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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 10.581-10.582


Non Diomedis equos nec currum cernis Achillishimself the sticking-point and tug of war.


aut Phrygiae campos: nunc belli finis et aeviDown went Arcadia 's warriors, and slain


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 16.419-16.420, 16.422, 16.426-16.507, 20.419-20.454 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

16.419. /Thereafter Erymas and Amphoterus, and Epaltes, and Tlepolemus, son of Damastor, and Echius and Pyris, and Ipheus and Evippus, and Polymelus, son of Argeas, all these one after another he brought down to the bounteous earth.But when Sarpedon saw his comrades, that wear the tunic ungirt 16.420. /being laid low beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius, he called aloud, upbraiding the godlike Lycians:Shame, ye Lycians, whither do ye flee? Now be ye swift to fight; for I myself will meet this man, that I may know who he is that prevaileth here, and verily hath wrought the Trojans much mischief 16.422. /being laid low beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius, he called aloud, upbraiding the godlike Lycians:Shame, ye Lycians, whither do ye flee? Now be ye swift to fight; for I myself will meet this man, that I may know who he is that prevaileth here, and verily hath wrought the Trojans much mischief 16.426. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.427. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.428. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.429. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.430. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.431. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.432. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.433. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.434. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.435. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.436. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.437. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.438. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.439. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. Then ox-eyed queenly Hera answered him: 16.440. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.441. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.442. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.443. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.444. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.445. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.446. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.447. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.448. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.449. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.450. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.451. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.452. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.453. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.454. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.455. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.456. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.457. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.458. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.459. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.460. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.461. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.462. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.463. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.464. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.465. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.466. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.467. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.468. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.469. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.470. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.471. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.472. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.473. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.474. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.475. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.476. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.477. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.478. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.479. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. Then again Sarpedon missed with his bright spear, and over the left shoulder of Patroclus went the point of the spear and smote him not. 16.480. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.481. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.482. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.483. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.484. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.485. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.486. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.487. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.488. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.489. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.490. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.491. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.492. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.493. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.494. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.495. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.496. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.497. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.498. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.499. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.500. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.501. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.502. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.503. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.504. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.505. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 16.506. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 16.507. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 20.419. /were fastened, and the corselet overlapped; through this straight on its way beside the navel passed the spear-point, and he fell to his knees with a groan and a cloud of darkness enfolded him, and as he sank he clasped his bowels to him with his hands. But when Hector beheld his brother Polydorus 20.420. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.421. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.422. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.423. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.424. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.425. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.426. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.427. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.428. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.429. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.430. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.431. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.432. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.433. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.434. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.435. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.436. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.437. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.438. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.439. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.440. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.441. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.442. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.443. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.444. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.445. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.446. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.447. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.448. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.449. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.450. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.451. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.452. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.453. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.454. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon.
2. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.753-1.756, 2.6-2.8, 2.29, 6.791-6.807, 10.464-10.473, 10.513, 10.515-10.542, 10.545, 10.552, 10.554-10.560, 10.562, 10.564-10.570, 10.582, 10.604, 11.282-11.287 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.753. we few swam hither, waifs upon your shore! 1.754. What race of mortals this? What barbarous land 1.755. that with inhospitable laws ye thrust 1.756. a stranger from your coasts, and fly to arms 2.6. how Asia 's glory and afflicted throne 2.7. the Greek flung down; which woeful scene I saw 2.8. and bore great part in each event I tell. 2.29. and opulent, ere Priam's kingdom fell 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 10.464. Then from his brother's body Numitor 10.465. the weapon plucked and hurled it, furious 10.466. upon Aeneas; but it could not strike 10.467. the hero's self, and grazed along the thigh 10.468. of great Achates. Next into the fight 10.469. Clausus of Cures came, in youthful bloom 10.470. exulting, and with far-thrown javelin 10.471. truck Dryops at the chin, and took away 10.472. from the gashed, shrieking throat both life and voice; 10.473. the warrior's fallen forehead smote the dust; 10.513. yon lands are all too small. Ha! Shall we steer 10.516. First in his path was Lagus, thither led 10.517. by evil stars; whom, as he tried to lift 10.518. a heavy stone, the shaft of Pallas pierced 10.519. where ribs and spine divide: backward he drew 10.520. the clinging spear; But Hisbo from above 10.521. urprised him not, though meaning it; for while 10.522. (In anger blind for friend unpitying slain) 10.523. at Pallas' face he flew:—he, standing firm 10.524. plunged deep into that swelling breast the sword. 10.525. Then Sthenius he slew; and next Anchemolus 10.526. of Rhoetus' ancient line, who dared defile 10.527. his step-dame's bridal bed. And also ye 10.528. fair Thymber and Larides, Daucus' twins 10.529. fell on that Rutule field; so like were ye 10.530. your own kin scarce discerned, and parents proud 10.531. miled at the dear deceit; but now in death 10.532. cruel unlikeness Pallas wrought; thy head 10.533. fell, hapless Thymber, by Evander's sword; 10.534. and thy right hand, Larides, shorn away 10.535. eemed feeling for its Iord; the fingers cold 10.536. clutched, trembling, at the sword. Now all the troop 10.537. of Arcady, their chief's great action seen 10.538. and by his warning roused, made at their foes 10.539. purred on by grief and shame. Next Pallas pierced 10.540. the flying Rhoetus in his car; this gained 10.541. for Ilus respite and delay, for him 10.542. the stout spear aimed at; but its flight was stopped 10.545. Teuthras and Tyres: from his car he rolled 10.552. grim Vulcan's serried flames; from some high seat 10.554. ees, glad at heart, his own victorious fires: 10.555. o now fierce valor spreads, uniting all 10.556. in one confederate rage, 'neath Pallas' eyes. 10.557. But the fierce warrior Halaesus next 10.558. led on the charge, behind his skilful shield 10.559. close-crouching. Ladon and Demodocus 10.560. and Pheres he struck down; his glittering blade 10.562. heer off; with one great stone he crushed the brows 10.564. bones, brains, and gore. Halaesus' prophet-sire 10.565. foreseeing doom, had hid him in dark groves; 10.566. but when the old man's fading eyes declined 10.567. in death, the hand of Fate reached forth and doomed 10.568. the young life to Evander's sword; him now 10.569. Pallas assailed, first offering this prayer: 10.570. “O Father Tiber, give my poising shaft 10.582. Down went Arcadia 's warriors, and slain 10.604. looked upon Turnus, glancing up and down 11.282. of all the woe. For mothers in their tears 11.283. lone brides, and stricken souls of sisters fond 11.284. and boys left fatherless, fling curses Ioud 11.285. on Turnus' troth-plight and the direful war: 11.286. “Let him, let Turnus, with his single sword 11.287. decide the strife,”—they cry,—“and who shall claim


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, arms of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, death of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, deceived by apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, greatest of greek warriors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, kills hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, responsible for the fall of troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors, ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors, turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
aeneas, intertextual identities, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
aeneas, memory of troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
agenor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
choice Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
courage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
death, of pallas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
death, of patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
death, of sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
dido de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
diomedes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
dolopians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
failure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
honor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
jupiter Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
memory, remembering, etc. Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
messenger-speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
myrmidons Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
narrators, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pallas, son of evander, death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
pallas, son of evander, intertextual identity, as iliadic sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pallas, son of evander, intertextual identity, patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
pallas, son of evander Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
prophecy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pyrrhus/neoptolemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
sublimity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
time, heroic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
troy, fall of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
troy, sack (fall, destruction) of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547
turnus, intertextual identity, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
turnus, intertextual identity, hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
turnus, intertextual identity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
ulysses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
virgil' de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 547