which wide-ruling Rome 7.797. keeps to this day, when to new stroke she stirs 7.798. the might of Mars; if on the Danube 's wave 7.799. resolved to fling the mournful doom of war 7.800. or on the Caspian folk or Arabs wild; 7.801. or chase the morning far as India 's verge 7.802. ind from the Parthian despot wrest away 7.803. our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be 7.804. of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: 7.805. a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength 7.806. of uncorrupting steel; in sleepless watch 7.807. Janus the threshold keeps. 'T is here, what time 7.808. the senate's voice is war, the consul grave 7.809. in Gabine cincture and Quirinal shift 7.810. himself the griding hinges backward moves 7.811. and bids the Romans arm; obedient then 7.812. the legionary host makes Ioud acclaim 7.813. and hoarse consent the brazen trumpets blow. 7.814. Thus King Latinus on the sons of Troy 7.815. was urged to open war, and backward roll 7.816. those gates of sorrow: but the aged king 7.817. recoiled, refused the loathsome task, and fled 8.18. through Latium waxes large. But what the foe 8.19. by such attempt intends, what victory 8.20. is his presumptuous hope, if Fortune smile 8.21. Aetolia 's lord will not less wisely fear 8.32. of flickering light that leaps from wall to wall 8.33. or, skyward lifted in ethereal flight 8.34. glances along some rich-wrought, vaulted dome. 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 10.82. and keep that spot of earth where once was Troy ! 10.442. while following in ill-omened haste the steps 10.606. canned him from far, hurling defiant words 10.607. in answer to the King's. “My honor now 10.608. hall have the royal trophy of this war 10.609. or glorious death. For either fortune fair 10.610. my sire is ready. Threaten me no more!” 10.611. So saying, to the midmost space he strode 10.612. and in Arcadian hearts the blood stood still. 10.613. Swift from his chariot Turnus leaped, and ran 10.614. to closer fight. As when some lion sees 10.615. from his far mountain-lair a raging bull 10.616. that sniffs the battle from the grassy field 10.617. and down the steep he flies—such picture showed 10.618. grim Turnus as he came. But when he seemed 10.619. within a spear's cast, Pallas opened fight 10.620. expecting Fortune's favor to the brave 10.621. in such unequal match; and thus he prayed: 10.622. “O, by my hospitable father's roof 10.623. where thou didst enter as a stranger-guest 10.624. hear me, Alcides, and give aid divine 10.625. to this great deed. Let Turnus see these hands 10.626. trip from his half-dead breast the bloody spoil! 10.627. and let his eyes in death endure to see 10.628. his conqueror!” Alcides heard the youth: 10.629. but prisoned in his heart a deep-drawn sigh 10.630. and shed vain tears; for Jove, the King and Sire, . 10.631. poke with benigt accents to his son: 10.632. “To each his day is given. Beyond recall 10.633. man's little time runs by: but to prolong 10.634. life's glory by great deeds is virtue's power. 10.635. Beneath the lofty walls of fallen Troy 10.636. fell many a son of Heaven. Yea, there was slain 10.637. Sarpedon, my own offspring. Turnus too 10.638. is summoned to his doom, and nears the bounds 10.639. of his appointed span.” So speaking, Jove 10.640. turned from Rutulia's war his eyes away. 10.641. But Pallas hurled his lance with might and main 10.642. and from its hollow scabbard flashed his sword. 10.643. The flying shaft touched where the plated steel 10.644. over the shoulders rose, and worked its way 10.645. through the shield's rim—then falling, glanced aside 10.646. from Turnus' giant body. Turnus then 10.647. poised, without haste, his iron-pointed spear 10.648. and, launching it on Pallas, cried, “Look now 10.649. will not this shaft a good bit deeper drive?” 10.650. He said: and through the mid-boss of the shield 10.651. teel scales and brass with bull's-hide folded round 10.652. the quivering spear-point crashed resistlessly 10.653. and through the corselet's broken barrier 10.654. pierced Pallas' heart. The youth plucked out in vain 10.655. the hot shaft from the wound; his life and blood 10.656. together ebbed away, as sinking prone 10.657. on his rent side he fell; above him rang 10.658. his armor; and from lips with blood defiled 10.659. he breathed his last upon his foeman's ground. 10.660. Over him Turnus stood: “Arcadians all,” 10.661. He cried, “take tidings of this feat of arms 10.662. to King Evander. With a warrior's wage 10.663. his Pallas I restore, and freely grant 10.664. what glory in a hero's tomb may lie 10.665. or comfort in a grave. They dearly pay 10.666. who bid Aeneas welcome at their board.” 10.667. So saying, with his left foot he held down 10.668. the lifeless form, and raised the heavy weight 10.669. of graven belt, which pictured forth that crime 10.671. all on their wedding night, in bridal bowers 10.672. to horrid murder given,—which Clonus, son 10.673. of Eurytus, had wrought in lavish gold; 10.674. this Turnus in his triumph bore away 10.675. exulting in the spoil. O heart of man 10.676. not knowing doom, nor of events to be! 10.677. Nor, being lifted up, to keep thy bounds 10.678. in prosperous days! To Turnus comes the hour 10.679. when he would fain a prince's ransom give 10.680. had Pallas passed unscathed, and will bewail 10.681. cuch spoil of victory. With weeping now 10.682. and lamentations Ioud his comrades lay 10.683. young Pallas on his shield, and thronging close 10.684. carry him homeward with a mournful song: 10.685. alas! the sorrow and the glorious gain 10.686. thy sire shall have in thee. For one brief day 10.687. bore thee to battle and now bears away; 10.691. tells him his followers' peril, and implores 10.692. prompt help for routed Troy . His ready sword 10.707. clean over him; then at Aeneas' knees 10.708. he crouched and clung with supplicating cry: 10.709. “O, by thy father's spirit, by thy hope 10.710. in young Iulus, I implore thee, spare 10.711. for son and father's sake this life of mine. 10.712. A lofty house have I, where safely hid 10.713. are stores of graven silver and good weight 10.714. of wrought and unwrought gold. The fate of war 10.715. hangs not on me; nor can one little life 10.716. thy victory decide.” In answer spoke 10.717. Aeneas: “Hoard the silver and the gold 10.718. for thy own sons. Such bartering in war 10.720. Thus bids Anchises' shade, Iulus—thus!” 10.721. He spoke: and, grasping with his mighty left 10.722. the helmet of the vainly suppliant foe 10.723. bent back the throat and drove hilt-deep his sword. 10.724. A little space removed, Haemonides 10.725. priest of Phoebus and pale Trivia, stood 10.726. whose ribboned brows a sacred fillet bound: 10.727. in shining vesture he, and glittering arms. 10.728. Him too the Trojan met, repelled, and towered 10.729. above the fallen form, o'ermantling it 10.730. in mortal shade; Serestus bore away 10.743. (Him Dryope, the nymph, to Faunus bore) 10.758. though all in Turnus' van; and Numa bold 10.759. and Camers tawny-tressed, the son and heir 10.767. against Jove's thunder;—so Aeneas raged
2. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.708-8.710 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Silius Italicus, Punica, 17.529-17.531, 17.538, 17.572 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, successors, mezentius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
amata Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
anchises Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
anxiety dreams and nightmares, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
aphrodite Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
augustus, augustan Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
carrhae, battle of ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
crassus (marcus licinius crassus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
diomedes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
divination, incubation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
divine visits, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dream figures, appearance Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dream figures, gods, in disguise Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, deixis, anxious state Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, dream/reality confusion Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, dream figures, phantoms Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, examples, vergil Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
dreams and visions, incubation, oracular Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
emotions, confidence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
etruscans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
history Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
intertextual chronology, identity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
intertextuality, future reflexive mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
iris Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italians, as iliadic greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
italy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
jupiter Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
kings, kingship theory Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
latinus, good king Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latinus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
lavinia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
mezentius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
orodes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
pallanteum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
parthians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
pharsalus, battle Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261
pompey, and hannibal Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261
prophecy, prophetic dreams and visions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 431
romans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
strength Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
suicide' Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
turnus, and hannibal Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261
turnus, at sea Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261
turnus, intertextual identity, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
turnus, intertextual identity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 268
wandering, odyssean theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 248, 268
zama, battle Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 261